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Shared Humanity

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Re: Places becoming less livable
« Reply #700 on: November 25, 2018, 12:18:51 AM »
Bbr - does the "oncoming ice age" really have to be inserted into every thread?

It is his raison d'etre.

Shared Humanity

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Re: Places becoming less livable
« Reply #701 on: November 25, 2018, 12:20:40 AM »
Bbr - does the "oncoming ice age" really have to be inserted into every thread?
I apologize, I will create a new thread for everyone's guesses re: political map of the world in 2100. I did not intend to make it about ice age just severe climate change (although obviously in my head that is where much of the NHEM is heading).

And in your head, I have no doubt it will happen.

Human Habitat Index

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Re: Places becoming less livable
« Reply #702 on: November 25, 2018, 01:47:09 AM »
Bbr - does the "oncoming ice age" really have to be inserted into every thread?
I apologize, I will create a new thread for everyone's guesses re: political map of the world in 2100. I did not intend to make it about ice age just severe climate change (although obviously in my head that is where much of the NHEM is heading).

BBR I'm surprised that you are so optimistic that we will be around in 2100.

IMHO even 2030 is optimistic.
There is a principle which is a bar against all information, which cannot fail to keep a man in everlasting ignorance. That principle is contempt prior to investigation. - Herbert Spencer

TerryM

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Re: Places becoming less livable
« Reply #703 on: November 25, 2018, 02:00:33 AM »
Bbr - does the "oncoming ice age" really have to be inserted into every thread?
I apologize, I will create a new thread for everyone's guesses re: political map of the world in 2100. I did not intend to make it about ice age just severe climate change (although obviously in my head that is where much of the NHEM is heading).

BBR I'm surprised that you are so optimistic that we will be around in 2100.

IMHO even 2030 is optimistic.


Is that we as a species, or we as a culture?
Terry

Wherestheice

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Re: Places becoming less livable
« Reply #704 on: November 25, 2018, 05:42:49 AM »
Bbr - does the "oncoming ice age" really have to be inserted into every thread?
I apologize, I will create a new thread for everyone's guesses re: political map of the world in 2100. I did not intend to make it about ice age just severe climate change (although obviously in my head that is where much of the NHEM is heading).

Let me know when the ice age comes :P
"When the ice goes..... F***

Human Habitat Index

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Re: Places becoming less livable
« Reply #705 on: November 25, 2018, 05:49:43 AM »
Bbr - does the "oncoming ice age" really have to be inserted into every thread?
I apologize, I will create a new thread for everyone's guesses re: political map of the world in 2100. I did not intend to make it about ice age just severe climate change (although obviously in my head that is where much of the NHEM is heading).


BBR I'm surprised that you are so optimistic that we will be around in 2100.

IMHO even 2030 is optimistic.


Is that we as a species, or we as a culture?
Terry

Species, all the trends are one way and showing signs of exponentiality.
There is a principle which is a bar against all information, which cannot fail to keep a man in everlasting ignorance. That principle is contempt prior to investigation. - Herbert Spencer

Human Habitat Index

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Re: Places becoming less livable
« Reply #706 on: November 25, 2018, 05:54:52 AM »
Bbr - does the "oncoming ice age" really have to be inserted into every thread?
I apologize, I will create a new thread for everyone's guesses re: political map of the world in 2100. I did not intend to make it about ice age just severe climate change (although obviously in my head that is where much of the NHEM is heading).

Let me know when the ice age comes :P

Hot or cold doesn't matter, it's about how changes affect mass food production.

Wavy jetsteams cause persistent or "stuck" weather systems.

The day the world stopped is the day the weather stopped.
There is a principle which is a bar against all information, which cannot fail to keep a man in everlasting ignorance. That principle is contempt prior to investigation. - Herbert Spencer

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Re: Places becoming less livable
« Reply #707 on: December 01, 2018, 11:40:42 AM »
https://news.nationalgeographic.com/2018/03/ipbes-land-degradation-environmental-damage-report-spd/
MEDELLIN, COLOMBIAMore than 75 percent of Earth’s land areas are substantially degraded, undermining the well-being of 3.2 billion people, according to the world’s first comprehensive, evidence-based assessment. These lands that have either become deserts, are polluted, or have been deforested and converted to agricultural production are also the main causes of species extinctions.

If this trend continues, 95 percent of the Earth’s land areas could become degraded by 2050. That would potentially force hundreds of millions of people to migrate, as food production collapses in many places, the report warns. (Learn more about biodiversity under threat.)

“Land degradation, biodiversity loss, and climate change are three different faces of the same central challenge: the increasingly dangerous impact of our choices on the health of our natural environment,” said Sir Robert Watson, chair of the Intergovernmental Science-Policy Platform on Biodiversity and Ecosystem Services (IPBES), which produced the report (launched Monday in Medellin, Colombia).

IPBES is the "IPCC for biodiversity"—a scientific assessment of the status of non-human life that makes up the Earth’s life-support system. The land degradation assessment took three years and more than 100 leading experts from 45 countries.

Sigmetnow

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Re: Places becoming less livable
« Reply #708 on: December 12, 2018, 03:47:45 PM »
CAL FIRE Chief says 1) some areas should be off-limits to housing, 2) citizens should be prepared to shelter in place, 3) the agency is having a "sea change" about prescribed fire, 4) firefighters are "living climate change"

Cal Fire chief: State must mull home ban in fire-prone areas
Quote
Cal Fire Director Ken Pimlott will leave his job Friday after 30 years with the agency. In an interview with The Associated Press, he said government and citizens must act differently to protect lives and property from fires that now routinely threaten large populations.

That may mean rethinking subdivisions in thickly forested mountainous areas or homes along Southern California canyons lined with tinder-dry chaparral. Los Angeles County supervisors on Tuesday were considering whether to allow a 19,000-home development in fire-prone mountains amid heavy criticism of the location's high fire danger.

California residents should also train themselves to respond more quickly to warnings and make preparations to shelter in place if they can't outrun the flames, Pimlott said.

Communities in fire zones need to harden key buildings with fireproof construction similar to the way cities prepare for earthquakes, hurricanes or tornadoes, and should prepare commercial or public buildings to withstand fires with the expectation hundreds may shelter there as they did in makeshift fashion when flames last month largely destroyed the Sierra Nevada foothills city of Paradise in Northern California. ...
https://www.kcra.com/article/cal-fire-chief-state-must-adapt-to-new-wildfire-norm/25475297

Cross-posted from Wildfires thread
People who say it cannot be done should not interrupt those who are doing it.

