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Tom_Mazanec

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Re: Places becoming less livable
« Reply #950 on: August 19, 2019, 06:11:15 PM »
When a hurricane approaches, the air tingles. The sea does strange things. In minutes, the sky can turn from azure blue to slate gray. Turbulence comes out of nowhere. You can picture what follows, and many photographers do, but you will find no images of catastrophe in Anastasia Samoylova’s “FloodZone.” She is looking for other things, the subtler signs of what awaits the populations that cluster along shorelines. What is it to live day by day on a climatic knife’s edge? What psychological state does it demand? Hurricanes are sudden and violent; sea-level rise is insidious and creeping. The low-level dread of slow change, and the shock of sudden extremes. Climate and weather.
https://www.newyorker.com/culture/photo-booth/life-in-miami-on-the-knifes-edge-of-climate-change-anastasia-samoylova

AUG 20
What U.S. Cities Facing Climate Disaster Risks Are Least Prepared?
New studies find cities most vulnerable to climate change disasters—heat waves, flooding, rising seas, drought—are the least prepared.
https://www.citylab.com/environment/2019/08/climate-impacts-resilient-cities-environmental-justice/596251/

Residents of Central America’s Dry Corridor are at a crossroads: stay in the drought-stricken region, where food insecurity and violence are rampant, or migrate.
Running along the Pacific Coast, the Dry Corridor includes parts of Guatemala, Honduras, El Salvador, and Nicaragua. According to the United Nations’ World Food Program (WFP), climate change is causing increasingly severe dry spells in the drought-prone region. 
https://www.circleofblue.org/2019/hotspots/hotspots-h2o-drought-and-unrest-push-residents-out-of-central-americas-dry-corridor/
« Last Edit: August 21, 2019, 12:25:29 AM by Tom_Mazanec »
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Tom_Mazanec

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Re: Places becoming less livable
« Reply #951 on: August 27, 2019, 08:58:04 PM »
If your place is becoming less livable, move.
Now.
Move away from coastal areas while you still can, scientists sound warning on climate change
https://www.ibtimes.com/move-away-coastal-areas-while-you-still-can-scientists-sound-warning-climate-change-2818167
Quote
Ateam of scientists has urged people to retreat from the coastal areas while they still can in order to move out of harm’s way, rather than being forced to move after disasters triggered by climate change strike.

The trio of scientists wrote in a paper published in the journal Science, that an estimated 1 billion people will be forced to migrate away from their homes due to disasters associated with climatic change in the next 30 years. The only way to avoid that scenario, according to them, would be to start a planned retreat from the low-lying coastal cities now, rather than waiting for harm that is sure to come.

"Faced with global warming, rising sea levels, and the climate-related extremes they intensify, the question is no longer whether some communities will retreat — moving people and assets out of harm’s way — but why, where, when, and how they will retreat," the environmental scientists wrote in the paper.
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Archimid

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Re: Places becoming less livable
« Reply #952 on: August 29, 2019, 02:39:29 PM »
Re. moving:

Not gonna happen. Like everyone else, we have a reason why we are better off where we are.
I am an energy reservoir seemingly intent on lowering entropy for self preservation.

Klondike Kat

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Re: Places becoming less livable
« Reply #953 on: August 29, 2019, 02:48:33 PM »
Re. moving:

Not gonna happen. Like everyone else, we have a reason why we are better off where we are.

Same here.  In a worst case scenario, people will be flocking to places like Michigan.

Mozi

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Re: Places becoming less livable
« Reply #954 on: August 29, 2019, 05:28:31 PM »
Re. moving:

Not gonna happen. Like everyone else, we have a reason why we are better off where we are.

Of course, but if you live in an area that will be affected at some point you will have reasons why you would be better off somewhere else, and at that point it would have been better to have already moved.

Archimid

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Re: Places becoming less livable
« Reply #955 on: August 29, 2019, 06:30:37 PM »
Nope, my brain will create a nice illusion where I'll be fine. So would most people's brain. It's a defense mechanism. The same applies to the climate change argument at all scales.

Once the climate reality superimposes over the illusion I create, then I'll run.
I am an energy reservoir seemingly intent on lowering entropy for self preservation.

Tom_Mazanec

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Re: Places becoming less livable
« Reply #956 on: August 29, 2019, 06:46:36 PM »
Nope, my brain will create a nice illusion where I'll be fine. So would most people's brain. It's a defense mechanism. The same applies to the climate change argument at all scales.

Once the climate reality superimposes over the illusion I create, then I'll run.

And get three cents on the dollar for your property.
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Archimid

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Re: Places becoming less livable
« Reply #957 on: August 29, 2019, 06:52:36 PM »
If that.
I am an energy reservoir seemingly intent on lowering entropy for self preservation.

vox_mundi

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Re: Places becoming less livable
« Reply #958 on: August 29, 2019, 09:01:39 PM »
Warsaw Sewage Plant Malfunction Contaminates Vistula River
https://phys.org/news/2019-08-warsaw-sewage-malfunction-contaminates-vistula.html

Polish authorities on Thursday were warning residents in cities along the Vistula river that runs into the Baltic Sea of a "crisis" situation after Warsaw's new sewage collection plant malfunctioned.

The sewage is being discharged at about 3,000 liters (nearly 800 gallons) a second at Warsaw's northern edge and goes north without affecting the city's waters, authorities said.

"There is no reason for panic and there is no threat to the health of Warsaw residents," Warsaw Mayor Rafal Trzaskowski said.

Experts were working to fix the malfunction at the sewage plant, which will take longer than three days, according to Trzaskowski.

It wasn't immediately clear what caused the sewage collection system, including an emergency backup, to fail.



------------------------

Chinese-Owned Nickel Plant Spills Waste Into Papua New Guinea Bay

Waste from a nickel plant in Papua New Guinea owned by Metallurgical Corporation of China spilled into the adjacent Basamuk Bay over the weekend, three sources told Reuters on Aug. 28.

Locals noticed red discharge clouding parts of the bay that is next to the Ramu Nickel plant in Madang, Papua New Guinea, a local indigenous person who took photographs of the spillage told Reuters.Papua New Guinea officials have sealed off the area around a Chinese-owned nickel plant in the north of the country after the leakage of potentially toxic slurry that has turned the ocean red.

The Mineral Resources Authority said on Thursday it had cordoned off a portion of Basamuk Bay in the north of the country, while emergency tests are carried out to determine the scale of environmental damage.

The water and coastline were dyed ochre red by the slurry, which is said to have overflowed from tanks at the Ramu Nickel refinery for almost an hour.



