Support the Arctic Sea Ice Forum and Blog

Author Topic: Larsen Ice Shelves A, B, D, E, F, G  (Read 6591 times)

paolo

  • Grease ice
  • Posts: 888
    • View Profile
  • Liked: 408
  • Likes Given: 16
Larsen Ice Shelves A, B, D, E, F, G
« on: November 12, 2020, 04:38:28 PM »
BIG calving at Larsen D !

Large image, click to animate
« Last Edit: February 04, 2022, 06:17:29 PM by oren »

gerontocrat

  • Multi-year ice
  • Posts: 13716
    • View Profile
  • Liked: 4584
  • Likes Given: 35
Re: Larsen D and more
« Reply #1 on: November 12, 2020, 05:13:17 PM »
BIG calving at Larsen D !
Scale? please pretty please
"Para a Causa do Povo a Luta Continua!"
"And that's all I'm going to say about that". Forrest Gump
"Damn, I wanted to see what happened next" (Epitaph)

paolo

  • Grease ice
  • Posts: 888
    • View Profile
  • Liked: 408
  • Likes Given: 16
Re: Larsen D and more
« Reply #2 on: November 12, 2020, 05:30:45 PM »
The scale was displayed at the bottom left, next to the date, in the second image (post-calving image: 12/11). ;)

Stephan

  • Nilas ice
  • Posts: 2085
    • View Profile
  • Liked: 649
  • Likes Given: 359
Re: Larsen D and more
« Reply #3 on: November 12, 2020, 07:13:30 PM »
The scale is only visible when the picture is zoomed.

It is a real massive calving event. Did anyone of us have it on his agenda?

Thank you paolo for sharing this information with us.
It is too late just to be concerned about Climate Change

paolo

  • Grease ice
  • Posts: 888
    • View Profile
  • Liked: 408
  • Likes Given: 16
Re: Larsen D and more
« Reply #4 on: November 12, 2020, 07:56:28 PM »
Here is the history of the front lines of 06/11 and 12/11. I have differentiated a part that probably is not part of the ice shelf and is simply very thick sea ice (multi-year). I added the estimate of the area that calved.

click to enlarge

interstitial

  • Nilas ice
  • Posts: 1784
    • View Profile
  • Liked: 431
  • Likes Given: 91
Re: Larsen D and more
« Reply #5 on: November 12, 2020, 08:39:44 PM »
Here is the history of the front lines of 06/11 and 12/11. I have differentiated a part that probably is not part of the ice shelf and is simply very thick sea ice (multi-year). I added the estimate of the area that calved.

click to enlarge
all of the grey is not ice shelf but multiyear sea ice but thanks for the update.

paolo

  • Grease ice
  • Posts: 888
    • View Profile
  • Liked: 408
  • Likes Given: 16
Re: Larsen D and more
« Reply #6 on: November 12, 2020, 10:52:11 PM »
Interstitial,
Thank you, I had doubts myself, but it must be very thick, and almost simulates the appearance of an ice platform.
So I applied a very strict criterion, and I find a line parallel to the blue-coloured part in the Sentinel1 image (the displacement corresponding to the advance of the ice shelf).
Below is the result and you can see that this calving remains very impressive.

Click to enlarge

interstitial

  • Nilas ice
  • Posts: 1784
    • View Profile
  • Liked: 431
  • Likes Given: 91
Re: Larsen D and more
« Reply #7 on: November 13, 2020, 12:52:11 AM »
Interstitial,
Thank you, I had doubts myself, but it must be very thick, and almost simulates the appearance of an ice platform.
So I applied a very strict criterion, and I find a line parallel to the blue-coloured part in the Sentinel1 image (the displacement corresponding to the advance of the ice shelf).
Below is the result and you can see that this calving remains very impressive.

Click to enlarge

It is an impressive calving and you can't really tell from the satellite image how thick they are. This calving was predicted by the same scientist who predicted the last one that occurred a bit north of this one. She didn't give an exact time table but I believe this was within her predicted time. Thanks for pointing this out. They seem to do nothing for so long I stop checking then BAM! something happens.