Sigmetnow

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Re: Places becoming less livable
« Reply #709 on: December 15, 2018, 12:52:58 AM »
U.S.:  South Carolina

Rain floods parts of Charleston area, more expected for afternoon commute
Quote
The downpours moved in before daylight. By late morning, areas from Johns Island to northern Mount Pleasant had collected between 2 and 3 inches of rain, easily shattering a daily record at the Charleston International Airport.
...
For the fourth time this year, Summerville shelter Dorchester Paws closed its doors to deal with 5 to 9 inches of standing water that flooded the facility’s parking lot and yards. The kennel scrambled to find temporary fosters. ...
https://www.postandcourier.com/news/rain-floods-parts-of-charleston-area-more-expected-for-afternoon/article_9f07b11a-ff99-11e8-88ef-cf93e3d05b70.html
People who say it cannot be done should not interrupt those who are doing it.

vox_mundi

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Re: Places becoming less livable
« Reply #710 on: December 17, 2018, 04:09:12 AM »
Tehran Is Sinking Dangerously
https://www.eurekalert.org/pub_releases/2018-12/ggph-wti120618.php

Quote
Iran has a water problem. The reserves in many groundwater basins there have been severely depleted. For the last forty years, the country has invested a lot in the agricultural sector and has been striving to be independent in its food supply. In order to cover the increased water demand, groundwater basins have been exploited to a considerable extent in a hardly state-regulated way.

In addition, the government built a lot of dams to store water for specific purposes, particularly in agriculture. However, this restricted the natural inflow into the country's groundwater basins in the downstream, in turn contributing to desertification and serious environmental issues like shrinkage of Lake Urmia, the world's second-largest salt lake in northwest Iran, and frequent dust and sand storms in recent years in the Khuzestan province in the southwest.

In the region around Tehran, the capital city of eight million inhabitants, the demand for water has also risen sharply due to the influx of many new inhabitants over the last four decades. The number of wells there rose from just under 4000 in 1968 to more than 32.000 in 2012. In addition, there was a lack of rainfall in periods of drought, which have occurred more frequently in recent years. All of this has greatly lowered the groundwater level - in Tehran, for example, by twelve meters between 1984 and 2011

.
“There are three classes of people: those who see. Those who see when they are shown. Those who do not see.” ― Leonardo da Vinci

Insensible before the wave so soon released by callous fate. Affected most, they understand the least, and understanding, when it comes, invariably arrives too late

vox_mundi

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Re: Places becoming less livable
« Reply #711 on: December 18, 2018, 08:26:01 PM »
Disaster-Linked Losses in 2018 Hit $155 Billion: Swiss Re 
https://m.phys.org/news/2018-12-disaster-linked-losses-billion-swiss.html

Quote
... Events this year "highlight the increasing vulnerability of the ever-growing concentration of humans and property values on coastlines and in the urban-wildlife interface."

Overall, the figures served as a reminder that "extreme weather conditions can quickly turn into catastrophe," the company said.

Among the major events causing damage this year were hurricanes Michael and Florence, a series of typhoons in Asia and the recent California wildfires.
“There are three classes of people: those who see. Those who see when they are shown. Those who do not see.” ― Leonardo da Vinci

Insensible before the wave so soon released by callous fate. Affected most, they understand the least, and understanding, when it comes, invariably arrives too late

sidd

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Re: Places becoming less livable
« Reply #712 on: January 01, 2019, 02:32:41 AM »

TerryM

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Re: Places becoming less livable
« Reply #713 on: January 01, 2019, 03:57:06 AM »
That's a powerful link sidd. It points out that immigrants are now being attacked from the left as well as the political right.
If peace should somehow break out, perhaps in Syria or Afghanistan, at least some of the newly migrant might be happy to return to the homes they fled.


I've developed my own prejudice's ever since my fearless (and feckless?) leader made noises about welcoming the White Helmets and their families to Canada.


Have a wonderful new year sidd
Terry

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Re: Places becoming less livable
« Reply #714 on: January 01, 2019, 05:48:39 AM »
The climate crises will bite harder every year, and accompanying instability and great power games. Spare a thought tonight for those hapless folk ground under the juggernaut.

A good new year to you, TerryM.

sidd

bligh8

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Re: Places becoming less livable
« Reply #715 on: January 01, 2019, 05:58:24 PM »
For 2018:

Annual: As of December 29th, statewide annual precipitation is 63.25”

NJ’s statewide annual precipitation averages 46.36”.

100 days with winds gusting to 40 mph or higher (2017 had 89). Of these, 25 had gusts of at least 50 mph (2017 had 34).

Yesterday it was 62DegF, heavy rain and windy into last night so the above will change.

From <https://www.njweather.org/content/top-ten-new-jersey-weather-and-climate-events-2018>

The rain interfered with outside work mostly in March, April & May…& high temps limited summer time outside heavy work into September.

The above remark was garnered from conversations with large construction products suppliers
across Monmouth county.

Bligh

And of course....best to all in the coming year


Edit:
     Coastal flooding
        Minor to moderate coastal flooding with beach erosion, road flooding and some structural damage occurred most notably on January 3rd–4th, March 2nd, March 12th–14th, March 20th–22nd, September 7th–10th, October 27th, and November 16th.
        The most substantial flooding of the year occurred on the morning of the 27th. The water level of 7.70’ in Atlantic City was the 13th highest in well over 75 years of record. The 8.77’ water level at Sandy Hook (Monmouth) was the 12th highest in over 75 years of record.

« Last Edit: January 01, 2019, 06:40:08 PM by bligh8 »

bbr2314

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Re: Places becoming less livable
« Reply #716 on: January 01, 2019, 06:20:11 PM »
A billion plus people wanna move:

https://www.wsws.org/en/articles/2018/12/31/pers-d31.html

sidd
Thank goodness for our thousands of nuclear weapons and the two great oceans between this continent and Eurasia.

Tor Bejnar

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Re: Places becoming less livable
« Reply #717 on: January 01, 2019, 09:41:05 PM »
Tallahassee, Florida had a very wet December and therefore a wet 2018.  Of real note is the loss (from climatic normal) of heating degree days (99 - about 25% down) and the extra cooling degree days (497 - about 20% up). NOAA records
Arctic ice is healthy for children and other living things.

Klondike Kat

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Re: Places becoming less livable
« Reply #718 on: January 01, 2019, 10:11:19 PM »
A billion plus people wanna move:

https://www.wsws.org/en/articles/2018/12/31/pers-d31.html

sidd

Yet, there is no mention of climate refugees.  I wonder how this compares to those who migrated during the early part of the 20th century.

Grubbegrabben

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Re: Places becoming less livable
« Reply #719 on: January 02, 2019, 02:03:11 AM »
A billion plus people wanna move:

https://www.wsws.org/en/articles/2018/12/31/pers-d31.html

sidd
Thank goodness for our thousands of nuclear weapons and the two great oceans between this continent and Eurasia.

From the study: "...desire is also up significantly in Northern America, where 14% want to migrate after years of remaining flat near 10%. This is almost entirely driven by increases in the U.S. in 2016 and 2017. The one in six Americans (16%) in 2017 who said they would like to move to another country is the highest measure to date...". Yeah, nuke yourselves out. Thanks ;-)

sidd

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Re: Places becoming less livable
« Reply #720 on: January 10, 2019, 10:39:04 PM »
Miami in a world of shit: widespread septic tank failure

"  By 2040, 64 percent of county septic tanks (more than 67,000) could have issues every year "

https://www.miamiherald.com/news/local/environment/article224132115.html

sidd

vox_mundi

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Re: Places becoming less livable
« Reply #721 on: January 18, 2019, 12:41:17 PM »
One Heatwave Killed 'a Third' of a Bat Species in Australia   
https://www.bbc.com/news/world-australia-46859000

Over two days in November, record-breaking heat in Australia's north wiped out almost one-third of the nation's spectacled flying foxes, according to researchers.