During a meeting in Beijing last week, the China Metallurgical Group asked visiting Papua New Guinea officials to approve plans to expand production capacity.

The project was commissioned in 2012 and delayed for almost two years by a legal challenge. Local landowners had tried to block the project because waste from the plant is dumped in the ocean rather than landfill.

“There are three classes of people: those who see. Those who see when they are shown. Those who do not see.” ― Leonardo da Vinci

Insensible before the wave so soon released by callous fate. Affected most, they understand the least, and understanding, when it comes, invariably arrives too late

vox_mundi

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Re: Places becoming less livable
« Reply #959 on: August 30, 2019, 12:27:24 PM »
Draft UN Report Warns of Rising Seas, Storm Surges, Melting Permafrost
https://phys.org/news/2019-08-seas-storm-surges-permafrost.html

... Destructive changes already set in motion—some irreversible—could see a steady decline in fish stocks, a hundred-fold or more increase in the damages caused by superstorms, and hundreds of millions of people displaced by rising seas, according to the new UN Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC) "special report" on oceans and Earth's frozen zones, known as the cryosphere.

As the 21st century unfolds, melting glaciers will first give too much and then too little to billions who depend on them for fresh water, it finds.

Without deep cuts to manmade emissions, at least 30 percent of the northern hemisphere's surface permafrost could melt by century's end, unleashing billions of tonnes of carbon and accelerating global warming even more.



... Shanghai, Ningbo, Taizhou and another half-dozen major coastal cities in China, for example, are highly vulnerable to future sea level rise, which is projected to add a metre by 2100 compared to the late 20th century global watermark, if CO2 emissions continue unabated. Mumbai and other coastal Indian cities are in harm's way as well.

Even in the United States, where billions are being spent to protect New York, Miami and other exposed cities, such efforts could easily be overwhelmed, say experts.

Quote
... "There is a pervasive thread in the US right now promoted by techno-optimists who think we can engineer our way out of this problem, ... But the US is not ready for a metre of sea level rise by 2100"

- Michael Mann - Director - Earth System Science Center - Pennsylvania State University

... By 2050, many low-lying megacities and small island nations will experience "extreme sea level events" every year, even under the most optimistic emissions reduction scenarios, the report concludes.

By 2100, "annual flood damages are expected to increase by two to three orders of magnitude," or 100 to 1,000 fold, the draft summary for policymakers says.
“There are three classes of people: those who see. Those who see when they are shown. Those who do not see.” ― Leonardo da Vinci

Insensible before the wave so soon released by callous fate. Affected most, they understand the least, and understanding, when it comes, invariably arrives too late

Tom_Mazanec

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Re: Places becoming less livable
« Reply #960 on: September 01, 2019, 12:49:54 AM »
Leaked Draft of U.N. Climate Report Says Warming Oceans Are ‘Poised to Unleash Misery’
http://nymag.com/intelligencer/2019/08/leaked-un-draft-warming-oceans-could-unleash-misery.html
Quote
The report, which leaked to the French News agency AFP and focuses on the oceans and the planet’s stores of frozen water known as the cryosphere, states that if warming isn’t halted at 1.5 degrees Celsius, sea levels will rise high enough to displace around 280 million people. (If perspective is needed, that’s four times the current number of worldwide refugees, which is a record high. And that’s to say nothing of other forms of climate displacement.) By 2100, the draft states that “annual flood damages are expected to increase by two to three orders of magnitude.” That means flood damages will increase either 100- or 1,000-fold — in a world where king tides are already causing cities like Miami to flood on a regular basis, and where Indonesia just announced announced a new inland capital because Jakarta is sinking. By 2050, low-lying cities and small island nations will face “extreme sea-level events” every year. At two degrees, the report anticipates that the frequency of extreme El Niño events will double, leading to greater risk of forest fires and cyclones.
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Tom_Mazanec

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Re: Places becoming less livable
« Reply #961 on: September 02, 2019, 06:34:29 PM »
Asia Should Fix Its Megacities, Not Move Them
https://www.bloomberg.com/opinion/articles/2019-08-31/indonesia-should-fix-jakarta-rather-than-shifting-capital
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Indonesia’s capital Jakarta suffers these urban ills more acutely than most, which is why President Joko Widodo announced a plan last week to shift the government 900 miles away, to a relatively undeveloped section of Borneo. Indonesia isn’t the first Asian country to move its official capital and won’t be the last. But evacuating government officials and their families won’t solve the problems of Jakarta, Bangkok, Dhaka or any other megacity. Given how many people will continue to live in those urban conurbations, the focus has to remain on fixing what ails them.
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kassy

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Re: Places becoming less livable
« Reply #962 on: September 04, 2019, 04:03:01 PM »
A land without water: the scramble to stop Jordan from running dry

...

Half a century ago, Azraq was legendary. Historical photos show ponds flanked by thick clusters of reeds and squat date palms. A shot from 1965, which hangs today in a local lodge, shows a man waist-deep in Shishan Pool. He is fishing, his net suspended in mid-air. All of this — Azraq’s mudflats, marshes and pools — depended on reserves of underground water replenished by yearly rains. In the early 1980s, Jordan’s government began drilling wells near Azraq and pumping millions of cubic metres of water annually from the aquifers — underground layers of porous rock and sediment. Farmers began unfettered pumping of their own.

Soon, the aquifer was losing water faster than rains could refill it. In 1987, the springs that fed the two main pools in northern Azraq stopped flowing. By 1990, the pools dried up. Today, the water table has dropped from the surface to tens of metres below ground. This is happening not just in Azraq, but in aquifers across Jordan.

...

Wells that tap the aquifers supply nearly 60% of the water consumed in the country, with the rest coming from surface-water supplies such as the Sea of Galilee and the River Jordan (see ‘Without water’). Some 45% of the water usage goes to agriculture. Meanwhile, municipal water networks lose roughly half their water to theft and leaks.

...

Of Jordan’s 12 groundwater basins, 10 are being pumped at a deficit. Overall, groundwater is being extracted at twice the rate that it is replenished, according to the Jordanian water ministry. At this pace, the looming question for Jordan’s aquifers is not if they will be depleted, but when.

...

To Al-Younes, who grew up in Azraq, the restoration (with water they are pumping from the aquifer... K ) is a feeble attempt to revive a place long ago destroyed by lack of foresight. She left Azraq in the early 2000s, following her children to Amman, where opportunity abounded in comparison to the dusty stopover that Azraq has become.

