Support the Arctic Sea Ice Forum and Blog

Author Topic: Northern Hemisphere Winter 2019-2020 Snowcover / Misc Obs  (Read 27716 times)

bbr2315

  • Frazil ice
  • Posts: 388
    • View Profile
  • Liked: 121
  • Likes Given: 61
Re: Northern Hemisphere Winter 2019-2020 Snowcover / Misc Obs
« Reply #200 on: May 30, 2020, 09:25:14 AM »
The models are showing snow clinging firmly to much of Quebec through day 10. The CMC and EURO both show major new snowfalls in the higher elevations. The heat this week definitely did a number on the southern parts of the province, but it appears most of the pack a few hundred miles and up on north of Montreal has held firm.



Volume is now running about 30 days behind normal, aka, our current SWE is roughly equivalent to what would be normal in late April.


blumenkraft

  • Guest
Re: Northern Hemisphere Winter 2019-2020 Snowcover / Misc Obs
« Reply #201 on: May 30, 2020, 03:41:49 PM »
Barents region prepares for flooding after snowiest winter in years

Link >> https://thebarentsobserver.com/en/ecology/2020/05/barents-region-prepares-flooding-after-snowiest-winter-years

gerontocrat

  • First-year ice
  • Posts: 9085
    • View Profile
  • Liked: 3589
  • Likes Given: 26
Re: Northern Hemisphere Winter 2019-2020 Snowcover / Misc Obs
« Reply #202 on: June 01, 2020, 06:41:27 PM »
https://ccin.ca/ccw/snow/current
https://climatereanalyzer.org/wx/fcst_outlook/


North America - the snow will go,  even that cold blob over Central Northern Canada looks like shrinking & weakening this week.

Arctic Eurasia - Siberia just too warm for the snow to survive for long.
"Para a Causa do Povo a Luta Continua!"
"And that's all I'm going to say about that". Forrest Gump
"Damn, I wanted to see what happened next" (Epitaph)

blumenkraft

  • Guest
Re: Northern Hemisphere Winter 2019-2020 Snowcover / Misc Obs
« Reply #203 on: June 03, 2020, 04:57:28 PM »
One impressive chart!


bbr2315

  • Frazil ice
  • Posts: 388
    • View Profile
  • Liked: 121
  • Likes Given: 61
Re: Northern Hemisphere Winter 2019-2020 Snowcover / Misc Obs
« Reply #204 on: June 04, 2020, 01:15:31 AM »
This is a bit tangential but I think it is not hysterical and reasonably well-reasoned.... I hope? In any case..... RAMBLINGS:

Comparing EOSDIS from today to every year in the satellite record, 2020 is far and away the leader in both extent and albedo in North America, IMO. Not only is it still snowy, in Nunavut, it is still DEEP, sufficiently so that reflectivity remains very high. The only years since 2000 that come kind of close are 2002 and 2009.

With 18 days to go til solstice, this year's snowcover could be a valuable datapoint as we move forward. When is it going to melt completely? As we can see in the data from Tromso, many locations with abnormally high snowcover are now melting out completely. But besides the record depth for much of spring, the melt itself has occurred in an extraordinarily abbreviated window in these locations, as well.

I think the evolution of the climate from 2012 to 2020 makes several observations now evident and important.

1) The PEAK "snow-water-equivalent" in both North America and Eurasia is moving LATER into the year. It is also becoming much HIGHER. Max values are now approaching +50% of 1998-2011 max, however, the discrepancy is especially high in April, May, and now, June, where the differential vs. normal is now oftentimes +100% or higher.

2) When snow melt occurs, it increasingly does so extremely rapidly, even with much higher snow-water-equivalent. With the overall volume and flux of the pack (unfortunately we do not have a measurement on FLUX, this would be very useful!!!), this means that MUCH MORE snow is melting MUCH LATER in the year than during the 1998-2011 period, especially in North America.

