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vox_mundi

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2022 Food developments
« on: April 08, 2022, 03:11:03 PM »
Global Food Prices Rise to Highest Ever Levels After Russian Invasion
https://www.theguardian.com/global-development/2022/apr/08/global-food-prices-rise-to-highest-ever-levels-after-russian-invasion-ukraine-wheat

World wheat prices soared by 19.7% in March as war in Ukraine disrupted Black Sea exports, FAO price index reveals

Cooking oils, cereals and meats hit all-time highs and meant food commodities cost a third more than the same time last year, according to the Food and Agriculture Organization’s monthly food price index published on Friday.

https://www.fao.org/worldfoodsituation/foodpricesindex/en/

The FAO said these problems were likely to persist, leading to higher prices, lower stocks and uncertainty in the wheat market in the future.

“Projected stock levels were already low relative to recent years, which means that there are few supplies available to buffer the impacts of reduced exports coming from the Black Sea,”
« Last Edit: April 19, 2022, 02:17:50 PM by kassy »
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gerontocrat

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Re: 2022 Food developments
« Reply #1 on: April 08, 2022, 03:32:16 PM »
World Food Prices - a bit more info...

Also today, Megan Durisin reported at Bloomberg that, “Global food prices are surging at the fastest pace ever as the war in Ukraine chokes crop supplies, piling more inflationary pain on consumers and worsening a global hunger crisis.

“The war has wreaked havoc on supply chains in the crucial Black Sea breadbasket region, upending global trade flows and fueling panic about shortages of key staples such as wheat and cooking oils. That’s sent food prices — which were already surging before the conflict started — to a record, with a United Nations’ index of world costs soaring another 13% last month.”



Durisin added that, “The FAO’s gauge of global prices has jumped about 75% since mid-2020, eclipsing levels seen in 2008 and 2011 that contributed to global food crises. Last month’s surge helped prices round out a seventh straight quarterly gain, the longest such run since 2008.

“The UN has warned that prices could still climb much more.”

Dow Jones writer Yusuf Khan reported today that, “Much of the rise has been driven from higher grain prices, with the FAO’s cereal index moving 17.1% higher month on month, mainly from the uncertainty surrounding grain exports from Russia and Ukraine. Russia and Ukraine accounted for 30% of global wheat exports and 20% of maize over the last three years, the FAO said.

“To add to the strain faced in Europe from grains, fears over American supply and crop conditions have also exacerbated the rise in prices, causing a 19.7 increase in wheat prices month-on-month.”

Meanwhile, Reuters writer Natalia Zinets reported today that, “Ukrainian Prime Minister Denys Shmyhal said on Friday this year’s grain harvest is likely to be 20% less than last year because of a reduced sowing area following Russia’s invasion.

“He said there was a shortage of fuel for farmers but Ukraine knew how to keep them supplied. He also said Ukraine had large stocks of grain, cereals and vegetable oil, and could feed its population.”

And Associated Press writer Bassem Mroue reported yesterday that, “Rising food prices as a result of the Russian invasion of Ukraine are increasing the risk of malnutrition of millions of children in the Middle East and North Africa, the U.N. children’s agency warned Thursday.”

“UNICEF warned that if the situation continues, it will severely impact children in the region, especially in Egypt, Lebanon, Libya, Sudan, Syria and Yemen, countries that were struggling with conflicts and severe economic crises even before the war in Europe began,” the AP article said.

Also this week, Reuters writer Lilian Wagdy reported that, “Iraq’s Agriculture Minister Muhammad Karim al-Khafaji said on Wednesday that Iraq has managed to secure three million tonnes of wheat, adding food security has been ensured until the end of the year.”
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El Cid

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Re: 2022 Food developments
« Reply #2 on: April 08, 2022, 03:48:58 PM »
3 screenshots of exchange traded corn , wheat and soybean prices (all 2022 September deliveries, USD). Corn is especially relentless in its rise. BTW, USD is basically strengthening vs all other currencies...so in most other currencies this looks even worse

Gray-Wolf

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Re: 2022 Food developments
« Reply #3 on: April 08, 2022, 04:12:24 PM »
Global Food Prices Rise to Highest Ever Levels After Russian Invasion
https://www.theguardian.com/global-development/2022/apr/08/global-food-prices-rise-to-highest-ever-levels-after-russian-invasion-ukraine-wheat

World wheat prices soared by 19.7% in March as war in Ukraine disrupted Black Sea exports, FAO price index reveals

Cooking oils, cereals and meats hit all-time highs and meant food commodities cost a third more than the same time last year, according to the Food and Agriculture Organization’s monthly food price index published on Friday.

https://www.fao.org/worldfoodsituation/foodpricesindex/en/

The FAO said these problems were likely to persist, leading to higher prices, lower stocks and uncertainty in the wheat market in the future.

“Projected stock levels were already low relative to recent years, which means that there are few supplies available to buffer the impacts of reduced exports coming from the Black Sea,”

So how will Autumn this year go for the developed world?

Ukrainian Wheat?, Grain Basket U.S. struggling without Russian fertilisers & Russia unlikely to spare us its Grain?

Up until now folk have been kept quiet with a combination of "Bread & Circuses"......take away the 'Bread' & what are You left with?
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kassy

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Re: 2022 Food developments
« Reply #4 on: April 08, 2022, 08:35:04 PM »
What will happen first in the poorer regions that depended on these imports? A whole lot of unrest i guess.

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Gray-Wolf

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Re: 2022 Food developments
« Reply #5 on: April 09, 2022, 01:40:04 PM »
What will happen first in the poorer regions that depended on these imports? A whole lot of unrest i guess.

After the Rusian drought of 2010 they just took the shortfall from the 'Aid Budget' so I guess the same would occur again?
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sidd

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Re: 2022 Food developments
« Reply #6 on: April 16, 2022, 10:01:18 AM »
Not really about climate change i suppose: RT on china reserves

"US Department of Agriculture estimated that China is expected to have 69% of the globe’s maize reserves in the first half of the crop year 2022, 60% of its rice and 51% of its wheat."

https://www.rt.com/business/553931-china-no-grain-to-west/

i havent yet tracked down the US DOA report ...

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johnm33

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Re: 2022 Food developments
« Reply #7 on: April 16, 2022, 11:25:02 AM »
I read somewhere that the Chinese have been building stocks of grains aiming for 4 years of reserves, initiated after one the epidemics that hit their livestock. It may prove to be an extremely wise move with the widespread famine due after this N.H. harvests fall short. Russia, given the sanction regime against it's trading may consider that it's a wise move for them to do the same, since it may not be possible for them to buy in after a poor harvest. Whilst there's still time every government should be maximising food production, at least where they give a toss about their populace.