The ice shelf does advance from the blue boundary. I just wish I knew when the boundary was created so I can estimate how fast some of those glaciers are moving. The Ronne ice shelf has extended well beyond its boundary but I don't think it is moving very fast. It may have already calved too. IDK

oren

  • Moderator
  • First-year ice
  • Posts: 8021
    • View Profile
  • Liked: 3129
  • Likes Given: 3206
Re: Larsen D and more
« Reply #8 on: November 13, 2020, 09:39:14 AM »
For the sake of less knowledgeable readers, whom I represent quite well, here is the short text from Wikipedia about Larsen D, and a map of the locations of the various Larsen ice shelves.
I would greatly appreciate if anyone can match the animation location relative to the map, or if anyone can post an overview image showing the regions surrounding the calving area.

Quote
The Larsen D Ice Shelf is between Smith Peninsula in the south and Gipps Ice Rise. It is considered to be generally stable. Over roughly the past fifty years it has advanced (expanded) whereas comparable George VI, Bach, Stange, and Larsen C ice shelves have retreated (to a much greater net extent). The most recent survey of Larsen D measured it at 22,600 km2. There is fast ice along the entire front. This makes it difficult to interpret the ice front because the semi-permanent sea ice varies in thickness and may be nearly indistinguishable from shelf ice.


FredBear

  • Frazil ice
  • Posts: 322
    • View Profile
  • Liked: 49
  • Likes Given: 39
Re: Larsen D and more
« Reply #9 on: November 13, 2020, 02:21:57 PM »
Earlier this year (July) iceberg A69 broke off from the extreme northern edge of Larsen D, just south of the "island' at the end of Larsen C.This 'berg then quickly broke into two named parts:-
https://www.natice.noaa.gov/doc/PR%20-%2020200708%20-%20Iceberg%20A-69A-B.pdf

The new breakage is offshore & south of the peninsular embedded in the ice shelf just south of the Larsen "D" tag on the previous map but nothing has been given the "A-70" iceberg tag yet. This indicates that the break-out is not significant enough to merit naming an individual big iceberg (although some of the 'bergs look as big as the bits of A69, some ice is likely to be accumulated sea ice)?

paolo

  • Grease ice
  • Posts: 888
    • View Profile
  • Liked: 408
  • Likes Given: 16
Re: Larsen D and more
« Reply #10 on: November 13, 2020, 03:29:56 PM »
Oren,
You will find enclosed :
> An animation with the two Sentinel1 images in their integrality with the scale and the indication lof two landmarks
> A simplified image of the Antarctic Peninsula with the two landmarks
> A detailed map of the Antarctic Peninsula

Click to enlarge and to animate the first image (very large images, to enlarge them completely click twice)

oren

  • Moderator
  • First-year ice
  • Posts: 8021
    • View Profile
  • Liked: 3129
  • Likes Given: 3206
Re: Larsen D and more
« Reply #11 on: November 13, 2020, 04:52:45 PM »
Thank you paolo.

paolo

  • Grease ice
  • Posts: 888
    • View Profile
  • Liked: 408
  • Likes Given: 16
Re: Larsen D and more
« Reply #12 on: November 13, 2020, 09:29:25 PM »
Interstitial,
I looked in Worldview which gives the speeds, but relative to 30/12/2011 and I find a maximum speed of 400 m/yr in the middle between Steele Island and Butler Island and 160 m/yr between Butler Island and Cape Mackintosh

"https://worldview.earthdata.nasa.gov/?v=-1795024.1235806216,913897.3490050219,-1598416.1235806216,1006313. 3490050219&p=antarctic&t=2011-12-30-T18%3A25%3A07Z&l=Coastlines,MEaSUREs_Ice_Velocity_Antarctica,MEaSUREs_Ice_Velocity_Greenland,Reference_Labels(hidden), Reference_Features(hidden),VIIRS_SNPP_CorrectedReflectance_TrueColor(hidden),MODIS_Aqua_CorrectedReflectance_TrueColor(hidden),MODIS_Terra_CorrectedReflectance_TrueColor(hidden)"

I checked the speed of a point between Steele Island and Butler Island, for which Worldview gives a speed of 280 m/yr in 2011, using the Sentinel2 images from 23/10/2019 and 17/10/2020 and I find, for the same point, a speed of 340 m/yr (± 12 m/yr taking 2 px as error).

Even if the oldest Sentinel1 image of the zone dates only from 09/07/2020 (120 days before the one of 06/11/2020), which makes a too narrow base to calculate speeds of a few hundred meters per year, I wanted to make a test anyway and, for this same point, I find a speed of 365 m/yr (happy coincidence, an error of only one pixel corresponds to an error of 60 m/yr!).

