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subgeometer

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Re: The 2019 melting season
« Reply #3400 on: July 07, 2019, 04:23:10 AM »
Wrangel Island is not going under 10C through day 10 of the Windy/ECMWF forecast today, lowest min next 5 days is 13C, with only wednesday not getting over 20C, it only makes it to 19, after some rain at 16C in the morning

Pevek a couple of hours ago was 17C, with dewpoint at 8 (Edit: fixed dewpoint, not 11C, 8C)

(The maps behind are dewpoint forecasts)

The CAA also continues to be warm. This is shaping up to be a historic week of a historic summer. I think in 2-3 weeks 2019 will have stolen a march on 2012 area and extent.

The end of the forecast hints at deepening lows stirring up the Laptev bite. As the continents start to cool in August storms are going to be attracted by potentially 10C SSTs over large areas, like flies to $hit

Pragma

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Re: The 2019 melting season
« Reply #3401 on: July 07, 2019, 04:23:17 AM »
I therefore cannot help wondering whether the extra thickness on the poleward sides of these islands is at least partly caused by extensive ice ridging in these areas thickening the ice rather than by MYI somehow occurring in relative isolation in these three areas.

that's exactly how it is and if partly then big partly ;) no doubt IMO

I agree. What we end up with and where, is almost all due to winds and currents, rather than old thick ice. It looks like the reason that the ice even gets old, is because it was piled up, allowing it to survive the next summer.

At least, that is  how it is now. I think in the past some ice survived through the summer to increase thickness the next winter, but after this year I think almost all of the multiyear ice will be gone.

Also, the final pattern that we end up with doesn't have that much to do with melt patterns per se, but winds. For example, if you look at 2012 around the end of June, the area between the pole and Greenland was looking pretty ragged, and yet that's exactly where the thickest ice ended up at the minimum.

If you look at all the minimums, the thickest ice ends up on the Canadian/Greenland side, usually in the notch at Nares Strait, or if not there, further west along the CAA.

subgeometer

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Re: The 2019 melting season
« Reply #3402 on: July 07, 2019, 04:49:25 AM »
RE: hot Chukchi and Bering Seas

I wonder whether this means that the freezing season will be even more amazing than the melt season - meaning that these "hot" seas could take ages to refreeze come autumn...

The Bering has struggled in recent years to freeze at all, and melts out at the hint of warm weather, even in late winter. The Chukchi is also freezing later, and melting earlier. This year will be the same even if the SSTs don't go up some more (unlikely!). A winter with constant northerlies might turn back the trend for a bit, but who knows at what expense to say, the Atlantic side

The freezing season is bound to be fascinating, perhaps more than 2016-7, with a combination 0f 2012's low minimum and really high SSTs

tzupancic

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Re: The 2019 melting season
« Reply #3403 on: July 07, 2019, 05:12:17 AM »
That is a good list.  I’m pretty sure we try to address all of them.  If you read through the comments on this thread, I think you will find answers to your questions.

Rod,

I think what is missing here is a discussion of the impact of increased solar irradiance. While the increased energy added to the system may not immediately drive sea ice melt in the short term, it would appear to have important implications.

tzupancic

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Re: The 2019 melting season
« Reply #3404 on: July 07, 2019, 05:22:11 AM »
Perhaps people here can correct me if I am wrong, but in comparison with air temperature, humidity, and wind action; solar insolation is the most substantial potential source of energy being added to the arctic system in terms of possible energy magnitude.


Burnrate

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Re: The 2019 melting season
« Reply #3405 on: July 07, 2019, 05:40:49 AM »
...
I think what is missing here is a discussion of the impact of increased solar irradiance.
...

Are you talking about the reduced albedo, low cloud cover, something else?

Looking at only solar irradiance I believe we are at a solar minimum right now with a lower irradiance than in 2012 and most of the rest of this decade (even then that difference is tiny).

Tor Bejnar

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Re: The 2019 melting season
« Reply #3406 on: July 07, 2019, 05:45:37 AM »
The most substantial potential source of energy to add to the ASI system is warm water that is 'held down' by the the halocline between 50 m and 250 m (per here)  Also, "In the central  Arctic Ocean, north of Svalbard and in the northern Barents Sea, a permanent pycnocline is present below the cold homogenous layer."