3) As Greenland apparently becomes the center of the "cold pole" we are also seeing an increasing shift in snow mass towards North America and, evidently, now Scandinavia. Thus, while these regions are seeing the consequences of greater / later meltwater flux, parts of Siberia are seeing the opposite unfold, where less snow / earlier melt = earlier abatement of meltwater flux = earlier onset of true summer conditions?

From these observations we can ask several questions.

1) How much SWE is necessary for remaining volume in July, and August, and September?

Moderator's Note: In order to ask this question you must first show a correlation between higher wintertime SWE and later melt-out dates. For example, the case of Tromso posted above does not support such a correlation. Until such proof is presented, this is purely speculative and considered disruptive to the forum.

This winter, we saw about 300 KM^3 of volume accretion in November, December, January, and February. March had about 200 KM^3 of accretion, October had about 160 KM^3.

It seems the deeper into WACCY weather we get, the more consistently snow accumulates at a greater pace than normal on the continents (esp North America). However, my big question here, is does monthly accumulation depend on meeting a baseline, and then hit a "sticky" number thereafter?

I.E., once we hit 200 KM^3, we can then rack up gains of 300KM^3 a month until spring.

Does hitting 200KM^3 earlier in the year open the door to FASTER and more consistent accumulations? Why can't October become apart of the +300KM^3 club? Why not September?

Moderator's note: Snow season does not begin in September. In a warming world snow season is not expected to begin earlier, until proof is presented of it actually beginning earlier this is speculative and considered disruptive to the forum.

I have a very strong hunch there is no reason these months CANNOT become part of this club but it hinges on enough volume surviving into the autumn to provide a sufficient baseline for regrowth. Regrowth from practically zero results in months of lag, but regrowth from ~200KM^3 could be sufficient to provide much faster and more reliable gains much earlier in the winter season.

Moderator's Note: There is no evidence that supports widespread snow survival through the summer into the autumn. Until such evidence is presented showing actual survival, this is speculative and considered disruptive to the forum.

Finally, on a more imaginative note, let's guesstimate 15 years into the future. The year is 2035.

SWE peaks at 2,400 KM^3 in North America. That is about 2X a good year 30 years ago. But more important than the raw increase in volume, was the fact that the peak does not occur until April 25th, leaving about 2,000 KM^3 of volume as of May 1st.

Moderator's Note: Such SWE accumulations are idle speculation. Moreover, the following part is even more speculative. Actual observed SWE progression during snowmelt season does not follow your speculations.

That number drops to 1,200 KM^3 by June 1st. The June 1st volume of snow in North America is about what it is at peak February thirty years prior. And it has increased about 12X from the 6/1 volume from 6/1/2005.

600KM^3 remains on 7/1. And 300KM^3 remains as of 8/1. The longer the snow stays in the summertime in substantial volume, the more snow falls atop the existing cover and in surrounding regions, effectively turning winter into a full-year affair in the regions of least melt.

By September 1st, volume has hit a minimum of 150KM^3 in the middle of August, before rapidly rebounding to about 200KM^3.

The next six months all feature gains of 350KM^3 apiece, taking volume to 2,400KM^3 by 3/1/2036. It hits 2,700KM^3 on 4/1/2036. And in 2036, the maximum does not happen until May 1st, at 2,850KM^3.

We still lose 40% of the volume that May. It is 1,700KM^3 as of 6/1/2036, but this year, the VERY late release and very MASSIVE release relative to time of year acts especially protective re: North America. 800KM^3 remains as of 7/1, 400KM^3 remains by 8/1, and from this trend,
it becomes clear how residual anomalies through summertime could have a snowball effect on overall anomalies IF AND WHEN THEY DO SURVIVE.

Moderator's Note: When residual anomalies do survive you can revisit these idle speculations.

There is another caveat here. Will the rate of continental accretion continue to increase during wintertime as the oceans get warmer and the Arctic becomes increasingly ice-free? I think there is an argument to be made that this is also a trend now worsening.

So basically the next twenty years we have a few things to keep closest eye on.

