Support the Arctic Sea Ice Forum and Blog

Author Topic: Lessons from COVID-19  (Read 3202 times)

Tom_Mazanec

  • Young ice
  • Posts: 2666
    • View Profile
    • Planet Mazanec
  • Liked: 513
  • Likes Given: 100
Re: Lessons from COVID-19
« Reply #100 on: April 02, 2020, 11:43:31 AM »
"If you still believed that in 2020 or even the last decade you were not paying attention. See all anti-science anti-people pro-business decisions by the current government or TARP etc before. Or the whole general set up on health care and wellfare. See Inequality thread for some nice examples."

Agree wholeheartedly here, the last "Good Old Day" was December 11th in 2000. (Yes, had to check the date of suspension of Florida recount). After that the US has not based it's policies in reality. No doubt their odd election system has skewed results even before that.  (Now they have a reverse compass needle as El Prez, while Obama said :we cannot know which end of the compass needle is the right one.' sorry frustration speaking.)
By that standard, even before then. I remember "Tricky Dick". The reason DEcember 31, 2019 will be remembered as the end of The Good Old Days is because this pandemic and its consequences will hit everybody, very hard, right away.
SHARKS (CROSSED OUT) MONGEESE (SIC) WITH FRICKIN LASER BEAMS ATTACHED TO THEIR HEADS

GoSouthYoungins

  • Nilas ice
  • Posts: 1286
    • View Profile
  • Liked: 90
  • Likes Given: 109
Re: Lessons from COVID-19
« Reply #101 on: April 02, 2020, 03:43:05 PM »
Simple lesson for anyone who hadn't figured it out yet. Elon Musk is a bad man.

He has downplayed the virus at every opportunity. He tried to keep his bay area factory open despite orders to close it. He promised 1255 FDA approved ventilators but actually delivered BiPAP machines which are plenty abundant because aerosolizing COVID-19 isn't a good idea.


Equally simple: if someone refuses to recognize that Elon Musk is a con artists who seeks out crises  to exploit low-IQ/low-info virtue-signalers, that someone is a worthless void masquerading as a genuine human.
big time oops

blumenkraft

  • Young ice
  • Posts: 3344
  • Fans of Hans Ø Club - circa 2018
    • View Profile
  • Liked: 1234
  • Likes Given: 1957
Re: Lessons from COVID-19
« Reply #102 on: April 02, 2020, 05:30:55 PM »
Believe it or not, GSY, i'm glad you are still alive.

I really thought something might have happened to you.

But to your post, blame trump, he is in charge. Elon isn't!
Everyone who can must self-isolate.

GoSouthYoungins

  • Nilas ice
  • Posts: 1286
    • View Profile
  • Liked: 90
  • Likes Given: 109
Re: Lessons from COVID-19
« Reply #103 on: April 02, 2020, 07:08:24 PM »
Thank you. I'm alive and well.

I gave up trying to get through to people. You can lead a horse to water but you can't make them drink / You can't wake a person who is pretending to be asleep.

Also I have new raised beds, chickens, goats, and a human to tend to. And I'm trying to put my writing energy into finishing a book rather than posting here. It's still great to read though.


I'm not comparing the blame Trump deserves vs Musk, I'm just pointing out what a complete ass-clown fraud Musk continues to prove himself to be.


https://ftalphaville.ft.com/2020/04/01/1585782924000/Elon-Musk-promised-ventilators--These-are-BPAP-machines-/

I'm sure he will manufacture invasive ventilators though. When? 3 months maybe, 6 months definitely. aka: never.


Another lesson from C19 that people are starting to realize: the modern economy is hyper-fragile and the financial system is a house of cards.
big time oops

longwalks1

  • Frazil ice
  • Posts: 102
    • View Profile
  • Liked: 22
  • Likes Given: 5
Re: Lessons from COVID-19
« Reply #104 on: April 03, 2020, 01:51:34 AM »
Posting here.  Mom and Dad 89 and 95 y.o.) under lockdown in senior place, rural Iowa.  Moi, I shuttle between 3 residential sites for mentally challenged under lockdowns, meds, overnights.  ...   Mar 13 - long day -  7 am to 7 pm ok, then an individual coughs, again, at risk for aspiration pneumo. I chide negelient staff, slow, give meds.  9 pm, more meds, very shallow breathing.  bad colour, I got 82 for pO2.  Nurse, 911, I follow ambulance  later to hospital, xrays, strep, influ neg.  She is released, I amdone at 2 am.  3 days later she is admitted.  Intubated.  NO NEW News.  3 days  later I go into do meds.  I don mask and ask how she is.  I state the mask is in case I am asymptomatic and carrying. There is really no one else to do meds.  I get email, she is negative, mask off.  She came back a few days later , did not improve, back in.  60 yr old mentally challenged.  Does not look good. I have seen 4 others die of aspiration pneumo since 1991 taking care of the mentally challenged.  So, I look back at all the years I and teams did right in managing dysphagias, cerebellar ataxias, ...   