Occasional disussions of Ekman pumping refer to storms accessing this heat.  E.g., from here:
Quote
Abstract
... the contribution of the Ekman transport to the seasonal fluxes of heat and salt to the Arctic Ocean mixed layer will be discussed. It was found that the greatest seasonal variations of Ekman transports of heat and salt occur in the southern Beaufort Sea in the fall and early winter when a strong anticyclonic wind and ice motion are present. The Ekman pumping velocity in the interior Beaufort Sea reaches as high as 10 cm day−1 in November while coastal upwelling is even stronger. The contributions of the Ekman transport to the heat and salt flux in the mixed layer are also considerable in the region.

Solar input seems to be a bigger contributor to ASI melt than imported heat (via air or currents), except where Atlantic water is at the surface.

But I am definitely not an expert on these matters!
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Re: The 2019 melting season
« Reply #3407 on: July 07, 2019, 05:58:20 AM »
Perhaps people here can correct me if I am wrong, but in comparison with air temperature, humidity, and wind action; solar insolation is the most substantial potential source of energy being added to the arctic system in terms of possible energy magnitude.

This paper, which was posted recently, agrees with you:

https://agupubs.onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/full/10.1002/2016JD025819

At least until the halocline breaks down substantially, as Tor pointed out...

Juan C. García

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Re: The 2019 melting season
« Reply #3408 on: July 07, 2019, 06:00:33 AM »
It seems that it will happen on the following days tomorrow: 2019 the lowest on record.
2019 needs to have a drop of -63,487 or more, to be the lowest on record tomorrow.
 
[See the tendency on July 6th graph]

Is it finally happening?
2019 is having the cliff that will make this year a leader on ASI melting?
At least on the first half of July?

Several places in which we can have some melting: Hudson, Baffin, Kara, Laptev, ESS, Beaufort, etc.
[ADS NIPR VISHOP (JAXA)] Arctic Sea Ice Extent.

July 6th, 2019:
     8,410,624 km2, a century drop of -114,369 km2.
     2019 is 2nd lowest on record.
     (2012 highlighted).
« Last Edit: July 07, 2019, 06:12:01 AM by Juan C. García »
Which is the best answer to Sep-2012 ASI lost (compared to 1979-2000)?
50% [NSIDC Extent] or
73% [PIOMAS Volume]

Volume is harder to measure than extent, but 3-dimensional space is real, 2D's hide ~50% thickness gone.
-> IPCC/NSIDC trends [based on extent] underestimate the real speed of ASI lost.

tzupancic

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Re: The 2019 melting season
« Reply #3409 on: July 07, 2019, 06:03:45 AM »
...
I think what is missing here is a discussion of the impact of increased solar irradiance.
...

Are you talking about the reduced albedo, low cloud cover, something else?

Looking at only solar irradiance I believe we are at a solar minimum right now with a lower irradiance than in 2012 and most of the rest of this decade (even then that difference is tiny).

Really? are you saying that the arctic in 2019 has experienced exceptionally low solar irradiance?  I do not think so.

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Re: The 2019 melting season
« Reply #3410 on: July 07, 2019, 06:08:18 AM »
Current wind situation..

Winds from a huge area north and south of Greenland and all the way to Barrow are pushing toward the Canadian coast near Banks Island.

Fram is not being fed by the CAB wind, but that export is partially replaced by the return of dispersion in the Beaufort where ice is being pushed to warm coastal water.

It's still blowing hard through some CAA channels, but Nares has calmed down.

On the Asian side of the Arctic ice, winds are still pushing toward the heat of the Laptev coast. Also dispersion which favors melt.

At this point it seems that almost any wind is unfavorable for the ice.

ajouis

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Re: The 2019 melting season
« Reply #3411 on: July 07, 2019, 06:10:37 AM »
the bremen map are showing some real dodgy areas in the ice now. All the edges are concerned, with a few notable things alongside the continued retreat from the chuchki.
As I predicted yesterday, ess fast ice started collapsing, but much more quickly than I thought, I am not even sure any of it will last a week.
Similarly the north kara/cab blob next to the kosmolets islands is also collapsing, which will allow for losses above 80 north, and prepare for a direct assault on the edge of the cab. Meltponding/low concentration remains extremely wide spread, with concerning spots on the cab close to the pole.
The only positive part of this is the relatively spared western caa. The hudson will be gone within a week and i think the laptev landfast ice might follow the same path given how weak the arm is. There is also a weird band just east of the pole if anyone knows what it is?

tzupancic

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Re: The 2019 melting season
« Reply #3412 on: July 07, 2019, 06:11:05 AM »
The most substantial potential source of energy to add to the ASI system is warm water that is 'held down' by the the halocline between 50 m and 250 m (per here)  Also, "In the central  Arctic Ocean, north of Svalbard and in the northern Barents Sea, a permanent pycnocline is present below the cold homogenous layer."