We can conclude that, at least for this point, there was a significant acceleration (25%).

For the moment no more detailed analysis, this sector does not fit, for the moment, in my schedule.

interstitial

  • Nilas ice
  • Posts: 1784
    • View Profile
  • Liked: 431
  • Likes Given: 91
Re: Larsen D and more
« Reply #13 on: November 14, 2020, 09:47:34 AM »
If I did not make a mistake the letters are the snow covered rises that look like snow covered boulders too me. A is not sure B is Dolleman I. C is Steele I. D is Ewing I. The numbers are the calving's. #1 is A68a the long skinny one that is still mostly intact and some speculate that it will crash into an Island soon. #2 is A69 #3 Just happened. I made images too but the image files are too big.                                                                                                               

interstitial

  • Nilas ice
  • Posts: 1784
    • View Profile
  • Liked: 431
  • Likes Given: 91
Re: Larsen D and more
« Reply #14 on: November 14, 2020, 09:50:12 AM »
Thanks paolo. That is a lot slower than PIG. I knew it would be I just wanted the comparison.

FredBear

  • Frazil ice
  • Posts: 322
    • View Profile
  • Liked: 49
  • Likes Given: 39
Re: Larsen D and more
« Reply #15 on: December 15, 2020, 07:59:02 PM »
More breakouts of ice today from the Larsen D ice shelf where the 70° south line crosses it - rather cloudy so not very clear (might possibly be mistaken??) - but a continuation of this years fraying of that shelf?

Tor Bejnar

  • Young ice
  • Posts: 4447
    • View Profile
  • Liked: 862
  • Likes Given: 761
Re: Larsen D and more
« Reply #16 on: December 15, 2020, 09:30:23 PM »
Wikipedia image:


Attached composite image from PolarView shows icebergs (circled in green).  Larsen C & D are circled in red.  Two selected frames have preview images.

Go to the PolarView link, select the frame of interest, then under the Image preview (it will be on the left), select a Product download (I use "variable" or "full resolution" to look at detail.)  Larsen D icebergs enlarged below.  [click to enlarge]
Arctic ice is healthy for children and other living things because "we cannot negotiate with the melting point of ice"

paolo

  • Grease ice
  • Posts: 888
    • View Profile
  • Liked: 408
  • Likes Given: 16
Re: Larsen D and more
« Reply #17 on: December 15, 2020, 10:44:29 PM »
FredBear,
There has been no new calving, the icebergs, which you saw in Worldview (and the image is actually a bit foggy) are simply moved away from the coast (along with the sea ice). Below is an animation

paolo

  • Grease ice
  • Posts: 888
    • View Profile
  • Liked: 408
  • Likes Given: 16
Re: Larsen D and more
« Reply #18 on: December 16, 2020, 12:50:02 PM »
My apologies, I responded by looking at the image of Tor Bejnar, but in reality FredBear, as he pointed out, was referring to a calving further north and this one is real.
There is no Sentinel1 image from yesterday and today, so I am posting an animation based on the Sentinel1 image from 14/12 and the Worldview image.

Click to animate

Update: in the commented image I had inverted the "old rift" and "new rift" labels. It is corrected

Update two: my apologies for French
« Last Edit: December 16, 2020, 02:31:51 PM by paolo »

Tor Bejnar

  • Young ice
  • Posts: 4447
    • View Profile
  • Liked: 862
  • Likes Given: 761
Re: Larsen D and more
« Reply #19 on: December 16, 2020, 04:37:37 PM »
Good eye, Paolo!

There are some curious long rectangular icebergs (less bright than others - floes?) around 74S in this Dec. 14 PolarView image.  There are a couple of places they look like they may have come from (near orange bars).  They might be old (thick) fast-ice floes rather than icebergs from an ice shelf.
Arctic ice is healthy for children and other living things because "we cannot negotiate with the melting point of ice"

RobertM

  • New ice
  • Posts: 2
    • View Profile
  • Liked: 1
  • Likes Given: 0
Re: Larsen D and more
« Reply #20 on: March 29, 2021, 02:22:28 AM »
Is this March 24 calving of Larsen F significant? It's very far south (74º 08'), right at the SE corner of the peninsula. https://twitter.com/usnatice/status/1376208662985854976

interstitial

  • Nilas ice
  • Posts: 1784
    • View Profile
  • Liked: 431
  • Likes Given: 91
Re: Larsen D and more
« Reply #21 on: March 29, 2021, 02:38:56 AM »
Is this March 24 calving of Larsen F significant? It's very far south (74º 08'), right at the SE corner of the peninsula. https://twitter.com/usnatice/status/1376208662985854976

