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Espen

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Re: Arctic Image of the Day
« Reply #350 on: August 10, 2014, 06:30:02 PM »
Holy shit, I didn't touch that button!
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epiphyte

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Re: Arctic Image of the Day
« Reply #351 on: August 10, 2014, 06:31:56 PM »
Poof.

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Re: Arctic Image of the Day
« Reply #352 on: August 10, 2014, 07:16:02 PM »
Sips on well iced glass of Wild Turkey.   8)

Bob Wallace

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Re: Arctic Image of the Day
« Reply #353 on: August 10, 2014, 08:32:38 PM »
What a difference 8 days can make...






August 1, 2014






August 9, 2014

Expect an Extent crash....

Espen

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Re: Arctic Image of the Day
« Reply #354 on: August 10, 2014, 09:26:32 PM »
What a beautiful day:

Please click on image to enlarge!
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greatdying2

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Re: Arctic Image of the Day
« Reply #355 on: August 13, 2014, 01:23:43 AM »
Nice view today of Ellesmere Island and the gap to its north.



Full resolution (2.1 MB): http://imgur.com/xgZDj8W
The Permian–Triassic extinction event, a.k.a. the Great Dying, occurred about 250 million years ago and is the most severe known extinction event. Up to 96% of all marine species and 70% of terrestrial vertebrate species became extinct; it is also the only known mass extinction of insects.

helorime

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Re: Arctic Image of the Day
« Reply #356 on: August 20, 2014, 10:27:18 PM »
I just like the curls in this fram transport melt
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Bruce

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Re: Arctic Image of the Day
« Reply #357 on: August 21, 2014, 05:53:51 PM »
I just like the curls in this fram transport melt
Can someone tell (or show) me what these curls are comprised of? I see this stuff in various places as the final stage of an area becoming open water, but I've never been quite clear on what it is. Is it slushy stuff, or just very small floes, or water-logged ice, or is it foam, or...? Any pictures of it from (near) the surface?

jdallen

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Re: Arctic Image of the Day
« Reply #358 on: August 21, 2014, 10:55:06 PM »
I just like the curls in this fram transport melt
Can someone tell (or show) me what these curls are comprised of? I see this stuff in various places as the final stage of an area becoming open water, but I've never been quite clear on what it is. Is it slushy stuff, or just very small floes, or water-logged ice, or is it foam, or...? Any pictures of it from (near) the surface?
Good question. I'll speculate its larger extents of ice disintegrated into a melange of flows under 200m in size.

I'll also speculate that ice in that state is another element contributing to the positive fluctuations in area we see - ice which has come apart over a wide area and spread out.

I need software, gridded data, and most important, more time to determine if its more than just speculation...
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helorime

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Re: Arctic Image of the Day
« Reply #359 on: August 22, 2014, 06:54:29 AM »
Here is some from MODIS at a resolution of 250M/pixil so yeah, lots of chucks of stuff, giant slushy.  These are actually pretty big pieces.  The are only small relatively speaking and they do melt fast.
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DavidR

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Re: Arctic Image of the Day
« Reply #360 on: August 22, 2014, 10:38:10 AM »
I just like the curls in this fram transport melt
Can someone tell (or show) me what these curls are comprised of? I see this stuff in various places as the final stage of an area becoming open water, but I've never been quite clear on what it is. Is it slushy stuff, or just very small floes, or water-logged ice, or is it foam, or...? Any pictures of it from (near) the surface?
Good question. I'll speculate its larger extents of ice disintegrated into a melange of flows under 200m in size.

I'll also speculate that ice in that state is another element contributing to the positive fluctuations in area we see - ice which has come apart over a wide area and spread out.

I need software, gridded data, and most important, more time to determine if its more than just speculation...
This appears to  have been caused by a small cyclone that  went through on the 12th August.  Prior to that there were plenty of floes up to  20km across in the area, after that just 600 km of curly slush running down the Greenland sea. 