1) Is more snow falling each and every year? (YES)
2) Is the time of year where snow can accrete at its fastest rate INCREASING in duration? (YES)
3) Is the time of year for absolute snow melt (SWE-volume wise) DECREASING in duration?  (YES)
4) Is the rate of snow melt increasing? (YES)
5) Is snow melt shifting proportionately later into the year (YES)

Moderator's Note: Does more SWE in winter mean later melt-out date in summer? (Proof is required). Show that specific locations are exhibiting such a correlation, before you are allowed to continue in such speculation as edited above. Following posts with similar speculative content will be edited out or removed entirely without much ceremony.
« Last Edit: June 04, 2020, 03:25:36 AM by oren »

bbr2315

  • Frazil ice
  • Posts: 388
    • View Profile
  • Liked: 121
  • Likes Given: 61
Re: Northern Hemisphere Winter 2019-2020 Snowcover / Misc Obs
« Reply #205 on: June 05, 2020, 12:43:18 AM »
12z EURO = wow for Ontario // + Cristobal!

Also volume going up again temporarily in North America. I will follow up to oren's edits to ^ post in a bit. But the fact we can see a volume increase in North America on June 3rd, which is 18 days from solstice, is pretty incredible.



For reference, we were at about 200KM^3 at this time last year, and only a bit below the current level in 2018, which I believe may have been a record at the time (?) it certainly had cold anomalies over the Shield though 2020 has been worse.

Comparing the May temperature departure map with 2018, I would say that WACC-Y breakdown has accelerated since 2018, with more Poleward heat transfer during the month and more pronounced negative anomalies in the continents adjacent to and over the areas with abnormal snowfalls.

Paradoxically this year the positive anomalies have been positioned in a way to maximize the overall snowfall coverage in the continent as a whole, being centered over the regions with very coldest May normals, and thus not resulting in appreciable melt (and possibly actually enhancing snowfall?). While Quebec was warmer than 2018 in 2020, these areas are still normal or colder than normal overall vs the climate period (Quebec, etc centered around the Baffin+).

It will be interesting to watch the Cristobal situation over the next week. I anticipate we will see most of the snow melt in June if 2018 was any guide, but we may still be in for a few unseasonal surprises yet along the way to zero.
« Last Edit: June 05, 2020, 12:58:30 AM by bbr2315 »

gerontocrat

  • First-year ice
  • Posts: 9085
    • View Profile
  • Liked: 3589
  • Likes Given: 26
Re: Northern Hemisphere Winter 2019-2020 Snowcover / Misc Obs
« Reply #206 on: June 05, 2020, 12:54:41 PM »
Snow in North America showing another blip up - but it will not last.
"Para a Causa do Povo a Luta Continua!"
"And that's all I'm going to say about that". Forrest Gump
"Damn, I wanted to see what happened next" (Epitaph)

oren

  • Moderator
  • First-year ice
  • Posts: 6183
    • View Profile
  • Liked: 2244
  • Likes Given: 1879
Re: Northern Hemisphere Winter 2019-2020 Snowcover / Misc Obs
« Reply #207 on: June 05, 2020, 04:43:49 PM »
Bbr, I dislike 10-day forecasts as a rule, unless you revisit them later and explain if the forecast came true or not. If you continue not to, I may remove them in the near future.

gerontocrat

  • First-year ice
  • Posts: 9085
    • View Profile
  • Liked: 3589
  • Likes Given: 26
Re: Northern Hemisphere Winter 2019-2020 Snowcover / Misc Obs
« Reply #208 on: June 11, 2020, 01:17:35 PM »
https://www.ccin.ca/ccw/snow/current

And the snow? It goes.

And the temperatures do not look good for snow survival.
__________________________________________
ps: I asked Waterloo University (who apparently do the website page from Environment Canada data) if they had snow data files we could access.  Got a nice e-mail back but no joy.

Quote
As for table of snow cover and swe, we just have the real-time graph on the website as we pull the information from EC. WE do not archive this information.