The animals, also known as spectacled fruit bats, were unable to survive in temperatures which exceeded 42C.

Lead researcher Dr Justin Welbergen, an ecologist, believes the "biblical scale" of deaths could be even higher - as many as 30,000 - because some settlements had not been counted.

Australia had only an estimated 75,000 spectacled flying foxes before November, according to government-backed statistics.

"This sort of event has not happened in Australia this far north since European settlement," says Dr Welbergen.

Dr Welbergen says about 10,000 bats of another species - black flying foxes - succumbed to the heat during the same two-day period.

--------------

Australia Heatwave: Overnight Minimum of 35.9C In Noona Sets New Record 
https://www.theguardian.com/australia-news/2019/jan/18/australia-heatwave-sydneys-west-to-hit-45c-after-week-of-extreme-weather

-----------------

https://www.bbc.com/news/world-australia-46886798

Australia has just sweltered through at least five of its 10 warmest days on record, authorities estimate.

A section of highway connecting Sydney and Melbourne started to melt. Bats fell dead from the trees, struck down by the heat.

On the northern Great Barrier Reef, 99% of baby green sea turtles, a species whose sex is determined by temperature, were found to be female.

In outer suburban Sydney, the heat hit 47.3C (117F) before a cool change knocked it down - to the relative cool of just 43.6C in a neighbouring suburb the following day.

Scenes from a sci-fi novel depicting a scorched future? No, just the first days of 2018 2019 in Australia, where summer is in fierce form

( Thanks TB)
« Last Edit: January 19, 2019, 01:40:33 AM by vox_mundi »
“There are three classes of people: those who see. Those who see when they are shown. Those who do not see.” ― Leonardo da Vinci

Insensible before the wave so soon released by callous fate. Affected most, they understand the least, and understanding, when it comes, invariably arrives too late

sidd

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Re: Places becoming less livable
« Reply #722 on: January 20, 2019, 01:53:07 AM »
Three months ago Insurance Journal informed that ratings agencies are doing exactly what they did before the housing crash: Nothing

"Last fall, after a trio of deadly hurricanes, ratings companies warned vulnerable coastal cities to get ready for climate change — or face higher borrowing costs ... Twelve months, two catastrophic storms and thousands of credit ratings later, those companies have yet to downgrade a single city because of climate change. "

“I don’t know how anyone can look at the last two years of catastrophic damage from severe weather in communities all across America and suggest with a straight face that we have our risks under control.”

"no cities or counties have been penalized ... despite warnings from disaster experts about the widespread failure of local governments to meaningfully prepare for the growing risks of global warming. Meanwhile, many of the cities and counties most exposed to the effects of climate change have received perfect ratings over the past year."

"In May, Fitch and Moody’s both issued triple-A ratings to Wilmington, North Carolina. Four months later, Wilmington, which was flooded by Hurricane Matthew in 2016, was inundated again by Hurricane Florence, causing more than $250 million in damage ..."

"Moody’s and Fitch gave AAA ratings to Ocean County, New Jersey, which according to the research group First Street is home to the zip code that has lost more in relative property value than anywhere else in the country ..."

"Moody’s and S&P issued perfect ratings to Palm Beach, Florida, a narrow barrier island where $1.3 billion in property value is less than two feet above sea level ..."

Read the whole thing:

https://www.insurancejournal.com/news/national/2018/11/05/506538.htm

Whatever could go wrong with this fine plan ? This masterly inaction ?

sidd

Human Habitat Index

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Re: Places becoming less livable
« Reply #723 on: January 20, 2019, 04:58:30 AM »
They got their finger in the dyke, if they degrade one area, others must follow possibly causing a downward spiral in the housing market and negative feedback into the insurance industry.
There is a principle which is a bar against all information, which cannot fail to keep a man in everlasting ignorance. That principle is contempt prior to investigation. - Herbert Spencer

Klondike Kat

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Re: Places becoming less livable
« Reply #724 on: January 20, 2019, 02:06:24 PM »
It appears that the insurance companies are using this as an excuse to raise rates.  Overall, the frequency of these events has not changed.  What has changed, is people building in places previously though too susceptible to these events.

Shared Humanity

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Re: Places becoming less livable
« Reply #725 on: January 20, 2019, 02:27:33 PM »
It appears that the insurance companies are using this as an excuse to raise rates.  Overall, the frequency of these events has not changed.  What has changed, is people building in places previously though too susceptible to these events.

???

The home insurance industry has been all but wiped out in the state of Florida due to dramatically rising claim rates. Insurance companies are in the business of making money. Climate change is making that more difficult.

The major impact that climate change will have in a capitalist country like the U.S. will first be seen in the insurance industry and banks and anyone who owns property that is at risk due to AGW should expect their property values to collapse. We are all just going to have to deal with it.

Klondike Kat

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Re: Places becoming less livable
« Reply #726 on: January 20, 2019, 07:27:35 PM »
It appears that the insurance companies are using this as an excuse to raise rates.  Overall, the frequency of these events has not changed.  What has changed, is people building in places previously though too susceptible to these events.

???

The home insurance industry has been all but wiped out in the state of Florida due to dramatically rising claim rates. Insurance companies are in the business of making money. Climate change is making that more difficult.

Yet, that is not what has occurred in the state of Florida. 

https://www.google.com/amp/amp.fox13news.com/news/florida-news/analysts-florida-insurers-have-sufficient-reserves-to-pay-claims

Be careful not to spread misinformation to bolster your belief.  It may just backfire.

gerontocrat

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Re: Places becoming less livable
« Reply #727 on: January 20, 2019, 08:46:08 PM »
It appears that the insurance companies are using this as an excuse to raise rates.  Overall, the frequency of these events has not changed.  What has changed, is people building in places previously though too susceptible to these events.

???

The home insurance industry has been all but wiped out in the state of Florida due to dramatically rising claim rates. Insurance companies are in the business of making money. Climate change is making that more difficult.

Yet, that is not what has occurred in the state of Florida. 

https://www.google.com/amp/amp.fox13news.com/news/florida-news/analysts-florida-insurers-have-sufficient-reserves-to-pay-claims

Be careful not to spread misinformation to bolster your belief.  It may just backfire.

