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dnem

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Re: The 2019 melting season
« Reply #6150 on: August 27, 2019, 04:59:11 PM »
unihamburg amsr2-uhh comparison of aug26  2012, 2016 and 2019

The solid pack this year is on the edge to completely disappear. A relatively strong storm can easily do that.

If these images are a true representation of the qualitative state of the ice, it is undeniable that 2012 left a far more compact and intact pack at the end of the season than either 2016 or 2019.  The fact that 2019 appears to be leaving a dispersed and "poor quality" pack across what will likely be a marginally larger extent than 2012 makes this the most damaging melt season of the satellite era.

Just to clarify a little, 2012 was likely a more "damaging" melt year, but the pack will be in poorest shape at the end of this melt season.

Wildcatter

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Re: The 2019 melting season
« Reply #6151 on: August 27, 2019, 05:08:38 PM »
Not sure I'd call a Beaufort Low with a cyclonic Beaufort Gyre + Bering high and minimal ice pack cover and wind aid, probable ekman divergence + alaska coastal downwelling and enhanced Pacific transport, wind drag across the pack, continuous cyclones in the North Atlantic with pressure gradients up currents, "best conditions I could ask for", but alrighty then!

These conditions actually favor a delay in the freezing season. And as long as this low over Beaufort stays around, or in Arctic with cyclonic Gyre, especially with the reach across Siberia/ESS and North Atlantic, I'm not really ruling anything out. I think given the next 3-5 day forecast, an "early" freezing season is probably out of the question. And I expect models to keep changing, there's a lot going on.

I, too, think the "measurements" are odd given what we can see. Maybe its semantics, maybe it's the daily artifacts from atmospheric conditions, not sure. Obviously been quite a bit of dispersion. In the context of this season, the state of the refuge of ice bordering CAA with a cyclonic gyre and wind aid is interesting (I would imagine some of the ice along ellesmere is worse than it looks, maybe not), also the atmospheric elements are likely hiding some CAB conditions on AMSR2.

Very interesting season.

Susan Anderson

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Re: The 2019 melting season
« Reply #6152 on: August 27, 2019, 05:15:04 PM »
Not sure how relevant this might be, but the Atlantic hurricane season is just getting going. That will push heat north (highly simplified, I know).

sailor

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Re: The 2019 melting season
« Reply #6153 on: August 27, 2019, 05:21:25 PM »
It seems as if a 2012-wannabe is turning into a 2016-wannabe, right now 2019 is second to 2016 in Dispersion according to Gero over the data thread.
Part of this dispersed ice will melt & compact. For the rest, 2016 experienced a quick core refreeze followed by a very bad Winter refreeze.
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jplotinus

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Re: The 2019 melting season
« Reply #6154 on: August 27, 2019, 06:42:24 PM »
The ice around Svalbard is already showing some serious damage, and the wind hasn't even started yet.

Damage apparent off NW coast of Svalbard from 8/25 to 8/27


MA Rodger

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Re: The 2019 melting season
« Reply #6155 on: August 27, 2019, 07:11:57 PM »
Susan Anderson mentions the Atlantic hurricane season "getting going." 2019 was a particularly slow start for the hurricane season, the slowest in twenty years. Despite this, in August NOAA were still predicting an above-average season suggesting that it might get a bit lively as the season progresses.

And hey presto, the un-named Tropical Depression Six is being forecaste to turn into a Tropical Storm (becoming Tropical Storm Erin) and, still at storm-strength, its path will run across Newfoundland on Saturday still in a strongly NE direction.
https://www.nhc.noaa.gov/?atlc
So do storms/ex-storms that far north get bent eastward as they do at lower latitudes? Or do they keep going North?

heartofsun

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Re: The 2019 melting season
« Reply #6156 on: August 27, 2019, 07:25:05 PM »
NE coast of Greenland over past 5 days, i clock some ice moving at 40-50km in 5 days. Nearly exploding.

