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NotaDenier

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Greenland River Flows
« on: August 02, 2019, 01:50:09 AM »
Irina Overeem of INSTARR has a least one river gauge in Greenland ( Naujatkuat River). However after a bunch of googling I can’t find any data from it. Does anyone know how to get a hold of her? Edit she says she doesn’t get live data from it. It’s just a data logger. It still would be interesting to see the data.

https://instaar.colorado.edu/news-events/instaar-news/muddy-waters-greenland-sedimentation/

https://www.iflscience.com/environment/greenland-s-meltwater-rivers-are-largest-contributor-rising-sea-levels/

http://mobile.twitter.com/irinaovereem/status/1156227258320732160

This river is in West Greenland, close to the capital Nuuk. The measurements are collected at N64 06 35, W50 06 22, see arrow.  The movie is from the cliff a little further down (you can vaguely see the station's solar panel on the bedrock in the upper corner).

This movie is from the previous warm spell - around July 13. The river is at 5.3m below our sensor. At the highest ever (during the eceptional melt in 2012) water reached to around 2.5 m below the sensor. Hopefully water will not rise higher this coming week.

NotaDenier

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Re: Greenland River Flows
« Reply #1 on: August 02, 2019, 01:57:55 AM »
Abrupt shift in the observed runoff from the southwestern Greenland ice sheet


https://advances.sciencemag.org/content/3/12/e1701169.full

Abstract
The recent decades of accelerating mass loss of the Greenland ice sheet have arisen from an increase in both surface meltwater runoff and ice flow discharge from tidewater glaciers. Despite the role of the Greenland ice sheet as the dominant individual cryospheric contributor to sea level rise in recent decades, no observational record of its mass loss spans the 30-year period needed to assess its climatological state. We present for the first time a 40-year (1975–2014) time series of observed meltwater discharge from a >6500-km2 catchment of the southwestern Greenland ice sheet. We find that an abrupt 80% increase in runoff occurring between the 1976–2002 and 2003–2014 periods is due to a shift in atmospheric circulation, with meridional exchange events occurring more frequently over Greenland, establishing the first observation-based connection between ice sheet runoff and climate change.


Fig. 1 The Tasersiaq catchment in southwest Greenland.
Red, ice-free part of the catchment; blue, ice-covered part of the catchment; A, unnamed ice-dammed lake delivering glacial lake outburst floods (GLOFs) to the catchment (subtracted from the discharge time series); B, Amitsulôq ice cap. Inset: map location in Greenland shown in green. A more detailed map of the outlet region is provided in fig. S1.