“You have to think about the future, about the people who will live here,” Al-Younes says. “Unfortunately, no one thinks this way at all.”

https://www.nature.com/articles/d41586-019-02600-w

Interesting article on Jordan with a rather depressing conclusion.
Þetta minnismerki er til vitnis um að við vitum hvað er að gerast og hvað þarf að gera. Aðeins þú veist hvort við gerðum eitthvað.

Tom_Mazanec

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Re: Places becoming less livable
« Reply #963 on: September 04, 2019, 07:52:37 PM »
You would think making weather warmer would make the world's most northerly town more livable
A climate-change frontier in the world's northernmost town
https://www.reuters.com/video/2019/09/03/a-climate-change-frontier-in-the-worlds?videoId=595527021&videoChannel=118169
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The world's northernmost town of Longyearbyen in Svalbard is struggling to cope with the effects of climate change. Icebergs are toppling into warming waters and thawing permafrost alongside unpredictable weather conditions leave a constant threat of what residents see as 'unnatural' disasters - like avalanches. Alex Fraser reports.
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VaughnAn

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Re: Places becoming less livable
« Reply #964 on: September 05, 2019, 09:13:52 PM »
This video is from 2017.  From all the things happening in northern Canada I do not think conditions have improved:


This is scary stuff. 

vox_mundi

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Re: Places becoming less livable
« Reply #965 on: September 08, 2019, 08:40:12 PM »
'It Can Kill You in Seconds': The Deadly Algae on Brittany's Beaches
https://www.theguardian.com/environment/2019/sep/08/it-can-kill-you-in-seconds-the-deadly-algae-on-brittanys-beaches

For decades, potentially lethal green algae has amassed in shallow bays on Brittany’s beautiful north-western coast. ... When the algae decomposes, pockets of toxic gas get trapped under its crust — potentially fatal to humans if they step on it.

This summer, six Brittany beaches were closed because of a mass of dangerous seaweed. The bay of Saint-Brieuc was the focus, with bulldozers piling so much algae into dumper trucks on the beach that an inland treatment centre, where seaweed is dried out and disposed of, briefly closed due to an unbearable stench. The centre blamed the foul odour on the method used to collect the algae, which had mixed in mud and sand. Local residents complained the smell was so bad it woke them up at night.

Quote
... “When I was 16, I used to bring a boat here with my uncle,” Ollivro said. “In those days, it was all about natural beauty and you didn’t see seaweed piled up. It’s a shame this place has come to be associated with death.”

... Jean-René Auffray, 50, was fit and preparing for a long-distance race when he set out on an afternoon jog from his home near the beach in Hillion. His dog returned alone and his wife and children went out to search for him. The area where he was found had already seen over 30 wild boar die in algal sludge five years before, with a likely link to rotting seaweed.



Last year, after a legal battle, the death of another man, Thierry Morfoisse, was ruled to have been a workplace accident linked to the seaweed. Morfoisse died suddenly while he was driving a truck transporting algae away from a beach in 2009.

... Another victim, a 27-year-old vet was dragged unconscious from a patch of rotting algae a metre deep in 2009. The horse he was riding collapsed and died within minutes from fumes given off by the sludge on the beach.

--------------------

Hydrogen Sulfide
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Hydrogen_sulfide

Hydrogen sulfide is a broad-spectrum poison, meaning that it can poison several different systems in the body, although the nervous system is most affected. The toxicity of H2S is comparable with that of carbon monoxide.[35] It binds with iron in the mitochondrial cytochrome enzymes, thus preventing cellular respiration.

... At 100–150 ppm the olfactory nerve is paralyzed after a few inhalations, and the sense of smell disappears, often together with awareness of danger.

... Concentrations over 1000 ppm cause immediate collapse with loss of breathing, even after inhalation of a single breath ... and a high probability of death.

Diagnostic of extreme poisoning by H2S is the discolouration of copper coins in the pockets of the victim.
“There are three classes of people: those who see. Those who see when they are shown. Those who do not see.” ― Leonardo da Vinci

Insensible before the wave so soon released by callous fate. Affected most, they understand the least, and understanding, when it comes, invariably arrives too late

Tom_Mazanec

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Re: Places becoming less livable
« Reply #966 on: September 09, 2019, 05:29:08 PM »
No Trees, No Shade, No Relief in Cities as Climate Heats Up
https://www.usnews.com/news/best-states/maryland/articles/2019-09-05/no-trees-no-shade-no-relief-in-cities-as-climate-heats-up?utm_source=Sailthru&utm_medium=email&utm_campaign=Issue:%202019-09-06%20Smart%20Cities%20Dive%20Newsletter%20%5Bissue:22870%5D&utm_term=Smart%20Cities%20Dive
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To cool neighborhoods, you could remove those materials or replace them with heat-repellent versions. Or you could prevent some of the sun's heat energy from reaching those materials in the first place. Trees -- especially dense clusters of large trees with expansive canopies, like those common in Baltimore's wealthier northern neighborhoods -- offer the best hope for doing that.

This helps partly explain why in Baltimore, the coolest neighborhood has 10 times more tree canopy than the hottest neighborhood. In temperature readings taken by researchers at Portland State University in Oregon and the Science Museum of Virginia on one particularly hot day in August 2018, there was an 8 degree Fahrenheit difference between the coolest and hottest neighborhoods in the city.
Quote
U.S. cities are losing 29 million trees every year, and many cities are struggling to reverse their dwindling canopies, according to an investigation by NPR and the University of Maryland's Howard Center for Investigative Journalism. Between 2009 and 2014, 44 states lost tree cover in urban areas, according to the U.S. Forest Service, though Baltimore bucked the trend with a small increase between 2007 and 2015.
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Tom_Mazanec

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Re: Places becoming less livable
« Reply #967 on: September 11, 2019, 09:28:31 PM »
Glowing fish? Alaskans say 'times have changed'
https://www.eenews.net/stories/1061111693
Quote
The Arctic beach at this small Inupiaq village was so wide, when Frank Oxereok Jr. was a boy, large planes could easily land on it.

Four decades later, the Bering Sea has claimed about 90% of the beach that shields residents from the ferocious offshore storms that slam into this remote hamlet, which as the westernmost town on the U.S. mainland is about 56 miles from Russia.

"Now we can barely drive two four-wheelers side by side during high water," lamented Oxereok, the mayor of Wales, during a town meeting last month with Sen. Lisa Murkowski (R-Alaska).

The story of Wales' shrinking beach is a familiar one throughout the Seward Peninsula, a sparsely populated tract of land that's home to about a dozen coastal villages and the regional hub of Nome. Life here is being upended by the accelerated pace of climate change; Alaska is warming twice as fast as the rest of the world.

