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Paul

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Re: The 2019/2020 freezing season
« Reply #950 on: February 26, 2020, 11:48:40 PM »
I think it's far too early to really speculate what the melting season may hold, it's too easy to say we may head for a bad melt season just because Europe snowcover is below average. I believe the Eurasian snow cover is marginally above average so its apples and oranges as far as I'm concerned.

jdallen

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Re: The 2019/2020 freezing season
« Reply #951 on: February 27, 2020, 08:00:05 AM »
Another way of looking at it is to think about melt rate at the peak of the season.  The difference between 2012 and pretty much every year starting with 2016 is 7-10 days of peak melt.  That's the razor's edge we are on.

Interesting point. This year might be a good test with all the extras we get via the pandemic. There was already going to be a change in shipping emissions and that signal got extra strong with reduced shipping and there are lots of other knock on effects on the way.
I fear a single year's variation in emissions really won't seriously affect any given melt season.

There's already been far too much of an increase in total system enthalpy, and the whole climate is trying to shift to accommodate and re-balance itself with the already existing increase in greenhouse gasses.
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oren

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Re: The 2019/2020 freezing season
« Reply #952 on: February 27, 2020, 08:45:42 AM »
Emissions meant masking aerosols in this case, removal of which may lead to short-term warming.

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Re: The 2019/2020 freezing season
« Reply #953 on: February 27, 2020, 10:00:41 AM »
^^
Local short-term warming, so not directly affecting the Arctic I think.
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Re: The 2019/2020 freezing season
« Reply #954 on: February 27, 2020, 10:42:03 AM »
^^
Local short-term warming, so not directly affecting the Arctic I think.

Local China is turning into local Europe and local USA in the coming few months.
While I have no idea what the results will be, it could give us a lot of interesting information moving forward.

uniquorn

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Re: The 2019/2020 freezing season
« Reply #955 on: February 27, 2020, 01:15:55 PM »
https://go.nasa.gov/2w5JEzD, update on ice north of Greenland. Not looking too good despite the cold.
ascat, feb20-26

Pavel

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Re: The 2019/2020 freezing season
« Reply #956 on: February 27, 2020, 03:56:45 PM »
Very quick export in just a week. The Laptev sea looks vulnerable because it has lost its autumn ice and has lack of fast ice, combined with the late start of refreeze. If the Siberian snow will melt early the Laptev bite could be very strong this summer

Niall Dollard

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Re: The 2019/2020 freezing season
« Reply #957 on: February 28, 2020, 12:25:06 AM »
Agreed Pavel.

And I expect the Kara Sea will melt out quickly this year.

johnm33

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Re: The 2019/2020 freezing season
« Reply #958 on: February 29, 2020, 12:40:56 PM »
"ice north of Greenland" With persistent lows over Barents the tidally enhanced flow into the arctic would increase, some water has to leave, i guess the shear zone is quite shallow and everything above it is moving towards Fram, hence the unusual size of the area on the move. The more or less persistent high[mslp] on the Beaufort side would add to the impetus. It's hard to establish any current but once established a 'slime effect' come into play and until some other random event disturbs the flow it'll persist. If Wayne at eh2r is right we may be stuck with this weather pattern for some time, so the loss of ice may begin to define the season.
« Last Edit: February 29, 2020, 05:33:54 PM by johnm33 »

VeliAlbertKallio

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Re: The 2019/2020 freezing season
« Reply #959 on: February 29, 2020, 01:29:18 PM »
I suspect that the Laxton Sea will materialize this year. The late University College London Professor late Seymour Laxton's seminal forecast of summer 2020 being the first year when the Arctic Ocean becomes ice free 'blue ocean' in summer time

The Laxton Sea (Blue Ocean Event) sits roughly in the mid-point of the early millennium 'early-bird forecasters for fast North Pole sea ice loss' against the forecasts of the IPCC and the Arctic Council.