Shared Humanity

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Re: 2022 Food developments
« Reply #8 on: April 16, 2022, 04:18:42 PM »
I read somewhere that the Chinese have been building stocks of grains aiming for 4 years of reserves, initiated after one the epidemics that hit their livestock. It may prove to be an extremely wise move with the widespread famine due after this N.H. harvests fall short. Russia, given the sanction regime against it's trading may consider that it's a wise move for them to do the same, since it may not be possible for them to buy in after a poor harvest. Whilst there's still time every government should be maximising food production, at least where they give a toss about their populace.

I may be misreading your statement.

In the most recent agricultural year, 2.8 billion tons of cereal stocks were produced and consumed globally. There were 850 million tons of grain stored at the end of this year, only 30% of the world's annual need. The world is absolutely dependent on each year's harvest to avoid mass starvation. There is no way that any single nation could accumulate 4 years of reserves.

https://www.fao.org/worldfoodsituation/csdb/en/

Even more problematic, cereal grains cannot be stored for more than a year before serious problems occur.

https://www.sciencedirect.com/topics/food-science/storage-of-cereals

« Last Edit: April 16, 2022, 04:26:12 PM by Shared Humanity »

El Cid

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Re: 2022 Food developments
« Reply #9 on: April 16, 2022, 05:58:02 PM »
Even more problematic, cereal grains cannot be stored for more than a year before serious problems occur.

https://www.sciencedirect.com/topics/food-science/storage-of-cereals

Joseph from the Bible luckily did not  read sciencedirect and stored the grain during the 7 good years preparing for the 7 lean years...


In reality grains can be stored for many-many years:

"A good rule of thumb is to rotate wheat so that no stored product is older than 5 years. However, older stored wheat did make acceptable bread. A B.Y.U. study indicated that, regardless of headspace oxygen level, wheat packaged in No. 10 cans throughout 32 years of storage at ambient or cooler temperatures made bread acceptable to a majority of consumers."


https://extension.usu.edu/preserve-the-harvest/research/storing-wheat

Shared Humanity

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Re: 2022 Food developments
« Reply #10 on: April 16, 2022, 06:49:42 PM »
Even more problematic, cereal grains cannot be stored for more than a year before serious problems occur.

https://www.sciencedirect.com/topics/food-science/storage-of-cereals

Joseph from the Bible luckily did not  read sciencedirect and stored the grain during the 7 good years preparing for the 7 lean years...


In reality grains can be stored for many-many years:

"A good rule of thumb is to rotate wheat so that no stored product is older than 5 years. However, older stored wheat did make acceptable bread. A B.Y.U. study indicated that, regardless of headspace oxygen level, wheat packaged in No. 10 cans throughout 32 years of storage at ambient or cooler temperatures made bread acceptable to a majority of consumers."


https://extension.usu.edu/preserve-the-harvest/research/storing-wheat

I am not talking about storing grain on a shelf in your kitchen. I am talking about cereal crop that is stored in silos.

vox_mundi

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Re: 2022 Food developments
« Reply #11 on: April 16, 2022, 07:02:12 PM »
Results may vary ...

https://www.eater.com/2017/12/12/16757660/doomsday-biscuit-all-purpose-survival-cracker

... “This is one of the oldest and most proven forms of food known to man,” Paul Visher, deputy assistant secretary of defense for civil defense, explained to Congress as he presented a plan to mass-produce the crackers. “It has been the subsistence ration for many portions of the earth for thousands of years. Its shelf life has been established by being edible after 3,000 years in an Egyptian pyramid.” After millions of dollars and years of research, it turned out that after a nuclear apocalypse, the remnants of the American civilization would survive by chowing down on whole-wheat crackers. The government dubbed its creation the “All-Purpose Survival Cracker.” — ultimately more than 20 billion crackers were produced by the end of the program in 1964 — and then sealed in airtight tins that varied in size depending on the manufacturer

... All-purpose survival-cracker tins were tested for freshness annually by, of all government entities, the U.S. Army Veterinary Corps, and they appeared to be hold up over the first decade following their introduction.

One Pentagon official, appearing to not understand the original purpose of the biscuits, reported that the rations dispatched for disaster victims weren’t meant to be a complete diet on their own. “You wouldn’t want to eat them for a couple of weeks with nothing else,” he said. “They’re good with little bit of cheese on them with a martini on the side.”

... Surplus cracker caches were dispatched to Guatemala to aid victims of a devastating 1976 earthquake. The recipients of the disaster food reported developing what one newspaper described as “severe gastric disturbances” after ingesting the biscuits.

In mid-1976, E. Erie Jones, the Illinois state emergency coordinator, convened a group in his shag-carpeted office in Springfield for a taste test; it didn’t even start well. The mere smell from the newly opened tin caused coughing fits. He took a single bite, grimaced, then canceled the rest of the experiment. In reporting the taste test gone wrong, the Chicago Tribune declared that the “Survival biscuits [would be] better as weapons” than food if a war did unfold.

That fall, after hearing similar reports from around the country, the federal government recommended officials discontinue the use of the millions of stored biscuits. By 1978, the federal government’s civil preparedness office issued what amounted to a nationwide recall of any crackers that remained in shelter stockpiles. “As a result of recent laboratory and other tests, a high probability exists that all of the cereal-based rations stored have become rancid,” the circular said. “It is recommended that cereal-based rations no longer be considered as shelter supplies and should be destroyed or disposed of.”

... Iris Weinshall, the city’s transportation commissioner at the time, was brave enough to taste one of the forgotten All-Purpose Survival Crackers. “It tasted like cardboard, but with a nasty backbite that stayed in your mouth for hours,” she told the New York Times. “I cannot think of eating a saltine now without that taste coming up.”
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johnm33

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Re: 2022 Food developments
« Reply #12 on: April 16, 2022, 09:15:37 PM »
SH "I am not talking about storing grain on a shelf in your kitchen. I am talking about cereal crop that is stored in silos."
Reading your link it appears that for strategic storage there are various possiblities. Lower temps, reduce moisture content, cleanse before storage, and reduced oxygen environment.
IIRC the article I read was dealing more with what China does to make use of it's excess $ so food storage was incidental to the narrative, I took the RT article to be the first confirmation that there was some truth to it. Taking the article as true then China with 20% of the worlds population has stored foods at 2.5 to 3+ times that ratio, if my boe maths is correct. I imagine having taken due diligence in accumulating and storing such reserves as they have then the bulk of it's costs are sunk and releasing/recycling them before time would be, for them, a waste of resources.

kassy

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Re: 2022 Food developments
« Reply #13 on: April 16, 2022, 09:43:54 PM »
Lets skip speculation and all that. This thread is for climate change and it´s long term impact on food. With recent developments we might need a separate thread for the 2022 consequences which are a mix of several recent events.
 