Occasional disussions of Ekman pumping refer to storms accessing this heat.  E.g., from here:
Quote
Abstract
... the contribution of the Ekman transport to the seasonal fluxes of heat and salt to the Arctic Ocean mixed layer will be discussed. It was found that the greatest seasonal variations of Ekman transports of heat and salt occur in the southern Beaufort Sea in the fall and early winter when a strong anticyclonic wind and ice motion are present. The Ekman pumping velocity in the interior Beaufort Sea reaches as high as 10 cm day−1 in November while coastal upwelling is even stronger. The contributions of the Ekman transport to the heat and salt flux in the mixed layer are also considerable in the region.

Solar input seems to be a bigger contributor to ASI melt than imported heat (via air or currents), except where Atlantic water is at the surface.

But I am definitely not an expert on these matters!



Tor Bejnar, Understood. I agreed that in the immediate term the heat energy impacting the sea ice system is being transferred to the ice from salty water. But what I am suggesting is that the significance of the introduction of this energy from solar irradiance is being underappreciated in the present discussion.

b_lumenkraft

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Re: The 2019 melting season
« Reply #3413 on: July 07, 2019, 06:16:46 AM »

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Re: The 2019 melting season
« Reply #3414 on: July 07, 2019, 06:17:42 AM »
The sun has been crushing the Canadian basin.  before that it was hitting the Atlantic side for a little bit and before that it was crushing the Pacific side especially the East Siberian sea very hard

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tzupancic

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Re: The 2019 melting season
« Reply #3415 on: July 07, 2019, 06:24:39 AM »
...
I think what is missing here is a discussion of the impact of increased solar irradiance.
...

Are you talking about the reduced albedo, low cloud cover, something else?

Looking at only solar irradiance I believe we are at a solar minimum right now with a lower irradiance than in 2012 and most of the rest of this decade (even then that difference is tiny).

The low solar minimum that the earth is presently experiencing is not the key issue that I am talking about. Rather, the key issue is the amount of solar energy entering the system as a result of reduced albedo in the arctic. This difference far offsets the difference in energy coming from the sun due to the solar cycle.

tzupancic

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Re: The 2019 melting season
« Reply #3416 on: July 07, 2019, 06:30:10 AM »
In fact, the arctic sea ice melt of 2019, regardless of whatever minimum extent occurs, is powerful evidence, coming at the solar minimum, after a solar cycle of reduced intensity, that the climate changes now being observed are not being driven by solar activity alone.

ajouis

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Re: The 2019 melting season
« Reply #3417 on: July 07, 2019, 06:30:20 AM »
tzupancic, there are the albedo warming potential graphs that are posted here regularly, and they clearly show 2019 either first or second depending on whether we consider the whole arctic or high arctic only

b_lumenkraft

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Re: The 2019 melting season
« Reply #3418 on: July 07, 2019, 06:34:18 AM »
When you type 'albedo' in the search field, you'll get tons of results for it from this thread on the first page. It is widely discussed.

There are great graphs made by @Tealight >> https://cryospherecomputing.tk/NRTawp.html

tzupancic

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Re: The 2019 melting season
« Reply #3419 on: July 07, 2019, 06:36:43 AM »
tzupancic, there are the albedo warming potential graphs that are posted here regularly, and they clearly show 2019 either first or second depending on whether we consider the whole arctic or high arctic only

ajouis, Agreed. A relatively large amount of solar energy has entered the arctic system so far this year.

Frivolousz21

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Re: The 2019 melting season
« Reply #3420 on: July 07, 2019, 06:45:59 AM »
The weather models look like they are having issues resolving
The albedo drop at the surface in the arctic everywhere.


When Albedo drops from .85-.9 to .45-.55 in a day or two.