Even as late as February 2007, the Arctic Council's "Arctic Impact Report" proposed the Arctic Ocean becoming ice free as late as year 2150 (which of course flied into face of FIPC's campaign of imminent event at the time).

Arctic Council produced two stage graphs with purpose to show two interim stages to the ice-free ocean. One of these suggested ice area for around 2040-2060 period, and another for 2070-2100 period. Only four to five months later (July-August 2007) the sea ice area loss approached this 2040-2060 graph with the Arctic Council abandoning its report. I got called to present FIPC point of view at RSE VII Symposium: Arctic - Mirror of Life where I was sitting on a press panel with Robert W Correll  (Arctic Council's lead author), Jane Lubchenko (then-to-be NOAA head), and Terry Callaghan http://www.rsesymposia.org/hbmore.php?catid=164&pcatid=162&thehbid=27

FIPC (Frozen Isthmuses' Protection Campaign of the Arctic and North Atlantic Ocean, and myself) based our extrapolation of the rapid sea ice area shrinking on summers 2005, 2006 & 2007 which was a linear extrapolation to hit (at that given rate) to zero around 2010 - only if sea ice area reduction had continued shrinking on that 3-year decline rate, perhaps slightly accelerating). This was, of course, not looking at thickness and other complex issues which have become obvious.

Peter Wadham of Head of the Polar Ocean Physics Group in the Department of Applied Mathematics and Theoretical Physics, University of Cambridge was perhaps the first person to raise concern for the shrinking ice body in the Arctic Ocean having observed a considerable thinning for years before the issue became visible on sea ice's spatial extent and stability. Already in 1990's Peter Wadhams appeared in the British newspapers pointing to considerable thinning in submarine upward sonar measurements taken throughout the Cold War as part of war games with the then USSR and then Russia. Peter Wadham's first ice free Arctic Ocean was forecast slightly later to FIPC date 2010, suggesting the summer 2012 in the forecast made towards the end of the first decade of the third millennium. (This made the full front page news on The First News newspaper at the time and appeared reported less prominently in other papers at the time in the UK.)

Wiesław Masłowski of Naval Postgraduate School in Monterey, California was third early bird at the time also suggesting early sea ice loss against the conventional views of the time. Though I do not have the exact dates for him, perhaps because his influence is in the US regions.

So, how the Laxton Sea materialises now? Perhaps, with the fringes melting really fast, followed by unstable and migratory Central Arctic ice pack that is increasingly tossed around and smashed by waves and weakened by warm temperatures. It is, of course, far too much said that persistent wind patterns, jet streams, and movement of depression systems and flow of warm air pan out.

My main concern for the Laxton Sea this summer would be its impact on north Greenland Ice Sheet and build up of water in moulins and crevasses and destabilzation of land ice post sea ice:
https://www.academia.edu/37157851/Our_Changing_Climate_in_Action_the_Risk_of_Global_Warming_and_the_Environmental_Damage_from_the_Rising_Ocean_Water_Table_Sustainable_Seas_Enquiry_Written_evidence_submitted_by_Veli_Albert_Kallio_FRGS_SSI0121_Ordered_to_be_published_23_May_2018_by_the_House_of_Commons

IPCC's very first date for the ice-free Arctic Ocean remains year 2030 (hence my statement of the Laxton Sea sitting on the mid-point of early birds 2010 and laggards earliest point at 2030).