I think so but maybe move it to the Antarctic iceberg thread. Maybe group the Larsen  threads together? IDK
It is not a huge calving. It shows a progression of calving's southward on all of the Larsen ice shelfs.

oren

  • Moderator
  • First-year ice
  • Posts: 8021
    • View Profile
  • Liked: 3129
  • Likes Given: 3206
Re: Larsen D and more
« Reply #22 on: March 29, 2021, 03:19:40 AM »
Good point interstitial, moved here.

Hello again RobertM.

paolo

  • Grease ice
  • Posts: 888
    • View Profile
  • Liked: 408
  • Likes Given: 16
Re: Larsen D and more
« Reply #23 on: March 29, 2021, 12:12:25 PM »
Small animation about the A75 iceberg (images from 21/02, 17/03 and 29/03)
Dimensions: 16 km x 6.5 km

Click to animate and enlarge

oren

  • Moderator
  • First-year ice
  • Posts: 8021
    • View Profile
  • Liked: 3129
  • Likes Given: 3206
Re: Larsen D and more
« Reply #24 on: March 29, 2021, 12:27:11 PM »
Oren,
You will find enclosed :
> A detailed map of the Antarctic Peninsula
Can you point the location of the new calving (and Larsen F) on this detailed map?

paolo

  • Grease ice
  • Posts: 888
    • View Profile
  • Liked: 408
  • Likes Given: 16
Re: Larsen D and more
« Reply #25 on: March 29, 2021, 01:43:38 PM »
Attached:
> The Sentinel1 image with notations
> An extract from 'Ellsworth Land to Palmer Land' USGS Map
> A map of the Antarctic Peninsula

Click to enlarge

oren

  • Moderator
  • First-year ice
  • Posts: 8021
    • View Profile
  • Liked: 3129
  • Likes Given: 3206
Re: Larsen D and more
« Reply #26 on: March 29, 2021, 02:12:01 PM »
Thanks a lot!

paolo

  • Grease ice
  • Posts: 888
    • View Profile
  • Liked: 408
  • Likes Given: 16
Re: Larsen D and more
« Reply #27 on: March 29, 2021, 04:08:08 PM »
I'm adding a map I just created with the names of the Larsen Ice Shelves

Click to enlarge

paolo

  • Grease ice
  • Posts: 888
    • View Profile
  • Liked: 408
  • Likes Given: 16
Re: Larsen D and more
« Reply #28 on: February 04, 2022, 12:23:25 PM »
A large calving (about 317 km2) in January, which we missed, in what remains of Larsen B.

Oren: can you change the title of the thread to "Larsen A, B, C, D, E, F and G Ice Shelves Discussions"?
I propose to keep a single thread for all these ice shelves (described in the map in the previous post)

Click to animate and expand

oren

  • Moderator
  • First-year ice
  • Posts: 8021
    • View Profile
  • Liked: 3129
  • Likes Given: 3206
Re: Larsen D and more
« Reply #29 on: February 04, 2022, 02:04:20 PM »
We currently have 3 Larsen threads. Besides this one, we have an old one for Larsen B, but also a large and often updated thread about Larsen C.
Tracking Larsen B remnants can be done in this thread, but I think Larsen C deserves its own thread.
How about "Smaller Larsen Ice Shelves A, B, D, E, F, G"?
And I'll rename the other one to "Larsen C Ice Shelf".

BTW, nice catch.

paolo

  • Grease ice
  • Posts: 888
    • View Profile
  • Liked: 408
  • Likes Given: 16
Re: Larsen D and more
« Reply #30 on: February 04, 2022, 02:39:52 PM »
it's ok and thank you

PS: LarsenD is not so small!