The amount of extra energy in that exchange is enormous.
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tzupancic

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Re: The 2019 melting season
« Reply #3421 on: July 07, 2019, 06:47:53 AM »
Although the mixing of salty vs relatively fresh water below the ice may be required to transfer the energy presently accumulated in the arctic sea to melt ice, (setting top down melting as a result of melt pond formation aside), it still would appear that having an increased amount of energy present in the system as a result of increased absorption of solar irradiance would increase the likelihood of significant melting as the season progresses in 2019.

grixm

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Re: The 2019 melting season
« Reply #3422 on: July 07, 2019, 08:00:54 AM »
NSIDC says the area in the CAA has increased over the past few days: https://forum.arctic-sea-ice.net/index.php/topic,2533.msg211320.html#msg211320

How can that be? It is hot and insolated, I only see melting.

b_lumenkraft

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Re: The 2019 melting season
« Reply #3423 on: July 07, 2019, 08:17:48 AM »
NSIDC says the area in the CAA has increased over the past few days: https://forum.arctic-sea-ice.net/index.php/topic,2533.msg211320.html#msg211320

How can that be? It is hot and insolated, I only see melting.

It's hard to say what the sensors see exactly.

We might have areas with draining melt ponds here, previously seen as open water. Or perhaps diverging. But i think the former is more likely.

Frivolousz21

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Re: The 2019 melting season
« Reply #3424 on: July 07, 2019, 08:35:43 AM »
The 00Z euro through day 7 is brutal.
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Aluminium

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Re: The 2019 melting season
« Reply #3425 on: July 07, 2019, 08:38:35 AM »
July 2-6.

2018.

Frivolousz21

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Re: The 2019 melting season
« Reply #3426 on: July 07, 2019, 08:38:44 AM »
By day 8 it has a huge dipole. 

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oren

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Re: The 2019 melting season
« Reply #3427 on: July 07, 2019, 08:54:15 AM »
July 2-6.

2018.
Strong Beaufort dispersion, bad for the ice, as also seen in the OSI SAF ice drift map. this is ice that will surely melt until the minimum, in warm waters and a southerly location.
In addition, some kind of circular motion is drawing ice from the western CAB into the Laptev, and onwards to the Fram. This also is not helpful.

oren

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Re: The 2019 melting season
« Reply #3428 on: July 07, 2019, 09:02:58 AM »
On a different note: I am officially going out on a limb here, making the prediction that 2019 will see a GAC in August. Not being a weatherman I am basing my claim on the Albedo Warming Potential charts, coupled with the relatively clear skies this year to get a huge amount of energy into the Arctic ocean. The two top years in the chart both had a GAC, other years have not, I think the chances are quite high for this year as well. And looking at the daily AWP anomaly numbers and at the Inner Basin area, I do not expect 2019 to slow down on AWP anomaly accumulation.

And if I am right, breaking the 2012 record or getting near it should be much easier.



b_lumenkraft

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Re: The 2019 melting season
« Reply #3429 on: July 07, 2019, 09:05:18 AM »
Anyone else sees the teddy bear in the OSI SAF ice drift map?

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Re: The 2019 melting season
« Reply #3430 on: July 07, 2019, 09:05:50 AM »
ajouis, Agreed. A relatively large amount of solar energy has entered the arctic system so far this year.

I refer to this as 'melting momentum', and I think that this year has built up a large amount of it, but we won't know for sure until the second half of July when big extent losses normally start to taper off.

We've been talking about this all the time this melting season, looking at SMOS, compactness, satellite images and David Schröder's melt pond fraction distribution maps to try and get a handle on how 2019 was stacking up against other years (see this blog post I recently published on the ASIB).

I would even venture to say that 2019 started out too sunny in May, when clouds and moisture are more helpful for melt onset. This is why 2019 was trailing years like 2010, 2012 and 2016 in surface preconditioning during the first two weeks of June.

But it has caught up. Boy, has it caught up.
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wallen

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Re: The 2019 melting season
« Reply #3431 on: July 07, 2019, 09:13:45 AM »
If I am not being presumptuous, it is well worth viewing the Arctic on Worldview using the Geographic Projection. Gives an amazing perspective of how bad the state of the ice pack is.

Alphabet Hotel

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Re: The 2019 melting season
« Reply #3432 on: July 07, 2019, 09:22:13 AM »
Northwest coast of Ellesmere, July 6th. The crack ends at the upper right. A big chunk of fast ice has broken off.

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Re: The 2019 melting season
« Reply #3433 on: July 07, 2019, 09:23:59 AM »
Friv: The 00z EURO is brutal through D7.

