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Author Topic: Solar cycle effects on barometric pressure in polar regions  (Read 419 times)

weatherdude88

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Let's discuss differences in barometric pressure at polar latitudes, during different stages of the solar cycle.

Quote
"The magnitude of the change in the troposphere is large enough to
alter sea level pressure fields such that a more positive
winter Southern Annual Mode (lower pressure at higher
latitudes) is produced in about 70% of the cases (especially
with climatological and historical SST). The sea level
pressure differences are on the order of 4 mb at high
southern latitudes"

Quote
"This effect, as well as the winter zonal
wind change descending into the troposphere, is more
consistent in the Southern Hemisphere during June –August
then in the Northern Hemisphere for December–February,
most likely owing to the greater planetary wave forcing and
inherent variability during Northern Hemisphere winter"

https://pubs.giss.nasa.gov/docs/2008/2008_Rind_ri07700f.pdf


Page 166 starts "Variations In Air Pressure And In Solar Activity"

https://books.google.com/books?id=yV81i_hopSwC&printsec=frontcover&source=gbs_ge_summary_r&cad=0#v=onepage&q&f=false


« Last Edit: June 11, 2019, 09:07:56 PM by weatherdude88 »

Neven

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Re: Solar cycle effects on barometric pressure in polar regions
« Reply #1 on: June 11, 2019, 09:45:54 PM »
I'll leave this thread open, for as long as the solar stuff doesn't go in the wrong direction, but given that a link is posted to a paper from 1921, I'm moving it to the Arctic Background category.
Il faut comparer, comparer, comparer, et cultiver notre jardin

Shared Humanity

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Re: Solar cycle effects on barometric pressure in polar regions
« Reply #2 on: June 12, 2019, 01:51:31 AM »
I'll leave this thread open, for as long as the solar stuff doesn't go in the wrong direction, but given that a link is posted to a paper from 1921, I'm moving it to the Arctic Background category.

Christ! 34 years before I was born. All of the scientists involved in the research are long since dead, I presume.

The most relevant reading to help us determine a proper approach to this research would be...

"The Structure of Scientific Revolutions" by Thomas S. Kuhn

Rod

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Re: Solar cycle effects on barometric pressure in polar regions
« Reply #3 on: June 12, 2019, 02:19:37 AM »
I could not get the first link to open, and I did not have the patience to scroll through the book from 1921.   However, I noticed this in my Twitter feed today:

Rod

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Re: Solar cycle effects on barometric pressure in polar regions
« Reply #4 on: June 12, 2019, 02:22:46 AM »
I also would note that both of the quotes above are related to winter conditions.  We are now in the melt season so I'm not sure what the rational behind this thread even is 🤔.

weatherdude88

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Re: Solar cycle effects on barometric pressure in polar regions
« Reply #5 on: June 12, 2019, 04:37:17 AM »
I could not get the first link to open

It opens faster on a desktop browser. Here is another link to the same paper, to access faster on your mobile device.

https://agupubs.onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/full/10.1029/2008JD010114
« Last Edit: June 12, 2019, 04:48:34 AM by weatherdude88 »

weatherdude88

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Re: Solar cycle effects on barometric pressure in polar regions
« Reply #6 on: June 12, 2019, 04:39:28 AM »
I also would note that both of the quotes above are related to winter conditions.  We are now in the melt season so I'm not sure what the rational behind this thread even is 🤔.

Quote
"In both the model and observations, the greatest correlations with the solar cycle during this season are in the Northern (summer) hemisphere."

weatherdude88

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Re: Solar cycle effects on barometric pressure in polar regions
« Reply #7 on: June 12, 2019, 04:42:44 AM »
I'll leave this thread open, for as long as the solar stuff doesn't go in the wrong direction, but given that a link is posted to a paper from 1921, I'm moving it to the Arctic Background category.

Christ! 34 years before I was born. All of the scientists involved in the research are long since dead, I presume.

The most relevant reading to help us determine a proper approach to this research would be...

"The Structure of Scientific Revolutions" by Thomas S. Kuhn

The initial source from the Journal of Geophysical Research is from 2008.

Rod

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Re: Solar cycle effects on barometric pressure in polar regions
« Reply #8 on: June 12, 2019, 04:44:29 AM »
Well then if that is what they say, the current conditions seem to be the opposite of their conclusions.

weatherdude88

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Re: Solar cycle effects on barometric pressure in polar regions
« Reply #9 on: June 12, 2019, 07:48:21 PM »
Well then if that is what they say, the current conditions seem to be the opposite of their conclusions.

If you are referring to specific latitudes outside the polar region during northern hemisphere summer, I would concur. However, this is a forum that focuses on the cryosphere, that is indeed located at high latitudes.

FishOutofWater

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Re: Solar cycle effects on barometric pressure in polar regions
« Reply #10 on: June 13, 2019, 05:38:20 PM »
Stick a fork in a solar hypothesis for what's happening this summer. We're approaching solar minimum and the SST pattern and summer temperature pattern is the opposite of what the solar hypothesis would predict.


Sea surface temperature changes between solar maximum and solar minimum conditions. (top) Results from the runs with calculated SST, for (left) the three run ensemble in M53 and (right) the single simulation in M23. (bottom left) Results for the historical SST changes. (bottom right) As an alternate, results are also given when the last solar maximum and first solar minimum are removed.

Caption for figure below taken from publication cited above:
Annual temperature change between solar maximum and solar minimum conditions in the model simulations. (left) Results are shown for the simulations with (calculated) varying SST, (middle) historical SST for the 1950–2004 time period, and (right) climatological‐average SST for the same time period. (bottom) Annual temperature changes divided by the standard deviations from respective control runs (with unchanging solar radiation) for the three SST approaches. Note the color table is used for both rows, representing (top) °C and (bottom) relative standard deviations.