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gerontocrat

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Satellite News
« on: June 09, 2019, 10:25:41 AM »
Starting this thread with a request - anyone any news on new satellites for NSIDC and JAXA sea ice data?

I am asking because the existing satellites are, I believe, somewhat long in the tooth. Copy of post in sea ice extent data thread below..
__________________________________________________
Quote
Quote from Gerontocrat

Quote
Quote from: Juan C. García on Today at 06:58:36 AM

Quote
Quote from: Rich on Today at 06:44:08 AM
Are there any plans to reduce the grid size?
There are always new satellites with better resolution. The question is if institutions like NSIDC are going to change the algorithm that they use to measure extent and take full advantage of the new instruments.

Nobody can go back in time and adjust the NSIDC data collected by the instrument on the DMSP satelliteS  to the higher resolution data collected by current instruments and maintain consistency in the record. That is why the graphs using higher-resolution data from the new instruments on the new satellites (e.g. from Wipneus) only go back a few years.

The much greater problem is the inevitability of the NSIDC record dating from 1979 ending. The satellite up there is years beyond its design life and the United States Air Force programme DMSP was killed by Mike Rogers in 2017. The last satellite is now in a museum somewhere.

I asked NSIDC a few months ago what the plan is for when this last satellite fails. The answer was along the lines of "under discussion". It will be a real shame if this unique record is cut short.

As Arctic Sea Ice Shows Record Decline, Scientists Prepare to Go Blind
https://www.newsdeeply.com/oceans/articles/2017/05/30/as-arctic-sea-ice-shows-record-decline-scientists-prepare-to-go-blind

Air Force unveils $500M satellite museum piece
https://www.c4isrnet.com/home/2017/12/22/500m-never-flown-air-force-weather-satellite-goes-on-display/
_____________________________________________________________________
And things are not much better at JAXA. JAXA’s GCOM-W1 satellite was launched in 2012 with the Advanced Microwave Scanning Radiometer 2 (AMSR2) on board.

Its design life was 3 to 5 years.
"Para a Causa do Povo a Luta Continua!"
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b_lumenkraft

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Re: Satellite News
« Reply #1 on: June 09, 2019, 10:38:11 AM »
And there i thought you forgot about it. Silly me.

Thanks for opening this thread Gerontocrat.

ArcticMelt2

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Re: Satellite News
« Reply #2 on: June 09, 2019, 10:53:18 AM »
Recently watched that AMSR3 will start after 2022 (satellite GOSAT-3).

gerontocrat

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Re: Satellite News
« Reply #3 on: June 09, 2019, 03:34:51 PM »
And there i thought you forgot about it. Silly me.

I did forget about it. |Ho hum

GRACE Follow On Project
Below is stuff about data and when data will be available

For my own amusement I pushed some buttons on panoply and got the graph below.  But  do not know that package at all, at all. Some of you know how to do this stuff.

Perhaps simpler stuff will emerge, but I bet I never see data all nicely laid out in a .csv file.
_____________________________________________________
Finding GRACE-FO data
https://podaac.jpl.nasa.gov/GRACE-FO
Quote
Index of /grace-fo/GravIS/GFZ/Level-3/ICE/
[parent directory]
Name   Size   Date Modified
AIS/      10/04/2019, 20:12:00
GIS/      10/04/2019, 20:12:00
373 kB   11/04/2019, 13:53:00

ftp://isdcftp.gfz-potsdam.de/grace-fo/GravIS/GFZ/Level-3/ICE/

______________________________________________
updates from Potsdam at this link
https://www.gfz-potsdam.de/en/section/global-geomonitoring-and-gravity-field/projects/gravity-recovery-and-climate-experiment-follow-on-grace-fo-mission/
_____________________________________________________________
Quote
e-mail from Potsdam

Frank Flechtner
1 Jun 2019, 08:09 (8 days ago)
to me

Dear xxxxxxx,

I advice to visit our GRACE and GRACE-FO archives at GFZ, the Information System and Data Center (ISDC) at https://isdc.gfz-potsdam.de/grace-isdc/ and https://isdc.gfz-potsdam.de/grace-fo-isdc/.