I hope this is helpful, please let me know if you have any other question!

Gabrielle
--

Gabrielle Alix
Data Manager
Polar Data Catalogue & Canadian Cryospheric Information Network
Interdisciplinary Centre of Climate Change
University of Waterloo
"Para a Causa do Povo a Luta Continua!"
"And that's all I'm going to say about that". Forrest Gump
"Damn, I wanted to see what happened next" (Epitaph)

gerontocrat

  • First-year ice
  • Posts: 9085
    • View Profile
  • Liked: 3589
  • Likes Given: 26
Re: Northern Hemisphere Winter 2019-2020 Snowcover / Misc Obs
« Reply #209 on: June 13, 2020, 09:11:00 PM »
Looks like the heat has hit the far north of North America - snow mass (SWE) falling like a stone.
Snow cover extent (SCE) will surely follow once snow depth approaches zero.
"Para a Causa do Povo a Luta Continua!"
"And that's all I'm going to say about that". Forrest Gump
"Damn, I wanted to see what happened next" (Epitaph)

gerontocrat

  • First-year ice
  • Posts: 9085
    • View Profile
  • Liked: 3589
  • Likes Given: 26
Re: Northern Hemisphere Winter 2019-2020 Snowcover / Misc Obs
« Reply #210 on: June 14, 2020, 06:32:56 PM »
Looks like the heat is continuing to hit the far north of North America - snow mass (SWE) falling like a stone.
Snow cover extent (SCE) follows as snow depth approaches zero.
"Para a Causa do Povo a Luta Continua!"
"And that's all I'm going to say about that". Forrest Gump
"Damn, I wanted to see what happened next" (Epitaph)

gerontocrat

  • First-year ice
  • Posts: 9085
    • View Profile
  • Liked: 3589
  • Likes Given: 26
Re: Northern Hemisphere Winter 2019-2020 Snowcover / Misc Obs
« Reply #211 on: June 17, 2020, 01:34:42 PM »
https://ccin.ca/ccw/snow/current

Snow Water Equivalent (SWE) in North America continues a near vertical descent.
Snow Cover Extent (SCE)  decline much gentler - but must catch up soon, because...

warmth continues to build - afternoon temperatures getting really high by the weekend & beyond.
"Para a Causa do Povo a Luta Continua!"
"And that's all I'm going to say about that". Forrest Gump
"Damn, I wanted to see what happened next" (Epitaph)

gerontocrat

  • First-year ice
  • Posts: 9085
    • View Profile
  • Liked: 3589
  • Likes Given: 26
Re: Northern Hemisphere Winter 2019-2020 Snowcover / Misc Obs
« Reply #212 on: June 20, 2020, 01:07:40 PM »
https://ccin.ca/ccw/snow/current

Snow Water Equivalent (SWE) in North America continues a near vertical descent.
Snow Cover Extent (SCE)  decline was much gentler - now catching up.

warmth continues to build - afternoon temperatures getting really high this weekend & beyond.

EURASIA - I attache the graphs for the last time. Why? Because the map shows that apart from some scraps, the graphs are showing snow on the Himalayas & the Tibetan Plateau. This is of great importance for several hundred million people dependent on snow melt into South & SE Asia, but not to the Arctic Snow thread
"Para a Causa do Povo a Luta Continua!"
"And that's all I'm going to say about that". Forrest Gump
"Damn, I wanted to see what happened next" (Epitaph)

gerontocrat

  • First-year ice
  • Posts: 9085
    • View Profile
  • Liked: 3589
  • Likes Given: 26
Re: Northern Hemisphere Winter 2019-2020 Snowcover / Misc Obs
« Reply #213 on: June 22, 2020, 01:12:42 PM »
https://ccin.ca/ccw/snow/current

The snow in the far North of Canada continues to vanish. It is interesting that the strongest +ve temperature anomalies are where not so long ago the strongest -ve temperature anomalies were, i.e. Central Canada & the CAA.
« Last Edit: June 22, 2020, 03:23:32 PM by gerontocrat »
"Para a Causa do Povo a Luta Continua!"
"And that's all I'm going to say about that". Forrest Gump
"Damn, I wanted to see what happened next" (Epitaph)