Aleph_Null

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Re: The 2019 melting season
« Reply #6157 on: August 27, 2019, 09:06:25 PM »
That's the one creeping me out: "exploding" ice NE of Greenland. It looks like storm turbulence tearing it up like tissue paper (I don't know what I'm seeing). Deeply disturbing.
« Last Edit: August 27, 2019, 09:11:47 PM by Aleph_Null »

blumenkraft

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Re: The 2019 melting season
« Reply #6158 on: August 27, 2019, 09:13:29 PM »
It looks like storm turbulence tearing it up like tissue paper

IMHO you are quite right with this statement.

Shared Humanity

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Re: The 2019 melting season
« Reply #6159 on: August 27, 2019, 09:29:43 PM »
The ice around Svalbard is already showing some serious damage, and the wind hasn't even started yet.

Damage apparent off NW coast of Svalbard from 8/25 to 8/27

Kind of surprising how quickly Rijpfjorden cleared of ice.

Shared Humanity

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Re: The 2019 melting season
« Reply #6160 on: August 27, 2019, 09:39:28 PM »
That's the one creeping me out: "exploding" ice NE of Greenland. It looks like storm turbulence tearing it up like tissue paper (I don't know what I'm seeing). Deeply disturbing.

What you are seeing is the behavior of thin, 1 year old ice when it is subjected to wind.

https://forum.arctic-sea-ice.net/index.php?action=dlattach;topic=119.0;attach=130872;image

sailor

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Re: The 2019 melting season
« Reply #6161 on: August 27, 2019, 11:07:09 PM »
A nice image directly available from Worldview
https://go.nasa.gov/2PrLCDw
Current SSMIS (NSIDC) concentration superimposed to NASA blue marble Earth with Bathymetry.
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uniquorn

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Re: The 2019 melting season
« Reply #6162 on: August 28, 2019, 12:27:20 AM »
Nice. Didn't realise you could drag the base layers and have semi transparent modis over bathy.
https://go.nasa.gov/345rHxN
No gifs with transparency though

Niall Dollard

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Re: The 2019 melting season
« Reply #6163 on: August 28, 2019, 01:07:09 AM »
The ice around Svalbard is already showing some serious damage, and the wind hasn't even started yet.

Damage apparent off NW coast of Svalbard from 8/25 to 8/27

That's the northeastern part of Svalbard.

Oddly it is one of the few areas where ice is beyond NSIDC's median 1981-2010 edge for this time of year.

jplotinus

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Re: The 2019 melting season
« Reply #6164 on: August 28, 2019, 04:54:17 AM »
Ah, so! Thanks for well spotted correction.

Freegrass

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Re: The 2019 melting season
« Reply #6165 on: August 28, 2019, 04:56:16 AM »
Nice. Didn't realise you could drag the base layers and have semi transparent modis over bathy.
https://go.nasa.gov/345rHxN
No gifs with transparency though
Yesterday I compared 2012 ice cover with this year on the same date. This tool makes it easy to compare both years, and I don't see any way how we could catch up to 2012 without an apocalyptic storm.

2012 vs 2019
https://go.nasa.gov/2PeCF0m
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peterlvmeng

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Re: The 2019 melting season
« Reply #6166 on: August 28, 2019, 05:22:20 AM »
Nice. Didn't realise you could drag the base layers and have semi transparent modis over bathy.
https://go.nasa.gov/345rHxN
No gifs with transparency though
Yesterday I compared 2012 ice cover with this year on the same date. This tool makes it easy to compare both years, and I don't see any way how we could catch up to 2012 without an apocalyptic storm.

2012 vs 2019
https://go.nasa.gov/2PeCF0m

Of course. It will not break the record even with a storm. The storm will expand the extent even the area.

Freegrass

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Re: The 2019 melting season
« Reply #6167 on: August 28, 2019, 05:43:06 AM »
Nice. Didn't realise you could drag the base layers and have semi transparent modis over bathy.
https://go.nasa.gov/345rHxN
No gifs with transparency though
Yesterday I compared 2012 ice cover with this year on the same date. This tool makes it easy to compare both years, and I don't see any way how we could catch up to 2012 without an apocalyptic storm.