PS2: Wikipedia gives LarsenC 44,200 km2 and LarsenD 22,600 km2
« Last Edit: February 04, 2022, 03:04:29 PM by paolo »

oren

  • Moderator
  • First-year ice
  • Posts: 8021
    • View Profile
  • Liked: 3129
  • Likes Given: 3206
Re: Larsen Ice Shelves A, B, D, E, F, G
« Reply #31 on: February 04, 2022, 06:18:04 PM »
Done and noted.

paolo

  • Grease ice
  • Posts: 888
    • View Profile
  • Liked: 408
  • Likes Given: 16
Re: Larsen Ice Shelves A, B, D, E, F, G
« Reply #32 on: February 07, 2022, 09:44:51 PM »
A small calving (13 km2) at the Gipps Ice Rise, which is between the Larsen C and Larsen D (the calving is on the Larsen C side)
It happened on 03/02 and I mention it because this Ice Rise is very important for the stability of the Larsen C and Larsen D and this point is to be watched.
The animation is made with S1 images from 02/02, 03/02 and 07/02, as well as a zoom of the iceberg with its measurements. In the image from 07/02, we can see that the iceberg had already moved about 20 km away from the starting point.
I add a map of the area

Click to animate and enlarge

paolo

  • Grease ice
  • Posts: 888
    • View Profile
  • Liked: 408
  • Likes Given: 16
Re: Larsen Ice Shelves A, B, D, E, F, G
« Reply #33 on: February 16, 2022, 10:28:01 PM »
This is an old calving, which I just detected today, related to the Edgeworth Glacier in the ex-Larsen A area; indeed the remains of the calving were still lying around in the bay and they intrigued me.
I am attaching two maps (the second is a zoom of the first) to locate this glacier
There were several successive calving events (at least two), but I limit myself to presenting two S2 images: one before the start of calving and one after, and more precisely the images of 20/10/2021 and 28/01/2022 (1 px = 16.4 m; scale displayed on the bottom right left)
The area concerned by the calving, calculated from two fronts is 17.2 km2, but, taking into account the displacement of the glacier (between the two images 100 days ago), I added 2.3 km2 (for the velocity of the Edgeworth glacier, as well as its tributary, I used Worldview-Ice velocity Antarctica), which leads us to a total area of 19.5 km2.

For this glacier it is a big calving

Click to animate and to enlarge the images
« Last Edit: February 16, 2022, 10:40:12 PM by paolo »

Stephan

  • Nilas ice
  • Posts: 2085
    • View Profile
  • Liked: 649
  • Likes Given: 359
Re: Larsen Ice Shelves A, B, D, E, F, G
« Reply #34 on: February 17, 2022, 07:24:43 PM »
well spotted, paolo.
Tell me, are you a detective in real life?
It is too late just to be concerned about Climate Change

paolo

  • Grease ice
  • Posts: 888
    • View Profile
  • Liked: 408
  • Likes Given: 16
Re: Larsen Ice Shelves A, B, D, E, F, G
« Reply #35 on: March 01, 2022, 10:44:10 PM »
A major calving has just occurred in Larsen D (global area 162 km2, 35.8 x 6.4 km)
Animation based on S1 high resolution images (1px = 20m) from 17/02/2022 and 01/03/2022
I also add a map to position the calving

Click to animate (twice to enlarge completely)

oren

  • Moderator
  • First-year ice
  • Posts: 8021
    • View Profile
  • Liked: 3129
  • Likes Given: 3206
Re: Larsen Ice Shelves A, B, D, E, F, G
« Reply #36 on: March 02, 2022, 12:17:52 AM »
Considering the recent activity it would be interesting to compare the Larsen D situation to 2008, when it was measured as stable/slightly advancing, 22600 km2, and considered the Antarctic Peninsula ice shelf which was farthest from risky average annual temperatures isotherms.
Interestingly, it appears recent activity is where the shelf was somewhat retreating in previous decades, while elsewhere it was advancing, if I read the diagram correctly.

Source: https://www.researchgate.net/figure/Larsen-D-Ice-Shelf_fig5_26848412


paolo

  • Grease ice
  • Posts: 888
    • View Profile
  • Liked: 408
  • Likes Given: 16
Re: Larsen Ice Shelves A, B, D, E, F, G
« Reply #37 on: March 12, 2022, 11:34:15 PM »
As can be seen, in this animation based on the high resolution S1 images (1px 20m; overall dimensions 24 x 26 km) of 16/02, 28/02 and today, the calving of the Edgeworth Glacier System continues, even if the areas are smaller.

In reality it is a complex of three glaciers: Dinsmoor, Bombardier and Edgeworth which I have indicated in the last image of the animation.

