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Aluminium

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Re: The 2020 melting season
« Reply #650 on: May 08, 2020, 09:07:05 AM »
May 2-7.

2019.

Jim Hunt

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Re: The 2020 melting season
« Reply #651 on: May 08, 2020, 11:41:33 AM »
For the benefit of any lurkers....

here's the latest CryoSat-2/SMOS "measured" volume:

http://GreatWhiteCon.info/2020/05/facts-about-the-arctic-in-may-2020/

The graph stops in mid April, since melt ponds confuse the sensors
Reality is merely an illusion, albeit a very persistent one - Albert Einstein

Jim Hunt

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Re: The 2020 melting season
« Reply #652 on: May 08, 2020, 11:44:20 AM »
Fish out of water, Good to see you back for the melt season.

Hear, hear!
Reality is merely an illusion, albeit a very persistent one - Albert Einstein

Freegrass

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Re: The 2020 melting season
« Reply #653 on: May 08, 2020, 01:48:33 PM »
Five Day Forecast
Wind + Temp @ Surface

My apologies to the people with low bandwidth, but this weather event is too big to ignore. There's a lot of ice that's gonna go down the drain in the coming week...
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Burnrate

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Re: The 2020 melting season
« Reply #654 on: May 08, 2020, 04:33:57 PM »
Five Day Forecast
Wind + Temp @ Surface

My apologies to the people with low bandwidth, but this weather event is too big to ignore. There's a lot of ice that's gonna go down the drain in the coming week...

Are you talking about the big warm cyclone coming off of Norway on the 12th?  The strong consistent southerly wind in the Fram Strait?  Or am I totally missing the point?

Freegrass

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Re: The 2020 melting season
« Reply #655 on: May 08, 2020, 04:45:56 PM »
Five Day Forecast
Wind + Temp @ Surface

My apologies to the people with low bandwidth, but this weather event is too big to ignore. There's a lot of ice that's gonna go down the drain in the coming week...

Are you talking about the big warm cyclone coming off of Norway on the 12th?  The strong consistent southerly wind in the Fram Strait?  Or am I totally missing the point?
There's a lot going on in the Arctic right now. You have the high pressure system bringing in heat on the pacific side that will spread over the CAB, and you've got strong winds blowing ice out of the Fram and towards the Barents sea.

I'll post another wind update on the Nullschool Forecast thread later. It's really crazy the winds that are predicted.
If every 8 year old in the world is taught meditation, we will eliminate violence from the world within one generation.
-The Dalai Lama

Did you know that Jesus was thought to be the reincarnation of a Buddhist monk?
Where do you think the three wise men came from?
They came from the east! ;)

Burnrate

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Re: The 2020 melting season
« Reply #656 on: May 08, 2020, 04:54:05 PM »
....

It's really crazy the winds that are predicted.

It does seem pretty volatile.  Can anyone comment on how this compares to previous years?  I'm no expert and don't post much but have been reading the blog for almost ten years :).

I've read about how the reduction in aerosols is supposed to create much more dynamic weather in the arctic in the short term.  It will be interesting to see how well we can link that reduction to increased temps/precipitation/storms this season.

This season is going to be a nail biter.

F.Tnioli

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Re: The 2020 melting season
« Reply #657 on: May 08, 2020, 04:54:31 PM »
here's the latest CryoSat-2/SMOS "measured" volume:

http://GreatWhiteCon.info/2020/05/facts-about-the-arctic-in-may-2020/

The graph stops in mid April, since melt ponds confuse the sensors
The figure's interesting to see alright, thanks for sharing! But here's one side note about it.

What melt ponds? Like was said above in the topic, there are no significant melt ponds in April in Arctic. Or were there? So, it sure looks like someone's lying: either those who said "no meltponds there", or whomever said "after mid-April melt ponds confused the sensors". Simple, right?