At GRACE (but also GRACE-FO) you can read there: To get access via FTP to the different GRACE Level-1B (instrument and orbit data as well as atmosphere and ocean de-aliasing (AOD) model), Level-2 (gravity models in terms of spherical harmonic coefficients) and Level-3 (user-friendly gridded) data and documentation, (monthly) newsletters and various project related documentation please follow the link "GRACE Gravity Data and Documentation" on the left hand side. The link “News related to GRACE Gravity Data” provides further useful information on recent Level-1B and Level-2 data distribution. The Level-3 data provided at ISDC are based on the most recent GRACE data release from GFZ and are visualized and described at GFZ´s Gravity Information Service (GravIS). 
The Level-2 (and later L3) GRACE-FO products will be available in about 10-14 days. So far only L1 have been made available a week ago. I also ask you to get familiar with the GravIS portal where you should find "ready to use" data also for Greenland and Antarctica.

Best regards

Frank Flechtner

"Para a Causa do Povo a Luta Continua!"
"And that's all I'm going to say about that". Forrest Gump
"Damn, I wanted to see what happened next" (Epitaph)

gerontocrat

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Re: Satellite News
« Reply #4 on: June 15, 2019, 10:50:03 PM »
The link below is to a new paper gives a real insight into the measurement of Arctic Sea Ice.
If the writers were business people they would have called it "A SWOT Analysis".

For example the the paper talks at length about the deficiencies and difficulties in the measurement of ice thickness. Loads of stuff about loads of other data types as well.

It also gives more data on the parlous state of the existing satellites used, especially for sea ice extent and area. The only possible stand-by if failure happens soon is a Chinese series of satellites already up there. (Can you see Trump allowing NASA to ask China to bail them out?)
 
https://iopscience.iop.org/article/10.1088/1748-9326/ab09b3
Essential gaps and uncertainties in the understanding of the roles and functions of Arctic sea ice

Really worth a read
"Para a Causa do Povo a Luta Continua!"
"And that's all I'm going to say about that". Forrest Gump
"Damn, I wanted to see what happened next" (Epitaph)

b_lumenkraft

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Re: Satellite News
« Reply #5 on: July 01, 2019, 10:59:18 PM »
Using NASA Data to Monitor Drought and Food Insecurity


b_lumenkraft

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Re: Satellite News
« Reply #6 on: July 11, 2019, 09:49:03 PM »
Sentinel playground down?  :-\

solartim27

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FNORD

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Re: Satellite News
« Reply #8 on: July 26, 2019, 02:40:36 PM »
Hi!

I am new here ::)

And I see that here I can find very interesting and useful information ;D

Thank you!

gerontocrat

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Re: Satellite News
« Reply #9 on: July 27, 2019, 09:35:34 PM »
Hi!

I am new here ::)

And I see that here I can find very interesting and useful information ;D

Thank you!
That's the idea. Always glad to hear that people think this is more than a blah blah shop.
"Para a Causa do Povo a Luta Continua!"
"And that's all I'm going to say about that". Forrest Gump
"Damn, I wanted to see what happened next" (Epitaph)

gerontocrat

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Re: Satellite News
« Reply #10 on: July 27, 2019, 10:12:59 PM »
GRACE-FO is producing loads of stuff.

For those who know what they are doing - start here:-
https://isdc.gfz-potsdam.de/grace-fo-isdc/ (or over at JPL)

For those, like me, who don't know what they are doing - try here
ftp://isdcftp.gfz-potsdam.de/grace-fo/

By following that and pushing buttons, I found new data on Greenland and Antarctic Mass Loss to May 2019 which I am shoving into the computer at the moment.

ftp://isdcftp.gfz-potsdam.de/grace-fo/GravIS/GFZ/Level-3/ICE/

If I find out more.....