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sidd

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Re: 2022 Food developments
« Reply #14 on: April 16, 2022, 11:09:10 PM »
I have a neighbour who has stored twenty tons of soyabeans for six years now ... its fine. We joke about it sometimes ...

sidd

Shared Humanity

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Re: 2022 Food developments
« Reply #15 on: April 17, 2022, 01:55:44 PM »
Lets skip speculation and all that. This thread is for climate change and it´s long term impact on food. With recent developments we might need a separate thread for the 2022 consequences which are a mix of several recent events.

My comment about world cereal production, consumption and grain stores is relevant. Climate change will have an impact on cereal crop production. We need to understand that 70% of the world's cereal grain requirements for this year need to be met by this year's harvest. There isn't some grand surplus of grain that we can draw on to feed the world. We could not build up such a surplus even if we needed to as grain production and consumption are pretty evenly matched. I am not trying to suggest a catastrophe is imminent. I am merely providing some data as context for this discussion.
« Last Edit: April 17, 2022, 02:50:51 PM by Shared Humanity »

kassy

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Re: 2022 Food developments
« Reply #16 on: April 17, 2022, 05:28:14 PM »
That is a great point. My comment wasn't aimed at that.
Looking though the thread i also noticed i missed one critical article which lead to the recent posts for which i shall blame the guy at the scroll wheel.  :)

I also don't want to suggest a catastrophe but the combined shock in food prices/availability and the the high gas prices, high fertilizer cost etc does not bode well.

Anyway continue the discussion. I will split the relevant posts into a 2022 thread later.
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El Cid

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Re: 2022 Food developments
« Reply #17 on: April 18, 2022, 09:21:48 AM »
Couple of relevant things:

1) while it is true that  annual consumption and production of grains is close
2) yet it is not necessarily so as grains CAN be stored for years without problem
3) governments choose not to keep big piles of grains as it would be costly but
4) if there were shortages you can be sure that

4a) there would be rationing and

4b) as most of corn and soybeans is used as animal feed which is not very effective from a calorific point of view for humans, animals would be slaughtered and instead of meat grains and soybeans would be directly consumed which makes it possible to supply billions of people with food.

There will be no hunger in the developed world

SteveMDFP

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Re: 2022 Food developments
« Reply #18 on: April 18, 2022, 02:31:13 PM »

There will be no hunger in the developed world

Quite right.  No hunger in the high- and middle-income countries--as long as there's a reasonable safety net.

In the US, the food program is SNAP (formerly Food Stamps, the more common colloquial term still).  This program is quite miserly in amount of assistance, and the reductions taken with even meagre income.  If you earn enough to pay your rent, you probably won't qualify for any food assistance.

I've been helping a few who are in this kind of bind.  I'm able to, and I'm happy to help, but it pisses me off that this extremely wealthy nation is too miserly to help its own citizens on a systematic basis.

But of course, people in low-income countries have it even worse.  In our current global situation, meat-eating takes on a special moral dimension.  Grain-fed livestock is a wasteful approach to grain resources, and quite a lot of people will starve in the coming year (or years). 

The Walrus

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Re: 2022 Food developments
« Reply #19 on: April 18, 2022, 11:24:59 PM »

There will be no hunger in the developed world

Quite right.  No hunger in the high- and middle-income countries--as long as there's a reasonable safety net.

In the US, the food program is SNAP (formerly Food Stamps, the more common colloquial term still).  This program is quite miserly in amount of assistance, and the reductions taken with even meagre income.  If you earn enough to pay your rent, you probably won't qualify for any food assistance.

I've been helping a few who are in this kind of bind.  I'm able to, and I'm happy to help, but it pisses me off that this extremely wealthy nation is too miserly to help its own citizens on a systematic basis.

But of course, people in low-income countries have it even worse.  In our current global situation, meat-eating takes on a special moral dimension.  Grain-fed livestock is a wasteful approach to grain resources, and quite a lot of people will starve in the coming year (or years).

Yes, it has always been that way.  Hence the term fat cats, because the rich usually ate quite well.  In recent decades, food has become relatively cheaper and more widely available.  Consequently, world hunger has fallen significantly.  Claims of mass starvation have been made for half a century, without fruition.  Local pockets have occurred due mainly to local events.

kassy

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Re: 2022 Food developments
« Reply #20 on: April 19, 2022, 02:19:10 PM »
I split a number of posts out for the 2022 food developments. 
It is also complicated by the fertilizer situation and high fuel costs and some Covid lag so we will see what happens.
« Last Edit: April 19, 2022, 02:30:33 PM by kassy »
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kassy

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Re: 2022 Food developments
« Reply #21 on: April 21, 2022, 10:53:59 AM »
World facing ‘human catastrophe’ food crisis from Russia’s invasion of Ukraine, says World Bank

Historic rise in the food prices could lead hundreds of millions people across the world into poverty


"It’s a human catastrophe, meaning nutrition goes down. But then it also becomes a political challenge for governments who can’t do anything about it, they didn’t cause it and they see the prices going up," World Bank president David Malpass said in an interview with the BBC.

Mr Malpass warned that the historic rise in the food prices could lead hundreds of millions people across the world into poverty and lower nutrition, if the crisis keeps growing.

According to estimates by the World Bank, there could be a huge 37 per cent spike in prices of food which will be “magnified for the poor”, who will “eat less and have less money for anything else such as schooling.

“...And so that means that it’s really an unfair kind of crisis. It hits the poorest the hardest. That was true also of Covid”, the report added.

The World Bank top official added that the price spikes are broad and deep.

“It’s affecting food of all different kinds… oil, grains, and then it gets into other crops, corn crops, because they go up when wheat goes up,” Mr Malpass said.

He added that while there was enough food in the world to feed everyone and even the global stockpiles are large by historical standards, there will have to a sharing or sales process to make sure the food reaches where it is needed.

He also suggested that the countries should not subsidise production or cap prices.