My guts say, it ain't melt ponds. DMI shows major volume drop in volume exactly in 2nd half of April. "Coincedence"? Hardly. And may i remind us all that DMI volume is "based on calculations using DMI's operational ocean and sea ice model HYCOM-CICE". Models don't get confused by melt ponds, eh. But people who see sensors showing volume going down when it shouldn't be going down even half as much - they have a reason to worry whether sensors are malfunctioning (or something gone wrong between sensors and actual collected data), and thus just make up an excuse and stop sharing data. Since they could be affraid at the time that collected data could be significantly wrong due to some technical malfunction or somesuch.

P.S. By the way, as of today DMI volume starts to dip down again. Already. Maybe CryoSat-2 now sees things which are way too wild to publish and the actual reason is not mainly about "melt ponds confuses sensors"? Confusions like this can sure happen aplenty when unexpected occurs. Please, let us try to find even more ways to estimate what's going on, gentlemen. It'd help.
To everyone: before posting in a melting season topic, please be sure to know contents of this moderator's post: https://forum.arctic-sea-ice.net/index.php/topic,3017.msg261893.html#msg261893 . Thanks!

oren

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Re: The 2020 melting season
« Reply #658 on: May 08, 2020, 05:08:43 PM »
F. Tnioli, a gentle warning: I will not tolerate hints of lies, conspiracies and the like on this thread. There is a perfectly good explanation, and lying by ice scientists is not it.
In addition, I've requested that DMI volume discussions take place in the appropriate thread.

F.Tnioli

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Re: The 2020 melting season
« Reply #659 on: May 08, 2020, 05:53:27 PM »
F. Tnioli, a gentle warning: I will not tolerate hints of lies, conspiracies and the like on this thread. There is a perfectly good explanation, and lying by ice scientists is not it.
In addition, I've requested that DMI volume discussions take place in the appropriate thread.
Will you tolerate this thread saying "there are no melt ponds in April" and also saying "no data from CryoSat-2 for 2nd half of April because meltponds confuse sensors"?

If the answer is "yes", i'll see myself to the door voluntarily. If the answer is "no", then i ask to forgive me for probably inappropriate way used to describe the problem.

DMI's realiability or lack of - was not discussed. I merely mentioned couple things about it as relevant to discussing "melt ponds in late April confused CryoSat-2 sensors" line, which line is the thing i discussed. DMI graphs are welcomed here for what - to ignore them? I am confused. For now i'll simply avoid doing _any_ mention of DMI results / data, then.

In any case, please feel free to snip this and/or previous post of mine any way you deem good for this topic, up to and including complete removal. I will never hold any grudge towards you, Oren, no matter how much my opinion may differ from yours at times.
To everyone: before posting in a melting season topic, please be sure to know contents of this moderator's post: https://forum.arctic-sea-ice.net/index.php/topic,3017.msg261893.html#msg261893 . Thanks!

Wildcatter

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Re: The 2020 melting season
« Reply #660 on: May 08, 2020, 06:47:33 PM »
Looking at the nasa over the last few days, aluminums gif, and the forecast. ESS might look pretty interesting in a week, might get punished for not eating its vegetables this winter (volume), more cracking with wind and ice movement.

could have cracking all around the "shell" (coasts), like the beaufort ones with continued southerlies. kara. the anti-cyclonic winds also seem to help spur ice retreat in the bering. FJL ice on the Atlantic side too, that one will probably close up but there's a lot of wind forcing and it's moved quite a bit just the last few days, then the big ol' cyclone comes in over the barents, good chunk of volume sitting next to it and svalbard

east eurasia heat might be worth watching, looks like its tired of being cold. and then all the fram/atlantic export, will be an interesting week

shendric

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Re: The 2020 melting season
« Reply #661 on: May 08, 2020, 08:24:06 PM »
Will you tolerate this thread saying "there are no melt ponds in April" and also saying "no data from CryoSat-2 for 2nd half of April because meltponds confuse sensors"?

There are two separate issues here as the CryoSat-2/SMOS thickness/volume is based on two different sensor types.

CryoSat-2 (radar altimetry): It is common practice to not compute thickness in the Arctic beyond April, since the snow will get wet in May which causes extinction of the radar waves. Open melt ponds that form later are a different issue.

SMOS (L-Band radiometry): Here, the method of thin-ice thickness estimation is based (in essence) on the temperatur difference between the sea water and the ice surface. And this difference can get too small at already in the end of April for reliable ice thickness estimates.