"Para a Causa do Povo a Luta Continua!"
"And that's all I'm going to say about that". Forrest Gump
"Damn, I wanted to see what happened next" (Epitaph)

vox_mundi

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Re: Satellite News
« Reply #11 on: August 01, 2019, 05:21:26 PM »
Researchers Calculate Soil Freezing Depth from Satellite Data
https://phys.org/news/2019-08-soil-depth-satellite.html

A team of researchers from the Space Research Institute of the Russian Academy of Sciences (RAS), the Institute for Water and Environmental Problems of the Siberian Branch of RAS, and the Moscow Institute of Physics and Technology (MIPT) has proposed a way to determine soil freezing depth based on satellite microwave radiometry. The findings were published in Studying the Earth From Space, a Russian-language journal of RAS.

... "This method has many advantages: gathering data from large areas independently from solar lighting and atmospheric conditions, a high frequency of observation in the high latitudes, sensitivity to subterranean processes, and relative cheapness," said Associate Professor Vasiliy Tikhonov from the space physics department at MIPT, who is also a senior researcher at the Space Research Institute of RAS. "We tested the method's reliability on the Kulunda Plain, a vast steppe in the southeast of Russia's West Siberian Plain. To this end, we compared satellite microwave radiometry data with the actual soil parameters and climate indicators measured on location at weather stations."


Figure 1. Frozen soil layer thickness, as measured and calculated using the model. The digits 1 through 4 indicate four studied areas on the Kulunda Plain in Altai Krai, Russia. The black symbols correspond to directly measured values, and the red triangles stand for calculated values.

... It turned out that identical sets of satellite data may correspond to different soil freezing depths. The additional factors at play are soil moisture, salinity, and composition, which can all affect the soil's capacity for microwave emission. The researchers also found that one-time radiometric observations do not produce reliable results, because radio waves may reflect at the interface between the frozen and unfrozen soil.

The team accounted for these findings in their calculations, proposing a method that determines soil freezing depth with a high accuracy based on the data from the Soil Moisture and Ocean Salinity (SMOS) satellite. To remotely determine soil freezing depth, the researchers employed daily series of thermal emission measurements, along with their own emission model that incorporates soil characteristics. The time period considered in the study began with the date of freezing, defined as a spike in thermal radiation picked up by the satellite. It ended with the first thaw day, when the amount of thermal radiation dropped sharply.


Open Access: D. A. Boyarskii et al. On evaluation of depth of soil freezing based on SMOS satellite data, Исследования Земли из Космоса (2019)

-------------------------

SMOS detects freezing soil as winter takes grip
https://phys.org/news/2011-12-smos-soil-winter.html
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petm

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Re: Satellite News
« Reply #12 on: August 04, 2019, 04:53:40 AM »

blumenkraft

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Re: Satellite News
« Reply #13 on: August 04, 2019, 10:55:08 AM »
Sentinel making progress apparently. The error message is gone now, but it still does not load the canvas.
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vox_mundi

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Re: Satellite News
« Reply #14 on: August 06, 2019, 05:20:42 PM »
CryoSat Conquers Ice on Arctic Lakes
http://www.esa.int/Our_Activities/Observing_the_Earth/CryoSat/CryoSat_conquers_ice_on_Arctic_lakes

For the first time, CryoSat's altimeter has been used to measure the thickness of ice in the Great Slave Lake and the Great Bear Lake, in the Northwest Territory of Canada.

Lakes in North America's Arctic and sub-Arctic regions cover between 15% and 40% of the landscape, and play an important role in the region's climate. They are also a vital resource for both society and an important habitat for aquatic wildlife.

The Great Slave Lake and the Great Bear Lake were chosen for their flat and smooth icy surfaces, and scientists were able to distinguish radar reflections from both ice-free and ice-covered areas. By subtracting the travel times of the radar signals between the ice surface and ice bottom, they were able to measure the thickness of the ice floating on the lake.

The distance between the two reflections increased during winter, representing the seasonal thickening of the lake ice, and were then accurately validated with in situ drill-hole measurements.

Christian Haas from the University of Bremen (formerly at York and Alberta), said, "Thanks to CryoSat, we are able to study seasonal changes and cycles of ice thickness, as well as volume and variability for many other smaller lakes in the sub-Arctic.

