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Author Topic: Weird Weather and anecdotal stories about climate change  (Read 611157 times)

Gray-Wolf

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Re: Weird Weather and anecdotal stories about climate change
« Reply #2750 on: June 12, 2019, 12:34:18 PM »
I don't know much about meteorology, but this just doesn't look right!

If only this 'oxbow' contortion of the jet could become cut off leaving the jet far to the North and us under a Big ,Fat, blocked High with hot temps & clear skies?

I'll set my mind to joining those two loose ends of the Jet and give us a second half of summer to be dreamed of now the land has had a good watering!!!!
KOYAANISQATSI

ko.yaa.nis.katsi (from the Hopi language), n. 1. crazy life. 2. life in turmoil. 3. life disintegrating. 4. life out of balance. 5. a state of life that calls for another way of living.
 
VIRESCIT VULNERE VIRTUS

b_lumenkraft

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Re: Weird Weather and anecdotal stories about climate change
« Reply #2751 on: June 12, 2019, 12:42:36 PM »
I sure hope the same.

Gray-Wolf

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Re: Weird Weather and anecdotal stories about climate change
« Reply #2752 on: June 12, 2019, 01:36:52 PM »
Hi Lumenkraft!!

The appearance of the low up in Kara, and its drift into Barentsz, gives me some hope of us breaking this awful run of cool/wet for us!

If the Basin stirs on our side then it should have some knock on impacts further south and maybe that includes closing that loop and settling our bits of Europe down into something like 'Summer'?
KOYAANISQATSI

ko.yaa.nis.katsi (from the Hopi language), n. 1. crazy life. 2. life in turmoil. 3. life disintegrating. 4. life out of balance. 5. a state of life that calls for another way of living.
 
VIRESCIT VULNERE VIRTUS

b_lumenkraft

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Re: Weird Weather and anecdotal stories about climate change
« Reply #2753 on: June 12, 2019, 02:09:17 PM »
There is a nice German saying, Wolf:

Dein Wort in Gottes Ohr.

Translates to 'your word in God's ear'.

(Not that i'm religious, but i like old sayings.)

Klondike Kat

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Re: Weird Weather and anecdotal stories about climate change
« Reply #2754 on: June 12, 2019, 02:33:42 PM »
I don't know much about meteorology, but this just doesn't look right!

If only this 'oxbow' contortion of the jet could become cut off leaving the jet far to the North and us under a Big ,Fat, blocked High with hot temps & clear skies?

I'll set my mind to joining those two loose ends of the Jet and give us a second half of summer to be dreamed of now the land has had a good watering!!!!

This is a typical Greenland blocking events, which is expected to bring much cooler temperatures to much of Europe.

https://agupubs.onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/pdf/10.1002/2016GL072387

https://www.aer.com/science-research/climate-weather/arctic-oscillation/

Gray-Wolf

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Re: Weird Weather and anecdotal stories about climate change
« Reply #2755 on: June 12, 2019, 06:16:18 PM »
We're all aware of the old currency Klondike but what of the tweeks the last 2 decades have placed over that mask?

The 'stormy' bottom melt end of the season that we've become accustomed to must have its teleconnections further South?

Having young children over the time of the UK's run of 'washout summers' made me acutely aware that as soon as they were going back to school ,post summer hols, the weather miraculously cleared up and gave us a lovely end to summer?

I'd reckon that this 'second bite of the cherry' has now moved back into late July/early Aug as the Arctic produces its own cyclones and so allowed HP to migrate further south....... and over us here in NW Europe.

I'm hoping this will pan out this year and give us a blazing end to summer?
KOYAANISQATSI

ko.yaa.nis.katsi (from the Hopi language), n. 1. crazy life. 2. life in turmoil. 3. life disintegrating. 4. life out of balance. 5. a state of life that calls for another way of living.
 
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Alexander555

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Tom_Mazanec

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Re: Weird Weather and anecdotal stories about climate change
« Reply #2757 on: June 18, 2019, 10:55:11 PM »
Record heat will become the new normal:
https://www.nature.com/articles/d41586-019-01891-3
SHARKS (CROSSED OUT) MONGEESE (SIC) WITH FRICKIN LASER BEAMS ATTACHED TO THEIR HEADS

Ktb

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Re: Weird Weather and anecdotal stories about climate change
« Reply #2758 on: June 19, 2019, 02:02:57 AM »
There was absolutely stifling heat in the Jasper/Yoho/Banff/Kootenay national parks area during the past week. Read several articles about records being broken. Was almost too hot to hike. Almost ;)
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Comradez

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Re: Weird Weather and anecdotal stories about climate change
« Reply #2759 on: June 19, 2019, 05:11:54 AM »
I wonder how long it will be before the Yukon River Delta region in Alaska starts attracting more development.  Maybe even a road connection with the rest of the Continental U.S.?  With the Bering Sea offshore hardly ever freezing around there anymore, I expect the climate to get much more temperate much more quickly. 