I had a look and what did I find. An article suggesting it is the mortgage industry that could be in the biggest trouble from extreme weather events and climate change in general.

https://www.cnbc.com/2019/01/16/potential-for-foreclosure-crisis-because-of-climate-change-is-real.html

Quote
The mortgage industry isn’t ready for a foreclosure crisis created by climate change
KEY POINTS
- The threat to real estate from increasingly extreme weather brought on by climate change is clear, but the threat to the nation’s mortgage market is only beginning to come into focus.
- In Hurricane Harvey’s federally declared disaster areas, 80 percent of the homes had no flood insurance, because they weren’t normally prone to flooding.
- Serious mortgage delinquencies on damaged homes jumped more than 200 percent, according to CoreLogic.

ps: Most insurance companies hedge their risks through companies like Swiss-Re. I did read that one or two small insurance companies went belly-up from a surge in claims caused by recent events through failing to do this.
pps; The Insurance regulator in Florida has had a go at insurance companies dragging their heels about coughing up the loot on outstanding claims. Perhaps one or two more are in trouble from failing to hedge their bets. Time will tell.
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Klondike Kat

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Re: Places becoming less livable
« Reply #728 on: January 20, 2019, 11:25:47 PM »
That would not surprise me.  Especially, if home owners opt not to purchase hurricane insurance.  The holder of the mortgage would then be on the hook.

Sigmetnow

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Re: Places becoming less livable
« Reply #729 on: January 21, 2019, 02:11:39 AM »
Brock Nanson:  “They actually did add colors. I have to question whether the country will eventually become unlivable. Excessive heat and droughts on an already dry land. There's a limit to what it can realistically support.”

Simon Donner: "Australia has to keep adding colours to its temperature maps. Pretty soon it'll just be a flame emoji.”
https://twitter.com/simondonner/status/1086709179400761345
Image below.
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Archimid

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Re: Places becoming less livable
« Reply #730 on: January 21, 2019, 02:25:05 PM »
About insurance.

 If they are underestimating the risks to manipulate the housing market they will pay for it. Well maybe not them, but someone will. The math that worked so well to make billions by taking risk can't be cheated forever.

Just as a reminder :

Quote
Warren Buffett‘s Berkshire Hathaway shareholders voted overwhelmingly against a shareholder proposal to create a report citing the climate-change risks for its insurance companies.

Buffett, the so-called “Seer of Omaha” for his company’s S&P-beating returns, said he doesn’t think climate change creates serious risks for Berkshire’s insurance business and also refused to make a public statement in favor of reducing fossil-fuel use.


They are also blinding themselves.
I am an energy reservoir seemingly intent on lowering entropy for self preservation.

Shared Humanity

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Re: Places becoming less livable
« Reply #731 on: January 21, 2019, 04:25:12 PM »
Warren Buffet, who I have always admired, has just fallen way down on my list of people who I care to listen to.

oren

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Re: Places becoming less livable
« Reply #732 on: January 21, 2019, 11:17:05 PM »
Warren Buffet, who I have always admired, has just fallen way down on my list of people who I care to listen to.
+1
When a (well known and successful) long term investor willfully ignores the longest trend coming up fast on the horizon, you know somethng's horribly wrong.

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Re: Places becoming less livable
« Reply #733 on: February 17, 2019, 04:50:59 PM »
“We don't know how to move people with deep roots.  I mean that's the emotional, spiritual, social and cultural level.  We have to figure out how to do that because there's other communities that are deep rooted and as leaders we have to figure out how to do that good, and right.”

The Feds are spending $48 million to move his village. But he doesn't want to go.
https://www.cnn.com/2019/02/11/us/louisiana-climate-relocation-weir-wxc/index.html
People who say it cannot be done should not interrupt those who are doing it.

mitch

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Re: Places becoming less livable
« Reply #734 on: February 17, 2019, 05:25:49 PM »
Warren Buffett is 88 years old, and has reached the stretch where he has a certain decrease in his skills and fossilization of his point of view. From an investment point of view the time horizon is on the order of 2-5 years, not 50.  You can be right about the issues 50 years from now and lose your shirt tomorrow.

I agree however that he is not taking climate change seriously enough.

sidd

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Re: Places becoming less livable
« Reply #735 on: February 19, 2019, 08:53:50 AM »
Bergman at guardian on florida real estate: money, money, money

"Miami streets will flood every year by 2070."

" luxury condominiums going up in flood-prone South Beach, and property values rising in the vulnerable Keys, post-Hurricane Irma ... a culture of “systemic, fraudulent nondisclosure” "

"low-income neighborhoods like Little Haiti are rising in value and under pressure from developers because of their higher ground ... raising the rents, forcing renters onto month-to-month leases ... "

“I’m worried we’re one bad storm away from a rush for the exits,”

 “great fishing”

" a significant percentage of at-risk properties are owned by people of color."

https://www.theguardian.com/environment/2019/feb/15/florida-climate-change-coastal-real-estate-rising-seas

sidd

vox_mundi

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Re: Places becoming less livable
« Reply #736 on: February 20, 2019, 09:13:34 PM »
This has Poisoned Everything’ – Pollution Casts Shadow Over New Mexico’s Booming Dairy Industry
https://www.theguardian.com/us-news/2019/feb/20/new-mexico-contamination-dairy-industry-pollution

For months, Clovis, New Mexico, dairy farmer Art Schaap has been watching his life go down the drain. Instead of selling milk, he is dumping 15,000 gallons a day – enough to provide a carton at lunch to 240,000 children. Instead of working 24/7 to keep his animals healthy, he’s planning to exterminate all 4,000 of his cows, one of the best herds in his county’s booming dairy industry.

The 54-year-old second-generation dairy farmer learned last August that his water, his land, his crops – even the blood in his body – were contaminated with chemicals that migrated to his property from nearby Cannon air force base.

The toxins, collectively known as PFAS, have caused rampant pollution on military installations, something the Department of Defense (DoD) has known about for decades but routinely failed to disclose. Now New Mexico’s dairy industry is ground zero in an unprecedented crisis. For the first time ever, PFAS is threatening the US food supply.

They have poisoned the groundwater at 121 military bases across the US, the DoD disclosed in 2018.
https://www.militarytimes.com/news/your-military/2018/04/26/dod-126-bases-report-water-contaminants-harmful-to-infant-development-tied-to-cancers/


GAO identified 401 installations with known or potential releases of these chemicals
https://www.gao.gov/products/GAO-18-700T

Schaap’s dairy is ground zero, but this may soon change. The toxic plume is spreading slowly and inexorably – not only under Schaap’s fields but across the Ogallala Aquifer, the largest aquifer in the nation, which spans 174,000 miles and parts of eight states.

Though the NMED has known of the threat since at least 2017, it neglected to contact the community and its many dairy farmers. Milk was bought and sold, crossed state lines, mixed with that from other dairies, and consumed in vast quantities before Schaap’s Highland Dairy was informed of a problem.

When the air force finally tested Schaap’s water on 28 August 2018, it was found to be so polluted that the military immediately began delivering bottled water to the family home. One of Schaap’s wells tested at 12,000 parts per trillion, or 171 times the EPA health advisory level of 70 ppt.

The EPA on 14 February announced its intention to regulate the chemicals by year’s end, but the agency’s plan does not include immediate cleanup actions and has been widely criticized as foot-dragging.