The focus, instead Mr Malpass said, needs to be on increasing supplies of fertilisers and food across the world, in addition to the targeted assistance for the very poorest people.

Warning of a knock on “crisis within a crisis” springing from the inability of developing nations to service their large pandemic debts even as the prices of food and energy rise.

Mr Malpass said: "This is a very real prospect. It’s happening for some countries, we don’t know how far it’ll go. As many as 60% of the poorest countries right now are either in debt distress or at high risk of being in debt distress.”

...

https://www.independent.co.uk/news/world/europe/world-bank-human-catastrophe-russia-ukraine-b2062138.html

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The Walrus

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Re: 2022 Food developments
« Reply #22 on: April 21, 2022, 11:57:12 PM »
Yes, people in the undeveloped world are not starving due to food shortages.  Rather, they are going hungry because they are poor.  Rising food prices will not help their situation.  The wealthy nations cannot overcome this situation by doling out food, which is a temporary fix only.  COVID showed us that.  As infrastructure closed down, food could not reach those most in need.  The wealthy nations had plenty of food stockpiles, but infrastructure issues led to shortages, and consequently price increases.  Those countries which have experienced wealth increases, like China, have seen a large decrease in hunger. 

There are other issues involved, but poverty is still the leading cause of hunger.

vox_mundi

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Re: 2022 Food developments
« Reply #23 on: April 23, 2022, 03:31:48 PM »
https://www.bbc.com/news/business-61193141

BBC : "The conflict continues to have a wider impact, with shoppers in the UK now facing a limit on purchase of cooking oil due to disruption to exports from Ukraine"

Some supermarkets are limiting how much cooking oil customers are able to buy as supplies are hit by war in Ukraine.

Olive, rapeseed and sunflower oils are included in the limits being put in place by some supermarkets, both in-store and online.

... shoppers can be reassured that there are plenty of alternatives when it comes to cooking oils.

"We are used to an abundance of varieties, what we may see is that they become more limited," he says.

But he also warned that sunflower oil may soon be unavailable on the shelves. "These limits may delay things a bit, but in a couple of months, there won't be any sunflower oil available to buy," he suggests.

"We are used to an abundance of varieties, what we may see is that they become more limited," he says.

But he also warned that sunflower oil may soon be unavailable on the shelves. "These limits may delay things a bit, but in a couple of months, there won't be any sunflower oil available to buy,"
he suggests.

------------------------------------------



------------------------------------------

Sunflower oil: UK bottler has a few weeks' supply left
https://www.bbc.com/news/business-60941091

The biggest cooking oil bottler for UK shops has said it only has a few weeks' supply of sunflower oil left.

Ukraine and Russia produce most of the world's sunflower oil and the war is disrupting exports, said Edible Oils.

The company, which packages oil for 75% of the UK retail market, is ramping up supplies of other oils for shoppers.

If you buy any cooking oil on the supermarket shelves, chances are it has come from the Edible Oils plant in Erith, on the outskirts of south-east London. It bottles oil for brands and retailers own label products.

"From a UK consumer perspective, sunflower oil is the biggest oil. It's used more than anything else," said Mr Matthews.

... For grocery expert, Ged Futter, the food industry is now grappling with supply issues not experienced since the end of World War Two.

... "At the moment, Ukrainian farmers should be sowing the seeds now for the harvest in October and November.

"Clearly that's not going to happen… we're probably going to miss the season so we could be impacted for 12-18 months."

... "There's an incredible scramble. Everyone's doing the same thing. So while sunflower oil is impossible to get at the moment, rapeseed oil is possible but difficult to get as well obviously because everyone's having the same idea, as prices are skyrocketing at the moment."

--------------------------------------------------

... meanwhile, in Mariupol, residents haven't had a full meal in 8 weeks
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kassy

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Re: 2022 Food developments
« Reply #24 on: April 23, 2022, 06:17:56 PM »
Add to that:

Quote
Vrees voor nog groter tekort aan bak- en braadolie door exportban Indonesië

...

Indonesië voegt zich namelijk bij een reeks landen die de export van bakolie verbieden vanwege plaatselijke tekorten en oplopende prijzen. Indonesië is goed voor meer dan een derde van de wereldwijde export van plantaardige olie.

...

In ontwikkelingslanden als India zullen de grootste klappen vallen. Deze landen zijn qua voedingspatroon sterk afhankelijk van de invoer van palmolie als goedkoper alternatief voor de duurdere soja-, zonnebloem- en canolaolie.

https://www.nu.nl/economie/6196848/vrees-voor-nog-groter-tekort-aan-bak-en-braadolie-door-exportban-indonesie.html

Indonesia joins the list of countries forbidding the export of baking oils due to local shortages and escalating prices. They export a third of plant based baking oils in the world.

India and similar countries will be hit by this because they import a lot of palm oil (which i guess is Indonesia's main export) because it is cheaper the soy, sunflower or canola oil.

PS: as suggested in one of the comments below the article you can buy an Airfryer. Yes, you probably can...  ::)
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El Cid

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Re: 2022 Food developments
« Reply #25 on: April 23, 2022, 07:08:32 PM »
Russia and Ukraine produce 50% of the world's sunflower supply (15-15 bn tons each). The third placed country is Argentina with 3.8 bn! That is how concentrated production is.

If there is going to be a shortage of any agriproduct due to the war in Ukraine  then it is sunflower oil for sure. Unless the war comes to a quick end, it will simply not be available.  (due to the replacement effect this will most surely drive up the prices of all cooking oils as well)

BTW in all "normal" wars there is rationing, so we should prepare for that too. Rationed cooking oil, gasoline, natural gas, etc...brave new world


https://www.atlasbig.com/en-us/countries-sunflower-production

kassy

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Re: 2022 Food developments
« Reply #26 on: April 23, 2022, 07:56:09 PM »
Yes and the replacement effect is real for all kinds of things. There was also a story about SEA where the wood prices jumped up because richer people started buying wood because the other fuel prices went up. No link since this was from before the thread started.

A bit of rationing is not that bad for the rich west since we waste so much resources.

I do fear for the consequences in all those other places which are missing imports which they can't really replace. The fertilizer prices hit all the small farmers too so that does not help with local production.