This year, the area was snow-free by late March.  This week and the next in St. Mary's, Alaska highs are around 70 and lows are around 50.  Positively delightful! 

Tor Bejnar

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Re: Weird Weather and anecdotal stories about climate change
« Reply #2760 on: June 19, 2019, 05:23:26 AM »
Maybe, maybe not:
Quote
Mosquitoes are more than a nuisance in the summer in northern Alaska; they are a genuine problem.
from here

I  was a passenger on an impromptu field trip (to my study area in South Island, New Zealand) with some visiting North American geologists.  The Canadian was telling of the ferocious mosquitoes in Canada's far north after an American told his story from Alaska.  (These matched the stories I'd previously heard from my supervisor who'd studied rocks on Labrador (Newfoundland, Canada), but he kept his tongue).  We rounded a corner and got an (unexpected to the visitors) panoramic view of a tectonically created wetlands, and one of the visitors asked, "What are those?"  One of the genuine Kiwis in the Land Rover said of the black swans, "Ne' Zealan' misquitas."
« Last Edit: June 19, 2019, 05:41:34 AM by Tor Bejnar »
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Pragma

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Re: Weird Weather and anecdotal stories about climate change
« Reply #2761 on: June 19, 2019, 06:11:55 AM »
Maybe, maybe not:
Quote
Mosquitoes are more than a nuisance in the summer in northern Alaska; they are a genuine problem.
from here

I  was a passenger on an impromptu field trip (to my study area in South Island, New Zealand) with some visiting North American geologists.  The Canadian was telling of the ferocious mosquitoes in Canada's far north after an American told his story from Alaska.  (These matched the stories I'd previously heard from my supervisor who'd studied rocks on Labrador (Newfoundland, Canada), but he kept his tongue).  We rounded a corner and got an (unexpected to the visitors) panoramic view of a tectonically created wetlands, and one of the visitors asked, "What are those?"  One of the genuine Kiwis in the Land Rover said of the black swans, "Ne' Zealan' misquitas."



 :)

Ktb

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Re: Weird Weather and anecdotal stories about climate change
« Reply #2762 on: June 19, 2019, 07:59:00 AM »
Quote
from hereOne of the genuine Kiwis in the Land Rover said of the black swans, "Ne' Zealan' misquitas."

Sand flies from the west coast of the south island are the devil incarnate for sure.
« Last Edit: June 21, 2019, 12:45:05 AM by Ktb »
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Tor Bejnar

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Re: Weird Weather and anecdotal stories about climate change
« Reply #2763 on: June 19, 2019, 03:59:41 PM »
My worst experience was of sand flies after camping one night near a mangrove in (coastal) Senora, Mexico.  It was hot so I slept on top of my sleeping bag.  The next day I thought I had a bad sunburn so I wore a shirt all day.  The following day a companion saw my bare back and said it was solid sand fly bites.  We were later told that during sand fly season, the local native people abandoned that part of the coast because they weren't stupid.

The morning after a night in Needles, California, sleeping under the stars next to the tepid Colorado River (nothing like the cold running creek I knew in southern Colorado!), I counted over 100 mosquito bites on my face.  The sand fly bites were 100x worse.

Then there was the beetle in the Kimberlies that took a 2 mm cube out of my arm.  Now that hurt!

There was a tiny story in the local New Hampshire newspaper 25 years ago about an attorney trying to get his key in his car's frozen door lock muttering, "When will global warming get here?"  Now, in Florida, I only experience cold when Maintenance cannot get the AC working right: it was 62ºF (17ºC) yesterday!
Arctic ice is healthy for children and other living things.

Sebastian Jones

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Re: Weird Weather and anecdotal stories about climate change
« Reply #2764 on: June 19, 2019, 04:16:23 PM »
I wonder how long it will be before the Yukon River Delta region in Alaska starts attracting more development.  Maybe even a road connection with the rest of the Continental U.S.?  With the Bering Sea offshore hardly ever freezing around there anymore, I expect the climate to get much more temperate much more quickly. 