Indeed Friv, indeed! This year we might call the high pressure domination in Arctic: "Ridiculously Resilient Arctic Ridge". Most people at the forum remember RRR that hovered west of US for a few years.

subgeometer

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Re: The 2019 melting season
« Reply #3434 on: July 07, 2019, 09:24:59 AM »
After its ill treatment, all the coastal ice along the Russian coast is about to expire(that which hasn't already)

I've included a pic of the southern Laptev Sea today, with a gif of a section showing yesterday and today

Sterks

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Re: The 2019 melting season
« Reply #3435 on: July 07, 2019, 09:38:40 AM »
On a different note: I am officially going out on a limb here, making the prediction that 2019 will see a GAC in August. Not being a weatherman I am basing my claim on the Albedo Warming Potential charts, coupled with the relatively clear skies this year to get a huge amount of energy into the Arctic ocean. The two top years in the chart both had a GAC, other years have not, I think the chances are quite high for this year as well. And looking at the daily AWP anomaly numbers and at the Inner Basin area, I do not expect 2019 to slow down on AWP anomaly accumulation.

And if I am right, breaking the 2012 record or getting near it should be much easier.

If Oren is forecasting a GAC, is that things are really titanic-like. Cause you are usually like one of the musicians, perfectly conscious of the disaster but keeping it cool. Did you guys just play the last tune?

No seriously, this is scary somehow. I am not sure a GAC will play out, but I recognize the gravity of things you just conveyed...

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Re: The 2019 melting season
« Reply #3436 on: July 07, 2019, 10:14:04 AM »
I'm hoping there won't be a GAC, just to see what happens. But with all that heat...
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Re: The 2019 melting season
« Reply #3437 on: July 07, 2019, 10:29:07 AM »
...
There is also a weird band just east of the pole if anyone knows what it is?
I agree with you're analysis -  the ice melt  looks mostly very bad for 2019.
The expression "East of the pole" tripped me up for a short while.
But the feature to the right of the pole on this chart?
I'm a mathematician not a sea-ice expert, but..
The  dark vertical lines maybe the effect of compression
of more rounded areas of  lower concentration by general
drift to the right toward  Svalbard?

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Re: The 2019 melting season
« Reply #3438 on: July 07, 2019, 10:32:01 AM »
I believe it has been posted earlier, somewhere else on the forum, but one of the main indicators of the september minimum seems to be the amount of posts on this thread.

In a day we will pass 2018 total posts (70 pages), with still some three months to go, before neven closes the thread.

I am certain of a new minimum.

MrGreeny

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Re: The 2019 melting season
« Reply #3439 on: July 07, 2019, 11:04:33 AM »
Quote
Posted by: Poldergeist
« on: Today at 10:32:01 AM »

    Insert Quote


I believe it has been posted earlier, somewhere else on the forum, but one of the main indicators of the september minimum seems to be the amount of posts on this thread.

In a day we will pass 2018 total posts (70 pages), with still some three months to go, before neven closes the thread.

I am certain of a new minimum.

Agreed, I am also certain that this will be a new minimum.

I have been lurking this forum for a while and have been reading over a lot of topics, lots of interesting stuff to read. I would like to say hi.

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Re: The 2019 melting season
« Reply #3440 on: July 07, 2019, 11:25:59 AM »
The expression "East of the pole" tripped me up for a short while.
Trips me up all the time.
I keep on having to think ,
- If I cross the Bering Strait from Russia to Alaska then on the way in one step I move from 180 East to 180 West." and
- When a Russian says "Go East, Young Man" and an American says "Go West, Young Man" they point in the same direction.

Wind direction is the easiest to get wrong.

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Re: The 2019 melting season
« Reply #3441 on: July 07, 2019, 11:40:07 AM »
I believe it has been posted earlier, somewhere else on the forum, but one of the main indicators of the september minimum seems to be the amount of posts on this thread.

In a day we will pass 2018 total posts (70 pages), with still some three months to go, before neven closes the thread.

I am certain of a new minimum.
Huh.. 2019 not even in the top three, can't even say "I coulda been a contender" (yet).

https://forum.arctic-sea-ice.net/index.php?action=stats
Replies
2019 - 3,439        2015 - 4,869

Views
2019 - 317,842    2015 - 1,632,921
"Para a Causa do Povo a Luta Continua!"
"And that's all I'm going to say about that". Forrest Gump
"Damn, I wanted to see what happened next" (Epitaph)

Poldergeist

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Re: The 2019 melting season
« Reply #3442 on: July 07, 2019, 11:46:32 AM »
@ Gerontocrat. I didn't even consider 2015... wow. I bow to your knowledge.

