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Author Topic: Fram Export  (Read 20352 times)

Glen Koehler

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Re: Fram Export
« Reply #50 on: June 11, 2019, 04:28:26 PM »
Thanks Oren, exactly what I was looking for.  I had seen that before just couldn't remember where.
johnm33 - ice only.  Just trying see how much export is contributing to "melt" season relative to other years.

Pragma

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Re: Fram Export
« Reply #51 on: June 12, 2019, 01:11:20 AM »
Here is a link to the latest graph.

https://forum.arctic-sea-ice.net/index.php/topic,119.msg203472.html#msg203472

Thanks, but I would like to see something that integrates the flow over a week or month. I found a number of sites that only list export for the winter months and was shocked to find that the winter export is on par, or a little larger than the melt season. Unfortunately what I found only went to 2010.

Any other suggestions most welcome.

Sterks

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Re: Fram Export
« Reply #52 on: June 12, 2019, 01:32:47 AM »
But that’s normal. Export weakens during (most of the) summers with a few exceptions. There is a graph from a paper in this thread that illustrates this well.

https://forum.arctic-sea-ice.net/index.php/topic,298.msg113817.html#msg113817
« Last Edit: June 12, 2019, 01:37:59 AM by Sterks »

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Re: Fram Export
« Reply #53 on: April 23, 2020, 01:12:28 PM »
Its still there.

sedziobs

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Re: Fram Export
« Reply #54 on: July 15, 2020, 05:38:52 PM »
Uniquorn posted a wonderful ASCAT animation of the 2019/2020 freezing season. Below is my attempt to delineate areas of export since the September 2019 minimum by tracking features.

Red exits the Fram, blue into the Barents Sea, yellow into Nares Strait, and green into McClure Strait. It wasn't a very active season for Nares or the garlic press.

For me the takeaway is that melt in the Pacific and American sectors is much more consequential for multi-year ice than how far the ice edge retreats on the Atlantic or Laptev fronts.

FishOutofWater

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Re: Fram Export
« Reply #55 on: July 15, 2020, 09:03:26 PM »
You are quite correct that the Beaufort gyre was once the place that thick multiyear ice went round and round, with a modest fraction lost via export through the Fram and Nares straits. The accumulation of heat in the Beaufort and Chukchi seas turned that region into an ice killing zone, melting most of the multiyear ice in the Arctic ocean.

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Re: Fram Export
« Reply #56 on: July 16, 2020, 04:28:27 AM »
Proximity to Greenland and northern CAA seems to be most important for long term ice survival. To a lesser degree proximity to the the north pole helps as well. In recent years and especially this year melt has increased along that coast. Originally four year or older ice was considered multiyear ice.


Now I don't think there is enough ice that old to really talk about multiyear ice.


 Peak ice extent for 4 year old ice last year was in Oct at 132,000 km^2 (1.5% of total ice extent) with an average over the last 20 years of about 2.4 million.
Minimum ice in Sep was 53,000 km^2 (1.3% of total ice extent) with a 20 year average of about 2.4 million.   

sedziobs

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Re: Fram Export
« Reply #57 on: July 16, 2020, 08:09:55 PM »
Right, significant 4+ yr old MYI is a thing of the past. I was more referring to claims of one melting season "setting up" the next one. Extensive melt at the pole, a deep Laptev bite, or an advancing Atlantic front will have limited effects on future seasons compared to events on the Pacific and American sides.

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Re: Fram Export
« Reply #58 on: August 05, 2020, 02:05:51 AM »
This buoy data is old I wish they had an update. I found it poking around in the Hycom website. I also wish I had the same for Bering strait. This is sea water export at 1320 meters below the surface not ice on the surface.