Click twice to animate and enlarge completely

oren

  • Moderator
  • First-year ice
  • Posts: 8021
    • View Profile
  • Liked: 3129
  • Likes Given: 3206
Re: Larsen Ice Shelves A, B, D, E, F, G
« Reply #38 on: March 13, 2022, 12:47:39 AM »
So first the Dinsmoor front has disconnected from the other glaciers (as shown in the "old calving" post upthread), and now it appears that Bombardier and Edgeworth fronts might be disconnected from each other soon. Every such disconnect case causes the glacier to lose support, helping to accelerate and destabilize the front.

FredBear

  • Frazil ice
  • Posts: 322
    • View Profile
  • Liked: 49
  • Likes Given: 39
Re: Larsen Ice Shelves A, B, D, E, F, G
« Reply #39 on: March 24, 2022, 07:04:23 AM »
This is an old calving, which I just detected today, related to the Edgeworth Glacier in the ex-Larsen A area; indeed the remains of the calving were still lying around in the bay and they intrigued me.
I am attaching two maps (the second is a zoom of the first) to locate this glacier
There were several successive calving events (at least two), but I limit myself to presenting two S2 images: one before the start of calving and one after, and more precisely the images of 20/10/2021 and 28/01/2022 (1 px = 16.4 m; scale displayed on the bottom right left)
The area concerned by the calving, calculated from two fronts is 17.2 km2, but, taking into account the displacement of the glacier (between the two images 100 days ago), I added 2.3 km2 (for the velocity of the Edgeworth glacier, as well as its tributary, I used Worldview-Ice velocity Antarctica), which leads us to a total area of 19.5 km2.

For this glacier it is a big calving


The ice in front of the Edgeworth Glacier (60o W line) on the edge of Larsen A had been consolidating but has recently broken down and started to disperse.
Recently ice has also been moving out from Larsen B bays - Vaughan Bay (north west) and Exasperation Inlet below it. The ice from Vaughan has been showing blue tints on Worldview (melting or old ice?). Image from 23 March.
« Last Edit: March 24, 2022, 07:10:55 AM by FredBear »

paolo

  • Grease ice
  • Posts: 888
    • View Profile
  • Liked: 408
  • Likes Given: 16
Re: Larsen Ice Shelves A, B, D, E, F, G
« Reply #40 on: April 06, 2022, 01:27:32 AM »
At Larsen B in the last few weeks there has been a series of major calvings that have involved the Evans, Green and Hektoria Glaciers (EGH).

The first image is a map of the Larsen A and B where I have indicated the position of the new calving and I have recalled the positions of previous calvings: at the Scar Inlet (Larsen B) and at the DBE: the Dinsmoor, Bombardier and Edgeworth Glaciers (Larsen A)

The second is a zoom on the three glaciers

The third is an animation based on the S1 images of 28/02, 12/03, 24/03 and 05/04 (1px = 20m ; global dimensions 28x28 km) :
The image of 28/02 is the normal situation, before any modification, in the following image the mélange of icebergs and fast ice in face of the front of glaciers has totally disappeared, no more support and the break-up will start as we can see in the two following images.

Definitely an interesting year for Larsen A and B !

Click to enlarge the images completely and to animate the third image
Click again to enlarge the images completely

oren

  • Moderator
  • First-year ice
  • Posts: 8021
    • View Profile
  • Liked: 3129
  • Likes Given: 3206
Re: Larsen Ice Shelves A, B, D, E, F, G
« Reply #41 on: April 06, 2022, 08:07:10 AM »
Similar to the DBE situation, this is some serious calving and hastens the upcoming loss of support when the EGH glacier fronts lose contact with each other.

grixm

  • Grease ice
  • Posts: 565
    • View Profile
  • Liked: 320
  • Likes Given: 108
Re: Larsen Ice Shelves A, B, D, E, F, G
« Reply #42 on: April 06, 2022, 08:25:47 AM »
Is that record retreat for those glaciers?

steve s

  • New ice
  • Posts: 91
    • View Profile
  • Liked: 4
  • Likes Given: 7
Re: Larsen Ice Shelves A, B, D, E, F, G
« Reply #43 on: April 06, 2022, 11:56:08 AM »
Is that a retrograde bed collapse? Seems likely to me from the speed, the length of the retreat (beyond the obvious ice shelf) and the degree of fragmentation, but I don't have access to a bed map to check.