Aluminium

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Re: The 2019 melting season
« Reply #3443 on: July 07, 2019, 11:52:28 AM »
Replies
2019 - 3,439        2015 - 4,869
2019 - 3442        2016 - 4869

b_lumenkraft

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Re: The 2019 melting season
« Reply #3444 on: July 07, 2019, 11:56:59 AM »
+1

LOL

ArcticMelt2

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Re: The 2019 melting season
« Reply #3445 on: July 07, 2019, 12:00:29 PM »
I believe it has been posted earlier, somewhere else on the forum, but one of the main indicators of the september minimum seems to be the amount of posts on this thread.

In a day we will pass 2018 total posts (70 pages), with still some three months to go, before neven closes the thread.

I am certain of a new minimum.
Huh.. 2019 not even in the top three, can't even say "I coulda been a contender" (yet).

https://forum.arctic-sea-ice.net/index.php?action=stats
Replies
2019 - 3,439        2015 - 4,869

Views
2019 - 317,842    2015 - 1,632,921


No wonder. People believed the words of the current world leaders that AGW is a myth, and that the current warming can be explained by natural cycles. Even on this forum there are a lot of deniers.

The more terrible and unexpected for the world will be the harsh reality.

Neven

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Re: The 2019 melting season
« Reply #3446 on: July 07, 2019, 12:02:55 PM »
I am certain of a new minimum.

Agreed, I am also certain that this will be a new minimum.

I've said it often and I'll say it again: Nothing in the Arctic is a dead certainty.

The point is that since 2012 there hasn't been a melting season that made it this far. Usually by now, we know whether there's a shot at breaking records or not. There still is, but it is far from certain. Yes, there are plenty of indications for massive melting momentum, but no one knows what the weather will do.

Mind you, this knife cuts both ways. But we just don't know. We'll know in a couple of weeks.
Il faut comparer, comparer, comparer, et cultiver notre jardin

ArcticMelt2

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Re: The 2019 melting season
« Reply #3447 on: July 07, 2019, 12:10:56 PM »
I've said it often and I'll say it again: Nothing in the Arctic is a dead certainty.

The fact that the Arctic is dying, this is 100% certainty. Is not 6-degree warming in Kotzebue a clear indication that there is no longer a way back?


gerontocrat

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Re: The 2019 melting season
« Reply #3448 on: July 07, 2019, 12:13:31 PM »
I believe it has been posted earlier, somewhere else on the forum, but one of the main indicators of the september minimum seems to be the amount of posts on this thread.

In a day we will pass 2018 total posts (70 pages), with still some three months to go, before neven closes the thread.

I am certain of a new minimum.
Huh.. 2019 not even in the top three, can't even say "I coulda been a contender" (yet).

https://forum.arctic-sea-ice.net/index.php?action=stats
Replies
2019 - 3,439        2015 - 4,869

Views
2019 - 317,842    2015 - 1,632,921
The more terrible and unexpected for the world will be the harsh reality.
Tomorrow's National Enquirer front page

The End of the World is Nigh

Record Postings on ASIF  2019 melting Season Thread !!!

Emergency Meeting of UN Security Council Today !!!
"Para a Causa do Povo a Luta Continua!"
"And that's all I'm going to say about that". Forrest Gump
"Damn, I wanted to see what happened next" (Epitaph)

ArcticMelt2

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Re: The 2019 melting season
« Reply #3449 on: July 07, 2019, 12:19:44 PM »
I believe it has been posted earlier, somewhere else on the forum, but one of the main indicators of the september minimum seems to be the amount of posts on this thread.

In a day we will pass 2018 total posts (70 pages), with still some three months to go, before neven closes the thread.

I am certain of a new minimum.
Huh.. 2019 not even in the top three, can't even say "I coulda been a contender" (yet).

https://forum.arctic-sea-ice.net/index.php?action=stats
Replies
2019 - 3,439        2015 - 4,869

Views
2019 - 317,842    2015 - 1,632,921
The more terrible and unexpected for the world will be the harsh reality.
Tomorrow's National Enquirer front page

The End of the World is Nigh

Record Postings on ASIF  2019 melting Season Thread !!!

Emergency Meeting of UN Security Council Today !!!



You know perfectly well that even if in September 2019 the area of ice in the Arctic drops to 2-2.5 million kilometers, the public will not worry much about it.

People love summer more than winter. This is the simplest psychology.

Awareness will come only when the planet begins to really burn in the fire. But then something will be impossible to change. The only thing that world leaders will do in this situation - use of radical methods. The poisoning of the atmosphere with sulfurous aerosols and powerful nuclear explosions for rapid cooling.

But such actions will kill the remnants of the biosphere and give only a temporary effect.