FLIGHT TO THE FUTURE
https://packages.trust.org/flight-to-the-future/index.html
Quote
Somaliland, a self-declared republic of 4 million people in the Horn of Africa, is one of the world's most vulnerable places to climate change. Poor and drought-hit, and without legal status as a country, it is struggling to adapt for the future.

As the Syria-sized republic battles worsening weather crises and growing migration within and out of the region, it is racing to find ways to stem a tide of climate migrants, keep people on ever-less-productive land and create new jobs for the unemployed.
« Last Edit: September 11, 2019, 10:01:15 PM by Tom_Mazanec »
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Tom_Mazanec

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Re: Places becoming less livable
« Reply #968 on: September 13, 2019, 10:23:03 PM »
A Shantytown’s Warning About Climate Change and Poverty from Hurricane-Ravaged Bahamas
https://insideclimatenews.org/news/11092019/poverty-climate-change-bahamas-hurricane-dorian-risk-recovery-global-warming
Quote
The devastation was so widespread across Great Abaco and Grand Bahama islands that recovery crews were only beginning to get into many areas more than a week later and only a few dozen bodies had been formally counted. The thousands of people unaccounted for and the descriptions of bodies amid the debris suggested a far higher death toll.

As of Tuesday, 5,400 people had been evacuated to New Providence, home to Nassau, the nation's capital. Emergency response officials estimated 4,000 people remained on Great Abaco, where living conditions, including lack of food, running water and electricity, were becoming increasingly dire.
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Sebastian Jones

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Re: Places becoming less livable
« Reply #969 on: September 17, 2019, 04:51:07 AM »
Savoonga is a Yupik village on the north shore of St. Lawrence Island, just south of the Bering Strait. Its residents have made a living from the sea, and the ice, since the rising seas formed St. Lawrence Island at the end of the Pleistocene. Alert members of the forum will be aware that the Bering Sea has failed to freeze normally the past two winters. We also know that this  lack of sea ice has had ecological consequences- the ice hosts algae, which feed phytoplankton which feeds zooplankton and which sustains the extraordinarily rich marine life of the Bering Sea. Without the ice, the algae struggle and the consequences reverberate up the food chain until even the people of Savoonga face uncertain, even troubling times. The linked article is intended to part of a series that examines the effects of climate change in this exquisitely sensitive region.
https://www.seattletimes.com/seattle-news/as-bering-sea-ice-melts-nature-is-changing-on-a-massive-scale-and-alaska-crab-pots-are-pulling-up-cod/

Tom_Mazanec

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Re: Places becoming less livable
« Reply #970 on: September 18, 2019, 07:09:05 PM »
UK will see four heatwaves a year and twice as many flash floods by 2070s, Met Office predicts
https://www.independent.co.uk/news/uk/home-news/uk-weather-met-office-climate-change-defra-environment-agency-a9107446.html
Quote
“Extreme weather events, such as higher maximum daily temperatures and intense rainfall events leading to flash flooding, are projected to be serious consequences of climate change affecting the UK in coming decades,” said Lizzie Kendon, a climate scientist at the Met Office.

“The new 2.2 km projections will allow us to look at the potential for local temperature extremes to exceed 40C.”
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Tom_Mazanec

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Re: Places becoming less livable
« Reply #971 on: September 21, 2019, 12:40:06 AM »
Slimy lakes and dead dogs: climate crisis has brought the season of toxic algae
https://www.theguardian.com/environment/2019/sep/18/toxic-algae-climate-change-slimy-lakes-dead-dogs
Quote
“We believe climate change is really having a huge impact on the occurrence and growth of these blooms,” said Anne Schechinger, a senior analyst for the Environmental Working Group (EWG). “We know the incidence of blooms is just going to keep going up and up.”

A report by the EWG found toxic algae blooms have apparently grown in size and frequency multifold since 2010. Reports of algae outbreaks are up 22% compared to this same time last year.

“It really is a national problem,” said Schechinger. “It essentially affects everybody.”

Climate Change Is Already Hurting Our National Parks
https://talkingpointsmemo.com/cafe/climate-change-national-parks
Quote
National parks are at the forefront of the climate crisis in our country, from melting glaciers to record flooding to disastrous wildfires. These regions offer an early view of climate change’s devastating impact on our land. According to a recent study by the National Parks Conservation Association, 80 percent of our more than 400 national parks are experiencing changes in climate through extreme trends in temperature, precipitation, or early onset of spring. In fact, temperatures in national parks are warming twice as fast as in the rest of the country, causing harm to irreplaceable park resources.
« Last Edit: September 21, 2019, 01:11:33 AM by Tom_Mazanec »
SHARKS (CROSSED OUT) MONGEESE (SIC) WITH FRICKIN LASER BEAMS ATTACHED TO THEIR HEADS


Tom_Mazanec

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Re: Places becoming less livable
« Reply #973 on: September 24, 2019, 07:59:10 PM »
WEATHERING THE STORM
https://theintercept.com/2019/09/22/puerto-rico-hurricane-maria-disaster-relief/
Quote
Now, the island is set to receive a new round of relief funding intended for low-income residents whose homes remain in a state of disrepair. The Department of Housing and Urban Development’s R3 program stands for Repair, Reconstruction, and Relocation, but for much of San Isidro, the first two R’s are unlikely to apply. Instead, the only option for relief will be to relocate. That’s because the HUD funds come attached to a new FEMA flood map that designates more than 250,000 homes across Puerto Rico as virtually ineligible for reconstruction because of their susceptibility to flooding. Another portion of the HUD money will go to flood mitigation, but those funds won’t be available until long after relocations have begun. And for those unable to prove they own their homes, there may be no help offered at all.
SHARKS (CROSSED OUT) MONGEESE (SIC) WITH FRICKIN LASER BEAMS ATTACHED TO THEIR HEADS

Sigmetnow

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Re: Places becoming less livable
« Reply #974 on: September 25, 2019, 09:31:51 PM »
Mont Blanc glacier in danger of collapse, experts warn
Italian mayor orders roads closed and homes evacuated over fears ice will break away
Quote
Italian authorities have closed off roads and evacuated homes after experts warned that a portion of a Mont Blanc glacier is at risk of collapse.

Stefano Miserocchi, the mayor of the town of Courmayeur, said “public safety is a priority” after experts from the Fondazione Montagna Sicura (Safe Mountains Foundation) in the Aosta Valley said up to 250,000 cubic metres of ice was in danger of sliding off the Planpincieux glacier on the Grandes Jorasses peak.

