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Author Topic: Weird Weather and anecdotal stories about climate change  (Read 576247 times)

Shared Humanity

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Re: Weird Weather and anecdotal stories about climate change
« Reply #2650 on: March 15, 2019, 01:18:27 PM »
Meanwhile, it hit 70F in Chicago yesterday with high winds and periods of heavy rain. Spring is coming in with a bang.

Klondike Kat

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Re: Weird Weather and anecdotal stories about climate change
« Reply #2651 on: March 15, 2019, 03:19:22 PM »
Here are pictures from my farm after the blizzard.  Incredible.  If it was open before, it is still open after the blizzard.  Lots of bare road surfaces.  But if it was drifted before, oh boy, is it ever drifted.  Most of the area behind the outbuildings is 6-8 feet deep, with crests higher than that.

http://imgur.com/gallery/zChc4R7
That is absolutely bonkers. I wonder how bad the Mississippi flooding could get this spring. The river is already flooding in many locations.

A lot is dependent on the spring weather.  The western snowpack is quite deep, which will result in significant spring runoff.  As I understand it, the eastern river system is already high, so there is the potential for heavy flooding.  However, a slow melting spring could alleviate these conditions.  We will just have to wait and see, but if I lived there, I would prepare early.

be cause

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Re: Weird Weather and anecdotal stories about climate change
« Reply #2652 on: March 15, 2019, 04:57:27 PM »
and in Norn' Ireland .. the chestnut at the end of the lane is in leaf earlier than in my memory .. drama on so many scales .. :) .. b.c.
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will .. through you .. transform all nations :)

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Re: Weird Weather and anecdotal stories about climate change
« Reply #2653 on: March 15, 2019, 08:31:30 PM »
Emphasis added
The NWS reported that Dodge City, Kansas, saw its lowest recorded barometric pressure in more than 100 years. A reading of 28.78 inches of mercury (974.9 millibars) was recorded Wednesday at the Dodge City Airport, shattering the previous record of 974.9 millibars, which was set in 1960 and stood for more than 100 years
Must be that new math people keep talking about. I guess that is twitter for you.

Rod

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Re: Weird Weather and anecdotal stories about climate change
« Reply #2654 on: March 16, 2019, 12:24:54 AM »
I think someone just made a mistake when retyping the information because it combined two different tweets.

Below is a screen shot of the actual tweets from NWS Dodge City.  I find twitter to be a very helpful for keeping up to date on current information on weather and climate change.  But, like with anything, it is important to always check the source. 

bbr2314

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Re: Weird Weather and anecdotal stories about climate change
« Reply #2655 on: March 16, 2019, 01:26:21 AM »
Here are pictures from my farm after the blizzard.  Incredible.  If it was open before, it is still open after the blizzard.  Lots of bare road surfaces.  But if it was drifted before, oh boy, is it ever drifted.  Most of the area behind the outbuildings is 6-8 feet deep, with crests higher than that.

http://imgur.com/gallery/zChc4R7
That is absolutely bonkers. I wonder how bad the Mississippi flooding could get this spring. The river is already flooding in many locations.

A lot is dependent on the spring weather.  The western snowpack is quite deep, which will result in significant spring runoff.  As I understand it, the eastern river system is already high, so there is the potential for heavy flooding.  However, a slow melting spring could alleviate these conditions.  We will just have to wait and see, but if I lived there, I would prepare early.



The Missouri is a few inches away from the Brownsville nuclear plant's emergency status level and is forecast to breach it by almost 2 feet in the coming days.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Cooper_Nuclear_Station

gerontocrat

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Re: Weird Weather and anecdotal stories about climate change
« Reply #2656 on: March 16, 2019, 10:27:37 AM »
Here are pictures from my farm after the blizzard.  Incredible.  If it was open before, it is still open after the blizzard.  Lots of bare road surfaces.  But if it was drifted before, oh boy, is it ever drifted.  Most of the area behind the outbuildings is 6-8 feet deep, with crests higher than that.

http://imgur.com/gallery/zChc4R7
That is absolutely bonkers. I wonder how bad the Mississippi flooding could get this spring. The river is already flooding in many locations.