According  to  Wipneus's figures area and extent went up about 20% in the next three days. Then they started to  drop again.
Toto, I've a feeling we're not in Kansas anymore

Icebird

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Re: Arctic Image of the Day
« Reply #361 on: August 22, 2014, 11:04:33 AM »
I just like the curls in this fram transport melt
Can someone tell (or show) me what these curls are comprised of? I see this stuff in various places as the final stage of an area becoming open water, but I've never been quite clear on what it is. Is it slushy stuff, or just very small floes, or water-logged ice, or is it foam, or...? Any pictures of it from (near) the surface?
Hey jdallen, try to put some crushed ice in a big bin or the kitchen sink and watch how it moves when it's melting. I think that the swirling is a part of gravity between the interconnected ice that is left. And the difference between (warmer) and colder water has influence 2
Good question. I'll speculate its larger extents of ice disintegrated into a melange of flows under 200m in size.

I'll also speculate that ice in that state is another element contributing to the positive fluctuations in area we see - ice which has come apart over a wide area and spread out.

I need software, gridded data, and most important, more time to determine if its more than just speculation...
This appears to  have been caused by a small cyclone that  went through on the 12th August.  Prior to that there were plenty of floes up to  20km across in the area, after that just 600 km of curly slush running down the Greenland sea. 

According  to  Wipneus's figures area and extent went up about 20% in the next three days. Then they started to  drop again.

Phil.

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Re: Arctic Image of the Day
« Reply #362 on: August 22, 2014, 03:04:23 PM »
I just like the curls in this fram transport melt
Can someone tell (or show) me what these curls are comprised of? I see this stuff in various places as the final stage of an area becoming open water, but I've never been quite clear on what it is. Is it slushy stuff, or just very small floes, or water-logged ice, or is it foam, or...? Any pictures of it from (near) the surface?

When you get mixing of two fluids in a flow like this you get vortices forming at the interface, the ice in the one flow is acting as a tracer.  You sometimes see similar patterns with clouds, check out von Karman vortex streets.
http://www.brockmann-consult.de/CloudStructures/karman-vortex-description.htm
You can see something similar where two rivers join:
http://a1.typepad.com/6a01116860210d970c019b0385c2d9970c-pi

Espen

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Re: Arctic Image of the Day
« Reply #363 on: August 23, 2014, 08:43:40 PM »
You may think these islands are down in the tropics somewhere, nope it is Prince Charles Island in Foxe Basin, Nunavut Canada.

The polar bear seems a bit confused too!
« Last Edit: August 23, 2014, 08:48:56 PM by Espen »
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diablobanquisa

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Re: Arctic Image of the Day
« Reply #364 on: August 24, 2014, 11:11:04 AM »
First snow at Eureka:




ghoti

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Re: Arctic Image of the Day
« Reply #365 on: August 28, 2014, 01:26:03 AM »
Interesting how chaotic ice movement can result in a very square hole northeast of Greenland


nukefix

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Re: Arctic Image of the Day
« Reply #366 on: August 28, 2014, 02:54:38 PM »
Jakobshaven ice-stream calving-front imaged by Sentinel-1 SAR, 17.8.2014. Note in the lower right corner how differentiation between the ice-stream and ice melange with icebergs can be hard.

nukefix

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Re: Arctic Image of the Day
« Reply #367 on: August 29, 2014, 06:30:16 PM »
Arcuate crevasses on the trunk of PIG, Sentinel-1 dual-pol 23/08/2014. The scale of this thing is mind-boggling - the width of the scene is 70km!  :o ??? :-X

edit: oops this is Antarctica, not Arctic. Cool shit anyway :)

ghoti

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Re: Arctic Image of the Day
« Reply #368 on: September 03, 2014, 08:46:39 PM »
BTW Andreas Muenchow wrote up a great explanation of the swirls and eddies of ice seen this year in the Greenland sea.

http://icyseas.org/2014/08/22/east-greenland-current-instabilities/

gideonlow

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Re: Arctic Image of the Day
« Reply #369 on: September 13, 2014, 08:30:05 AM »
I can't really figure-out exactly what's going on here, but: Beautiful!