“This phenomenon once again testifies that the mountain is in a phase of strong change due to climatic factors, therefore it is particularly vulnerable,” Miserocchi said in a statement. ...
https://amp.theguardian.com/environment/2019/sep/25/mont-blanc-glacier-in-danger-of-collapse-experts-warn
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vox_mundi

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Re: Places becoming less livable
« Reply #975 on: September 26, 2019, 11:17:37 PM »
Turkey Doctor Gets 15 Months for Revealing Pollution Cancer Risk
https://phys.org/news/2019-09-turkey-doctor-months-revealing-pollution.html

A Turkish scientist was sentenced to 15 months in prison on Thursday for revealing the cancer risks posed by toxic pollution in western Turkey.

The court in Istanbul found Dr Bulent Sik guilty of "disclosing classified information"—a verdict described as a "travesty of justice" by Amnesty International.

Dr Sik last year revealed the results of a study carried out with other scientists for the Ministry of Health between 2011 and 2015 linking the toxicity in soil, water and food to high rates of cancer in several western provinces.

He wrote the articles for newspaper Cumhuriyet after realising the government was not acting on the study's findings.

The study "clearly revealed the extent to which water resources were contiminated by toxic materials," Dr Sik told reporters after the verdict.

Pollution from the industrial zone of Dilovasi, around 80 kilometres from Istanbul and home to many chemical and metallurgy factories, was singled out in the report for having cancer rates well above the international average.
“There are three classes of people: those who see. Those who see when they are shown. Those who do not see.” ― Leonardo da Vinci

Insensible before the wave so soon released by callous fate. Affected most, they understand the least, and understanding, when it comes, invariably arrives too late

Sigmetnow

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Re: Places becoming less livable
« Reply #976 on: September 27, 2019, 01:46:50 AM »
Houston, Texas

In an interview on The Weather Channel, Dominic Boyer recommended a "managed retreat" out of the 100-year flood plain in Harris County, Texas.  The area has experienced four 500-year floods in the past four years.

Multiple flood events erode neighborhood spirit, study finds
https://phys.org/news/2019-09-multiple-events-erode-neighborhood-spirit.html
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nanning

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Re: Places becoming less livable
« Reply #977 on: September 27, 2019, 05:05:02 AM »
^^
Climate refugees in a rich country. After only 4 years of severe weather. And the severity of the weather will only increase.
How many internal climate refugees does it take to destabilize a whole country? Soon many more will be on the move.

Harris County has ca. 4.5 million inhabitants.
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Re: Places becoming less livable
« Reply #978 on: September 29, 2019, 07:22:53 AM »
Australia. NSW. Sydney.

  'Critical': parts of regional NSW set to run out of water by November
   by Paul Karp and Australian Associated Press
WaterNSW warns without significant rain, Macquarie River will run dry, wiping out supply to Dubbo, Cobar, Nyngan and Narromine

  Quotes:

The Macquarie River experiences an average inflow of 1,448GL annually but in the past two years has seen just 97GL enter the river system, the data shows.

Australia’s longest river, the Murray, has been severely affected with 901GL of water entering the system in the past 12 months compared with its annual average of 5000GL.

The data shows that Menindee Lakes – which is a source of flows for the Lower Darling and is a vital fish nursery – received just six gigalitres of water in the past year. It’s annual inflow average is 1,387GL.

The data predicts that most of Sydney’s water supply will remain flowing until at least October 2021 when, under the worst-case scenario, the upper Nepean River will run dry.

Pavey sidestepped questions about whether global warming constituted a “climate emergency” but accepted the drought “could be [caused by] climate change, climate variability”.

-----

   Indigenous custodians say document looking at impact of flooding parts of Blue Mountains is hard to follow
   by Lorena Allam

https://www.theguardian.com/australia-news/2019/aug/14/warragamba-dam-level-report-deadline-too-short-traditional-owners-say

Australia’s largest urban water supply dam – Warragamba Dam – is projected to stop flowing by January 2022, according to the data.

The New South Wales government wants to raise the dam wall by at least 14 metres to reduce flood risks to western Sydney suburbs downstream. But green groups, Aboriginal traditional owners and Unesco are against the proposal, with the world heritage committee announcing last month that it was “likely to have an impact on the outstanding universal value” of the area.

Warragamba dam provides water to 4.5 million people. The proposal to raise the wall is expected to create an extra 995-gigalitre capacity

A Give a DAM campaigner, Harry Burkitt, said the plan to raise the wall would flood more than 300 Aboriginal cultural sites within the greater Blue Mountains world heritage area, along with 4,700 hectares of national park, and “shows how far the state government will go” to appease floodplain developers in western Sydney.
"It is preoccupation with possessions, more than anything else, that prevents us from living freely and nobly" - Bertrand Russell
   Simple: minimize your possessions and be free and kind    It's just a mindset.       Refugees welcome

Sigmetnow

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Re: Places becoming less livable
« Reply #979 on: October 02, 2019, 02:51:36 AM »
Miami, Florida.  Not rain; this is street flooding during a king tide.
Quote
Brian Entin (@BrianEntin) 10/1/19, 1:17 PM
Really disturbing drive to pick up lunch. Miami streets not even near the ocean are submerged with ocean water bubbling up from drains. Never seen a king tide like this one.
https://twitter.com/brianentin/status/1179082859908403200
Image below, 7-second video clip at the link.
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TerryM

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Re: Places becoming less livable
« Reply #980 on: October 02, 2019, 08:21:03 AM »
Thank heaven that salt water isn't corrosive. And that raw sewage won't be flowing through restaurants or soaking into everyone's carpets. ::)


Time to move to higher ground. Permanently.

Terry

gerontocrat

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Re: Places becoming less livable
« Reply #981 on: October 02, 2019, 11:55:47 AM »
Miami, Florida.  Not rain; this is street flooding during a king tide.
Quote
Brian Entin (@BrianEntin) 10/1/19, 1:17 PM
Really disturbing drive to pick up lunch. Miami streets not even near the ocean are submerged with ocean water bubbling up from drains. Never seen a king tide like this one.
Hullo Meteo Lady,

Those King Tides in Florida might have been exacerbated by - Lorenzo
Quote from latest NHC.NOAA.GOV discussion ....
Quote
Swells generated by Lorenzo have spread across much of the
North Atlantic, and are affecting the east coast of the United
States, Atlantic Canada, the Bahamas, portions of the Greater and
Lesser Antilles, and portions of the coast of Europe.  These swells
will produce life-threatening surf and rip currents.