Tor Bejnar

  • Young ice
  • Posts: 3542
    • View Profile
  • Liked: 606
  • Likes Given: 374
Re: Northern Hemisphere Winter 2019-2020 Snowcover / Misc Obs
« Reply #214 on: June 22, 2020, 10:20:08 PM »
Which would deserve a headline, or even a note?
  • Snow Melts Rapidly in Northern Hemisphere Summer
  • For Months, Now, Northern Hemisphere Snow Extent and Volume Remain Above Average
Arctic ice is healthy for children and other living things.

blumenkraft

  • Guest
Re: Northern Hemisphere Winter 2019-2020 Snowcover / Misc Obs
« Reply #215 on: June 23, 2020, 09:07:54 AM »
Above-average snow masses decrease rapidly - flooding expected

There you have your headline. :)

gerontocrat

  • First-year ice
  • Posts: 9085
    • View Profile
  • Liked: 3589
  • Likes Given: 26
Re: Northern Hemisphere Winter 2019-2020 Snowcover / Misc Obs
« Reply #216 on: June 26, 2020, 10:30:31 AM »
Which would deserve a headline, or even a note?
  • Snow Melts Rapidly in Northern Hemisphere Summer
  • For Months, Now, Northern Hemisphere Snow Extent and Volume Remain Above Average
Or, you could say ...
"the snow year has been a demonstration of what the climate models predict."
Or you could say ...
"development of the new ice sheet in the far North of Canada has been delayed for yet another year."

Meanwhile.....
https://ccin.ca/ccw/snow/current

The snow in the far North of Canada continues to vanish. The slope of decline reduces as the available snow declines in thickness and extent- The Gompertz curve kicks in. This I presume will reduce the snowmelt run-ff into the channels of the CAA.

The strongest +ve temperature anomalies are still where not so long ago the strongest -ve temperature anomalies were, i.e. Central Canada & the CAA, and looks set to remain high. As the snow cover disappears I guess the albedo on land will greatly reduce , the land will dry out, and therefore heat up quickly.
"Para a Causa do Povo a Luta Continua!"
"And that's all I'm going to say about that". Forrest Gump
"Damn, I wanted to see what happened next" (Epitaph)

bbr2315

  • Frazil ice
  • Posts: 388
    • View Profile
  • Liked: 121
  • Likes Given: 61
Re: Northern Hemisphere Winter 2019-2020 Snowcover / Misc Obs
« Reply #217 on: June 30, 2020, 07:20:29 AM »
Eurasian's SWE decline has slowed dramatically.... North America's has also although it is only somewhat above the blue line.



Extent also looks to be at least 1M KM^2 above normal?



In either case I am guessing that the Himalayas are to blame for the majority of this discrepancy. Perhaps this has some correlation with the massive floods swallowing parts of China (more snowfall = more snowmelt = more rainfall downwind as well ? (i.e. the airmasses from the Himalayas traversing snow-covered vs barren land would probably have more clouds when they arrive downwind over China from whatever time to whatever time). IDK.

blumenkraft

  • Guest
Re: Northern Hemisphere Winter 2019-2020 Snowcover / Misc Obs
« Reply #218 on: June 30, 2020, 09:08:21 AM »
There was fresh snow in east Siberia. Should be gone in no time.

gerontocrat

  • First-year ice
  • Posts: 9085
    • View Profile
  • Liked: 3589
  • Likes Given: 26
Re: Northern Hemisphere Winter 2019-2020 Snowcover / Misc Obs
« Reply #219 on: July 01, 2020, 12:31:46 PM »
My last post on this thread unless something really, really weird happens.