"ice north of Greenland" With persistent lows over Barents the tidally enhanced flow into the arctic would increase, some water has to leave, i guess the shear zone is quite shallow and everthing above it is moving towards Fram, hence the unusual size of the area on the move. The more or less persistent high[mslp] on the Beaufort side would add to the impetus. It's hard to establish any current but once established a 'slime effect' come into play and until some other random event disturbs the flow it'll persist. If Wayne at eh2r is right we may be stuck with this weather pattern for some time, so the loss of ice may begin to define the season.
« Last Edit: February 29, 2020, 01:41:01 PM by VeliAlbertKallio »
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The Walrus

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Re: The 2019/2020 freezing season
« Reply #960 on: February 29, 2020, 03:02:16 PM »
I would say that the early birds are those predicting an ice-free Arctic prior to 2030, and the laggards much later in the century.  Mid-century seems to be more average.

https://www.scientificamerican.com/article/when-will-all-the-ice-in-the-arctic-be-gone/

Jim Hunt

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Re: The 2019/2020 freezing season
« Reply #961 on: February 29, 2020, 03:32:33 PM »
I would say that the early birds are those predicting an ice-free Arctic prior to 2030

I surreptitiously recorded that question being posed at The Economist's 2013 Arctic Summit in Oslo. Of course the assorted learned speakers might have revised their opinions since then? However have a listen:

https://soundcloud.com/water-connects-us/ice-free-summer-arctic-numbers
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The Walrus

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Re: The 2019/2020 freezing season
« Reply #962 on: February 29, 2020, 04:24:14 PM »
I would say that the early birds are those predicting an ice-free Arctic prior to 2030

I surreptitiously recorded that question being posed at The Economist's 2013 Arctic Summit in Oslo. Of course the assorted learned speakers might have revised their opinions since then? However have a listen:

https://soundcloud.com/water-connects-us/ice-free-summer-arctic-numbers

Yes, that was after the infamous 2012 Arctic melt.  I suspect that the learned have revised their opinions since - especially the prediction of 2014. 

Jim Hunt

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Re: The 2019/2020 freezing season
« Reply #963 on: February 29, 2020, 07:12:22 PM »
Last week ARCUS held a webinar on my favourite topic. “Ocean Waves in the New Arctic”, presented by Jim Thomson from the University of Washington.

A slightly less technical video featuring Jim Thomson and some big waves in the New Arctic:

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VeliAlbertKallio

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Re: The 2019/2020 freezing season
« Reply #964 on: March 01, 2020, 02:21:27 AM »
Passing the February leap day, we have now arrived to the start of the spring quarter, which means that the spring equinox is now only three weeks away - bringing the sun out of hiding on the North Pole, visible light images on the Arctic Ocean improving.  8)
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Aluminium

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Re: The 2019/2020 freezing season
« Reply #965 on: March 01, 2020, 11:08:07 AM »
November 12 - February 29 (fast).

Niall Dollard

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Re: The 2019/2020 freezing season
« Reply #966 on: March 01, 2020, 11:29:00 AM »
Thanks Aluminium.

The state of the Russian side now, Kara to Laptev, is worrying.

blumenkraft

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Re: The 2019/2020 freezing season
« Reply #967 on: March 01, 2020, 06:10:41 PM »
Yep, the Russian side developing big holes.

Sunday to Saturday ice drift map.
« Last Edit: March 01, 2020, 06:16:07 PM by blumenkraft »
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blumenkraft

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Re: The 2019/2020 freezing season
« Reply #968 on: March 01, 2020, 06:12:27 PM »
7-day hindcast temperature anomalies, Sunday to Sunday

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blumenkraft

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Re: The 2019/2020 freezing season
« Reply #969 on: March 01, 2020, 06:13:39 PM »
Fram export via SAR. Sunday to Sunday.
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Stephan

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Re: The 2019/2020 freezing season
« Reply #970 on: March 01, 2020, 07:04:20 PM »
Oops...
It is too late just to be concerned about Climate Change

philopek

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Re: The 2019/2020 freezing season
« Reply #971 on: March 01, 2020, 08:54:38 PM »
Not too long ago there was a discussion about the effect of lower albedo at this time of the year about 60N.

If you look at the attached image you shall see that the sun at Utquiagvik already now, from about 10:00 A.M. way farther north than that, it's around 70° N, has a significant effect as soon as only the slightest spot without snow is there to absorb the energy. Even that it's grey on top an the black part was snow covered as still is the part that does not get sunlight after 10:00 A.M. or is behind the construction that hosts the camera.