Thus, CryoSat-2 thicknesses stop at April 30 and SMOS (respectively CryoSat-2/SMOS) thicknesses stop at April 15.

Cheers, Stefan

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Re: The 2020 melting season
« Reply #662 on: May 08, 2020, 08:51:03 PM »
You have the high pressure system bringing in heat on the pacific side that will spread over the CAB, and you've got strong winds blowing ice out of the Fram and towards the Barents sea.

 It's really crazy the winds that are predicted.

Heat from the Pacific spreading over the CAB in early May would be a rare observation. What's your source for this and how are you defining the CAB?

Instead of using adjectives like "crazy" to describe the winds, maybe you can try objective descriptions like location, duration and wind speed so people have a better idea what you are referring to?

Freegrass

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Re: The 2020 melting season
« Reply #663 on: May 08, 2020, 09:16:44 PM »
You have the high pressure system bringing in heat on the pacific side that will spread over the CAB, and you've got strong winds blowing ice out of the Fram and towards the Barents sea.

 It's really crazy the winds that are predicted.

Heat from the Pacific spreading over the CAB in early May would be a rare observation. What's your source for this and how are you defining the CAB?

Instead of using adjectives like "crazy" to describe the winds, maybe you can try objective descriptions like location, duration and wind speed so people have a better idea what you are referring to?
I think the video is self-explanatory. If you want more details, you can always look those up on Nullschool.

https://earth.nullschool.net/#2020/05/12/1800Z/wind/surface/level/orthographic=-45.02,91.24,2304/loc=34.948,80.486
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Did you know that Jesus was thought to be the reincarnation of a Buddhist monk?
Where do you think the three wise men came from?
They came from the east! ;)

grixm

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Re: The 2020 melting season
« Reply #664 on: May 08, 2020, 09:41:59 PM »
Strong Fram export in the last few days. Meanwhile the ice n the other side of Svalbard is retreating back towards the north.

F.Tnioli

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Re: The 2020 melting season
« Reply #665 on: May 08, 2020, 09:42:54 PM »
...
Thus, CryoSat-2 thicknesses stop at April 30 and SMOS (respectively CryoSat-2/SMOS) thicknesses stop at April 15.

No.



To everyone: before posting in a melting season topic, please be sure to know contents of this moderator's post: https://forum.arctic-sea-ice.net/index.php/topic,3017.msg261893.html#msg261893 . Thanks!

Phoenix

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Re: The 2020 melting season
« Reply #666 on: May 08, 2020, 10:17:03 PM »
You have the high pressure system bringing in heat on the pacific side that will spread over the CAB, and you've got strong winds blowing ice out of the Fram and towards the Barents sea.

 It's really crazy the winds that are predicted.

Heat from the Pacific spreading over the CAB in early May would be a rare observation. What's your source for this and how are you defining the CAB?

Instead of using adjectives like "crazy" to describe the winds, maybe you can try objective descriptions like location, duration and wind speed so people have a better idea what you are referring to?
I think the video is self-explanatory. If you want more details, you can always look those up on Nullschool.

https://earth.nullschool.net/#2020/05/12/1800Z/wind/surface/level/orthographic=-45.02,91.24,2304/loc=34.948,80.486

That link is a good example of data that helps people understand what you are referring to regarding "crazy" wind.

The link doesn't support your assertion that heat from the Pacific is going to spread over the CAB. What's the source for that?

uniquorn

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Re: The 2020 melting season
« Reply #667 on: May 08, 2020, 10:30:07 PM »
...
Thus, CryoSat-2 thicknesses stop at April 30 and SMOS (respectively CryoSat-2/SMOS) thicknesses stop at April 15.
No.
Please read....https://seaice.uni-bremen.de/thin-ice-thickness/
Quote
Thin sea ice occurs during the freezing season. In the melting season, the thickness of sea ice is highly variable and the emission properties in the microwave change due to the wetness of the surface and occurrence of melt ponds in the Arctic. Therefore, thickness data are calculated only during the freezing season, that is from October to April in the Arctic and from March to September in the Antarctic. During the melting season, the procedure does not yield meaningful results.
uni-bremen are kind enough to continue to provide the service as other information may be inferred from the data...at the user's discretion

shendric

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Re: The 2020 melting season
« Reply #668 on: May 08, 2020, 10:38:20 PM »
...
Thus, CryoSat-2 thicknesses stop at April 30 and SMOS (respectively CryoSat-2/SMOS) thicknesses stop at April 15.