Eurasia - apart from scraps its all about the Tibetan Plateau & the Himalayas,

North America - it's just scraps. Of interest is the CAA, which other threads look at in greater detail. And with all that heat currently there, won't be much snow left.
"Para a Causa do Povo a Luta Continua!"
"And that's all I'm going to say about that". Forrest Gump
"Damn, I wanted to see what happened next" (Epitaph)

bbr2315

  • Frazil ice
  • Posts: 388
    • View Profile
  • Liked: 121
  • Likes Given: 61
Re: Northern Hemisphere Winter 2019-2020 Snowcover / Misc Obs
« Reply #220 on: July 11, 2020, 02:52:02 AM »
Hudson Bay down to a solitary blip of coverage but 87cm remains at the apex of Labrador:

« Last Edit: July 11, 2020, 11:29:07 AM by oren »

bbr2315

  • Frazil ice
  • Posts: 388
    • View Profile
  • Liked: 121
  • Likes Given: 61
Re: Northern Hemisphere Winter 2019-2020 Snowcover / Misc Obs
« Reply #221 on: July 14, 2020, 06:47:03 PM »
GFS has some snows into Alaska and other modeling looks like it may be supportive of a wintery intrusion as well.

I have to say that I suspect that as we see increasing +SWE during summertime coupled with dwindling extent, that when we see this anomalous blips of coverage, the albedo gradient vs the nearby open water is likely to contribute to enhanced baroclinic gradients and accompanying cyclonic activity.



These minor blips of coverage are certainly effective at reflecting W/M^2, as well!

bbr2315

  • Frazil ice
  • Posts: 388
    • View Profile
  • Liked: 121
  • Likes Given: 61
Re: Northern Hemisphere Winter 2019-2020 Snowcover / Misc Obs
« Reply #222 on: July 24, 2020, 07:45:31 PM »
Evidently some sensors are experiencing issues... bleep bloop, bleep bloop, lol


Comradez

  • New ice
  • Posts: 74
    • View Profile
  • Liked: 29
  • Likes Given: 0
Re: Northern Hemisphere Winter 2019-2020 Snowcover / Misc Obs
« Reply #223 on: August 03, 2020, 11:04:45 PM »
Looks like some fresh snow fell on Axel Heiberg Island in the CAA on August 3rd.  It's early enough that it may re-melt again before the freeze season.

Tealight

  • Frazil ice
  • Posts: 444
    • View Profile
    • CryosphereComputing
  • Liked: 145
  • Likes Given: 14
Re: Northern Hemisphere Winter 2019-2020 Snowcover / Misc Obs
« Reply #224 on: August 06, 2020, 12:39:46 AM »
Some time ago I posted regional snow extents, but the topic is kind of lost in the depth of the forum. After some minor improvements and adding two new regions in Asia I created a seperate webpage for the data. It makes it easier to analyse than several different forum posts.

On the snow-cover webpage, featuring snow maps I added the long term NOAA data since 1967. The low 200km resolution looks terrible compared to the new 24km, but the longer timespan is better to judge changes over time.

https://cryospherecomputing.tk/Snow-Cover
https://cryospherecomputing.tk/snow-regional

oren

  • Moderator
  • First-year ice
  • Posts: 6183
    • View Profile
  • Liked: 2244
  • Likes Given: 1879
Re: Northern Hemisphere Winter 2019-2020 Snowcover / Misc Obs
« Reply #225 on: August 06, 2020, 03:40:09 AM »
Thanks a lot Tealight. Amazing work, and great improvements. Added to bookmarks.

Is there a way in the "snow-cover" section to add data for the current year, and somehow compare with same-date cumulative data from years past? For example cumulative 2020 snow cover days map, side by side with a map from 2012 until the current date.

Here's a good chart showing Northern Canadian snow cover is actually disappearing earlier in spring, compared to past decades.

Tealight

  • Frazil ice
  • Posts: 444
    • View Profile
    • CryosphereComputing
  • Liked: 145
  • Likes Given: 14
Re: Northern Hemisphere Winter 2019-2020 Snowcover / Misc Obs
« Reply #226 on: August 07, 2020, 09:32:15 PM »
Is there a way in the "snow-cover" section to add data for the current year, and somehow compare with same-date cumulative data from years past? For example cumulative 2020 snow cover days map, side by side with a map from 2012 until the current date.