“In addition to monitoring ice thickness, the method could also be used to retrieve lake water levels and volume throughout winter.”

“There are three classes of people: those who see. Those who see when they are shown. Those who do not see.” ― Leonardo da Vinci

Insensible before the wave so soon released by callous fate. Affected most, they understand the least, and understanding, when it comes, invariably arrives too late

gerontocrat

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Re: Satellite News
« Reply #15 on: August 11, 2019, 08:51:40 PM »
GRACE-FO News

It is Germany (the Institute in Potsdam) that seems to be taking the lead in getting GRACE-FO data out to the world. (I wonder if the Trump effect is giving NASA real problems on climate-based stuff). The links are

http://gravis.gfz-potsdam.de/greenland -Greenland Ice Sheet,
http://gravis.gfz-potsdam.de/antarctica -Antarctic Ice Sheet,
______________________________________
and loads more, e.g.
Terrestrial Water Storage Anomalies
Terrestrial Water Storage (TWS) variability as observed by GRACE/GRACE-FO is an integrated signal from a number of different processes. The following individual components are available:

GRACE: Water Storage
Water mass anomalies expressed in terms of equivalent water height from all water storage compartments including snow, surface water, soil moisture, and deep groundwater.
Errors: Water Storage
Time-variable component of the uncertainty estimate for the GRACE-based water storage variability.
Model: Atmospheric Mass
Atmospheric mass variability as represented in the non-tidal de-aliasing model AOD1B expressed in terms of equivalent water height.
___________________________________________________________

The clever ones amongst us will be able then to link to,
e.g. ftp://isdcftp.gfz-potsdam.de/grace/GravIS/GFZ/Level-3/ICE/GIS

and play with the NC and TIF files there.

The ASCII file is not there (with the numeric data on icesheet mass changes), it disappeared. How come. I emailed to find out and got an answer amazingly quickly :-

Extracts.....
______________________________
To:   ingo.sasgen@awi.de
From: me


I am a contributor to the Arctic Sea Ice Forum (https://forum.arctic-sea-ice.net/index.php).
One of the subjects I post on is mass changes of the AIS and GIS (using the handle gerontocrat)

We have all been waiting for GRACE-FO to produce the data and thanks to some really helpful e-mails from  Prof. Dr. Frank Flechtner  I was able to access the ASCII files produced by you including GRACE-FO data to May 2019 and from that data post some initial graphs on our forum.

A few days ago I found the GRAVIS webpages http://gravis.gfz-potsdam.de/greenland  and http://gravis.gfz-potsdam.de/antarctica and then followed the link to the latest level 3 products @ ftp://isdcftp.gfz-potsdam.de/grace/GravIS/GFZ/Level-3/ICE/AIS/.

To my dismay, while the .nc and .tif files are there, the ASCII files for the GIS and AIS  have gone missing.(e.g. file GRAVIS-3_2002095-2019151_GFZOP_0600_GIS_BAVE_AWI_0001)

Rather than push my luck with  Prof. Dr. Frank Flechtner gain, I thought to try you as the author to find out if this is temporary and when we might hope to see some even more up-to-date data. (With the DMI data portal providiing SMB (surface mass balance data)and climate data by basins also from DMI the combination of the three sets of data looks like a powerful analysis tool).
__________________________________________________________________
Dear XXXXXXXXXXXXXXX,

thank you for using the GRACE L3 data from gravis portal and posting it on the Arctic sea-ice forum.

I also appreciate your feedback concerning the data presentation and availability of the basins.

We had discovered a slight error in one of the text files and had to take the files down to fix the problem. I will tend to this early next week.

I can send you the basin geometry via email if you wish. I thought we did have them on the portal.

Thanks for your understanding,

Ingo

PS: And yes, the DMI data portal is a great resource. We are working at the German Polar Sciences institute to implement something similar. Maybe you are aware of our sea-ice portal: https://www.meereisportal.de/en/

Best,

Ingo
________________________________________________________________________
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DrTskoul

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Re: Satellite News
« Reply #16 on: August 12, 2019, 01:18:45 AM »
Great effort gero....

blumenkraft

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Re: Satellite News
« Reply #17 on: August 12, 2019, 09:08:10 PM »
apps.sentinel-hub.com working again! \o/
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Shared Humanity

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Re: Satellite News
« Reply #18 on: August 13, 2019, 02:42:03 AM »
Great effort gero....