This year, the area was snow-free by late March.  This week and the next in St. Mary's, Alaska highs are around 70 and lows are around 50.  Positively delightful! 

Answer: Never. The Yukon river delta is barely above sea level. Sea level rise and erosion guarantees that most of the delta will be under water by the end of the century. Disastrous salmon management means that the sole viable economy in the area is imploding. The area is a hot spot for places becoming less liveable.

Aluminium

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Re: Weird Weather and anecdotal stories about climate change
« Reply #2765 on: June 21, 2019, 11:21:31 PM »
Pevek, Chukotka.

gerontocrat

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Re: Weird Weather and anecdotal stories about climate change
« Reply #2766 on: June 22, 2019, 07:07:45 PM »
Posted on Arctic Cafe but worth repeating here?

Yesterday, Solstice day, at about 52N 2W, the afternoon and evening became totally cloudless. So my daughter took the dogs for a long late evening walk.

A short time after sunset, in the West, it suddenly got a lot lighter. She took some photos on her mobile phone. When I saw them, after a few minutes the memory store swung into action"noct something clouds?). After a brief struggle with google, I found...

http://www-das.uwyo.edu/~geerts/cwx/notes/chap08/noctilucent.html
Quote
Noctilucent clouds (Fig 2) occur in the upper mesosphere, at about 80 km. Their name derives from the fact that they can be seen from the ground when the Sun is 7-10 degrees below the horizon and only reflects off these very high clouds . It arises from the water vapour released upon oxidation of methane. The recent observed increase of such clouds is related to increased atmospheric concentrations of methane***, a greenhouse gas. Noctilucent clouds are most common in the summer in polar regions. At this time the mesospheric lapse rate is close to neutral, and this makes uplift easier.

*** AGW - the gift that keeps on giving.


Are they Noctilucent clouds? (Right time of day and year, right direction) Lumnekraft says yes.

Images attached.
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nanning

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Re: Weird Weather and anecdotal stories about climate change
« Reply #2767 on: June 22, 2019, 07:36:39 PM »
Beautiful.
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vox_mundi

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Re: Weird Weather and anecdotal stories about climate change
« Reply #2768 on: June 23, 2019, 02:18:45 AM »
Line of Storms Leaves 1,000 Mile Path of Destruction, Impacting Four US Major Cities 
https://amp.cnn.com/cnn/2019/06/22/us/derecho-us-storms/index.html
https://weather.com/en-US/news/news/2019-06-22-storms-derecho-midwest-impacts

A fast-moving line of severe storms known as a derecho stretched from the Midwest to the South Carolina coastline, leaving three people dead and more than 350 damage reports in its wake.

The extreme weather phenomena started in central Nebraska in the predawn hours on Friday and traveled all the way to Charleston by Saturday morning.   


Shelf clouds were seen along the line of storms. Major US cities, such as Kansas City and St. Louis, got a taste of strong winds and heavy rain from these apocalyptic-looking clouds.



Hurricane force winds and flash flooding are typical of derechos.

More than 14 states felt the impact of the storm.

Three people were killed Friday as a result of winds toppling trees onto vehicles and a boat, according to authorities.

The Kansas City Fire Department responded to a water rescue early Friday morning as streets in downtown flooded from the storms, CNN affiliate KMBC reported.

https://mobile.twitter.com/andywardemt/status/1142059799271628800

There is the potential for straight-line wind gusts to reach an AccuWeather Local StormMax™ of 80 mph, which can easily topple trees and power lines and cause structural damage.

https://accuweather.com/en/weather-news/derecho-blasts-kansas-to-georgia-with-powerful-winds-flooding-rain/70008620
« Last Edit: June 23, 2019, 02:30:42 AM by vox_mundi »
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scottie

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Re: Weird Weather and anecdotal stories about climate change
« Reply #2769 on: June 23, 2019, 01:27:03 PM »
*** AGW - the gift that keeps on giving.
Are they Noctilucent clouds? (Right time of day and year, right direction) Lumnekraft says yes.


They are indeed noctilucent (nght shining) clouds and yes they are beautiful. I saw my first for a number of years pre-dawn last week (I live about 50 miles east of London). This year is possibly the best ever for these clouds with sightings as far south as LA, much further south than ever seen before. As well as being increased by AGW they are apparently seeded by meteorites and linked to solar activity, appearing much more numerous at solar minimum which is where we are now. The last time I saw them here was around 11 years ago, which makes sense. More info and photos can be found at http://www.spaceweather.com/
« Last Edit: June 23, 2019, 09:52:56 PM by scottie »