It's about what i tried to say back then. Where i grew up in the alps, even in January and almost 2000m above sea-level, once the wind blew the snow from the rocks, the snow melted in overdrive all around that snow-free location.

jdallen

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Re: The 2019/2020 freezing season
« Reply #972 on: March 02, 2020, 09:13:13 AM »
Oops...
That's Good News, actually.

Unfortunately, it's offset by the unusually high temperatures over Eurasia.

There's also a lot of snow cover missing, in particular over Europe. 

Like others, I'm also concerned about what's happening in the Kara, and to a lesser extent, the Barents, as well as export of MYI out of the Fram.

To make me happy, I'd like to see those DMI temps 10C *below* normal.

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El Cid

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Re: The 2019/2020 freezing season
« Reply #973 on: March 02, 2020, 09:45:38 AM »
I took a look at Bremen, picture attached for 20200301. I looked at the previous years. Never have we ever had so much "red" and "yellow" in the Kara-Laptev region. The ice there is likely very fractured and thin and will go poof extremely quickly come May...I attach 2016/03/01 for comparison

SimonF92

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Re: The 2019/2020 freezing season
« Reply #974 on: March 02, 2020, 10:54:46 AM »
I wrote a script that mines MASIES's data.

It takes the current area for each region and compares the area on today's date versus the decade mean for that date.

It also calculates the rate and direction of change in each area (growth or decline), by calculating the change between present day and 10-days ago.

 df2['ROC'][df2["Rate"] > 0.05] = 'Strong Growth'
    df2['ROC'][(df2['Rate'] > 0) & (df2['Rate'] < 0.05)] = 'Growth'
    df2['ROC'][df2['Rate'] == 0] = "Stable"
    df2['ROC'][(df2['Rate'] < 0) & (df2['Rate'] > -0.05)]= "Decline"
    df2['ROC'][df2['Rate'] < -0.05] = "Strong Decline"

Its supposed to be a summary of the regional data found here;

https://sites.google.com/site/arcticseaicegraphs/regional

Heres the script, would be happy to take comments.

https://github.com/SimonF92/Arctic/blob/master/Arctic_Regions_Decadal.py

Check out our home-grown ASIF MOSAiC website @ www.mosaic-ice.com:8501

Freegrass

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Re: The 2019/2020 freezing season
« Reply #975 on: March 02, 2020, 11:26:30 AM »
We just had the numbers in on our Belgian winter, and it was the third warmest on record, after 2007 and 2016. Is that sign of things to come this summer in the arctic? I still have plants that can't survive a -1°C temperature, and they're still flowering right now. So not even at night did it freeze in my garden, in the city of Antwerp. CRAZY!

My apologies for the Flemish, but there's no english translation for this article.

Quote
De voorbije weerkundige winter (december, januari en februari) had een algemene gemiddelde temperatuur van ongeveer 6,3 graden. Na 2007 en 2016 wordt het daarmee de op twee na warmste winter in bijna twee eeuwen, sinds het begin van de waarnemingen in Ukkel in 1833. In 2007 bedroeg de gemiddelde temperatuur 6,6 graden Celsius, 3 graden boven de normaalwaarde.

https://www.vrt.be/vrtnws/nl/2020/02/25/de-winters-in-belgie/
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binntho

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Re: The 2019/2020 freezing season
« Reply #976 on: March 02, 2020, 12:13:11 PM »
Brilliant!
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F.Tnioli

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Re: The 2019/2020 freezing season
« Reply #977 on: March 02, 2020, 12:16:26 PM »
...
I think to put it in context Hefaistos, you need to think not necessarily about what's happening now, but where conditions will be in 3-4 weeks.

