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Author Topic: Bering Strait  (Read 756 times)

Freegrass

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Bering Strait
« on: January 20, 2020, 04:50:41 PM »
The changes in the strength and salinity of the bering strait current play a important role in Arctic changes, so I was surprised to see that the Bering Strait didn't have it's own thread here yet.

I believe that the increase in the strength of the bering strait current has to do with a slowdown of the AMOC. Maybe we can start off the discussion with these two papers?

Relations between salinity in the northwestern Bering Sea, the Bering Strait throughflow and sea surface height in the Arctic Ocean
https://link.springer.com/article/10.1007/s10872-017-0453-x


Increases in the Pacific inflow to the Arctic from 1990 to 2015, and insights into seasonal trends and driving mechanisms from year-round Bering Strait mooring data.
http://psc.apl.washington.edu/HLD/Bstrait/BeringStraitSeasonalInterannualChange2017.html

Year-round in situ Bering Strait mooring data (1990-2015) document a long-term increase (~0.01Sv/yr whole record, ~0.02Sv since 2000) in the annual mean transport of Pacific waters into the Arctic.  Between 2002 and present (2015), all annual mean transports (except 2005 and 2012) are greater than the previously accepted climatology (~0.8Sv).
« Last Edit: January 20, 2020, 05:45:30 PM by Freegrass »
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Bruce Steele

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Re: Bering Strait
« Reply #1 on: June 22, 2020, 08:14:45 PM »
Freegrass, There are no buoy arrays currently monitoring Bering inflow rates so you have to read as much as you can by Rebecca Woodgate . She authored a number of papers about a buoy array no longer being maintained.
 She has a 2018 paper on causes of variability in flow rates . “ Most notably, however, we find the increase in the Bering Strait throughflow is due to a strong increase in the pressure-head forcing of the flow, consistent through most of the year, reflecting the naturally longer timescales of the far-field forcing of the flow. ”



  http://psc.apl.washington.edu/HLD/Bstrait/BeringStraitSeasonalInterannualChange2017.html

Here is another older link that includes Chukchi circulation 101



http://psc.apl.washington.edu/HLD/Chukchi/Chukchi.html


I didn’t think I wanted to post on the melting season .  Just read Woodgate .




« Last Edit: June 24, 2020, 01:34:18 AM by Bruce Steele »

Sebastian Jones

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Re: Bering Strait
« Reply #2 on: June 23, 2020, 09:08:10 PM »
For an entertaining series of posts regarding the Bering Strait, I might suggest TM Mallard and his thread on damming the straits in order to refreeze the Arctic Ocean, raise global albedo and arrest global warming:
https://forum.arctic-sea-ice.net/index.php/topic,1545.0.html

Freegrass

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Re: Bering Strait
« Reply #3 on: June 23, 2020, 10:01:32 PM »
No buoys monitoring the Bering Strait? How is that possible at such an important strait? I guess it would be difficult to place buoys there with all that ice passing through, but surely it would be possible to place some on the seafloor?

I'll check out Rebecca Woodgate. Thanks for that!

The one article I found was given to me by someone on this forum, and I posted here. It showed an increase of the inflow. That's why I became convinced that a slowdown of the AMOC must be increasing the inflow through the Bering Strait, but I lack way to much knowledge to figure that out myself. I keep hoping I can convince someone else of my theory, but nobody seems to want to bite.  :'(

What do you think? Does my theory make sense?
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Bruce Steele

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Re: Bering Strait
« Reply #4 on: June 24, 2020, 01:57:03 AM »
Freegrass, I went back and added a quote from the Woodgate 2017 paper . So a difference in sea height between the Atlantic and the North Pacific seems to be the reason for the increased inflow or would explain it.
 I don’t have enough knowledge to speculate why.
 

Freegrass

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Re: Bering Strait
« Reply #5 on: June 24, 2020, 03:14:23 AM »
I think it's logical to assume that when the inflow from the AMOC goes down by 15%, that the water level must go down as well. But that's just my reasoning. I have absolutely no prove for that speculation.

I do think it's an important development for the Arctic Ocean that needs attention. If the inflow through the Bering strait does indeed increase, that would mean that increasingly hotter water from the Pacific can melt more ice. And that would be a bad development...

My solution would be to drop a lot of rocks into the Bering Strait to reduce the flow...
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oren

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Re: Bering Strait
« Reply #6 on: June 24, 2020, 08:06:48 AM »
FG don't fall into the trap of simplistic models. The Arctic water balance is made up of many currents and not just AMOC + Bering. In addition there's evaporation, precipitation, river discharge, wind driven water+ice movement, general SLR and more.
Besides, is the Bering flow indeed increasing? Is the AMOC indeed decreasing? Without a chain of tethered buoys all around the Arctic, that is hard to quantify and prove.
Note damming the Bering Strait belongs in the other thread mentioned above.