No.



The SMOS product (ex University Hamburg, now AWI) that goes into CryoSat-2/SMOS stops at April 15.

Neven

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Re: The 2020 melting season
« Reply #669 on: May 08, 2020, 11:31:12 PM »
Quote
Instead of using adjectives like "crazy" to describe the winds

By all means, use adjectives like "crazy" to describe winds and other phenomena. In fact, be as creative as you can (friv is a good teacher  ;) ). However, make sure that the forecasted winds truly are crazy, and a bit of comparative context is always nice.
Il faut comparer, comparer, comparer, et cultiver notre jardin

Freegrass

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Re: The 2020 melting season
« Reply #670 on: May 08, 2020, 11:56:53 PM »
Quote
Instead of using adjectives like "crazy" to describe the winds

By all means, use adjectives like "crazy" to describe winds and other phenomena. In fact, be as creative as you can (friv is a good teacher  ;) ). However, make sure that the forecasted winds truly are crazy, and a bit of comparative context is always nice.
Thanks Neven.  :)  I'll keep doing my best to be better. But still so much to learn...  :-[

I'll be posting a new video with those "crazy winds" in an hour or so on the Nullschool thread, after Nullschool gets updated with the new GFS data. Then people will be able to see what I meant with crazy. What's coming is going to be so bad for the ice... But I like to let my video's speak for themselves... What is it they say about a picture and a thousand words?  ;)
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Where do you think the three wise men came from?
They came from the east! ;)

gerontocrat

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Re: The 2020 melting season
« Reply #671 on: May 09, 2020, 12:26:18 AM »
winds & WARMTH
"Para a Causa do Povo a Luta Continua!"
"And that's all I'm going to say about that". Forrest Gump
"Damn, I wanted to see what happened next" (Epitaph)

F.Tnioli

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Re: The 2020 melting season
« Reply #672 on: May 09, 2020, 12:28:07 AM »
...
uni-bremen are kind enough to continue to provide the service as other information may be inferred from the data...at the user's discretion
"Service" from "stopped" SMOS?

This is a recurring problem of this page: terms. "SMOS stopped" does not equal "does not produce meaningful results". "Other information may be inferred" does not equal "does not produce meaningful information". "Melt ponds confuse sensors" does not equal "wetness of the surface confuses sensors".

Since we're talking about, i'll note that from what i know, SMOS growing error in April has little to nothing to do with "melt ponds" nor with "wetness" of ice surface itself. Instead, the main problem is increasing presense of fog and thin clouds [Yu and Rothrock 1996]. This does not mean April and May SMOS data is "meaningless", however. It means different, more complex approaches are needed in treating raw data to have still useful and precise enough results. Specific data products having a cut at April 15 do not nesessarily mean all data products are stopped. The picture i gave as an example - is a kind of a data product itself, and is indeed useful for easy eye-balling of thin ice right now, in May.

Please note, i am not asking to explain every little detail in this topic. I ask to use non-contradicting terms. Like, instead of "melt ponds confuse sensors" - say, for example, "technology limitations disallow reliable total Arctic ice volume measurement after mid-April based on those sensors". Like, instead of "SMOS stopped" say "SMOS measurements stop being used for calculating total ice volume mid-spring due to growing measurement errors which currently we're unable to remove". Etc.

If we'd be failing to avoid "contradicting per common sense of a non-scientist" statements here - even when such contradictions are in error de-facto - then what exactly this topic is for?
To everyone: before posting in a melting season topic, please be sure to know contents of this moderator's post: https://forum.arctic-sea-ice.net/index.php/topic,3017.msg261893.html#msg261893 . Thanks!

be cause

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Re: The 2020 melting season
« Reply #673 on: May 09, 2020, 12:54:01 AM »
Really unusual is the near permanent ridge from Ireland to Alaska/Bering/Siberia .. ECM and GFS have it forecast to last the next 10 days .