Our current JIT model does not really handle supply shocks that well.
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etienne

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Re: 2022 Food developments
« Reply #27 on: April 23, 2022, 08:27:40 PM »
The fertilizer prices hit all the small farmers too so that does not help with local production.
This is not totally true. Some farmers were already before the price increase too poor to buy fertilizers.
Here is also a link to an organic agricultural school in Colombia.
https://fundaninosesperanza.org/granja-los-pinos/

El Cid

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Re: 2022 Food developments
« Reply #28 on: April 24, 2022, 09:33:29 AM »
Some farmers were already before the price increase too poor to buy fertilizers.
Here is also a link to an organic agricultural school in Colombia.
https://fundaninosesperanza.org/granja-los-pinos/

While some very poor countries (mostly in Africa) and also organic/soil regen producers in developed countries do not use mass produced fertilizers (replacing it with compost and/or N-fixing covercrops and/or manure) but even smallholders in middle income countries use it extensively, eg:

https://data.worldbank.org/indicator/AG.CON.FERT.ZS?locations=ZJ

Latin-American average fertilizer use /ha is 171 kg (in Europe it's 154 kg, in S.Asia it's 170 kg).

The price and (un)availability of N-fertilizers will surely reduce production in many places. P and K are not so much of a problem as those stay in the soil for longer but N needs to be added in modern production every year...

etienne

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Re: 2022 Food developments
« Reply #29 on: April 24, 2022, 04:59:13 PM »
If you look the data of the individual countries, you can guess that the less industrial agriculture (Bolivia) uses less N.
In other countries (Chile, Colombia), consumption has been reduced a lot.

Bruce Steele

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Re: 2022 Food developments
« Reply #30 on: April 24, 2022, 06:01:50 PM »
I asked the owner of a local multimillion dollar organic produce operation about fertilizer costs this year and was surprised to hear that organic fertilizer costs hadn’t gone up too much. Conventional farmers that can access chicken manure are using as much chicken as they can get to replace fossil fertilizers but only farmers near poultry operations can utilize chicken manure. Although liquid  organic fertilizer hasn’t jumped in price it is still way more expensive than conventional operators can afford.

https://www.agriculture.com/news/crops/what-are-farmers-doing-to-overcome-high-fertilizer-prices

Most vegetarians don’t understand how reliant we are on chickens for organic fertilizer but without farm animals the cost of “organic nitrogen “ would cripple most organic production.
We have lost about 30 million chickens and turkeys to avian flu and chicken fertilizer maybe isn’t going to be cheap if the outbreak continues and spreads. Just a thought.

sidd

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Re: 2022 Food developments
« Reply #31 on: April 24, 2022, 09:45:55 PM »
Avian flu hits chicken concentration camps in PA: 1.4 million chickens killed

"a case of highly pathogenic avian influenza in a commercial layer chicken flock, in Lancaster County, Pennsylvania."

"first confirmed case of HPAI in Pennsylvania in commercial poultry since an outbreak in 1983-84."

"There were 1.4 million birds in the infected flock, all of which were culled and composted"

https://www.farmanddairy.com/news/1-4-million-birds-culled-in-first-bird-flu-outbreak-in-pennsylvania/713994.html

The existence of these mass chicken operations is an obscenity. Please pause a moment and think before you buy their products.

sidd

Bruce Steele

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Re: 2022 Food developments
« Reply #32 on: April 25, 2022, 01:40:53 AM »
Sidd, Yes terrible but that is where organic fertilizer comes from.
I keep a few hens that run loose. There are a couple chicks with them right now. The hen is teaching them about hawks and how to hide from them.
In the US there are a lot of people who could keep a couple hens ,even in some urban environs, but they don’t. They used to keep some chickens, grow some vegetables and a couple fruit trees. But now you have to look to find gardens, or gardeners. I don’t know the value in telling people that they are responsible for the treatment of the animals they eat. Society shunts the responsibility to someone else, someone we can ignore or look down upon. Everything comes down to money, ease and the soma of willful ignorance .
 Sidd, Where would you propose to get nitrogen ? I know legumes are good but they only subsidize the nitrogen corn needs in the rotation. I don’t believe we can feed everyone with organic production even if we wanted to because there is not enough organic fertilizer sources. Conventional agriculture needs lots of reform but like everything else we will postpone change as long as possible and buy cheap factory food without the slightest guilt regarding it’s source.
 I will be farming at a loss this year. Barley has risen from $350 to $560 a ton. Processing ( slaughter,cut&wrap) have risen from $1.10 to $1.90lb.  So input costs have risen over 50% but you can’t sell $20 a lb. pork for $30. Ethics isn’t something that can be marketed, it is what you teach your children ,right? Now explain to your kids why they can’t eat at McDonalds ,like all their friends.

 

El Cid

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Re: 2022 Food developments
« Reply #33 on: April 25, 2022, 07:41:40 AM »

 Sidd, Where would you propose to get nitrogen ? I know legumes are good but they only subsidize the nitrogen corn needs in the rotation. I don’t believe we can feed everyone with organic production even if we wanted to because there is not enough organic fertilizer sources.

Bruce, I think you are wrong about that. Most of our corn is used for ethanol and animal feed. Soybeans are used almost exclusively for animal feed (despite being a great protein source). Even lower crop yields resulting from organic practices would easily be enough to provide food for all,  if people stopped eating meat (or reduced it to a minimum). I haven't eaten meat in 30yrs. My two sons were brought up without meat (although they do sometimes eat meat at school, but not very often). They are very healthy, the older one is 192 cm (6ft4inches or something like that) tall, so I don't think it hurt them very much :)

According to ourworldindata:

Livestock takes up nearly 80% of global agricultural land, yet produces less than 20% of the world’s supply of calories (as shown in the visualization)

https://ourworldindata.org/agricultural-land-by-global-diets

I think the soultion is not that difficult (if people wanted it): keep animals only in marginal lands, and use good arable land to produce human food. And the Dutch - using clover-rotations could provide enough nitrogen already in the 18th century...same for Masanobu Fukuoka and his famous clover-barley-rice rotation in Japan...Gabe Brown grows decent corn without insutrial fertilizers (though he keeps animals)

sidd

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Re: 2022 Food developments
« Reply #34 on: April 25, 2022, 07:47:44 AM »
Re: we will postpone change as long as possible and buy cheap factory food without the slightest guilt regarding it’s source

That is what i see. Therefore my plea to pause and think before purchase.

Re: explain to your kids why they can’t eat at McDonalds ,like all their friends.

take em for a drive down 85 in colorado, say start in Cheyenne and wind up in denver.

sidd

kassy

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Re: 2022 Food developments
« Reply #35 on: April 26, 2022, 10:41:33 AM »
Zimbabwe Loaf of Bread Now Costs $2, a 100% Increase Since Russia Invaded Ukraine

HARARE, ZIMBABWE  —
One of the citizens feeling the pinch of rising prices in Zimbabwe is Christine Kayumba. She says she can’t afford to buy bread for her four dependents on her salary of less than $250 a month — because a loaf now costs more than $2.