The agency has failed for 20 years to regulate PFAS or any other new hazardous substance for drinking water, advocates have noted. In 2016, it issued a “lifetime health advisory” for PFOA and PFOS, recommending that individual or combined concentrations of the chemicals in drinking water should be no greater than 70 ppt.
“There are three classes of people: those who see. Those who see when they are shown. Those who do not see.” ― Leonardo da Vinci

Insensible before the wave so soon released by callous fate. Affected most, they understand the least, and understanding, when it comes, invariably arrives too late

Shared Humanity

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Re: Places becoming less livable
« Reply #737 on: February 21, 2019, 03:03:01 PM »
JFC!

longwalks1

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Re: Places becoming less livable
« Reply #738 on: February 21, 2019, 05:41:52 PM »
Above, yea.  Quick look at how it PFA's "work" in vitro,  nothing worthwhile via adding cytochrome p-450 ( liver enzyme) to search, I am starting with

https://www.tn.gov/content/dam/tn/environment/solid-waste/documents/esos/sw_esos-13_2018-05-16-1540-jones.pdf

Also - places becoming less livable - maybe the AAAS itself. 

https://www.counterpunch.org/2019/02/21/with-monsanto-and-glyphosate-on-the-run-aaas-revokes-award-to-scientists-whose-studies-led-to-ban-on-weedkiller-in-sri-lanka-and-other-countries/

vox_mundi

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Re: Places becoming less livable
« Reply #739 on: February 21, 2019, 08:38:18 PM »
Shared Humanity, longwalks1 - Back in 80-90's I worked as an environmental and forensic toxicologist and we investigated the human exposure from PFOA by Dupont's Teflon manufacture. I can tell you without reservation, that if your reading this, you have measurable levels of PFOA and PFAS in your bloodstream.

Here is some background on Perfluoroalkyl Sulfonates (PFAS) and Perfluorooctanoic acid (PFOA) - a precursor of Teflon, two of the thousands of Toxic Perfluoroalkyl Substances in our environment ...

PFAS chemicals still exist in the environment because they are not easily broken down or degraded. They are toxic, persistent (stable) and can bioaccumulate in organisms.

PFAS contamination is often found near sites where it was produced or used by industries and on military bases. PFAS contaminants are water-soluble and easily infiltrate the soil into groundwater (ATSDR 2017) and find their way into adjacent waters.

When humans and other animals consume water or food containing PFAS, these chemicals can remain in the body for many years after exposure (Bruton and Blum 2017). The ATSDR (ATSDR 2017) has reviewed multiple studies and identified possible effects from exposure to PFAS in water and food, including effects on growth, developmental effects to fetuses, interferences with hormones, increases in cholesterol and immune system effects. Exposure can also lead to increased risk of liver, kidney and testicular cancer. In animals, potential health effects may include renal and liver toxicity, cancer, immune suppression, reproductive and developmental effects and mortality and delayed development of offspring (Bruton and Blum 2017).

Think DDT squared

A Must Read: The Lawyer Who Became DuPont’s Worst Nightmare
https://www.nytimes.com/2016/01/10/magazine/the-lawyer-who-became-duponts-worst-nightmare.html

Quote
Just months before Rob Bilott made partner at Taft Stettinius & Hollister, he received a call on his direct line from a cattle farmer. The farmer, Wilbur Tennant of Parkersburg, W.Va., said that his cows were dying left and right. He believed that the DuPont chemical company, which until recently operated a site in Parkersburg that is more than 35 times the size of the Pentagon, was responsible. Tennant had tried to seek help locally, he said, but DuPont just about owned the entire town. He had been spurned not only by Parkersburg’s lawyers but also by its politicians, journalists, doctors and veterinarians.

DuPont purchased a 66 acre property from the Tennants rechristed Dry Run Landfill, named after the creek that ran through it. The same creek flowed down to a pasture where the Tennants grazed their cows. Not long after the sale, Wilbur told Bilott, the cattle began to act deranged.

Quote
... ‘‘I’ve taken two dead deer and two dead cattle off this ripple,’’ Tennant said. ‘‘The blood run out of their noses and out their mouths. ... They’re trying to cover this stuff up. ... The video shows a large pipe running into the creek, discharging green water with bubbles on the surface. ‘‘This is what they expect a man’s cows to drink on his own property,’’

Bilott watched the video and looked at photographs for several hours. He saw cows with stringy tails, malformed hooves, giant lesions protruding from their hides and red, receded eyes; cows suffering constant diarrhea, slobbering white slime the consistency of toothpaste, staggering bowlegged like drunks. Tennant always zoomed in on his cows’ eyes. ‘‘This cow’s done a lot of suffering,’’ he would say, as a blinking eye filled the screen.

‘‘This is bad,’’ Bilott said to himself. ‘‘There’s something really bad going on here.’’

... ‘‘I started seeing a story,’’ Bilott said. ‘‘I may have been the first one to actually go through them all [the evidence]. It became apparent what was going on: They had known for a long time that this stuff was bad.’’

Bilott could not believe the scale of incriminating material that DuPont had sent him. The company appeared not to realize what it had handed over. ‘‘It was one of those things where you can’t believe you’re reading what you’re reading,’’ he said. ‘‘That it’s actually been put in writing. It was the kind of stuff you always heard about happening but you never thought you’d see written down.’’ ...
It gets better ... :'(

-----------------------------------

PFAS Levels at NJ Base 24,000 Times Higher Than Proposed Fed Standard — Study
https://www.njspotlight.com/stories/18/10/04/pfas-levels-at-nj-base-24-000-times-higher-than-proposed-federal-standard-study-says/

-----------------------------------

Toxic ‘Forever Chemicals’ in Drinking Water Leave Military Families Reeling
https://www.nytimes.com/2019/02/22/us/military-water-toxic-chemicals.html

Quote
... All told, 10 million people could be drinking water laced with high levels of PFAS, according to Patrick Breysse, a top official at the federal Centers for Disease Control. Mr. Breysse has called the presence of the chemicals “one of the most seminal public health challenges” of the coming decades.

... frustration persists. The military never alerted all of the people who drank polluted water, meaning some are still in the dark. When asked how many people were affected by contamination, Ms. Sullivan said she “couldn’t hazard a guess.”

We’re tracking water sources,” she said, “not people.

... a growing movement of veterans and others,.. are asking the military test their blood for the chemicals, hoping to bring results to their doctors or use them in lawsuits.

Their requests have been denied, and the military says that too little is known about the substances to make the results useful.
Quote
... “They don’t want to know,” said Cindi Ashbeck, 56, a veteran who worked out of Wurtsmith Air Force Base in Michigan. “It’s not being addressed, because you open that can of worms, and you’ve got an Agent Orange thing on your hands.”