What is happening is setup, much like how much running room you have leading up to a broad jump.  By losing snow this early, and picking up what are modest but still significant amounts of solar energy means that considerably more energy will
(1) ... be captured directly at Arctic latitudes
(2) ... be available early in the melt season
(3) ... not be required for/buffered by local phase change (e.g. melting snow locally)
(4) ... indirectly permit more transport of heat to the Arctic from lower latitudes. (primarily via
          increased moisture)
...

That's why lots of bare ground at high latitudes is concerning, even before the equinox.
Right. I can also add (5) to the list: less snow cover "buffer" to resist melting season start.

By this, i mean that when some place say south of Finland has 0 cm snow cover or say 10 cm snow cover - while the average for the place is say 1 meter of snow cover, by March 1st, - then very little to zero heat is needed to have the place's surface to start absorbing sunlight as soon as the Sun starts to put any substantial amount of it in. When such a place is say few millions km2, this will warm up cyclone-scaled air masses in a matter of couple weeks or so; while normally, they'd remain on top of (slowly melting, but still largely white) snow-covered land. Means most outcoming radiation is simply reflected, i.e. short-wave; while in this "new normal", lots of outcoming radiation is long-wave (infra-red), thus greenhouse gases further add in even more heat to the air.

There certainly are some situations in Arctic and next to it when further increase of temperatures is slowed / halted by some strong negative feedbacks, but "little / no snow late winter and early spring" is one opposite case; positive feedbacks seem to strongly prevail.
To everyone: before posting in a melting season topic, please be sure to know contents of this moderator's post: https://forum.arctic-sea-ice.net/index.php/topic,3017.msg261893.html#msg261893 . Thanks!

jdallen

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Re: The 2019/2020 freezing season
« Reply #978 on: March 02, 2020, 10:51:24 PM »
...
I think to put it in context Hefaistos, you need to think not necessarily about what's happening now, but where conditions will be in 3-4 weeks.
<snip>
Right. I can also add (5) to the list: less snow cover "buffer" to resist melting season start.
<snip>
There certainly are some situations in Arctic and next to it when further increase of temperatures is slowed / halted by some strong negative feedbacks, but "little / no snow late winter and early spring" is one opposite case; positive feedbacks seem to strongly prevail.

Agree.  In essence, we are shortening the "fuse", as well as increasing the size of the "charge" it is setting off.
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Re: The 2019/2020 freezing season
« Reply #979 on: March 02, 2020, 11:55:41 PM »
I took a look at Bremen, picture attached for 20200301. I looked at the previous years. Never have we ever had so much "red" and "yellow" in the Kara-Laptev region. The ice there is likely very fractured and thin and will go poof extremely quickly come May...

From a preservation of sea ice in the Arctic Basin point of view, I would much prefer to have thicker/more extensive ice in the Kara/Laptev than in the Bering. This is not good at all. 
 

Paul

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Re: The 2019/2020 freezing season
« Reply #980 on: March 03, 2020, 01:12:12 AM »
I took a look at Bremen, picture attached for 20200301. I looked at the previous years. Never have we ever had so much "red" and "yellow" in the Kara-Laptev region. The ice there is likely very fractured and thin and will go poof extremely quickly come May...

From a preservation of sea ice in the Arctic Basin point of view, I would much prefer to have thicker/more extensive ice in the Kara/Laptev than in the Bering. This is not good at all.

Apart from during most of February the Kara sea has been cold this winter so the ice should be thicker than some years. The concentration of the ice does not fully reflect on how thick it is, it might just be highly fractured because of the recent weather where it has been stormy with strong southerly windsbso no doubt some compaction going on aswell somewhat.

I don't think the ice around the Kara plays a huge part as it melts out anyways and sometimes the ice around Novaya zemlya gets seperated from the main pack like it did in 2018.