2012 vs 2019
https://go.nasa.gov/2PeCF0m

Of course. It will not break the record even with a storm. The storm will expand the extent even the area.
There's no record breaking storm on the horizon yet, but there still will be some more destruction and compaction going on in the coming days.

Wind + Temp @ 1000hPa
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slow wing

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Re: The 2019 melting season
« Reply #6168 on: August 28, 2019, 05:54:38 AM »
Yesterday I compared 2012 ice cover with this year on the same date. This tool makes it easy to compare both years, and I don't see any way how we could catch up to 2012 without an apocalyptic storm.

2012 vs 2019
https://go.nasa.gov/2PeCF0m


Wow! That's a great display -- thanks to you and, especially, NASA.


Also convincing that 2019 won't catch 2012 for extent at minimum, barring something extraordinary.


The current weather pattern -- shown below -- should continue to disperse the ice pack. The pattern -- a dipole of a low pressure centre inside the pack, towards the Beaufort sector, and high pressure outside the pack, in the ESS -- is predicted to continue at least over the next couple of days.


That might continue the slowdown of extent losses. But the flip side is that the ice movement and the increasing gaps in the ice should both help with melt. So the actual ice volume is presumably going down faster than usual for this time of year.


While 2019 is unlikely to catch 2012 for extent, or even area, the comparison of minimum sea ice volumes should be more of a contest.


  (Parenthetically, the reason the current weather pattern disperses the pack is because low pressure systems tend to disperse the ice away from their low pressure centres as the ice rotates in the CCW winds, while the CW winds of high pressure systems draw the ice towards their centres (in this case, outside the ice pack). This is a consequence of the Coriolis effect -- the ice is pushed in a direction to the right of the wind direction -- by about 45 degrees, I'm told. Qualitatively, winds from the East/West oppose/enhance the ice's velocity from the CCW-rotating Earth, so slowing/speeding it and so it drifts towards/away from the North Pole.)
« Last Edit: August 28, 2019, 06:05:04 AM by slow wing »

Freegrass

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Re: The 2019 melting season
« Reply #6169 on: August 28, 2019, 07:48:36 AM »
Yesterday I compared 2012 ice cover with this year on the same date. This tool makes it easy to compare both years, and I don't see any way how we could catch up to 2012 without an apocalyptic storm.

2012 vs 2019
https://go.nasa.gov/2PeCF0m

...the actual ice volume is presumably going down faster than usual for this time of year.

While 2019 is unlikely to catch 2012 for extent, or even area, the comparison of minimum sea ice volumes should be more of a contest.
I totally agree. Volume must be at a record low right now with all that thick MYI gone. The one thing that was positive about this years melt season is that there was very little export of thick MYI through the fram strait. That is unusual, isn't it? I think this is the only positive thing about this years melting season, and will surely have a positive impact on next years melt. But I'm quite sure that the damage that was done to the ice in other places this year was far worse, and so the overall balance IMHO is a fast freeze over at the start of winter - thanks to all that dispersed ice - but then it will become a slow freeze over because of all that hot water.

2007 + 5 = 2012 + 4 = 2016 +4 = 2020, 2023, 2025, 2027, 2029, 2030, 31, 32, 33,... ?

Quote
(Parenthetically, the reason the current weather pattern disperses the pack is because low pressure systems tend to disperse the ice away from their low pressure centres as the ice rotates in the CCW winds, while the CW winds of high pressure systems draw the ice towards their centres (in this case, outside the ice pack). This is a consequence of the Coriolis effect -- the ice is pushed in a direction to the right of the wind direction -- by about 45 degrees, I'm told. Qualitatively, winds from the East/West oppose/enhance the ice's velocity from the CCW-rotating Earth, so slowing/speeding it and so it drifts towards/away from the North Pole.)
That sounds counterintuitive if you consider centrifugal forces, but as kids we used to clean out our big round swimming pool by running around in it, spinning the water, and the dirt would end up in the middle of the pool. So there goes my centrifugal theory...  ;D
But are you saying that spinning that water in a different direction, it would change the result?