-------------------------------------------

The U.S. Military Plans to Keep Incinerating Toxic Firefighting Foam, Despite Health Risks 
https://static.theintercept.com/amp/toxic-firefighting-foam-pfas-pfoa.html

Quote
... The Air Force itself acknowledged in a 2017 document that the foam, which was designed to resist extremely high temperatures, is hard to burn and that “the high-temperature chemistry of PFOS and PFOA has not been characterized, so there is no precedent to predict products of pyrolysis or combustion, temperatures at which these will occur, or the extent of destruction that will be realized.”

Even more concerning, “environmentally unsatisfactory” byproducts may be created by incinerating the foam. Among the highly toxic byproducts of PFAS incineration are hydrofluoric acid, which burns human skin on contact; perfluoroisobutylene, a chemical that so reliably kills people within hours of being inhaled that it’s been used as a warfare agent; as well as dioxins and furans, which cause cancer. ....

-----------------------------

3M Knew About the Dangers of PFOA and PFOS Decades Ago, Internal Documents Show
https://theintercept.com/2018/07/31/3m-pfas-minnesota-pfoa-pfos/

------------------------------------

Children’s Exposure to PFAS Chemicals Begins in the Womb
https://www.ewg.org/news-and-analysis/2019/02/children-s-exposure-pfas-chemicals-begins-womb

------------------------------

Cancer-Causing Compounds Found In Alligators, Dolphins, Wildlife at Kennedy Space Center
https://www.floridatoday.com/story/news/local/environment/lagoon/2018/08/24/cancer-alligators-dolphins-kennedy-space-center/934923002/

---------------------------------

PFAS in Drinking Water: Hazardous at Ever-Lower Levels
https://www.ewg.org/news-and-analysis/2019/02/pfas-drinking-water-hazardous-ever-lower-levels

--------------------------------

PFAS 'Do Not Eat' Fish Advisory Issued For Sites on Huron River in Oakland, Livingston and Washtenaw Michigan Counties
https://www.theoaklandpress.com/lifestyles/health/pfas-do-not-eat-fish-advisory-issued-for-sites-on/article_af75b526-9980-11e8-b0fc-572d36d11897.html

-------------------------------

Map | Here are Confirmed PFAS Threats to Michigan Water
https://www.bridgemi.com/michigan-environment-watch/map-here-are-confirmed-pfas-threats-michigan-water

Quote
Michigan’s list of contaminated sites is likely to grow as the state continues to test all public water systems and schools that tap well water.


----------------------------------------

Trump EPA Won’t Limit Chemicals Found In Alabama Drinking Water, Report Says
https://www.al.com/news/2019/01/trump-epa-wont-limit-chemicals-found-in-alabama-drinking-water-report-says.html

------------------------------------------------

EPA Nominee’s Inaction On Water Contaminants is Troubling
https://www.newsday.com/opinion/editorial/epa-nominee-s-inaction-on-water-contaminants-is-troubling-1.26685592

Quote
The federal government continues to abdicate its responsibility to protect the nation’s health and environment. EPA acting head Andrew Wheeler, one of several agency officials who once lobbied for industry, refuses to act on PFOA and PFOSs.

Now it’s the Environmental Protection Agency’s apparent refusal to set drinking-water limits for PFOS (perfluorooctane sulfonate) and PFOA (perfluorooctanoic acid), which have been linked to kidney and testicular cancer, among other ailments. The Trump administration last year tried to block an EPA report that found the tap water of at least 16 million Americans contains unsafe levels of the chemicals, found in firefighting foam and Teflon-coated cookware.

Quote
The intervention by Scott Pruitt’s aides came after one White House official warned the findings would cause a ‘public relations nightmare.'
https://www.politico.com/story/2018/05/14/emails-white-house-interfered-with-science-study-536950

This issue is probably one reason Michael Dourson withdrew his nomination to head the EPA’s chemical regulation branch. Two North Carolina senators opposed the nomination largely because he had worked for industry on a related chemical known as GenX.

------------------------------------------

Worrisome Nonstick Chemicals are Common in U.S. Drinking Water, Federal Study Suggests
https://www.sciencemag.org/news/2019/02/worrisome-nonstick-chemicals-are-common-us-drinking-water-federal-study-suggests

-------------------------------------------------

To the EPA, ‘Forever Chemicals’ Are a Big Problem Now
https://www.washingtonpost.com/business/to-the-epa-forever-chemicals-are-a-big-problem-now/2019/02/14/c73d8e10-3073-11e9-8781-763619f12cb4_story.html

Quote
What do you do about lab-made chemicals that are in 99 percent of people in the U.S. and have been linked to immune system problems and cancer? Whose bonds are so stable that they’re often called “forever chemicals”? Meet PFAS, a class of chemicals that some scientists call the next PCB or DDT. ...

----------------------------------------------------

EPA: GenX Nearly as Toxic as Notorious Non-Stick Chemicals It Replaced
https://www.ewg.org/release/epa-genx-nearly-toxic-notorious-non-stick-chemicals-it-replaced

------------------------------------------

Chemours Is Using The U.S. As An Unregulated Dump for Europe’s Toxic GenX Waste
https://theintercept.com/2019/02/01/chemours-genx-north-carolina-netherlands/

----------------------------------------

'Forever' chemicals leave costly water problem in 'Twin Cities', and across the country
https://www.mprnews.org/story/2019/02/14/pfas-leaves-costly-water-problem-in-bemidji-and-other-cities

---------------------------------

Chemical made by 3M, other firms, forces Bemidji to abandon water wells
http://www.businessnorth.com/minnesota_public_radio/chemical-made-by-m-other-firms-forces-bemidji-to-abandon/article_1a72cbaa-3145-11e9-bee7-9bd833ba858e.html

--------------------------------

PFASs Seen as Biggest Emerging Chemical Issue for US States
https://chemicalwatch.com/62977/pfass-seen-as-biggest-emerging-chemical-issue-for-us-states

---------------------------------------------

Hundreds of Unrecognized Halogenated Contaminants Discovered in Polar Bear Serum
https://phys.org/news/2018-12-hundreds-unrecognized-halogenated-contaminants-polar.html

---------------------------------------------

This Is How Perfluorinated Substance Pollution Is Distributed In Spain
https://phys.org/news/2017-11-perfluorinated-substance-pollution-spain.html



----------------------------------

OBTW if you see any article by the American Council on Science and Health on this subject consider the source ...

Quote
The American Council on Science and Health (ACSH) is a pro-industry[2][3][4] nonprofit advocacy organization

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/American_Council_on_Science_and_Health

ACSH frequently advocates against regulating chemicals without scientific proof of harm. A 2009 editorial by board member Henry Miller in Investor's Business Daily criticized the United States Environmental Protection Agency (EPA)'s employment of the precautionary principle to regulate chemicals such as bisphenol-A, phthalates, flame retardants, the herbicide atrazine and fluorinated chemicals used to make Teflon, all of which he described as "important and demonstrably safe".