From http://climate.audubon.org/article/12-views-warming-world:

"These opalescent streaks are actually rivulets of glacial meltwater, making their way from ice caps to the sea. The milky appearance comes from all the dissolved sediments, known as rock flour, once locked away in the ice. The tiny rivers’ beauty conceals a dark reality: The country’s more than 300 glaciers are losing 11 billion tons of ice a year. Photo Credit: Solent News/Splash News/Corbis"
« Last Edit: September 13, 2014, 08:40:39 AM by gideonlow »

Espen

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Re: Arctic Image of the Day
« Reply #370 on: September 14, 2014, 10:04:55 PM »
The season is soon over, the black hole is returning to Modis:

http://rapidfire.sci.gsfc.nasa.gov/imagery/subsets/?mosaic=Arctic.2014257.terra.4km
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viddaloo

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Re: Arctic Image of the Day
« Reply #371 on: September 17, 2014, 08:44:23 PM »
BÁRÐARBUNGA: OF LAVA LAKES AND RESERVOIRS:



NASA/USGS TrueColor Landsat 8 image of Bardarbunga and Halslon Reservoir, September 6, 2014.
[]

pikaia

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Re: Arctic Image of the Day
« Reply #372 on: September 18, 2014, 02:25:26 PM »
One of the winning images from the Astronomy Photographer of the Year 2014 competition.



http://www.rmg.co.uk/whats-on/exhibitions/astronomy-photographer-of-the-year/2014-winners/earth-and-space

solartim27

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Re: Arctic Image of the Day
« Reply #373 on: September 21, 2014, 09:17:52 PM »
Cross post from ASI
WTF?
FNORD

jdallen

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Re: Arctic Image of the Day
« Reply #374 on: September 22, 2014, 05:25:40 AM »
Dramatic but not that significant in itself, solartime27.

More to the point is the huge body of open water, still open at high latitude.

The refreeze begins.  Now we wonder over how much ice will return.
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Espen

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Re: Arctic Image of the Day
« Reply #375 on: October 06, 2014, 04:42:43 AM »
Some serious sea ice cracking north of the Canadian Archipelago:
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jdallen

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Re: Arctic Image of the Day
« Reply #376 on: October 06, 2014, 09:22:25 PM »
Some serious sea ice cracking north of the Canadian Archipelago:
A result of there being nothing to hold the pack in place, perhaps.

I wonder if cracking like this has some future implications?
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nukefix

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Re: Arctic Image of the Day
« Reply #377 on: October 22, 2014, 12:25:08 PM »
Sentinel-1 EW image off the coast of Svalbard, 16.10.2014 at 06:14, dual-pol HH/HV, scene width 400km, at various zoom levels.

pikaia

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Re: Arctic Image of the Day
« Reply #378 on: November 03, 2014, 10:19:12 AM »


from NASA's Astronomy Picture of the day.
http://apod.nasa.gov/apod/ap141103.html

ChrisReynolds

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Re: Arctic Image of the Day
« Reply #379 on: November 17, 2014, 08:49:38 PM »
Thanks for the link Pikia, without it I was convinced that was photo-shopped.

PS - Thanks Nukefix, great images. Is there a public source of those sort of images (like Terra/MODIS rapidfire?)
http://rapidfire.sci.gsfc.nasa.gov/realtime/

A-Team

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Re: Arctic Image of the Day
« Reply #380 on: November 18, 2014, 03:15:23 PM »
Here is the slope map of Greenland computed from the surface elevation map. Note that Greenland is basically very flat -- a logarithmic color scale is needed to display subtle differences. However colors chosen by the authors did not do that very well so I re-worked the image in Gimp using the Hue tool, keeping both the native resolution provided to the journal (for which a pdf image extractor is needed) and staying within the blog's 700 pixel width constraint so it will display without compression.