A lot is dependent on the spring weather.  The western snowpack is quite deep, which will result in significant spring runoff.  As I understand it, the eastern river system is already high, so there is the potential for heavy flooding.  However, a slow melting spring could alleviate these conditions.  We will just have to wait and see, but if I lived there, I would prepare early.
The mid-west is flooding - big-time

https://www.wunderground.com/news/safety/floods/news/2019-03-15-record-flooding-nebraska-iowa-south-dakota-bomb-cyclone-snowmelt
Record Flooding in Nebraska, Iowa, South Dakota Follows Snowmelt, Bomb Cyclone; Rivers Still Rising Into Next Week

River level records have been smashed in four states in the Plains and Midwest, and river flooding will continue for several more days after rapid snowmelt and heavy rain from the bomb cyclone swamped the nation's heartland.

As of Friday, 24 locations have topped new record river levels, mainly in the Missouri Valley from southeastern South Dakota into Nebraska and western Iowa, but also in parts of Wisconsin and Minnesota.

While smaller creeks, streams and rivers have crested or soon will, larger main stem rivers might continue to rise and remain in flood for days from the central Plains to the Mississippi Valley, Ohio Valley and Great Lakes as this volume of water slowly moves downstream.

There were over 300 river gauges above flood stage in the Mississippi River and Missouri River watersheds.

The good news is mainly dry weather is expected in the nation's heartland for the next several days. However, markedly warmer weather is also expected, which will accelerate melting of lingering snow cover from the northern Plains into the northern Great Lakes. As a result, water from melting snow will continue to pour into smaller tributaries, then larger mainstem rivers, likely keeping those mainstem rivers relatively high over the next few weeks.
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vox_mundi

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Re: Weird Weather and anecdotal stories about climate change
« Reply #2657 on: March 16, 2019, 05:08:48 PM »
Deadly, Historic Flooding Swamps Plains, Midwest; Nebraska City Cut Off, Nuke Plant Prepares to Shut Down
https://weather.com/news/news/2019-03-16-deadly-flooding-midwest-impacts



Nebraska's sixth largest city has become "an island" amid historic flooding in parts of the Midwest that has left one man dead, forced a National Weather Service office to evacuate and may force a nuclear power plant to shut down out of caution.

Fremont, Nebraska, lies about 40 miles northeast of Omaha and is home to more than 26,000 residents. As of Friday afternoon, flooded roadways coming in and out of the city were closed, leaving the city cut off, the Fremont Tribune reported.

On Saturday, a levee was breached northwest of the city, prompting law enforcement officers to warn people to get to higher ground.

... Wight told weather.com there is "concern" for the nuclear plant but that it "is perfectly safe."

"We don't expect any safety issues but we do expect they will get flooding around them and if it gets too far they will shut it down," Wight said, adding that it will not be an "issue with power supply" because they can get power from other sources within the grid.

"It is something we're really watching closely," Wight said

... Mark Becker, spokesman for the Nebraska Public Power District, previously told the Omaha World-Herald that if the river rises to 45.5 feet this weekend, as projected by the NWS, the nuclear power plant, which accounts for 35 percent of NPPD's power, will have to be shut down.

 The water surpassed that level early Saturday and reached an all-time record 45.64 inches.


Thursday morning, the hydroelectric plant at the Spencer Dam on the Niobrara River was lost when the dam broke and a large ice floe jammed a hole in the building[/b



After surveying the extensive flooding from the air, Nebraska Gov. Pete Ricketts said in a Friday press conference that it was the "most widespread flooding damage we've had in the last half-century."

"Even when we were away from the water system, we saw that the fields were very saturated," he added.
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