It is gentlepersons like gerontocrat who make this site work...

DrTskoul

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Re: Satellite News
« Reply #19 on: August 13, 2019, 03:02:06 AM »
You mean geropersons....

vox_mundi

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Re: Satellite News
« Reply #20 on: August 13, 2019, 06:16:38 PM »
Satellite Study Reveals That Area Over Emits One Billion Tonnes of Carbon
https://phys.org/news/2019-08-satellite-reveals-area-emits-billion.html

A vast region of Africa affected by drought and changing land use emits as much carbon dioxide each year as 200 million cars, research suggests.

Observations from two satellites have consistently shown emissions over northern tropical Africa of between 1 and 1.5 billion tonnes of carbon each year.


The data suggest stored carbon has been released from degraded soils—those subject to prolonged or repeated drought or land use change—in western Ethiopia and western tropical Africa, but scientists say further study is needed to provide a definitive explanation for the emissions.

... The carbon source might have gone undiscovered with land-based surveys alone, according to a team led by researchers from the University of Edinburgh.

Researchers examined data gathered by two NASA satellite missions—Japanese Greenhouse Gases Observing SATellite (GOSAT) and the Orbiting Carbon Observatory (OCO-2).

Open Access: Paul I. Palmer, et.al. Net carbon emissions from African biosphere dominate pan-tropical atmospheric CO2 signal, Nature Communications (2019)
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blumenkraft

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Re: Satellite News
« Reply #21 on: August 31, 2019, 07:53:32 PM »
What a Tweet Tells Us About US Spy Satellites

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vox_mundi

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Re: Satellite News
« Reply #22 on: September 18, 2019, 05:29:37 PM »
Satellites Spot Carbon Pollution From Oil and Gas Wells
https://spectrum.ieee.org/energywise/energy/fossil-fuels/eyes-high-in-the-sky-track-carbon-pollution

Methane-tracking satellites named Claire and Iris pressure oil and gas producers to act.

... Those methane leaks may soon have nowhere to hide thanks to a growing wave of private, methane-detecting satellites being placed in orbit. Canada's GHGSat led the charge in 2016 with its carbon-tracking Claire microsatellite, and the company now has a second-generation microsat ready to launch. Several more methane-detecting satellites are coming, including one from the Environmental Defense Fund. If gas producers don't find and squelch their own pollution, this proliferation of remote observers will make it increasingly likely that others will shine a spotlight on it. https://www.methanesat.org/



The technology improvements on Iris are a mix of lessons learned from Claire and some original engineering. Tweaks to Claire’s spectrometer and optics will make Iris more sensitive. In order to measure small emissions sources with Claire, GHGSat must combine at least 10 or so images of a site, sometimes from multiple flyovers, to get a statistically significant reading of methane emissions. “Whereas it might have taken us 20 measurements to see smaller plumes with Claire, we should be able to see those plumes with a single pass with Iris,” says Germain.

Much of the boost comes from better optics that reduce stray light and internal reflections. Some improvements are possible thanks to a tighter spectral detection range. Whereas Claire was designed to detect both CO2 and methane, Iris’s spectrometer will only see the telltale light absorption patterns for methane.