That's probably OT, so let's not get into that here! I'll just take your word for it... ;)

Quote
the ice is pushed in a direction to the right of the wind direction -- by about 45 degrees, I'm told. Qualitatively, winds from the East/West oppose/enhance the ice's velocity from the CCW-rotating Earth, so slowing/speeding it and so it drifts towards/away from the North Pole.)
« Last Edit: August 28, 2019, 08:18:32 AM by Freegrass »
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Aluminium

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Re: The 2019 melting season
« Reply #6170 on: August 28, 2019, 08:30:34 AM »
August 23-27.

2018.

Niall Dollard

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Re: The 2019 melting season
« Reply #6171 on: August 28, 2019, 08:53:13 AM »
I agree more with Freegrass. Air moves from HP towards centre of LP. Wind direction in NH is deflected a little in to the left of the isobar line, pulled towards centre of LP. Wind direction being a big factor for ice movement (and also of course ocean current).

The coriolis effect would be quite small on small objects like individual ice floes

binntho

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Re: The 2019 melting season
« Reply #6172 on: August 28, 2019, 09:12:37 AM »
I agree more with Freegrass. Air moves from HP towards centre of LP. Wind direction in NH is deflected a little in to the left of the isobar line, pulled towards centre of LP. Wind direction being a big factor for ice movement (and also of course ocean current).

The coriolis effect would be quite small on small objects like individual ice floes

I believe that this has been well established through observation, but others are probably much more knowledgable than I am. A floating object will be deflected by wind at a 45 degree angle, and the coriolis effect decides whether it will tend to go to the left or to the right of the direction of the wind.

(PS the coriolis effect apparently gets stronger the closer you get to the poles)
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Yossarian80

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Re: The 2019 melting season
« Reply #6173 on: August 28, 2019, 09:44:17 AM »
You are correct binntho... the Coriolis force combined with frictional effects between the wind and sea surface causes the ocean currents to deviate to the right of the wind in the NH.  Look up Ekman transport/spirals for more info.  So, somewhat counterintuitively, low pressures cause dispersion from the center; and high pressures compaction towards the center.

The recent/current LP that moved from the CAA into the northern Beaufort/CAB has definitely caused some ice to disperse.  This effect has stalled the extent numbers somewhat... an artifact of the dispersion, and not an actual improvement in the state of the ice.

oren

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Re: The 2019 melting season
« Reply #6174 on: August 28, 2019, 10:00:38 AM »
August 23-27.
Thank you as always Aluminium.
I note that after being static throughout the summer - due to a combination of thick ice, late melt and a near-constant wind from the south - the ice in the northwestern Parry Channel has suddenly started moving in mass along the channel in a southeasterly direction. Should this movement continue in a sustained manner, a lot of the ice could be eventually exported to Baffin Bay and lost before refreeze hits.

petm

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Re: The 2019 melting season
« Reply #6175 on: August 28, 2019, 10:26:16 AM »
Aug 21-27

5-day min v. original Bremen concentration

Pacific side partially rebounds after yesterday's retreat. Atlantic side slow advance continues. Asian side no obvious change.

Interestingly, in the Beaufort, the area adjacent to "the tongue" (which itself is becoming rather thin) is approaching zero concentration. Continuous export to the SE Beaufort (where it melts) has taken a toll on this source area. Is the Beaufort the new Greenland Sea?

Also, as noted by Oren, the CAA is on the move.

