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Aluminium

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Observing Our Sun
« on: April 22, 2022, 10:19:57 AM »
About the most noteworthy star in the sky.

Some links:
Solar Dynamics Observatory
Kislovodsk Solar Station

Currently we can see a large sunspot group.

gerontocrat

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Re: Observing Our Sun
« Reply #1 on: April 23, 2022, 11:52:28 AM »
https://www.forbes.com/sites/jamiecartereurope/2022/04/02/see-the-jaw-dropping-new-83-megapixel-photo-of-the-sun-sent-back-from-a-spacecraft-halfway-there/
See The Jaw-Dropping New 83 Megapixel Photo Of The Sun Sent Back From A Spacecraft Halfway There
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If you only look at one “space photo” this year then this one has to be it.

Here it is to download—the Sun, our life-giver, in stunning 83-megapixel glory. You can zoom-in like never before to see close-up its filaments and flares.

Taken from half way between Earth and the Sun, it was created on March 7, 2022 by the camera onboard the European Space Agency’s Solar Orbiter spacecraft.

A mosaic of 25 individual 10-minute exposures taken one after the other, it took the spacecraft four hours to create it.

The image measures a whopping 9148 x 9112 pixels. That’s 83 megapixels. For comparison, a 4K TV has 3840 x 2160 pixels, which is 8 megapixels.

Here is the link to use to download the 83 megapixel image...
https://www.esa.int/ESA_Multimedia/Images/2022/03/The_Sun_in_high_resolution

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The Sun as seen by Solar Orbiter in extreme ultraviolet light from a distance of roughly 75 million kilometres. The image is a mosaic of 25 individual images taken on 7 March by the high resolution telescope of the Extreme Ultraviolet Imager (EUI) instrument. Taken at a wavelength of 17 nanometers, in the extreme ultraviolet region of the electromagnetic spectrum, this image reveals the Sun’s upper atmosphere, the corona, which has a temperature of around a million degrees Celsius.  In total, the final image contains more than 83 million pixels in a 9148 x 9112 pixel grid, making it the highest resolution image of the Sun’s full disc and outer atmosphere, the corona, ever taken.

An image of Earth is also included for scale, at the 2 o’clock position.
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Aluminium

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Re: Observing Our Sun
« Reply #2 on: April 23, 2022, 05:09:43 PM »
Space observations have obvious advantages. Before space telescopes become available, some scientists suggested another way to reduce the influence of the atmosphere. In 1966 there was a project for a stratosphere solar observatory with 1025 mm mirror. Unfortunately, the fourth flight in 1973 ended in the Volga River. The images were saved somehow but the Saturn never flew again. Later the telescope was adapted for ground observations.

Aluminium

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Re: Observing Our Sun
« Reply #3 on: May 05, 2022, 06:29:37 PM »
Chromosphere (H-alpha), Kanzelhoehe Solar Observatory, May 5.

Aluminium

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Re: Observing Our Sun
« Reply #4 on: May 15, 2022, 06:05:17 PM »
Photosphere, SDO, May 15.

Quite impressive activity. The melting season may be affected.

morganism

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Re: Observing Our Sun
« Reply #5 on: May 25, 2022, 01:48:22 AM »
New calculations of solar spectrum resolve decade-long controversy about the sun's chemical composition

"We found, that according to our analysis the sun contains 26% more elements heavier than helium than previous studies had deduced," explains Magg. In astronomy, such elements heavier than helium are called "metals." Only on the order of a thousandth of a percent of all atomic nuclei in the sun are metals; it is this very small number that has now changed by 26% of its previous value. Magg adds: "The value for the oxygen abundance was almost 15% higher than in previous studies." The new values are, however, in good agreement with the chemical composition of primitive meteorites ("CI chondrites") that are thought to represent the chemical make-up of the very early solar system."

Maria Bergemann says: "The new solar models based on our new chemical composition are more realistic than ever before: they produce a model of the sun that is consistent with all the information we have about the sun's present-day structure—sound waves, neutrinos, luminosity, and the sun's radius—without the need for non-standard, exotic physics in the solar interior."

As an added bonus, the new models are easy to apply to stars other than the sun. At a time where large-scale surveys like SDSS-V and 4MOST are providing high-quality spectra for an ever greater number of stars, this kind of progress is valuable indeed—putting future analyses of stellar chemistry, with their broader implications for reconstructions of the chemical evolution of our cosmos, on a firmer footing than ever before.

The study, "Observational constraints on the origin of the elements. IV: The standard composition of the sun," is published in the journal Astronomy & Astrophysics.

https://phys.org/news/2022-05-solar-spectrum-decade-long-controversy-sun.html

Aluminium

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Re: Observing Our Sun
« Reply #6 on: June 15, 2022, 11:47:00 AM »
A lot of hotspots are currently visible on the solar disk.