ReverendMilkbone

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Re: The 2019/2020 freezing season
« Reply #981 on: March 03, 2020, 05:08:22 AM »

[/quote]

Apart from during most of February the Kara sea has been cold this winter so the ice should be thicker than some years. The concentration of the ice does not fully reflect on how thick it is, it might just be highly fractured because of the recent weather where it has been stormy with strong southerly windsbso no doubt some compaction going on aswell somewhat.

I don't think the ice around the Kara plays a huge part as it melts out anyways and sometimes the ice around Novaya zemlya gets seperated from the main pack like it did in 2018.
[/quote]

IDK...looks like a slushy mess to me...

Pavel

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Re: The 2019/2020 freezing season
« Reply #982 on: March 03, 2020, 08:02:17 AM »
We have 0.5 mln sq km of additional sea ice extent but also 4 mln sq km of the gray land where we expect to have the white snow this time of year. It's spring now and albedo is important

Paul

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Re: The 2019/2020 freezing season
« Reply #983 on: March 03, 2020, 01:32:34 PM »


Apart from during most of February the Kara sea has been cold this winter so the ice should be thicker than some years. The concentration of the ice does not fully reflect on how thick it is, it might just be highly fractured because of the recent weather where it has been stormy with strong southerly windsbso no doubt some compaction going on aswell somewhat.

I don't think the ice around the Kara plays a huge part as it melts out anyways and sometimes the ice around Novaya zemlya gets seperated from the main pack like it did in 2018.
[/quote]

IDK...looks like a slushy mess to me...
[/quote]

If/when the winds change direction and pushes the ice back towards the landmasses then the ice will look less thin and concentration will rise again. 

2017 had quite a retreat in the Kara sea during March but the cold weather returned and ice declined less quickly than in years like 2012 where the ice struggled to form all winter that year.

Freegrass

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Re: The 2019/2020 freezing season
« Reply #984 on: March 03, 2020, 04:48:08 PM »
I'm curious... When you have the ice pack cracked up and smashed together like it is now, don't a lot of the ice slabs stick out deep underneath the ice pack? And would that cause that ice to melt out quickly with bottom melt?
« Last Edit: March 03, 2020, 05:58:40 PM by Freegrass »
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Pavel

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Re: The 2019/2020 freezing season
« Reply #985 on: March 04, 2020, 09:12:33 PM »
It's cold north of 80 latitude but warmer than average in the lower latitudes. Not a good pattern for the sea ice because the Fram export is high and the thick ice will leave anyway but the land snow is starting to melt more quickly

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Re: The 2019/2020 freezing season
« Reply #986 on: March 04, 2020, 11:53:15 PM »
I'm curious... When you have the ice pack cracked up and smashed together like it is now, don't a lot of the ice slabs stick out deep underneath the ice pack? And would that cause that ice to melt out quickly with bottom melt?

Not certain if this is a full answer to your question FG, but have a read of this snippet taken from a recent blog from the MOSAiC page :

According to the sea-ice expert, “Over the past few months, we’ve been able to observe winter at the North Pole more consistently and precisely than ever before. The ice thickness has doubled to an average of 160 centimetres since December, which corresponds to a growth rate of roughly ten centimetres per week.”

In addition, with the aid of helicopter laser-scanner readings, Polarstern’s radar system, and buoys, the researchers were able to observe how the ice deformed, and channels opened and closed again. Thanks to the warming of the Arctic Ocean, smaller and thinner ice floes are becoming more common. Driven by the wind, they can collide and overlap, producing pack ice hummocks up to four metres tall. Since a great deal of their mass lies underwater, some hummocks are 20 to 30 metres thick – a phenomenon that now represents a challenge for the resupply icebreakers.