« Last Edit: August 28, 2019, 11:40:18 AM by petm »

BenB

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Re: The 2019 melting season
« Reply #6176 on: August 28, 2019, 10:55:56 AM »
I think the rebound on the Pacific side is matched by a reduction in concentration further into the pack on that side, which is consistent with the low over Beaufort and what you can see on Modis - ice being pushed south into Chukchi/Beaufort from the central pack, leaving gaps behind further north. The low stays around for a couple of days more, although it's not very deep, so the general pattern should continue. Most of the ice that gets pushed into Chukchi/Beaufort melts fairly quickly, so I don't think the advances will last long. The question is how significant the reduction in concentration deeper into the pack will become.

gandul

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Re: The 2019 melting season
« Reply #6177 on: August 28, 2019, 11:12:19 AM »
I agree more with Freegrass. Air moves from HP towards centre of LP. Wind direction in NH is deflected a little in to the left of the isobar line, pulled towards centre of LP. Wind direction being a big factor for ice movement (and also of course ocean current).

The coriolis effect would be quite small on small objects like individual ice floes
No
That's like saying the force of gravity in us humans is very small compared to mountains so it should not affect us.
Unfortunately we can't fly, the acceleration induced by gravity is the same.

<Okay, that's the last I want to hear about Coriolis, next comments will be snipped; N.>
« Last Edit: August 28, 2019, 01:31:28 PM by Neven »

uniquorn

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Re: The 2019 melting season
« Reply #6178 on: August 28, 2019, 11:53:02 AM »
Interestingly, in the Beaufort, the area adjacent to "the tongue" (which itself is becoming rather thin) is approaching zero concentration. Continuous export to the SE Beaufort (where it melts) has taken a toll on this source area. Is the Beaufort the new Greenland Sea?
Beaufort arm is definitely melting, but when large floes are moving at speed a 5day minimum may exaggerate the loss of concentration.

SimonF92

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Re: The 2019 melting season
« Reply #6179 on: August 28, 2019, 11:53:42 AM »
Compaction still going down
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petm

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Re: The 2019 melting season
« Reply #6180 on: August 28, 2019, 12:00:44 PM »
Beaufort arm is definitely melting, but when large floes are moving at speed a 5day minimum may exaggerate the loss of concentration.

Very much so. Best to look at the original maps for this.

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Re: The 2019 melting season
« Reply #6181 on: August 28, 2019, 02:05:19 PM »

While 2019 is unlikely to catch 2012 for extent, or even area, the comparison of minimum sea ice volumes should be more of a contest.


While I agree with your assessment of the current situation and it's "real" effects, i doubt that volume measurement is sufficiently accurate to mirror that. I suspect that high area and high extent will overrule the thickness part and fool us with the resulting volume numbers for the umpteenth time.

Suspect does not mean I claim to know, it is and remains a suspicion and reality remains to be seen.

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Re: The 2019 melting season
« Reply #6182 on: August 28, 2019, 02:12:14 PM »
It may remain to be seen, but is measurement sufficiently accurate to see it?
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Freegrass

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Re: The 2019 melting season
« Reply #6183 on: August 28, 2019, 02:25:35 PM »
Latest five day forecast predicts a 984 hPa storm to pop up (in a weird way) in the last frames, right where the weakest ice is, North of the Laptev sea. That ice on the Siberian side will probably have compacted a little by then from the southern winds that will be passing over it in the coming days, but this storm could really mess that ice up again big time!
« Last Edit: August 28, 2019, 02:37:04 PM by Freegrass »
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philopek

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Re: The 2019 melting season
« Reply #6184 on: August 28, 2019, 02:40:55 PM »
Latest five day forecast predicts a 984 hPa storm ....

I want to bring up another good reason(s) to post the same with temps included:

- depending on temperatures, the very same winds will impact freezing exactly as they impact melting at given amounts of open water and temperatures. For me that means that wind data alone, without temperatures, provide little information. What counts are the combo of:

Wind + Temps + Surface + Moisture

https://earth.nullschool.net/#current/wind/surface/level/overlay=temp/orthographic=-0.44,91.21,1105/loc=-121.776,76.782

While surface we can either watch elsewhere or know it by heart, at least approximately.

Not such a good reason but still, is that once you were reasoning the appearance, means the visual effect of the map without temps but only winds.

Now it will be about the choice, usefulness against the "show" effect. I've my opinion about it as one can easily guess ;)

Either way thanks for your appreciated efforts.
« Last Edit: August 28, 2019, 03:06:30 PM by philopek »

Freegrass

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Re: The 2019 melting season
« Reply #6185 on: August 28, 2019, 03:02:14 PM »
Latest five day forecast predicts a 984 hPa storm ....