  Oh .. And the wind , and the heat , the highs and the lows , the ejection of cold and it's consequences further south ...

 Welcome to the new May .. b.c.
« Last Edit: May 09, 2020, 01:18:53 AM by be cause »
2007 + 5 = 2012 + 4 = 2016 + 3 = 2019 + 2 = 2021 
 (phew)

uniquorn

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Re: The 2020 melting season
« Reply #674 on: May 09, 2020, 01:07:57 AM »
...
uni-bremen are kind enough to continue to provide the service as other information may be inferred from the data...at the user's discretion
"Service" from "stopped" SMOS?
>>>>>
If we'd be failing to avoid "contradicting per common sense of a non-scientist" statements here - even when such contradictions are in error de-facto - then what exactly this topic is for?
Hamburg, Bremen and AWI are different institutions. We are fortunate that we can share some of their data. We are unfortunate in that some of it disappears quite suddenly. I recommend using what you can while it is available. There is also this thread
edit:time for hyperion2??
« Last Edit: May 09, 2020, 01:18:11 AM by uniquorn »

oren

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Re: The 2020 melting season
« Reply #675 on: May 09, 2020, 01:13:18 AM »
Quote
Please note, i am not asking to explain every little detail in this topic. I ask to use non-contradicting terms. Like, instead of "melt ponds confuse sensors" - say, for example, "technology limitations disallow reliable total Arctic ice volume measurement after mid-April based on those sensors". Like, instead of "SMOS stopped" say "SMOS measurements stop being used for calculating total ice volume mid-spring due to growing measurement errors which currently we're unable to remove". Etc.

If we'd be failing to avoid "contradicting per common sense of a non-scientist" statements here - even when such contradictions are in error de-facto - then what exactly this topic is for?
Thank you for the better description of SMOS cutoff for Cryosat, and other SMOS limitations. This is what should have been posted in the first place if you find the original poster was not accurate enough. Clarify, explain, bring more info, make better wording. And do not hint the cutoff is to hide something or that somebody was lying because they used inaccurate terminology.

Back to what this topic is for - bringing information, data, analysis and commentary about the Arctic sea ice melting season that is just beginning in earnest.

Phoenix

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Re: The 2020 melting season
« Reply #676 on: May 09, 2020, 03:30:41 AM »
Siberia is heating up. Temps (C)in the mid twenties in the region just S of the Kara Sea.. This is your likely source of the heat coming through the Kara/Laptev into the Arctic in the coming days. Aided and abetted by the massive high pressure system over the Arctic and a couple of cyclones.

https://weather.com/en-TT/weather/tenday/l/ae0195f293190f0a3c83e846a147a91ec8935cd4be8021cb5e46b71ea2c6c5f3




Phoenix

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Re: The 2020 melting season
« Reply #677 on: May 09, 2020, 04:55:01 AM »
For those marveling at the intense high pressure system evolving in the Arctic at 1055+, there was a more intense high just last month in Nunavut that approached 1070.

https://www.theweathernetwork.com/ca/news/article/staggeringly-strong-high-pressure-in-nunavut-flaunts-record-values

F.Tnioli

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Re: The 2020 melting season
« Reply #678 on: May 09, 2020, 05:03:41 AM »
Thank you for the better description of SMOS cutoff for Cryosat, and other SMOS limitations. This is what should have been posted in the first place if you find the original poster was not accurate enough. Clarify, explain, bring more info, make better wording. And do not hint the cutoff is to hide something or that somebody was lying because they used inaccurate terminology.

Back to what this topic is for - bringing information, data, analysis and commentary about the Arctic sea ice melting season that is just beginning in earnest.
When it seems someone is not accurate enough, i exactly offer a description which i deem better one. Like i just did above, - and there is no need to thank me for it really, such a small thing. "Not accurate enough" at some point gets "so off the target it doesn't look they are even trying" though.