Aluminium

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Re: Observing Our Sun
« Reply #7 on: July 15, 2022, 06:29:05 PM »
I pixelated the last image of the Sun. That huge sunspot potentially visible with the naked eye. Be careful though, it still requires wildfire smoke or something like that. Observing our Sun without filters is dangerous for eyes.

Sigmetnow

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Re: Observing Our Sun
« Reply #8 on: July 17, 2022, 01:04:13 PM »
GEOMAGNETIC STORM WATCH: Minor G1-class geomagnetic storms are possible on July 20th or 21st when a slow-moving CME is expected to hit Earth's magnetic field. The CME was hurled into space by Friday's 'canyon of fire' eruption, described below….

A 'CANYON OF FIRE' JUST OPENED ON THE SUN: A dark filament of magnetism whipsawed out of the sun's atmosphere on July 15th, carving a gigantic 'canyon of fire.' NASA's Solar Dynamics Observatory recorded the eruption…
https://spaceweather.com/

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Direct Hit! A snake-like filament launched as a big #solarstorm while in the Earth-strike zone. NASA predicts impact early July 19. Strong #aurora shows possible with this one, deep into mid-latitudes. Amateur #radio & #GPS users expect signal disruptions on Earth's nightside.
7/16/22, 2:53 PM. https://twitter.com/tamithaskov/status/1548380370038444034
⬇️ Image below; gif at the link.
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Sigmetnow

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Re: Observing Our Sun
« Reply #9 on: July 20, 2022, 04:44:43 PM »
Great Solar Prominence Releasing a CME Captured on 10th July 2022 on Vimeo
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On 10th July, 2022, the Sun has featured a gigantic solar prominence over the chromosphere, throwing a coronal mass ejection (CME) into space. Luckily I was checking the sun activity at the end of the day, as normally I don't photograph the sun so late, specially for being low and close to the horizon. As soon as I realised that a huge prominence was visible and growing so fast and drastically, I quickly start shooting. Seeing forecast was amazing around 0,71" arc. but the sun was lower than ideal and the atmosphere had a fine layer of dust coming from Africa. The temperature was very high, around 38º at 18h00. So I made a huge effort of gathering as much images as possible. The sequence was captured between UT17h37 and UT18h30 and shows spectacular motion of the CME. The gradual change in contrast in the solar disc, is related with the sun getting lower and crossing the dust layer which scattered the light even more. The final result is a 4K high resolution solar movie comprising around 1hour of images, captured from the Dark Sky® Alqueva region, Portugal. Here is the animations from NASA SDO and LASCO-c2 (Cactus CME detection) from this same day, showing the same giant as seen from the probe in Space.

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Sigmetnow

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Re: Observing Our Sun
« Reply #10 on: August 14, 2022, 03:22:09 AM »
“This week at NASA”
Short video includes a piece on SunRISE, a group of six satellites to be deployed with Artemis 1 to detect radio frequency emissions from the sun.
May take a moment to load.

 

⬇️ Screencap below.
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Sigmetnow

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Re: Observing Our Sun
« Reply #11 on: September 26, 2022, 04:52:19 PM »
—- Massive solar flare imaged
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Andrew McCarthy
There it is, folks. The largest solar prominence I’ve ever witnessed. This is what I spent all day yesterday chasing down as it lifted off the solar chromosphere. The resulting CME was launched millions of miles into space.
 —
This is about 500,000 miles long. Earth would be about the size of the tiny blob on the left side of this image, for perspective. …
  —
Here’s most of the event in a timelapse, this is probably around 2 hours squeezed into 5 seconds. The scope reflections and faintness of the ejecta made it way too difficult to animate the last half of the event.➡️ pic.twitter.com/UYxBo2otno
9/25/22 https://twitter.com/ajamesmccarthy/status/1574118801460760576
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vox_mundi

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Re: Observing Our Sun
« Reply #12 on: September 26, 2022, 05:18:05 PM »
Hopefully not heading in our general direction ...  :o
“There are three classes of people: those who see. Those who see when they are shown. Those who do not see.” ― anonymous

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Sigmetnow

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Re: Observing Our Sun
« Reply #13 on: September 26, 2022, 09:21:58 PM »
Hopefully not heading in our general direction ...  :o

Apparently not.  NASA is not freaking — although they do have a rather striking vid of their own. Click on the blue “CORONAL MASS EJECTIONS” square for 9/26:

https://www.spaceweather.gov/
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vox_mundi

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Re: Observing Our Sun
« Reply #14 on: September 26, 2022, 11:08:44 PM »
Yowza!
“There are three classes of people: those who see. Those who see when they are shown. Those who do not see.” ― anonymous

Insensible before the wave so soon released by callous fate. Affected most, they understand the least, and understanding, when it comes, invariably arrives too late