The high school English teacher says she cooks a bland, thin porridge three times a day, and rarely serves rice as it is now expensive too.

“This price increase of bread has reduced me to nothing,” she told VOA. “I don’t feel I am still the mother figure, the bread winner for my family. Because I am failing to provide, each and every morning they wake up crying for porridge, crying for bread.”

...

Tafadzwa Musarara is the chairman of the Grain Millers Association of Zimbabwe, which imports grain. He said the Russia-Ukraine conflict is the main cause for the price hike.

“As early as November last year, we were unable to load wheat from that region because political tensions had gone high, and insurers revoked their coverages. This is a supplier who was supplying us with good wheat, accounting for 65% of the wheat that we need.”

Musarara said the impact of the crisis in Ukraine was immediately felt in Zimbabwe. “Suddenly we woke up without that supply... the inflation on the price of bread, the increase on the price of bread is an imported factor.”

Musarara added that a consignment of Zimbabwe’s wheat has been stuck in the embattled Ukrainian city of Mariupol for weeks now. He added that the war is pushing people to look for ways to meet the need in the country. “Now we are making our efforts to see how we can get [it] from other countries. [In] Australia, there is the issue of floods, which affected their agriculture. We are now pushing towards getting wheat from Canada and other countries.”

...

https://www.voanews.com/a/zimbabwe-loaf-of-bread-now-costs-2-a-100-increase-since-russia-invaded-ukraine-/6545373.html
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vox_mundi

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Re: 2022 Food developments
« Reply #36 on: April 26, 2022, 04:49:15 PM »
Russia’s War Heats Up Cooking Oil Prices In Global Squeeze
https://apnews.com/article/russia-ukraine-covid-business-health-africa-688a358195a4723fc862cfe3f9e60474

Global cooking oil prices have been rising since the COVID-19 pandemic began for multiple reasons, from poor harvests in South America to virus-related labor shortages and steadily increasing demand from the biofuel industry. The war in Ukraine — which supplies nearly half of the world’s sunflower oil, on top of the 25% from Russia — has interrupted shipments and sent cooking oil prices spiraling.

The conflict has further fueled already high food and energy costs, hitting the poorest people hardest.

The food supply is particularly at risk as the war has disrupted crucial grain shipments from Ukraine and Russia and worsened a global fertilizer crunch that will mean costlier, less abundant food. The loss of affordable supplies of wheat, barley and other grains raises the prospect of food shortages and political instability in Middle Eastern, African and some Asian countries where millions rely on subsidized bread and cheap noodles.

Vegetable oil prices hit a record high in February, then increased another 23% in March, according to the U.N. Food and Agriculture Organization. Soybean oil, which sold for $765 per metric ton in 2019, was averaging $1,957 per metric ton in March, the World Bank said. Palm oil prices were up 200% and are set to go even higher after Indonesia, one of the world’s top producers, bans cooking oil exports starting Thursday to protect domestic supply.

Some supermarkets in Turkey have imposed limits on the amount of vegetable oil households can purchase after concerns about shortages sparked panic-buying. Some stores in Spain, Italy and the United Kingdom also have set limits. German shoppers are posting photos on social media of empty shelves where sunflower and canola oil usually sit. In a recent tweet, Kenya’s main power company warned that thieves are draining toxic fluid from electrical transformers and reselling it as cooking oil.

“We will just have to boil everything now, the days of the frying pan are gone,” said Glaudina Nyoni, scanning prices in a supermarket in Harare, Zimbabwe, where vegetable oil costs have almost doubled since the outbreak of the war. A 2-liter bottle now costs up to $9.

... The high cost of cooking oil is partly behind recent protests in Jakarta. Indonesia has imposed price caps on palm oil at home and will ban exports, creating a new squeeze worldwide. Palm oil has been sought as an alternative for sunflower oil and is used in many products, from cookies to cosmetics.

... Big companies are feeling the pain, too. London-based Unilever — maker of Dove soap and Hellmann’s mayonnaise — said it has contracts for critical ingredients like palm oil for the first half of the year. But it warned investors that its costs could rise significantly in the second half.

Cargill, a global food giant that makes vegetable oils, said its customers are changing formulas and experimenting with different kinds of oils at a higher rate than usual. That can be tricky because oils have different properties; olive oil burns at a lower temperature than sunflower oil, for example, while palm oil is more viscous.

... Longer term, the crisis may lead countries to reconsider biofuel mandates, which dictate the amount of vegetable oils that must be blended with fuel in a bid to reduce emissions and energy imports. In the U.S., for example, 42% of soybean oil goes toward biofuel production, Glauber said. Indonesia recently delayed a plan to require 40% palm oil-based biodiesel, while the European Commission said it would support member states that choose to reduce their biofuel mandates.
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Shared Humanity

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Re: 2022 Food developments
« Reply #37 on: May 14, 2022, 04:50:59 PM »
I thought I would expand on the global cereal grain analysis I provided here...

https://forum.arctic-sea-ice.net/index.php/topic,3767.msg335742.html#msg335742

...by providing a snapshot of China, the world's largest producer and consumer of cereal grains. The data can be found here.

https://www.fas.usda.gov/data/china-grain-and-feed-annual-7

The report I am drawing from is for the 2020/2021 season. The link to the pdf is here.

https://apps.fas.usda.gov/newgainapi/api/Report/DownloadReportByFileName?fileName=Grain%20and%20Feed%20Annual_Beijing_China%20-%20People%27s%20Republic%20of_04-01-2021.pdf

The numbers below represent the 3 main cereal grains produced and consumed on the planet. (corn, rice, wheat) Here is a brief summary of this most recent year for China with regards to these cereal grains. These numbers can be found in the linked report.