In 2013, leaked internal financial documents revealed that 58% of the ACSH's donations in the period from July 1, 2012 to December 20, 2012 came from corporations and large private foundations, many of which themselves had ties to industries.[3] Donors included Chevron, Coca-Cola, Bristol-Myers Squibb, Dr Pepper Snapple Group, Bayer Cropscience, Procter & Gamble, Syngenta, 3M, McDonald's and Altria.[3] In addition, the documents revealed that the organization had on numerous occasions directly solicited donations from industry sources on the basis of projected reports on the specific issues in which those companies and industry organizations had such a stake.[3]

In 2017, 26 health, environmental, labor and public interest groups sent a letter to US Today, asking them to "refrain from publishing further columns authored by members of the American Council on Science and Health, or at the very least require that the individuals identify the organization accurately as a corporate-funded advocacy group"

Gilbert Ross, ACSH's former medical director, served time in federal prison and had his medical license revoked for Medicare fraud before being hired by ACSH ... (wholesome people one and all)
« Last Edit: February 22, 2019, 05:55:45 PM by vox_mundi »
“There are three classes of people: those who see. Those who see when they are shown. Those who do not see.” ― Leonardo da Vinci

Insensible before the wave so soon released by callous fate. Affected most, they understand the least, and understanding, when it comes, invariably arrives too late

kassy

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Re: Places becoming less livable
« Reply #740 on: February 24, 2019, 10:30:45 AM »
The battle to save Lapland: 'First, they took the religion. Now they want to build a railroad'

The Sami – who have inhabited these harsh northern latitudes since the last ice age and are the only indigenous people in the EU – fear that proposals to build a €2.9bn railway to the EU’s first Arctic port, in Norway, will provide mining and logging companies with the infrastructure they need to venture ever further into the wilder, untouched parts of Lapland.

...

At present, only logging and gold panning take place in the Sami homeland. Last year, 4,250 hectares of forest were earmarked for felling and 253 gold extraction permits were in place, including 15 new ones for heavy digging machinery. Sanila-Aikio says this is only the start: “We don’t have any mines yet. But they are very close – there are mines all around the Sami area in Finland, Russia, Norway and Sweden.” She calls this process a “slow colonisation”, under which their lands are divided by the railway and handed over to outside industries. “This means the end of the Sami people, because there are no possibilities to practise traditional livelihoods,” she says, her eyes starting to fill with tears. “Then the Sami are extinct.”

...


ecologically pristine parts of northern Lapland will be completely transformed by the railway. “These areas are providing us with climate security. They are the lungs of Europe and the carbon sinks for the future,” he says on the phone from a climate conference. Mustonen, a lead author for the UN’s Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change, says Finland must decide if the promised GDP growth is worth the risk: “What are the economic benefits of those shipping containers compared to the benefits that rivers and marsh mires have provided to us over millennia in terms of climate security?” The peat-rich soil in Lapland’s wetlands traps vast amounts of carbon, preventing it from contributing to climate change, while rivers act as a conveyor belt, bringing nutrients and carbon between the sea and inland lakes.

Mustonen has produced the only study so far examining the ecological impact of the railway for the Sami parliament. He found engineers would have to quarry for rocks every 4km along the northern stretch of the 465km route to shore up the rails and service road, as well as diverting thousands of brooks, lakes, rivers and streams. “The railroad itself will be roughly 15m across,” he says. “But creating a network of service roads and quarries will leave a crater at least 100m wide across an area that has no infrastructure.”

https://www.theguardian.com/world/2019/feb/23/battle-save-lapland-want-to-build-railroad

Just some quotes from the much longer article.

Þetta minnismerki er til vitnis um að við vitum hvað er að gerast og hvað þarf að gera. Aðeins þú veist hvort við gerðum eitthvað.

sesyf

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Re: Places becoming less livable
« Reply #741 on: February 24, 2019, 05:51:33 PM »
The track options have been studied and it seems none of them could be profitable, so let’s hope that this amounts to nothing... but during the last few years the politicians have been able to ignore the reality in other matters, we should be not too hopeful.

vox_mundi

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Re: Places becoming less livable
« Reply #742 on: February 27, 2019, 03:29:05 PM »
Humans Now Producing More Chemical Waste Than Can Be Tested 
https://phys.org/news/2019-02-humans-chemical.html

...Humans produce thousands of chemicals and use them in wildly different ways—from chemicals to make our lawns grow to chemicals in birth control pills that show up in our urine. In this new effort, the researchers claim that the world now collectively dumps more chemicals into the natural environment than can be tested—and because of that, we really do not know what damage it may be causing.

In their review, the researchers focused mainly on endocrine disrupting chemicals, which include PCBs from plastics and drugs such as antidepressants and birth control pills. Such chemicals are known to disrupt reproduction in marine animals. As one example, they note that a pod of killer whales living off the coast of Scotland has not produced a calf in at least 25 years—one female washed ashore was tested, and researchers found levels of PCBs 100 times higher than the dose considered toxic.
 
Quote
We may be flushing chemicals into the ocean right now that could potentially kill off most if not all marine animals, and not even know it. 

What most concerns the researchers is the rate at which new chemicals are being introduced and used and which eventually wind up in natural ecosystems, which is so high that there is no way to test their impact.

Open Access: H. Charles J. Godfray et al. A restatement of the natural science evidence base on the effects of endocrine disrupting chemicals on wildlife, Proceedings of the Royal Society B: Biological Sciences (2019)
“There are three classes of people: those who see. Those who see when they are shown. Those who do not see.” ― Leonardo da Vinci

Insensible before the wave so soon released by callous fate. Affected most, they understand the least, and understanding, when it comes, invariably arrives too late

vox_mundi

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Re: Places becoming less livable
« Reply #743 on: March 05, 2019, 01:31:50 AM »
Chemical Pollutants In the Home Degrade Fertility In Both Men and Dogs
https://m.medicalxpress.com/news/2019-03-chemical-pollutants-home-degrade-fertility.html

New research by scientists at the University of Nottingham suggests that environmental contaminants found in the home and diet have the same adverse effects on male fertility in both humans and in domestic dogs. 

There has been increasing concern over declining human male fertility in recent decades with studies showing a 50% global reduction in sperm quality in the past 80 years. A previous study by the Nottingham experts showed that sperm quality in domestic dogs has also sharply declined, raising the question of whether modern day chemicals in the home environment could be at least partly to blame.

In a new paper published in Scientific Reports, the Nottingham team set out to test the effects of two specific man-made chemicals namely the common plasticizer DEHP, widely abundant in the home (e.g. carpets, flooring, upholstery, clothes, wires, toys) and the persistent industrial chemical polychlorinated biphenyl 153, which although banned globally, remains widely detectable in the environment including food.

The researchers carried out identical experiments in both species using samples of sperm from donor men and stud dogs living in the same region of the UK.

The results show that the chemicals, at concentrations relevant to environmental exposure, have the same damaging effect on sperm from both man and dog. 