I see it's time i walk outta that door - stay silent at least for fairly long while. Especially seeing you saying i anyhow stated that "someone's lying because they used inaccurate terminology". Which, i never did. Nothing even remotely close. I take this as a gentle hint that it's time i say good bye - what else can it be, seeing it's from you, not some stranger.

I'll keep reading now and then and of course, i wish you best of luck keeping things orderly and neat. Cheers!
To everyone: before posting in a melting season topic, please be sure to know contents of this moderator's post: https://forum.arctic-sea-ice.net/index.php/topic,3017.msg261893.html#msg261893 . Thanks!

oren

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Re: The 2020 melting season
« Reply #679 on: May 09, 2020, 08:23:15 AM »
F. Tnioli, I hope you continue posting (staying within the guidelines of course) as you are a longtime contributor with often unique perspective.

blumenkraft

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Re: The 2020 melting season
« Reply #680 on: May 09, 2020, 09:49:02 AM »
I take this as a gentle hint that it's time i say good bye

I don't read that anywhere, FT.

I too hope you stay with us.

gerontocrat

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Re: The 2020 melting season
« Reply #681 on: May 09, 2020, 11:26:22 AM »
The first significant warming event in this melting season unfolds?
"Para a Causa do Povo a Luta Continua!"
"And that's all I'm going to say about that". Forrest Gump
"Damn, I wanted to see what happened next" (Epitaph)

Jim Hunt

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Re: The 2020 melting season
« Reply #682 on: May 09, 2020, 11:32:10 AM »
Please note, i am not asking to explain every little detail in this topic. I ask to use non-contradicting terms. Like, instead of "melt ponds confuse sensors" - say, for example, "technology limitations disallow reliable total Arctic ice volume measurement after mid-April based on those sensors".

More haste less speed! Thanks for the clarification Stefan.

In case nobody's noticed I'm spending far more time on Covid-19 issues rather than sea ice at the moment.

I first typed "surface melt", then I thought I'd change it to "melt ponds" because that would convey the basic concept more easily in here. My bad!

Please bear in mind the current CS2/PIOMAS "anomaly" when discussing volume/thickness. As the latest PSC update puts it:

Quote
April  ice thickness anomalies from PIOMAS agree well with the multi-sensor CryoSat/SMOS thickness analysis from the Alfred Wegener Institute/ESA with the strongest positive and negative anomalies in the right places. An area of thicker than normal ice  north of Greenland that was present in PIOMAS but missing from CryoSat/SMOS in March is now is now showing up in Cryosat/SMOS though considerably smoothed out.   The time series for CryoSat/SMOS  total volume shows  April 2020 as lower relative to the  2011-2020 period while PIOMAS shows a bit of an uptick. Neither time series indicates a trend over the past 10 years contrasting the drastic thinning over the last 40-years.  Note that Cryosat/SMOS retrievals only go through April 15 as the microwave based retrieval of both system forces a summer hiatus.

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Aluminium

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Re: The 2020 melting season
« Reply #683 on: May 09, 2020, 11:47:34 AM »
The forecast from 18.05.2019 is added for comparison. The melting season is going to lift off. The next stop is hell.


Freegrass

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Re: The 2020 melting season
« Reply #684 on: May 09, 2020, 01:12:19 PM »
41 images of Arctic mayhem cramped into a 1,94 MB video.
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El Cid

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Re: The 2020 melting season
« Reply #685 on: May 09, 2020, 04:00:25 PM »
I am not an experienced meteorologist (by far), and I do not recall having seen this before, a "bridge" of high pressure/warm air cutting the Arctic so neatly into two:



romett1

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Re: The 2020 melting season
« Reply #686 on: May 09, 2020, 04:28:54 PM »
Fram export May 04 - May 09. There is this relatively big block interesting to follow. Images: Worldview.