Sure it's possible, but are you satisfied with only 2012? What about 2016, 2019 or the long term mean? It's either significantly more calculation to be done per day or storage taken if you pre calculate every single day of previous years.

oren

  • Moderator
  • First-year ice
  • Posts: 6183
    • View Profile
  • Liked: 2244
  • Likes Given: 1879
Re: Northern Hemisphere Winter 2019-2020 Snowcover / Misc Obs
« Reply #227 on: August 07, 2020, 11:49:33 PM »
Good points of course, but I think a 'near real time" snow cover product will be quite useful. Maybe just add an anomaly map of current year cumulative up to to date cumulative, compared to the long term mean cumulative up to current date. Obviously I don't know much about the computing limitations, I just give the "user" perspective.

bbr2315

  • Frazil ice
  • Posts: 388
    • View Profile
  • Liked: 121
  • Likes Given: 61
Re: Northern Hemisphere Winter 2019-2020 Snowcover / Misc Obs
« Reply #228 on: August 15, 2020, 12:59:12 AM »
The post-solstice weather pattern shows that this year the snowfalls have been occurring more thoroughly through summertime across highest elevations, and the map is supported by the Canucks and EOSDIS. There are likely substantial areas at highest elevations in NE Eurasia, the Himalayas, and the NW Rockies that retained snowcover through summer 2020.


gerontocrat

  • First-year ice
  • Posts: 9085
    • View Profile
  • Liked: 3589
  • Likes Given: 26
Re: Northern Hemisphere Winter 2019-2020 Snowcover / Misc Obs
« Reply #229 on: August 17, 2020, 07:10:07 PM »
Time for a new thread?

Canada starts a new year from Aug 1. Mind you with AGW maybe summer lasts longer, at least at lower elevations.
"Para a Causa do Povo a Luta Continua!"
"And that's all I'm going to say about that". Forrest Gump
"Damn, I wanted to see what happened next" (Epitaph)

HapHazard

  • Frazil ice
  • Posts: 353
    • View Profile
  • Liked: 140
  • Likes Given: 2613
Re: Northern Hemisphere Winter 2019-2020 Snowcover / Misc Obs
« Reply #230 on: August 17, 2020, 08:19:46 PM »

Sebastian Jones

  • Frazil ice
  • Posts: 408
    • View Profile
  • Liked: 105
  • Likes Given: 93
Re: Northern Hemisphere Winter 2019-2020 Snowcover / Misc Obs
« Reply #231 on: August 18, 2020, 02:58:19 AM »
The post-solstice weather pattern shows that this year the snowfalls have been occurring more thoroughly through summertime across highest elevations, and the map is supported by the Canucks and EOSDIS. There are likely substantial areas at highest elevations in NE Eurasia, the Himalayas, and the NW Rockies that retained snowcover through summer 2020.
OTOH, it appears we dodged the impending glaciation centred in Labrador/Quebec again; all the snow there seems to have melted. Phew!

gerontocrat

  • First-year ice
  • Posts: 9085
    • View Profile
  • Liked: 3589
  • Likes Given: 26
Re: Northern Hemisphere Winter 2019-2020 Snowcover / Misc Obs
« Reply #232 on: August 22, 2020, 01:00:49 PM »
"Para a Causa do Povo a Luta Continua!"
"And that's all I'm going to say about that". Forrest Gump
"Damn, I wanted to see what happened next" (Epitaph)

oren

  • Moderator
  • First-year ice
  • Posts: 6183
    • View Profile
  • Liked: 2244
  • Likes Given: 1879
Re: Northern Hemisphere Winter 2019-2020 Snowcover / Misc Obs
« Reply #233 on: August 22, 2020, 01:15:18 PM »
Yeah, I guess time for a new thread.