What do you think?
"Para a Causa do Povo a Luta Continua!"
"And that's all I'm going to say about that". Forrest Gump
"Damn, I wanted to see what happened next" (Epitaph)

Sigmetnow

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Re: Places becoming less livable
« Reply #982 on: October 02, 2019, 06:02:33 PM »
Miami, Florida.  Not rain; this is street flooding during a king tide.
Quote
Brian Entin (@BrianEntin) 10/1/19, 1:17 PM
Really disturbing drive to pick up lunch. Miami streets not even near the ocean are submerged with ocean water bubbling up from drains. Never seen a king tide like this one.
Hullo Meteo Lady,

Those King Tides in Florida might have been exacerbated by - Lorenzo
Quote from latest NHC.NOAA.GOV discussion ....
Quote
Swells generated by Lorenzo have spread across much of the
North Atlantic, and are affecting the east coast of the United
States, Atlantic Canada, the Bahamas, portions of the Greater and
Lesser Antilles, and portions of the coast of Europe.  These swells
will produce life-threatening surf and rip currents.

What do you think?

Indeed.  I (and others) have posted on this in the Hurricane thread:
https://forum.arctic-sea-ice.net/index.php/topic,2569.msg231227.html#msg231227
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Shared Humanity

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Re: Places becoming less livable
« Reply #983 on: October 02, 2019, 09:54:39 PM »
Thank heaven that salt water isn't corrosive. And that raw sewage won't be flowing through restaurants or soaking into everyone's carpets. ::)


Time to move to higher ground. Permanently.

Terry


The infrastructure along our coasts that is most at risk from sea level rise are waste water systems. As these systems fail more and more frequently in urban areas, we will begin to see outbreaks of some diseases in urban areas that have not been seen since modern waste water sanitation systems were implemented.

How raw sewage can kill you...

https://www.cleansafeservices.co.uk/10-ways-raw-sewage-can-kill-you/

It will only take a few of these outbreaks to essentially destroy the real estate market in cities like Miami.

nanning

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Re: Places becoming less livable
« Reply #984 on: October 03, 2019, 05:24:09 AM »
I wonder if that water gives off a smell.

And I wonder how safe the superfund sites are against flooding.
"It is preoccupation with possessions, more than anything else, that prevents us from living freely and nobly" - Bertrand Russell
   Simple: minimize your possessions and be free and kind    It's just a mindset.       Refugees welcome

Sigmetnow

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Re: Places becoming less livable
« Reply #985 on: October 06, 2019, 02:43:58 PM »
The persistent high pressure “heat dome” over the southeast U.S. is causing record heat, and flooding along the coast.

'Sunny day flooding' and 90-degree days during South's endless summer
https://amp.cnn.com/cnn/2019/10/05/weather/charleston-flooding/index.html


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vox_mundi

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Re: Places becoming less livable
« Reply #986 on: October 06, 2019, 09:33:39 PM »
Red Tide is Back in Florida's Southwest Coast
https://phys.org/news/2019-10-scientists-red-tide-florida-southwest.html

Scientists say toxic red tide is back in the waters off the Florida southwest coast after fading away earlier this year following a 15-month bloom.

https://myfwc.com/research/redtide/statewide/

Biologists at the Florida Fish and Wildlife Research Institute said Friday that samples taken from the waters off the shore of Collier County found high concentrations of the toxic algae where they also received reports of dead fish and cases of respiratory irritation.

Scientists also observed low concentrations of the red tide algae in Lee County, according to the institute's red tide status report.

http://myfwc.maps.arcgis.com/apps/View/index.html?appid=87162eec3eb846218cec711d16462a72
“There are three classes of people: those who see. Those who see when they are shown. Those who do not see.” ― Leonardo da Vinci

Insensible before the wave so soon released by callous fate. Affected most, they understand the least, and understanding, when it comes, invariably arrives too late

Sigmetnow

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Re: Places becoming less livable
« Reply #987 on: October 14, 2019, 03:22:08 AM »
Northeast coast of the U.S.

Wind driven high tides flooding New Jersey Shore
Oct 11, 2019 | 11:15 AM
Quote
High tides and strong winds caused flooding in some parts of the New Jersey shore Friday.

No major problems were reported. But Sea Bright's fire department conducted numerous rescues of people who had become stranded in flood waters overnight Thursday into Friday morning in the particularly flood-prone community, which is wedged between the ocean and the Shrewsbury River.

Ocean City and Ventnor opened schools two hours late Friday to let flood waters subside before parents and school buses tried to navigate the roadways. And Wildwood closed a bridge into the city during the morning high tide.

Parts of Long Beach Boulevard, the main road through Long Beach Island, also were impassible Friday morning because of flooding. ...
https://www.mcall.com/news/pennsylvania/mc-nws-pa-jersey-shore-flooding-wind-20191011-q2bws53pg5fhloigjtlf7v2o7i-story.html

For Jersey Shore homeowners, hurricane and flood threats are worth the risk
https://www.inquirer.com/news/new-jersey/jersey-shore-hurricane-climate-change-flooding-risk-20191007.html
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Sigmetnow

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Re: Places becoming less livable
« Reply #988 on: October 15, 2019, 02:33:44 AM »
“Miami Water Homes” becoming a bit too literal. :o
Quote
John Morales (@JohnMoralesNBC6) 10/13/19, 10:24 AM
This guy is getting a lot of free publicity from me. But here we go again, with sunny day saltwater flooding in Miami. And it’s not even the #kingtide
#MiamiWaterHomes #sealevelrise #SaltLife
https://twitter.com/johnmoralesnbc6/status/1183387935221207042
Image below; video clip at the link.
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El Cid

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Re: Places becoming less livable
« Reply #989 on: October 15, 2019, 07:36:14 AM »
I am the resident Polyanna here, and I believe that climate change is making many parts of the world MORE liveable or at least not worse. But seriously, Miami? Why would anyone buy property there???There's going to be no Miami in a 100 years for sure, and maybe not much of it even in 30-40...it is already partly under the sea level, built on shallow sand pads and dried out swamps. Pretty insane if you ask me. Won't take much of a sea rise to wipe it out...

Juan C. García

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Re: Places becoming less livable
« Reply #990 on: October 19, 2019, 01:49:42 PM »
Facing unbearable heat, Qatar has begun to air-condition the outdoors
Quote
DOHA, Qatar — It was 116 degrees Fahrenheit in the shade outside the new Al Janoub soccer stadium, and the air felt to air-conditioning expert Saud Ghani as if God had pointed “a giant hair dryer” at Qatar.

Yet inside the open-air stadium, a cool breeze was blowing. Beneath each of the 40,000 seats, small grates adorned with Arabic-style patterns were pushing out cool air at ankle level. And since cool air sinks, waves of it rolled gently down to the grassy playing field. Vents the size of soccer balls fed more cold air onto the field.