I want to bring up another good reason(s) to post the same with temps included:

- depending on temperatures, the very same winds will impact freezing exactly as they impact melting at given amounts of open water and temperatures. For me that means that wind data alone, without temperatures, provide little information. What counts are the combo of:

Wind + Temps + Surface

While surface we can either watch elsewhere or know it by heart, at least approximately.

Not such a good reason but still, is that once you were reasoning the appearance, means the visual effect of the map without temps but only winds.

Now it will be about the choice, usefulness against the "show" effect. I've my opinion about it as one can easily guess ;)

Either way thanks for your appreciated efforts.
Thanks for the kind words philopek. I'm happy you Like them! ;)

I'm already doing two video's a day right now, one with wind only, and one with temperature or another setting. That way we have the best of both world. Either way, the predictions that pop up on the last day, are not very reliable, so by doing two video's a day,  people should get the whole picture, no?
Now let's pray...

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philopek

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Re: The 2019 melting season
« Reply #6186 on: August 28, 2019, 03:08:37 PM »

I'm already doing two video's a day right now, one with wind only, and one with temperature or another setting...........

Thanks for elaboration, I've seen the other one but was not aware it's a daily one hence my post was kind of superfluous, sorry then and keep goin'

Your new avatar had me just inspired ;) ;)   

Want some ?

https://www.dropbox.com/s/mad62dddqr3v682/20190827%20103335.jpg?dl=0

Wanted to post it yesterday in reply on another thread but apparently the page got stoned by it ;)
« Last Edit: August 28, 2019, 03:16:12 PM by philopek »

Freegrass

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Re: The 2019 melting season
« Reply #6187 on: August 28, 2019, 07:38:08 PM »
That's how I make my cigarettes. A good J needs to be handmade... ;)

We've really flatlined these last few days. The Slater model is looking quite brilliant again right now...
Now let's pray...

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Aleph_Null

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Re: The 2019 melting season
« Reply #6188 on: August 28, 2019, 08:45:42 PM »
A big chunk of anchored ice, looking like the head of a dachshund on August 1, may finally be succumbing. (Clouds leave us in suspense!) This is east of north Greenland.

UCMiami

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Re: The 2019 melting season
« Reply #6189 on: August 29, 2019, 01:16:47 AM »
Philopek - while temperature is always a factor, at this time of year there is very little area where the arctic temp is above freezing so if there is an ice melting (and there is) it is because of whatever heat exists in the ocean. And wind over broken ice is stirring ocean heat from below the surface that will accelerate that melting to some degree.

The current pattern of strong pressure gradients around the basin create strong winds is having some effect though it is not showing in the numbers at the moment - we certainly haven't had a GAC, but from a more quiet early August we are seeing a stormier end to the month.

Alphabet Hotel

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Re: The 2019 melting season
« Reply #6190 on: August 29, 2019, 02:32:36 AM »
Melt is still going strong. Note the sawtooth pattern at the ice edge and the swirls within the pack. Same thing is happening pretty much everywhere there is a clear view. (This image is from Aug 27. )


binntho

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Re: The 2019 melting season
« Reply #6191 on: August 29, 2019, 07:27:18 AM »
The recent wind driven expansion north of the ESS is very clear, I've tried to make a GIF that shows the general movement up and to the left since the 25th (26th not included due to clouds).

Requires a click.
because a thing is eloquently expressed it should not be taken to be as necessarily true
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bbr2314

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Re: The 2019 melting season
« Reply #6192 on: August 29, 2019, 07:36:12 AM »
Not often you SEE ICE survive into September in these parts


weatherdude88

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Re: The 2019 melting season
« Reply #6193 on: August 29, 2019, 09:57:35 AM »
From the daily Bremen ASMR2 6.25 km grid, there has been a significant expansion of cryosphere in the Beautfort and East Siberian seas. The area near the Laptev sea looks more solid, with possible addition gains.