GHGSat has also squeezed a potentially game-changing system onto Iris’s microwave-sized platform: an optical communications downlink, which is virtually nonexistent on large commercial satellites and will be a first for a microsat. If the experimental 1-gigabit-per-second laser-based transmission works, it will replace Iris's 2-megabit-per-second radio and smash GHGSat's greatest operational bottleneck. “We could have a thousand-fold increase in downlink capacity, which would allow us to take many, many more observations per satellite,” says Germain.
“There are three classes of people: those who see. Those who see when they are shown. Those who do not see.” ― Leonardo da Vinci

Insensible before the wave so soon released by callous fate. Affected most, they understand the least, and understanding, when it comes, invariably arrives too late

kassy

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Re: Satellite News
« Reply #23 on: October 06, 2019, 06:18:42 PM »
Quote
After 11 straight years of success, the U.S.-European Jason-2/Ocean Surface Topography Mission (OSTM) has come to an end. A joint mission combining the forces of NASA, the Centre National d'Etudes Spatiales (CNES), the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA), and the European Organization for the Exploitation of Meteorological Satellites (EUMETSAT), OSMT has studied Earth's changing oceans at a critical time in the planet's history.

...

the satellite leaves behind a powerful, unsung legacy: It has charted almost 2 inches (5 centimeters) of global sea level rise, a rise stemming from man-made climate change. Data from the mission resulted in over 2,000 academic papers.

"Jason-2/OSTM was a high point of operational satellite oceanography as the first Jason mission to formally include EUMETSAT and NOAA as partners," says Steve Volz, assistant administrator of NOAA’s Satellite and Information Service. “During its 11-year run, Jason-2/OSTM helped improve NOAA’s hurricane intensity forecasts and provided important observations of marine winds and waves and in doing so has anchored these essential ocean altimetry observations in NOAA’s operational observing system requirements.”

Jason-2 wasn't supposed to last this long. The coalition launched the satellite after the success of Jason-1, and it came with a 3-year life span. It has almost tripled its life expectancy, and was functioning while the international consortium launched its successor, Jason-3, in 2016.

https://www.popularmechanics.com/science/environment/a29371062/jason-2-satellite-decommissioned/

Not a bad run for number 2.  :)
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Stephan

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Re: Satellite News
« Reply #24 on: October 26, 2019, 09:25:39 PM »
It seems EOSDIS worldview (Antarctica) has no updates since October 23. Any guesses what is not working?
It is too late just to be concerned about Climate Change

Stephan

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Re: Satellite News
« Reply #25 on: October 31, 2019, 06:40:03 PM »
It is working again now  :)
It is too late just to be concerned about Climate Change

vox_mundi

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Re: Satellite News
« Reply #26 on: November 21, 2019, 05:52:35 PM »
New Earth Mission Will Track Rising Oceans Into 2030
https://phys.org/news/2019-11-earth-mission-track-oceans.html

For the first time, U.S and European agencies are preparing to launch a 10-year satellite mission to continue to study the clearest sign of global warming—rising sea levels. The Sentinel-6/Jason-CS mission (short for Jason-Continuity of Service), will be the longest-running mission dedicated to answering the question: How much will Earth's oceans rise by 2030?

The mission consists of two identical satellites, Sentinel-6A and Sentinel-6B, launching five years apart. The satellite is being prepared for a scheduled launch in November 2020 from Vandenberg Air Force Base in California on a SpaceX Falcon 9 rocket.

Sentinel-6/Jason-CS will continue studying not just sea level change but also changes in ocean circulation, climate variability such as El Niño and La Niña, and weather patterns, including hurricanes and storms.

Sentinel-6/Jason-CS will measure down to the millimeter how much global sea level rises during the 2020s and how fast that rise accelerates. As the rate increases, humans will need to adapt to the effects of rising seas—including flooding, coastal erosion, hazards from storms and negative impacts to marine life.

Along with measuring sea level rise, the mission will provide datasets that can help with weather predictions, assessing temperature changes in the atmosphere and collecting high-resolution vertical profiles of temperature and humidity.

As with its Jason-series predecessors, Sentinel-6/Jason-CS will gather global ocean data every 10 days, providing insights into large ocean features like El Niño events. However, unlike previous Jason-series missions, its higher-resolution instruments will also be able to provide data on smaller ocean features—including complex currents—that will benefit navigation and fishing communities.
“There are three classes of people: those who see. Those who see when they are shown. Those who do not see.” ― Leonardo da Vinci

Insensible before the wave so soon released by callous fate. Affected most, they understand the least, and understanding, when it comes, invariably arrives too late