Production: 670 million tonnes
Consumption: 608 million tonnes
Forecasted Imports: 30 million tonnes
Stores:101 million tonnes

China is simply the largest breadbasket in the world. It produces 25% of the world's three major cereal grains but also consumes nearly that much. There was a suggestion that China was working to store a 4 year reserve of cereal grains. This is not the case and is not possible. They currently have stored 17% of their annual cereal grain requirements. Worldwide grain stores are 30% of annual requirements so China has less grain stored vs. annual requirements than the world as a whole.
« Last Edit: May 15, 2022, 01:07:07 AM by Shared Humanity »

Shared Humanity

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Re: 2022 Food developments
« Reply #38 on: May 14, 2022, 05:21:25 PM »
I thought I would provide a ranking of cereal production by country. This ranking is from 2017 but it is still an accurate assessment of the relative importance of each country with regards to feeding the planet.

https://www.indexmundi.com/facts/indicators/AG.PRD.CREL.MT/rankings

The top 10 in millions of metric tonnes are...

1   China   617
2   U.S       440
3   India           313
4   Russia   131
5   Brazil   117
6   Indonesia   109
7   Argentina   76
8   France   64
9   Ukraine   60
10   Canada   56

These 10 nations account for 70% of all cereal grains (again corn, wheat and rice) grown on the planet.
« Last Edit: May 14, 2022, 06:32:36 PM by Shared Humanity »

neal

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Re: 2022 Food developments
« Reply #39 on: May 14, 2022, 06:06:52 PM »
India bans wheat exports to try and tame prices as a scorching heatwave curtailed output

India banned wheat exports on Saturday, just days after saying it was targeting record shipments this year, as a scorching heatwave curtailed output and local prices hit an all-time high amid strong export demand.

The government said it would still allow exports for letters of credit that have already been issued and on the request from countries that are trying “to meet their food security needs.”

Global buyers were banking on the world’s second-biggest wheat producer for supplies after exports from the Black Sea region plunged following Russia’s invasion of Ukraine in late February. Prior to the ban, India was targeting to ship out a record 10 million tonnes this year.

The Indian ban could drive up global prices to new peaks and hit poor consumers in Asia and Africa.

“The ban is shocking,” a Mumbai-based dealer with a global trading firm said. “We were expecting curbs on exports after 2-3 months, but seems inflation numbers changed government’s mind.”


https://www.cnbc.com/2022/05/14/india-blocks-all-wheat-exports-with-immediate-effect.html

kassy

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Re: 2022 Food developments
« Reply #40 on: May 14, 2022, 06:19:53 PM »
Bit of recycling:
The top 10 in millions of metric tonnes are...

1   China   617 Importer
2   U.S       440 Weather not that great
3   India           313 Export ban
4   Russia   131 Sanctions
5   Brazil   117
6   Indonesia   109
7   Argentina   76
8   France   64 Weather not that great
9   Ukraine   60 War
10   Canada   56

These 10 nations account for 70% of all cereal grains grown on the planet.

Russia and Ukraine and India and US big net exporters i think.

PS: Blanks in the nation list should be read as ´no idea´.
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Alexander555

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Re: 2022 Food developments
« Reply #41 on: May 14, 2022, 10:54:11 PM »

vox_mundi

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Re: 2022 Food developments
« Reply #42 on: May 15, 2022, 01:24:53 AM »
North Korea is currently being overrun with COVID

North Korea also has longstanding problems with food production. It suffered a brutal famine during the 1990s and today, the World Food Programme estimates that 11m of the country's 25m are undernourished.

Its farming methods are outdated, making successful harvests difficult. If agricultural workers are unable to tend the fields, greater trouble lies ahead.
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El Cid

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Re: 2022 Food developments
« Reply #43 on: May 15, 2022, 10:10:40 AM »


Its farming methods are outdated, making successful harvests difficult. If agricultural workers are unable to tend the fields, greater trouble lies ahead.

Maybe, but I don't think there is much "tending" to do now. Corn and beans are already in the soil, and wheat will need to be harvested only in July, corn and beans much later. Besides, for most middle aged the illness lasts less than a week so they will not be staying at home for long in any case

kassy

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Re: 2022 Food developments
« Reply #44 on: May 15, 2022, 10:39:36 AM »
In the grand scheme they don´t export much.
In North Korea there is a lot of malnutrition already so that might make the outcome worse but hard too tell with no reliable numbers.
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NevB

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Re: 2022 Food developments
« Reply #45 on: May 15, 2022, 11:44:42 AM »
Bit of recycling:
The top 10 in millions of metric tonnes are...

1   China   617 Importer
2   U.S       440 Weather not that great
3   India           313 Export ban
4   Russia   131 Sanctions
5   Brazil   117
6   Indonesia   109
7   Argentina   76
8   France   64 Weather not that great
9   Ukraine   60 War
10   Canada   56

These 10 nations account for 70% of all cereal grains grown on the planet.

Russia and Ukraine and India and US big net exporters i think.

PS: Blanks in the nation list should be read as ´no idea´.

FWIW I was curious about how much Australia produces and found this from the world bank.
Most recent data seems to be 2018 but there is a table at the bottom that can be sorted by production volume.

https://data.worldbank.org/indicator/AG.PRD.CREL.MT?end=2018&locations=AU&most_recent_value_desc=true&start=1998


vox_mundi

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Re: 2022 Food developments
« Reply #46 on: May 15, 2022, 04:27:29 PM »
Iraq's Prized Rice Crop Threatened By Drought
https://phys.org/news/2022-05-iraq-prized-rice-crop-threatened.html

Drought is threatening the Iraqi tradition of growing amber rice, the aromatic basis of rich lamb and other dishes, and a key element in a struggling economy.

The long-grained variety of rice takes its name from its distinctive scent, which is similar to that of amber resin. It is used in Iraqi meals including sumptuous lamb qouzi, mansaf and stuffed vegetables.

But after three years of drought and declining rainfall, Iraq's amber rice production will be only symbolic in 2022, forcing consumers to seek out imported varieties and leaving farmers pondering their future.

... Normally, rice fields planted in mid-May should stay submerged all summer until October—but that's a luxury Iraq can no longer allow.

The country's available water reserves "are well below our critical level of 18 billion cubic metres (4.8 trillion gallons)", Shaker Fayez Kadhim, Najaf's water resources manager, told AFP.

Rice drains between 10 and 12 billion cubic metres during its cultivation period of about five months, so it is "difficult to grow rice in Najaf or other provinces because of the high level of water it needs", Kadhim said.

Previously, more than 70 percent of the amber crop was grown in Diwaniyah and neighbouring Najaf provinces.

In early May, officials limited total rice crop areas to 1,000 hectares (2,471 acres), in Najaf and Diwaniyah only, according to the agriculture ministry.

The normal quota is 35 times that.

Water shortages have also led to reduced quotas for wheat farmers.

The country's annual rice production had been 300,000 tonnes (tons), according to Mohammed Chasseb, a senior official in the ministry's planning department.