Glen Koehler

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Re: The 2020 melting season
« Reply #687 on: May 09, 2020, 07:14:24 PM »
So, it sure looks like someone's lying: either those who said "no meltponds there", or whomever said "after mid-April melt ponds confused the sensors".
Ditto I hope you keep participating, but Oren was correctly moderating.  Now let's get back to the weather and ice...
« Last Edit: May 09, 2020, 07:28:49 PM by Glen Koehler »

gerontocrat

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Re: The 2020 melting season
« Reply #688 on: May 09, 2020, 07:47:07 PM »
NSIDC monthly update for April out now. Always an interesting read.
This month a lot about the March storms and the Chukchi.

http://nsidc.org/arcticseaicenews/
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uniquorn

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Re: The 2020 melting season
« Reply #689 on: May 09, 2020, 10:24:19 PM »
Welcome back Romett1. There was a second big block following but it didn't have the same resilience. Heavy contrast on this animation to highlight the many small fractures. There will probably be surface refreeze, but very little, if any, thickening from this point.
https://go.nasa.gov/3cjvdrZ, apr12-may6 with cloudiest days removed. The animation pauses to show the clearest day, apr22.
click to run, 9MB

oren

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Re: The 2020 melting season
« Reply #690 on: May 09, 2020, 11:45:11 PM »
NSIDC monthly update for April out now. Always an interesting read.
This month a lot about the March storms and the Chukchi.

http://nsidc.org/arcticseaicenews/
Thanks for this, puts things in perspective.
I was interested in the ice drift image from the end of March, at the height of the west to east transport event.

Aluminium

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Re: The 2020 melting season
« Reply #691 on: May 10, 2020, 07:25:53 AM »
May 5-9.

2019.

oren

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Re: The 2020 melting season
« Reply #692 on: May 10, 2020, 08:00:33 AM »
Thanks Aluminium. Interesting movements all around the Arctic. The Beaufort started its typical sweeping away to the north and west, rather late this year compared to 2012, 2017, 2019 and especially 2016. The Chukchi is also moving, though quite late. The ESS, Laptev and Kara are all showing increased open water in the last couple of days, all within the envelope of past years. The Barents ice has been quite extensive, but seems vulnerable at the end of the animation, and as expected Fram export is picking up. The only region that is rather static (beyond the CAA) is Baffin, leading the race early but stalling recently.

uniquorn

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Re: The 2020 melting season
« Reply #693 on: May 10, 2020, 02:31:34 PM »
Attempting to trace the origins of romett1's big block using edge detect on ascat. It looks like it has followed a similar drift path to whoi itp116 Probably MYI from near the pole.
the dots are somewhat erratic, please check by another method
« Last Edit: May 10, 2020, 02:37:32 PM by uniquorn »

Jim Hunt

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Re: The 2020 melting season
« Reply #694 on: May 10, 2020, 02:54:37 PM »
Some open water is now visible in the Beaufort Sea:

https://go.nasa.gov/3bnOffs
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pearscot

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Re: The 2020 melting season
« Reply #695 on: May 10, 2020, 06:13:23 PM »
I was just looking at that exact same thing on Worldview. After reviewing that region for a while, I was surprised to see how much more ice there is north of Alaska/Bering Sea. I'm not sure how much of a difference that will make...I think bottom melt is going to affect that region once it gets a bit warmer and open water exacerbates everything.

It was also posted above, but the export out of the Fram Strait has been really impressive. I also noticed a sizable chug being ripped off the most northeast coastline. Judging by the ice mobility, I still think the Greenland megacrack will reappear. As always, there is a whole lot of interesting stuff occurring
pls!

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Re: The 2020 melting season
« Reply #696 on: May 10, 2020, 08:38:41 PM »
Some open water is now visible in the Beaufort Sea:

https://go.nasa.gov/3bnOffs

The wind (shifting toward Alaska / Canada coast) and sub freezing temperature forecast for the Beaufort suggest that most of it might close again in a few days.

The forecast wind direction will favor open water adjacent to Banks Island.

blumenkraft

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Re: The 2020 melting season
« Reply #697 on: May 10, 2020, 08:57:49 PM »
Apropos wind.

Here is last week's ice drift map.

blumenkraft

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Re: The 2020 melting season
« Reply #698 on: May 10, 2020, 08:58:56 PM »
Fram export via SAR. Click to play.

blumenkraft

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Re: The 2020 melting season
« Reply #699 on: May 10, 2020, 09:00:39 PM »
7-day hindsight mean temperature anomalies.