Qatar, the world's leading exporter of liquefied natural gas, may be able to cool its stadiums, but it cannot cool the entire country. Fears that the hundreds of thousands of soccer fans might wilt or even die while shuttling between stadiums and metros and hotels in the unforgiving summer heat prompted the decision to delay the World Cup by five months. It is now scheduled for November, during Qatar's milder winter.

The change in the World Cup date is a symptom of a larger problem — climate change.

Already one of the hottest places on Earth, Qatar has seen average temperatures rise more than 2 degrees Celsius above preindustrial times, the current international goal for limiting the damage of global warming.
https://www.washingtonpost.com/graphics/2019/world/climate-environment/climate-change-qatar-air-conditioning-outdoors/?wpisrc=al_special_report__alert-hse--alert-national&wpmk=1
Which is the best answer to Sep-2012 ASI lost (compared to 1979-2000)?
50% [NSIDC Extent] or
73% [PIOMAS Volume]

Volume is harder to measure than extent, but 3-dimensional space is real, 2D's hide ~50% thickness gone.
-> IPCC/NSIDC trends [based on extent] underestimate the real speed of ASI lost.

El Cid

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Re: Places becoming less livable
« Reply #991 on: October 19, 2019, 07:25:07 PM »
"The change in the World Cup date is a symptom of a larger problem — climate change."

Absolutely not. It is a symptom of extreme corruption in FIFA. Only idiots or paid off assholes would grant the world cup to a city state that does not have or need so many stadiums (and many fellow-muslim guest-workers died building these needless buildings!)  and where summers have always been extremely hot. The corruption of FIFA is well known. Qatar has s**tloads of money and can buy as many votes as they wish.
They should have never been allowed to organize the World Cup. They have nothing going for them other than corruption. This is not a story of climate change, just take a look at the climate data from the past:

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Doha#Climate

Six months of unbearable heat, nighttime LOWs (!!) of 30 C. Come on....It is a story of greed and hubris. Shame on us

Juan C. García

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Re: Places becoming less livable
« Reply #992 on: October 19, 2019, 07:56:22 PM »
Surely both. Like several stories of climate change, it is a story of climate crisis and also a story of corruption. In this case, of FIFA corruption.

I didn't include other comments that the article has, that are important (it is a large article). I include them now. I think that Qatar is like Miami. Using fossil fuel energy to cool external places or using fossil fuel energy to pump sea wáter to avoid floodings. Just increasing the problem, when they try to control it.
Quote
To survive the summer heat, Qatar not only air-conditions its soccer stadiums, but also the outdoors — in markets, along sidewalks, even at outdoor malls so people can window shop with a cool breeze.

Yet outdoor air conditioning is part of a vicious cycle. Carbon emissions create global warming, which creates the desire for air conditioning, which creates the need for burning fuels that emit more carbon dioxide. In Qatar, total cooling capacity is expected to nearly double from 2016 to 2030, according to the International District Cooling & Heating Conference.

“I would say it’s wasteful,” Adi Baziac said. “I know how it impacts the environment negatively.”
But it allows them to enjoy the outdoors in the summer, she added. “We can sit outside in an air-conditioned, controlled area, and we sit and mix and mingle.”

So far, Ghani said, the design still needs work. The solar panels don’t provide enough power to run the cooling system. The plants are scraggly. And, worst of all, a stiff hot breeze is blowing through, rendering the cooling system ineffective. “Wind is your biggest enemy,” he said.
Edit: IMHO, it is also Qatar's human rights violation (seems slavery on the XXI Century):
Quote
The danger is acute in Qatar because of the Persian Gulf humidity. The human body cools off when its sweat evaporates. But when humidity is very high, evaporation slows or stops. “If it’s hot and humid and the relative humidity is close to 100 percent, you can die from the heat you produce yourself,” said Jos Lelieveld, an atmospheric chemist at the Max Planck Institute for Chemistry in Germany who is an expert on Middle East climate.

That became abundantly clear in late September, as Doha hosted the 2019 World Athletics Championships. It moved the start time for the women’s marathon to midnight Sept. 28. Water stations handed out sponges dipped in ice-cold water. First-aid responders outnumbered the contestants. But temperatures hovered around 90 degrees Fahrenheit and 28 of the 68 starters failed to finish, some taken off in wheelchairs.

Workers are particularly at risk. A German television report alleged hundreds of deaths among foreign workers in Qatar in recent years, prompting new limits on outdoor work. A July article in the journal Cardiology said that 200 of 571 fatal cardiac problems among Nepalese migrants working there were caused by “severe heat stress” and could have been avoided.
« Last Edit: October 20, 2019, 05:56:56 AM by Juan C. García »
Which is the best answer to Sep-2012 ASI lost (compared to 1979-2000)?
50% [NSIDC Extent] or
73% [PIOMAS Volume]

Volume is harder to measure than extent, but 3-dimensional space is real, 2D's hide ~50% thickness gone.
-> IPCC/NSIDC trends [based on extent] underestimate the real speed of ASI lost.

vox_mundi

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Re: Places becoming less livable
« Reply #993 on: October 19, 2019, 09:25:15 PM »
Stupid ain't limited to the hot parts of the globe ...

The hottest options when considering an outdoor heater for your Northern Michigan patio
https://mynorth.com/2019/08/outdoor-heaters-detroit-radiant-products-company/

Gas patio heaters run from $800 to $1600 per unit. ... We typically try for about 150 BTUs per square foot.

Our electric products are great. They heat a nice area and do it comfortably. You will need to make sure that your home is wired for the amount of electrical consumption they take.

If electric-style heaters are desired, they can run from $300 to $800 per unit but generally you need more of them to cover the same size space as a gas-fired product.

... Our heaters are installed in high-profile golf ranges where people can tee off comfortably in 20-degree weather.

« Last Edit: October 19, 2019, 09:49:32 PM by vox_mundi »
“There are three classes of people: those who see. Those who see when they are shown. Those who do not see.” ― Leonardo da Vinci

Insensible before the wave so soon released by callous fate. Affected most, they understand the least, and understanding, when it comes, invariably arrives too late


gerontocrat

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Re: Places becoming less livable
« Reply #995 on: October 19, 2019, 10:02:44 PM »
Australia - "The Lucky Country"

Can a whole country commit environmental, economic & financial suicide ? Oz is giving it a try.