Open Access: https://www.nature.com/articles/s41598-019-39913-9
“There are three classes of people: those who see. Those who see when they are shown. Those who do not see.” ― Leonardo da Vinci

Insensible before the wave so soon released by callous fate. Affected most, they understand the least, and understanding, when it comes, invariably arrives too late

Sebastian Jones

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Re: Places becoming less livable
« Reply #744 on: March 05, 2019, 04:32:42 AM »


Quote
There has been increasing concern over declining human male fertility in recent decades with studies showing a 50% global reduction in sperm quality in the past 80 years. A previous study by the Nottingham experts showed that sperm quality in domestic dogs has also sharply declined

Decreased fertility in humans is not a problem, it is not even THE problem (it is not exactly as if humanity is in danger of dying out), but it is a serious symptom of yet another insult to the environment.

Human Habitat Index

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Re: Places becoming less livable
« Reply #745 on: March 05, 2019, 06:32:41 AM »
Chemical Pollutants In the Home Degrade Fertility In Both Men and Dogs
https://m.medicalxpress.com/news/2019-03-chemical-pollutants-home-degrade-fertility.html

New research by scientists at the University of Nottingham suggests that environmental contaminants found in the home and diet have the same adverse effects on male fertility in both humans and in domestic dogs. 

There has been increasing concern over declining human male fertility in recent decades with studies showing a 50% global reduction in sperm quality in the past 80 years. A previous study by the Nottingham experts showed that sperm quality in domestic dogs has also sharply declined, raising the question of whether modern day chemicals in the home environment could be at least partly to blame.

In a new paper published in Scientific Reports, the Nottingham team set out to test the effects of two specific man-made chemicals namely the common plasticizer DEHP, widely abundant in the home (e.g. carpets, flooring, upholstery, clothes, wires, toys) and the persistent industrial chemical polychlorinated biphenyl 153, which although banned globally, remains widely detectable in the environment including food.

The researchers carried out identical experiments in both species using samples of sperm from donor men and stud dogs living in the same region of the UK.

The results show that the chemicals, at concentrations relevant to environmental exposure, have the same damaging effect on sperm from both man and dog. 


Open Access: https://www.nature.com/articles/s41598-019-39913-9

Pesticides and Polio: A Critique of Scientific Literature

"Central nervous system diseases (CNS) such as polio are actually the physiological and symptomatic manifestations of the ongoing government- and industry-sponsored inundation of the world’s populace with central nervous system poisons."

Conclusion
The word “virus” is ancient Latin, meaning “slime” or “poison.” Mainstream science admits that most viruses are harmless, yet the word “virus” adds to a biased and highly promoted language of fear regarding nature. Definitions of viruses range from “pathogenic” to “not usually pathogenic.” The more popular the media source, the more frightening the definition. Less fearful definitions would change the relationship between the medical industry and its “patients.”
Paradoxically, early virus studies considered virus filtrates to be a poison, not a microbe, thus the name virus. Today, we know that viruses are information.

Now, nearly a half-century later, the validity of Dr. Biskind’s work appears even more certain. Biskind’s warning bears repeating:

“It was even known by 1945 that DDT is stored in the body fat of mammals and appears in the milk. With this foreknowledge the series of catastrophic events that followed the most intensive campaign of mass poisoning in known human history, should not have surprised the experts. Yet, far from admitting a causal relationship so obvious that in any other field of biology it would be instantly accepted, virtually the entire apparatus of communication, lay and scientific alike, has been devoted to denying, concealing, suppressing, distorting and attempts to convert into its opposite, the overwhelming evidence. Libel, slander and economic boycott have not been overlooked in this campaign.”

The unique correlations between CNS disease and CNS poisons present a variety of research opportunities not only in medical science, but political science, philosophy, media studies, psychology, and sociology.

https://www.westonaprice.org/health-topics/environmental-toxins/pesticides-and-polio-a-critique-of-scientific-literature/
There is a principle which is a bar against all information, which cannot fail to keep a man in everlasting ignorance. That principle is contempt prior to investigation. - Herbert Spencer

Mozi

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Re: Places becoming less livable
« Reply #746 on: March 05, 2019, 12:46:29 PM »
Polio is the result of infection by the poliovirus.

kassy

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Re: Places becoming less livable
« Reply #747 on: March 05, 2019, 09:28:46 PM »
Polio is the result of infection by the poliovirus.

The claim is that the really severe polio is actually a consequence of chemicals like DDT.

There are basically two points for this. Not all cases diagnosed as polio can be confirmed (by finding the actual virus in the patient) so at least the diagnose is messy.

And there are some interesting bits:

Orthodox medical literature can offer no evidence that the poliovirus was anything else than benign until the first polio epidemic, which occurred in Sweden in 1887. This small epidemic occurred 13 years after the invention of DDT in Germany, in 1874, and 14 years after the invention of the first mechanical pesticide crop sprayer, which was used to spray formulations of water, kerosene, soap and arsenic. The epidemic also occurred immediately following an unprecedented flurry of pesticide innovations. This is not to say that DDT was the actual cause of the first polio epidemic, as arsenic was then in widespread use and DDT is said to have been merely an academic exercise. However, DDT or any of several neurotoxic organochlorines already discovered could have caused the first polio epidemic if they had been used experimentally as a pesticide. DDT’s absence from early literature is little assurance that it was not used.

...

Polio outbreaks occurred most often during the summer and were blamed on viruses picked up in swimming pools. But summer was the time when DDT spraying was at its peak and exposure would have been greatest, either directly or through foods from animals eating sprayed crops. Summer foods like ice cream from DDT-sprayed dairy cows would have been a likely source.

So the claim is that polio has been used to cover up the effects of chemicals which not the same as the claim it does not exist.

We do have a huge problem with chemicals in our environment and they are typically badly regulated.
Þetta minnismerki er til vitnis um að við vitum hvað er að gerast og hvað þarf að gera. Aðeins þú veist hvort við gerðum eitthvað.

Sebastian Jones

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Re: Places becoming less livable
« Reply #748 on: March 06, 2019, 03:58:07 PM »
Relating the 20th century rise of severe polio infections, especially in young children, to the rise in the use of pesticides is complicated by other changes that took place at the same time. The rise in sanitation in the 19th and 20th centuries reduced the natural exposure (hence natural immunity) that many kids had to polio viruses, and left them more vulnerable to getting severely ill.
I find it complicated to engage in this discussion, because my distaste (verging on fury) for anti-vaccination campaigns colours my view of theories around disease transmission that points away from the value of vaccination.
However, things ARE complicated.
It is certainly reasonable to posit that drenching our fields and forests and homes and towns with vast quantities of poorly understood poisons is a bad idea, and that there will be consequences to human and ecological health.

Sigmetnow

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Re: Places becoming less livable
« Reply #749 on: March 12, 2019, 03:17:25 PM »
A hydroelectric dam is part of the situation.

These Pictures Show Just How Severe Venezuela's Massive Blackouts Are
As many as 17 people have died in massive power blackouts across Venezuela, which have left hospitals without power and led to shortages in gas, food, and water.
March 11, 2019
https://www.buzzfeednews.com/article/gabrielsanchez/venezuela-massive-blackouts-power-photos
People who say it cannot be done should not interrupt those who are doing it.