It appears there is a noticeable extent reduction on the Atlantic front (however, the pack looks more solid).


« Last Edit: August 29, 2019, 10:37:07 AM by weatherdude88 »

Freegrass

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Re: The 2019 melting season
« Reply #6194 on: August 29, 2019, 11:14:20 AM »
Five day forecast looks pretty uneventful, except for the fram strait and Svalbard. That low that's been in the forecast for days now, has shifted just a little. So Fram export should get a turbo boost in the coming days...

I'll make one with temp later in the day.
« Last Edit: August 29, 2019, 03:05:45 PM by Freegrass »
Now let's pray...

If the science don't fit our beliefs, we pray to God and cuddle up in our own delusional fantasy where everything makes sense again...

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Re: The 2019 melting season
« Reply #6195 on: August 29, 2019, 12:13:50 PM »
Aug 22-28

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Re: The 2019 melting season
« Reply #6196 on: August 29, 2019, 12:41:32 PM »
As there is some discussion about ice drift direction, here is osisaf ice drift overlaid onto unihamburg amsr2-uhh, aug18-28.
Arguably amsr2 should be overlaid onto the previous 2 day osisaf but 1 pixel of amsr2, ~15km^2 of slush probably has a fair bit of inertia so in this case day n-2 to dayn osisaf is overlaid onto dayn amsr2-uhh(25-27aug onto 27aug)
Note that although both products use algorithms to interpret the data, both are based on real data and not models.

Quote
Low Resolution Sea Ice Drift product (OSI-405)

Which satellite sensors are processed?
The sensors and channels used are SSMIS (91 GHz H&V pol.) on board DMSP platform F17, ASCAT (C-band backscatter) on board EUMETSAT platform Metop-A, and AMSR-2 on board JAXA platform GCOM-W.

What is the spatial resolution of this product?
The low resolution sea ice drift product is a gridded dataset. The grid has 62.5 km spacing on a Polar Stereographic projection mapping. Definitions for the projection parameters can be found in the NetCDF files as well as in the Product User's Manual.

What is the time-span of this product?
Two days (48 hours). This is the time delay between the start and the stop time of the motion described by one vector. For comparison, the merged products from IFREMER/CERSAT is a 3 days lag dataset while the AMSR-E product by the same data centre is 2 days (using 89 GHz channels).

Several datasets are distributed every day, which one should I use?
The OSI SAF low resolution sea ice drift product is indeed composed of several single-sensor products and one multi-sensor analysis, every day. They are all at the same spatial resolution , on the same grid and with a 48 hours time-span.

The multi-sensor (aka merged, multi-oi) is intended for users requiring a spatial covering dataset. In this product, missing vectors are indeed interpolated from the neighbours and each vector is computed from the individual single-sensor products. In this merging process, however, some level of aliasing and averaging is to be expected that slightly degrade the quality of the dataset.
click to run
« Last Edit: August 29, 2019, 01:26:35 PM by uniquorn »

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Re: The 2019 melting season
« Reply #6197 on: August 29, 2019, 01:42:06 PM »
The excellence tournament among data artists at ASIF continues to astonish. What an awesome, eloquent product from uniquorn! (Please forgive my abject hero-worship.)
« Last Edit: August 29, 2019, 01:49:42 PM by Aleph_Null »

binntho

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Re: The 2019 melting season
« Reply #6198 on: August 29, 2019, 01:47:18 PM »
The excellence tournament among data artists as ASIF continues to astonish. What an awesome, eloquent product from uniquorn. (Please forgive my abject hero-worship.)
+1
because a thing is eloquently expressed it should not be taken to be as necessarily true
St. Augustine, Confessions V, 6

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Re: The 2019 melting season
« Reply #6199 on: August 29, 2019, 05:37:52 PM »
The excellence tournament among data artists at ASIF continues to astonish. What an awesome, eloquent product from uniquorn! (Please forgive my abject hero-worship.)

Couldn't agree more.