A government that
- puts all its weight behind coal,
- has to be dragged screaming no to allow exploitation of just about the cheapest & best solar power going (and wind),
- is throwing water greater than its replenishment at irrigators to expand farming fast,
- is cutting down trees faster and faster,
- etc etc etc
And yet has just won an election big-time.

https://www.theguardian.com/environment/2019/oct/20/resisting-droughts-day-zero-the-nsw-towns-close-to-running-dry
Resisting drought's day zero: the NSW towns close to running dry
Quote
After water restrictions and emergency infrastructure, the final drought strategy is sheer perseverance

People have started visiting the outback town of Pooncarie just to see a place that’s running dry.
Josh Sheard, the publican at the Pooncarie hotel, says the remote town in far south-west New South Wales needs the attention. “The community are mostly happy to see people, and have a yarn,” Sheard says. “The town is still here, and we’re not going anywhere. There’s businesses that rely on passing trade.”

It sits on the dwindling lower Darling River, about 100 kilometres south of Menindee. Menindee has become a symbol of the dire state of the river system, after millions of dead fish washed up over summer.

Pooncarie’s drinking water comes from a bore, but raw water for toilets and outdoor use has been trucked in by the Wentworth Shire council since September.

& so on & so on.....

https://www.theguardian.com/environment/2019/oct/17/australia-spends-billions-planting-trees-then-wipes-out-carbon-gains-by-bulldozing-them
Australia spends billions planting trees – then wipes out carbon gains by bulldozing them

https://www.theguardian.com/australia-news/2019/sep/16/nsw-government-faces-crunch-call-on-water-rights-as-drought-deepens
NSW government faces crunch call on water rights as drought deepens
NSW cabinet set to debate preventing irrigators from taking water from the Barwon-Darling river system during low-flow events
"Para a Causa do Povo a Luta Continua!"
"And that's all I'm going to say about that". Forrest Gump
"Damn, I wanted to see what happened next" (Epitaph)

bluice

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Re: Places becoming less livable
« Reply #996 on: October 20, 2019, 09:59:00 AM »
Qatar did not have any stadiums and Qatar doesn’t have any use for stadiums after the event. Football is not a very big sport in Qatar and they don’t have a competitive league or a good national team. Most strikingly, because of Qatari climate World Cup cannot be held at the time when it is supposed to be held, instead games will be played in winter when all the major leagues are active.

Yet FIFA considered Qatar to be the best candidate to host the World Cup.

Lesson from all this is that short term personal interests can supersede any meaningful action.
In PIOMAS we trust

oren

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Re: Places becoming less livable
« Reply #997 on: October 20, 2019, 10:46:20 AM »
Wow. This thread is really depressing. Maybe it should be retitled to people doubling down on climate change. Many of these locations should be evacuated, rather than cool the outdoors and truck in water for toilets.

Juan C. García

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Re: Places becoming less livable
« Reply #998 on: October 22, 2019, 12:06:49 AM »
As waters rise, so do concerns for sports teams along coast
Quote
One franchise’s challenge: Amid rising sea levels, build a stadium to last 100 years.

OAKLAND, Calif. — The infield is made of asphalt right now. So are the dugouts, the outfield and the stands. Someday this might be home to a baseball stadium, but today Howard Terminal is little more than a parking lot for 16-wheelers, populated by far more sea gulls than baseball fans.
...
Dave Kaval, the Oakland Athletics’ team president, walks from the gigantic cranes on the water’s edge to what soon might be the site of home plate…
...
The team is determined to build on the water, which on the surface might seem ill-advised...

How do you maintain operations in areas vulnerable to climate change? How do you sustain facilities and retain fans? How do you make it all economically viable when threats such as sea level rise are inevitable?

The Athletics’ ambitious stadium proposal highlights many of the problems posed by rising sea levels and some of the creative solutions teams and leagues might consider to address them. In targeting a site that the city of Oakland says sits six feet above sea level, Kaval said the team had no choice but to acknowledge the potential impacts of climate change.

Coastal cities across the country face a variety of threats, but no area is as vulnerable as South Florida, which is expected to see more storms, rising sea levels, increased flooding and storm surges. While that puts communities around Florida in serious jeopardy, it’s also a major threat to a bustling sports economy.

While most scientists agree that sea levels are rising, many climatologists — with a better understanding of how quickly ice sheets are melting in Greenland and Antarctica — now think earlier projections might have been too conservative.

“I always feel like I’m the doctor who’s giving bad news to a patient,” said Marco Tedesco, a climate scientist at Columbia University’s Lamont-Doherty Earth Observatory. “But we are starting to understand the reasons and the processes more, and there is a much larger consensus that many of the previous estimates were underestimated.”

Because of the evolving science and uncertainty looming down the road, the scientists behind the report said they could not rule out sea rise hitting two meters — more than 6½ feet — by the end of the century. Some of those immersed in the field say they’re fearful of something much more pronounced, perhaps even 10 feet or more.
https://www.washingtonpost.com/sports/2019/10/16/waters-rise-so-do-concerns-sports-teams-along-coast/?arc404=true
Which is the best answer to Sep-2012 ASI lost (compared to 1979-2000)?
50% [NSIDC Extent] or
73% [PIOMAS Volume]

Volume is harder to measure than extent, but 3-dimensional space is real, 2D's hide ~50% thickness gone.
-> IPCC/NSIDC trends [based on extent] underestimate the real speed of ASI lost.

Juan C. García

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Re: Places becoming less livable
« Reply #999 on: October 22, 2019, 03:18:21 AM »
Wow. This thread is really depressing. Maybe it should be retitled to people doubling down on climate change. Many of these locations should be evacuated, rather than cool the outdoors and truck in water for toilets.

Completely right! It is the whole world that it is becoming less livable, not just "some places".
In several articles you can have this conclusion, like we have it in the last one (Oakland Athletics) of the Washington Post:

Quote
Economists warn that climate change will have a major financial impact around the globe, and one working paper published last month stated that the United States could lose up to 10.5 percent of its gross domestic product by 2100 if emissions of greenhouse gases are not significantly cut. The economic impact similarly will be felt across the sports universe, one that could measure in the billions of dollars.

There has been no formal study done, but Allen Hershkowitz, an environment scientist who helped found Sport and Sustainability International, notes that teams and leagues will have to account for the physical impact on the venues but also losses from the disruption of business. Some locations will be prone to flooding, some to drought and still others to extreme heat, he says, and many will have to make serious adjustments in the years to come.
Which is the best answer to Sep-2012 ASI lost (compared to 1979-2000)?
50% [NSIDC Extent] or
73% [PIOMAS Volume]

Volume is harder to measure than extent, but 3-dimensional space is real, 2D's hide ~50% thickness gone.
-> IPCC/NSIDC trends [based on extent] underestimate the real speed of ASI lost.