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Re: The 2019/2020 freezing season
« Reply #987 on: March 05, 2020, 08:36:28 AM »
It's cold north of 80 latitude but warmer than average in the lower latitudes. Not a good pattern for the sea ice because the Fram export is high and the thick ice will leave anyway but the land snow is starting to melt more quickly
I think that's the farthest below normal the 80N DMI graph has been in nearly 5 years.
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Re: The 2019/2020 freezing season
« Reply #988 on: March 05, 2020, 05:44:08 PM »
Since a great deal of their mass lies underwater, some hummocks are 20 to 30 metres thick
Wow! That's like little icebergs, something we discussed here last summer.
I think it's reasonable to assume that this deep ice will melt out more quickly with bottom melt? Stacked Ice also will leave spots with fewer ice, that'll melt out faster, creating open water.

Ice + storm = not good...

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Re: The 2019/2020 freezing season
« Reply #989 on: March 06, 2020, 11:14:57 PM »
A strong 963 hPa cyclone is going to set up in several days. Huge polynyas could be open in the Laptev sea and ESS

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Re: The 2019/2020 freezing season
« Reply #990 on: March 07, 2020, 02:14:53 AM »
A strong 963 hPa cyclone is going to set up in several days. Huge polynyas could be open in the Laptev sea and ESS
The ice is getting banged up at the frontend of what will probably become a serious melt season. Not looking good for the ice this year!

What's going on in the ESS? The ice is already seriously banged up there, and there seems to be a river of ice flowing all the way to the Bering strait. (I know it only seems that way)

https://go.nasa.gov/2PS7CFw
« Last Edit: March 07, 2020, 02:28:26 AM by Freegrass »
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Re: The 2019/2020 freezing season
« Reply #991 on: March 08, 2020, 07:29:53 AM »
One more day and I think we should start the melting season thread

It's not your call, Wherestheice!

You are contributing absolutely nothing of substance!

You are only cluttering the data thread every now and then even though you are asked not to do this!

Leave the data thread to the ones who actually contribute something!!!

It has taken a lot of time and energy, successes and failures to build a library of spreadsheets and data sources. So it is a bit annoying to think people have to wade through a load of clutter to reach the data.

This is a data thread. So, please please please bring data or a new way of looking at the data (when discussion is great).
If not, bugger off.
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Re: The 2019/2020 freezing season
« Reply #992 on: March 08, 2020, 09:10:23 AM »
Couldn't agree more, BK.

I think there is a better than 50/50 chance we have seen the maximum. That's my take.

Anyone dare to disagree?  8)

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Re: The 2019/2020 freezing season
« Reply #993 on: March 08, 2020, 09:19:24 AM »
Thanks, HapHazard.
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Re: The 2019/2020 freezing season
« Reply #994 on: March 08, 2020, 02:05:54 PM »
I must also apologise for cluttering the data thread. I'm new here, so I did not realise that casual discussion was inappropriate.

Out of interest, is there a place where casual discussion about sea ice area and extent data is appropriate? Is it here or somewhere else?
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Re: The 2019/2020 freezing season
« Reply #995 on: March 08, 2020, 02:14:35 PM »
Thanks for your understanding, PA!

This is the right thread. And soon it's the 20/21 melting season thread.

If you want to comment on something specific from the data thread, hit the quote button there, copy the text out of the text field, and then come here (or the melting season thread) and paste it.
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Re: The 2019/2020 freezing season
« Reply #996 on: March 08, 2020, 03:19:50 PM »
Early spring in Eurasia. Snow cover will retreat fast according to the forecast. Later, lack of snow may accelerate the melting season but winter may strike back.

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Re: The 2019/2020 freezing season
« Reply #997 on: March 08, 2020, 03:45:08 PM »
Your weekly updates. Ice drift map first for a change.

CAA is remarkably static. The low winter temperatures in this area are showing.

Polarstern continues its drift towards Fram after a day with handbrakes on.
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Re: The 2019/2020 freezing season
« Reply #998 on: March 08, 2020, 03:46:05 PM »
7-day mean temperature anomalies.
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Re: The 2019/2020 freezing season
« Reply #999 on: March 08, 2020, 03:46:48 PM »
Fram export via SAR.
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