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Author Topic: The Nares Strait thread  (Read 631766 times)

grixm

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Re: The Nares Strait thread
« Reply #2300 on: May 24, 2020, 05:54:55 PM »
Looks like a piece broke off today.


uniquorn

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Re: The Nares Strait thread
« Reply #2301 on: May 24, 2020, 06:01:39 PM »
Indeed and the 2 polynya further north have joined up.

oren

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Re: The Nares Strait thread
« Reply #2302 on: May 24, 2020, 07:52:12 PM »
This loss of important structural support could result in a very early breakup of the arch.

Stephan

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Re: The Nares Strait thread
« Reply #2303 on: May 24, 2020, 08:58:36 PM »
Last year there was a permanent flow of sea ice through the Nares Strait into Baffin. This year up to now the arch is still intact and the sea SW of it is already completely ice-free. When I turn to gerontocrat's postings in the area/extent thread I remember that Baffin Sea has much less ice than usual. Would a permanently open Nares Strait lead to higher Baffin Sea Ice or is the input of ice through the narrow Nares Strait negligible?
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uniquorn

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Re: The Nares Strait thread
« Reply #2304 on: May 25, 2020, 12:43:40 AM »
Sorry, don't know, but it is possible to look up daily extent. It must make a difference.
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« Last Edit: May 25, 2020, 01:11:38 AM by uniquorn »

Niall Dollard

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Re: The Nares Strait thread
« Reply #2305 on: May 25, 2020, 01:33:44 AM »
Last year there was a permanent flow of sea ice through the Nares Strait into Baffin. This year up to now the arch is still intact and the sea SW of it is already completely ice-free. When I turn to gerontocrat's postings in the area/extent thread I remember that Baffin Sea has much less ice than usual. Would a permanently open Nares Strait lead to higher Baffin Sea Ice or is the input of ice through the narrow Nares Strait negligible?

I found a great analysis study on Nares Strait below on nature.com. It is open access thankfully and confirms a lot of all the good analysis we have already produced in this thread. The author mentions that you can add +/- 2 days to the dates of formation, as definitions can vary. (On a personal note I'm glad to say it confirms my own record on southern arch formation in this thread and also Oren's record on arch breakdown).

I have attached two images from the article on arch formation and trends going back 4 decades. I think anyone who reads this thread will find it a "must" read !   (I have left the screen shots in large size in order to make it legible in this thread).

https://www.nature.com/articles/s41598-019-56780-6

Back to your question Stephan. Inflow into Baffin Bay can be grouped into three main sources:

1) Inflow through Nares Strait (when it is open)
2) Inflow from the CAA. From the Lancaster and Jones Sound
3) New ice production in the North Water Polynya

The nature.com study says that there was a record volume went through the Nares Strait in 2007 when no arch formed (254 km3).

So clearly an open Nares will export a lot of ice into Baffin Bay.

In 2009 there was only a northern ice arch and it resulted in a virtually ice-free Baffin Bay in July, which led to unprecedented summertime sea surface temperatures largely as a result of decreased albedo and 24-hour solar insolation.

When the arches form, the NOW polynya is a big source of new sea ice production for Baffin Bay inwinter and spring. But this will be thin ice. This study below estimates that this polynya is repsonsible for around 80% of sea ice passing through the northern gate of Baffin Bay. There is a lot of data in this study but inflow and outflow into Baffin is variable and complex.

https://www.the-cryosphere.net/13/1025/2019/tc-13-1025-2019.pdf

blumenkraft

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Re: The Nares Strait thread
« Reply #2306 on: May 25, 2020, 01:30:24 PM »
In Kane Basin, the Humbold Glacier calved a little.

Note the grounded icebergs in the middle of the GIF. They are 2-4km away from the calving, but they are still moved.
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gerontocrat

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Re: The Nares Strait thread
« Reply #2307 on: May 26, 2020, 12:37:57 PM »
DMI says that in the last few days it's been warm enough for a little bit of melt and even a bit of run-off (i.e. liquid H2O) into the Nares Strait
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uniquorn

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Re: The Nares Strait thread
« Reply #2308 on: May 26, 2020, 12:58:55 PM »
yesterdays terra modis, https://go.nasa.gov/2A5M8jw
heavy contrast to show possible weak points beyond which a new arch might stabilise.
The northern polynya is consolidating

edit: that sliver broke off between the aqua and terra modis orbits.
« Last Edit: May 26, 2020, 05:34:02 PM by uniquorn »

uniquorn

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Re: The Nares Strait thread
« Reply #2309 on: May 26, 2020, 01:16:17 PM »
I have attached two images from the article on arch formation and trends going back 4 decades. I think anyone who reads this thread will find it a "must" read !   (I have left the screen shots in large size in order to make it legible in this thread).

https://www.nature.com/articles/s41598-019-56780-6

Excellent article. I'd assumed the NOW(polynya) was due to warmer saline water being forced up from depth by the shallow sill and turbulence. Latent heat of fusion is a contribution I hadn't considered.

Here are another 2 images from the document for easy reference. While we can look at worldview back to 2000, the 1980-1999 images are a real time saver.
Quote
Data availability

Satellite Advanced Very High Resolution (AVHRR) data is available on-line at the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) Comprehensive Large Array-data Stewardship System (CLASS)(https://www.bou.class.noaa.gov/saa/products/welcome). Archival ice charts are available on-line at the Government of Canada ice archive (https://iceweb1.cis.ec.gc.ca/Archive/page1.html?lang = en).
« Last Edit: May 26, 2020, 01:26:01 PM by uniquorn »

uniquorn

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Re: The Nares Strait thread
« Reply #2310 on: May 26, 2020, 11:41:31 PM »
constant drips...

blumenkraft

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Re: The Nares Strait thread
« Reply #2311 on: May 27, 2020, 08:03:06 PM »
Sentinel caught it nicely!
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gerontocrat

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Re: The Nares Strait thread
« Reply #2312 on: May 29, 2020, 01:47:52 PM »
Getting warm(ish) up there?
"Para a Causa do Povo a Luta Continua!"
"And that's all I'm going to say about that". Forrest Gump
"Damn, I wanted to see what happened next" (Epitaph)