... Last year, Iraq's own agricultural sector contracted by 17.5 percent "following severe droughts, energy outages, and the rising global price of inputs", according to the World Bank.

According to the World Food Programme, agriculture is the second-largest contributor to Iraq's GDP, after oil, and employs about 20 percent of the workforce.

... and there's no future in oil.
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vox_mundi

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Re: 2022 Food developments
« Reply #47 on: May 18, 2022, 06:17:27 AM »
Sri Lanka Faces ‘Man-Made’ Food Crisis as Farmers Stop Planting
https://www.aljazeera.com/news/2022/5/18/a-food-crisis-looms-in-sri-lanka-as-farmers-give-up-on-planting

Once self-sufficient nation reels from fall-out of ill-conceived shift to organic agriculture, compounded by fuel shortages.

Walsapugala, Sri Lanka – Mahinda Samarawickrema, 49, will not be planting paddy this season.

After a government ban on chemical fertilisers cut his yield in half during the March harvest, the farmer, who owns eight hectares (20 acres) of paddy and banana, said he no longer has the income to maintain a farm – especially as his banana crop also looks set to fail.

“It’s a total loss,” the father of five said in mid-April, standing in a field of stunted banana trees in Sri Lanka’s southern Hambantota district. “When I look at this, I know I cannot get the usual yield.”

By this time of the year, most of Samarawickrema’s trees should be twice their height and in bloom, but only a few of the 1,300 trees in the weed-strewn fields have any flowers.

Samarawickrema says he used to get up to 37,000kg (81,571 pounds) of bananas a year, but this time, he expects only 6,000kg (13,228 pounds). “Everything has collapsed,” he said. “I don’t know what to do, but to look up at the sky, look down at the ground and just wait.”

Most smallholder farmers in Samarawickrema’s Walsapugala village also say they will not be irrigating their fields in the growing season that runs from May to August. They say the fertiliser ban induced crop failures, coming amid nationwide fuel shortages, make farming untenable.

“There’s no point in farming any more,” said KA Sumanadasa, who grows brinjals (aubergine) on a his quarter of a hectare (0.6-acre) field. Taking out a bag of puny vegetables, many streaked with fungus, the 70-year-old says the switch to organic agriculture has brought down his yield from 400kg (882 pounds) per season to 50kg (110 pounds). With this output, Sumanadasa said he cannot recover the money he has invested in his farm.

The Movement for Land and Agricultural Reform (MONLAR), a non-government organisation, says most farmers in the surrounding Hambantota district, and in agricultural regions in the north, such as Anuradhapura and Polonnaruwa districts, are also halting operations this season

That could leave Sri Lanka, which is already grappling with shortages of imported foodstuffs amid its worst-ever economic crisis, facing widespread shortages of domestically produced food, too.

Fertiliser ban

An island nation of 22 million people, Sri Lanka used to be self-sufficient in food.

But President Gotabaya Rajapaksa’s drive to make the country the world’s first to fully adopt organic agriculture – by banning all synthetic agrochemicals, including fertilisers and pesticides – has proved disastrous for Sri Lanka’s two million farmers. Sold as a bid to improve soil health and reduce water pollution, the ban was imposed overnight in May last year.

Across the country, farmers, who were until then dependent on subsidised chemical fertilisers, suddenly found themselves left to their own devices. Despite the ban, they said the government neither increased production of organic fertiliser nor imported sufficient soil nutrients to meet their needs.

The result has been a dramatic fall in agricultural output across the country.


Official figures are not yet available for the March harvest, but experts have predicted a drop of between 20 to 70 percent, depending on the crop.

For rice, a staple of the Sri Lankan diet, output fell by between 40 and 50 percent nationwide in March, according to estimates. The drop has resulted in the island nation importing some 300,000 metric tonnes of rice in the first three months of the year – a sharp rise compared with the 14,000 metric tonnes it imported in 2020.

All of this comes as the country reels from a foreign exchange crisis that has left the government unable to pay for essential imports, including fuel and medicines. Shortages have led to sky-high inflation, long queues for diesel, rolling electricity cuts of up to 13 hours and warnings of a “catastrophic number of deaths” from doctors..

... “The president has agreed that the shift to organics was done too hastily. We have understood the errors and we will provide the fertiliser required by the farmers soon,” said Janaka Wakkumbura, who briefly served as agriculture minister in April after all of Rajapaksa’s ministers resigned in March over the worsening economic crisis

But with Sri Lanka’s foreign reserves having dwindled to $1.8bn at the end of April and Russia’s invasion of Ukraine pushing up fertiliser prices in the world market, experts have said it is not clear how the government can afford to import enough soil nutrients for its two million farmers, much less subsidise them.

In Walsapugala, farmers said they were worried about the future.

Despite the government reversing its ban on agrochemicals, they are unable to find adequate supplies or afford the sky-high prices charged by importers.

“Our lifestyle has been destroyed,” said Ajith Kumar, who like Samarawickrema, grows bananas.

Food inflation, which is currently at about 30 percent, could rise even further.

“Food availability is at a crossroads and food accessibility is at a crossroads,” said Jeewika Weerahewa, professor of agriculture at the University of Peradeniya in Sri Lanka.
“There are three classes of people: those who see. Those who see when they are shown. Those who do not see.” ― anonymous

Insensible before the wave so soon released by callous fate. Affected most, they understand the least, and understanding, when it comes, invariably arrives too late

El Cid

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Re: 2022 Food developments
« Reply #48 on: May 18, 2022, 07:54:14 AM »
Sri Lanka is policy stupidity on the next level really. Going organic does not mean that you simply give up fertilizers and pesticides overnight. You need to keep up soil fertility somehow (N-fixing cover crops, manure, woodchips from agroforestry, integrating animals, etc) and get resistant varieties of fruits and vegetables grown in a varied ecosystem to cope with  pests and diseases.  It's a learning curve. You need to incentivize it so that farmers would want to learn how to do it. Even then it takes many years.

Simply doing the same as before but without fertilizers and pesticides is a recipe for disaster.

kassy

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Re: 2022 Food developments
« Reply #49 on: May 18, 2022, 04:44:49 PM »
Yes they are in a lot of trouble now and they did this completely wrong. They also ran out of foreign reserves because Covid kept tourists away and there was some tax cut for the rich which also cost the nation a lot of money. One story is that going organic was also a way for the government to safe money which is wasted on common people instead of the Rajapaksa kleptocracy.
 
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