    Meanwhile dad is getting cabin fever immensely.  I am trying to finesse getting the keys away from him for his car.  He calls up and want to come up,  get a bottle of wine and 1/2 gallon milk (3 oz wine at bedtime with mom) and have me drive him back and then take the car.   I know he will get tossed out of lockdown if he does that.  I say stay put, I will be by toningh.  I get on my bicycle.
   Wicked head wind, 15 miles - 25 km down to him, buy wine and milk and meet him and mom at the door.  Mission accomplished. 

    You just do what you can. when you can; seize the moment when needed.   I do have a covenant via L'Arche of a life dedicated to the mentally challenged. So I will just continue to walk 2 or 4 or 8 blocks to various work sites for my vocation. 

  Not too crazy yet in rural north central Iowa. South Dakota is being idiotic with no restrictions.   Minnesota 40 km north is much more locked down.  Hopefully they can get some crops in around here.    I just might hire somebody to put on new shingles on house, dad was delaying.  Peace out. 

oren

  • Young ice
  • Posts: 4883
    • View Profile
  • Liked: 1185
  • Likes Given: 1388
Re: Lessons from COVID-19
« Reply #105 on: April 03, 2020, 02:29:13 AM »
Thanks for sharing longwalks.

TerryM

  • First-year ice
  • Posts: 5940
    • View Profile
  • Liked: 862
  • Likes Given: 5
Re: Lessons from COVID-19
« Reply #106 on: April 03, 2020, 02:28:47 PM »
Best of luck LongW!
Keep us informed.



Kassey & Pmt
What I was trying to express was that the Post-Pandemic era is liable to be so bad that everything preceding the pandemic will be viewed as favorable by comparison.


GSY
Great to read your words again!
Tesla's expanding PR expenses will be gobbling up much of what might have gone to pay back some of the creditors.
If the past is any indication, Musk's lobbyists will make sure that lots of federal funding will be flowing into Elon's Enterprises. Whether the public forgives Musk's unforgivable actions is another matter.


Tesla needs customers, but Spacex and Hyperloop need little other than generous government contracts, and regulatory agencies blinded by greed.
I fear that in the years ahead Musk's government contacts will keep him in business even as Elon's public image tanks.
Terry

Neven

  • Administrator
  • First-year ice
  • *****
  • Posts: 7401
    • View Profile
    • Arctic Sea Ice Blog
  • Liked: 838
  • Likes Given: 497
Re: Lessons from COVID-19
« Reply #107 on: April 03, 2020, 03:29:05 PM »
And of course, we need to move parts of humanity to other planets where there is no coronavirus.
Il faut comparer, comparer, comparer, et cultiver notre jardin

Paddy

  • Grease ice
  • Posts: 594
    • View Profile
  • Liked: 40
  • Likes Given: 39
Re: Lessons from COVID-19
« Reply #108 on: April 03, 2020, 05:47:10 PM »
One thing that I expect will happen from this at an individual level is that a lot more people will start to maintain a store of long lasting goods that they need at home, so that they don't end up out of pasta / tinned tomatoes / toilet roll / whatever the next time there's a crisis.

I also wonder if fewer people will want to board a cruise ship, after the various plague ship occurrences we've been seeing with this.

On a medical level, it's possible we may identify some new broad-spectrum antiviral treatments.  We'll certainly be able to rule out a lot of candidates for such treatment, given the number of trials under way.  And I'd imagine the world's intensive care capacity may get a significant upgrade.

On a systematic level of how the world runs?  Many countries may be a little quicker to respond the next time a new infection shows similar behaviour.  But remember that there have been a lot of false alarms and contained situations while waiting for the next viral pandemic, and there will be a lot more to come after this... which will likely wear down responsiveness all over again, over time.