Except it doesn't -- the blog has a secret file size maximum and so it needs a click to open separately and another click after that to reach full size 690 x 1299. It cannot be compressed further as jpg (like the image above, just 193k) without ruining its value.

Guessing that it cost $25,000,000 of science dollars to generate this image or $30 per pixel, every dot counts. I believe the authors submitted it to the journal at full experimental ground resolution (though they flattened coastline and lat,lon on top their precious data). It's very expensive data to throw away if at the very end it has to be displayed as here at 1/3 its size.

Below the blog software has taken it upon itself to replace the user-submitted image with their own jpg_thumb.png without warning or prior approval -- an unacceptable coding practice, because saving the image to desktop then saves the wrong file.

Elevation and elevation change of Greenland and Antarctica derived from CryoSat-2
V. Helm, A. Humbert, and H. Miller
http://www.the-cryosphere.net/8/1539/2014/
« Last Edit: November 18, 2014, 05:15:26 PM by A-Team »

pikaia

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Re: Arctic Image of the Day
« Reply #381 on: November 20, 2014, 08:54:33 PM »
Batman:

Wipneus

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Re: Arctic Image of the Day
« Reply #382 on: November 23, 2014, 05:52:05 PM »
The polar night falls over Jan Mayen between Greenland and Norway. The Beerenberg (bear mountain) volcano lights up in the low sun (5 degrees above the horizon).

diablobanquisa

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Re: Arctic Image of the Day
« Reply #383 on: November 24, 2014, 06:15:51 PM »
Sea ice arrives in Kimmirut




Pmt111500

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Re: Arctic Image of the Day
« Reply #384 on: November 30, 2014, 05:13:37 PM »
Hmm, I wonder what the airflow at 70 hPa (stratosphere) level today looks:
Cooling the outside by heat pump.

Espen

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Re: Arctic Image of the Day
« Reply #385 on: November 30, 2014, 05:45:03 PM »
Hmm, I wonder what the airflow at 70 hPa (stratosphere) level today looks:

Looks like someone is watching us with binoculars, scary!
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ChrisReynolds

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Re: Arctic Image of the Day
« Reply #386 on: December 09, 2014, 09:50:58 PM »
PMT111500,

It's the same dumbell we had last winter.

EDIT I finally pulled my finger out and looked at the climatology in the stratosphere. That dumbell is the normal for winter.


A-Team

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Re: Arctic Image of the Day
« Reply #388 on: December 15, 2014, 12:30:47 AM »
Wintery scene in frost-fringed Greenland captured by space shuttle photography? No, just something I made by accident taking the slope of the digital elevation map. The wedge on right center is NEGIS, the northeast Greenland ice stream.

Espen

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Re: Arctic Image of the Day
« Reply #389 on: December 21, 2014, 05:47:26 PM »
Have a ice day!

Pmt111500

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Re: Arctic Image of the Day
« Reply #390 on: December 23, 2014, 03:28:06 AM »
the situation in the arctic stratosphere appears to be normalizing, right in sync with our first larger snowfall. http://earth.nullschool.net/#current/wind/isobaric/70hPa/orthographic=-347.48,77.01,381
Cooling the outside by heat pump.

Wipneus

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Re: Arctic Image of the Day
« Reply #391 on: January 03, 2015, 04:05:15 PM »
More fun with Sentinel quick look images by ESA (see Nares Strait thread). Here is Svalbard, composed of three quick-look images. The retreating sea ice in the Barents Sea is visible.  A remarkable feature in the northeast Island (Nordaustlandet) looks like a surging glacier, although I could only find an ice cap over there.

( a little click will give you a bigger picture )

Espen

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Re: Arctic Image of the Day
« Reply #392 on: January 03, 2015, 07:46:35 PM »
Hello Wipneus it is Isdomen part of Austfonna.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Austfonna

http://toposvalbard.npolar.no/
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crandles

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Re: Arctic Image of the Day
« Reply #393 on: January 04, 2015, 12:04:36 AM »
I am certainly not a geologist, however I am wondering if Isdomen is an ice cap and not a glacier and with that image, could the bulge in the coastline from Kapp Mohn to Hartogbukta be an old landslide?

http://stadnamn.npolar.no/stadnamn/Isdomen?ident=6362&lang=en

Could a landslide like that cause a mega-tsunami and if so what sort of effect could something like that have on methane hydrates near the affected shorelines?

jdallen

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Re: Arctic Image of the Day
« Reply #394 on: January 04, 2015, 04:58:27 AM »
I am certainly not a geologist, however I am wondering if Isdomen is an ice cap and not a glacier

The difference if any is purely semantic. 1400KM3 of ice upwards of 250M thick of ice sounds rather ice cap-ish


and with that image, could the bulge in the coastline from Kapp Mohn to Hartogbukta be an old landslide?
http://stadnamn.npolar.no/stadnamn/Isdomen?ident=6362&lang=en

I'd say doubtful.  Morphologically, I'd expect a landslide to leave a "bite" rather than a "bulge".

Could a landslide like that cause a mega-tsunami and if so what sort of effect could something like that have on methane hydrates near the affected shorelines?

A quick survey of the stratigraphy and ocean bottom topography strongly suggest to me a large-scale land slip would be improbable to impossible.  Unlike places like the Hawaiian Island's or Azores or similar locations,  the bedrock appears to be well consolidated pre-cambrian metamorphic rocks or similar more recent well consolidated paleozoic (Carboniferous and Permian - remember coal mining is the major economic activity there) and mesozoic assemblages (as compared to layered poorly consolidated basalt flows.  Further, the shelves around the area are quite shallow - less than 250M - as compared to the abyssals that surround the isolated volcanic arc island chains.  In short, there is neither the weakness nor the gradient to prompt a catastrophic event like that.

Now, to speculate *somewhat*, the prompt effect of something like that on hydrates I think would be relatively limited, and would affect only those present directly in the path of the slide.  While the area affected by a megatsunami would be wide, that affected by the *cause* would not.  Further, much of it would be at depth, which while possibly exposing hydrate, would not necessarily prompt it to dissociate.  I'd speculate the ocean bottom directly affected would only amount at most to a few hundred KM2, which I doubt would be sufficient to cause a significant methane release.

I'd be far more concerned about large scale intrusions of warm, salty North Atlantic water into the region.
« Last Edit: January 04, 2015, 05:03:55 AM by jdallen »
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jdallen

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Re: Arctic Image of the Day
« Reply #395 on: January 04, 2015, 05:28:08 AM »
Quick reference stratigraphy map, high level.

http://nhm2.uio.no/norges/litho/svalbard/1-04.jpg
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Wipneus

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Re: Arctic Image of the Day
« Reply #396 on: January 04, 2015, 09:11:14 AM »
Well I did find about the Isdomen (perhaps it means ice cap) but wondered if this outlet glacier has been named separately.

Also it seems to extent much further than the maps that have been provided sofar allow, so I wondered about a recent "surge".

I looked through the available Landsat images, this it definitely a cloudy place. Attached is one of the better ones and quite recently.


Espen

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Re: Arctic Image of the Day
« Reply #397 on: January 04, 2015, 10:18:06 AM »
I actually believe the tear dropped rise is Isdomen (nunatak in Greenland), and integrated in Austfonna the largest glacier in "Europe".
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Wipneus

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Re: Arctic Image of the Day
« Reply #398 on: January 04, 2015, 10:59:16 AM »
The attached sequence shows the difference May 2013- September 2014. The expansion is very well visible.

I did not locate a suitable Landsat 7 image yet, but I believe the big surge could have happened in 2012.

(click req'd)

crandles

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Re: Arctic Image of the Day
« Reply #399 on: January 04, 2015, 11:26:01 AM »

A quick survey of the stratigraphy and ocean bottom topography strongly suggest to me a large-scale land slip would be improbable to impossible.

Thank you for detailed reply to my silly speculation.