Support the Arctic Sea Ice Forum and Blog

Author Topic: Places becoming less livable  (Read 188257 times)

Tom_Mazanec

  • Nilas ice
  • Posts: 1308
    • View Profile
    • Planet Mazanec
  • Liked: 262
  • Likes Given: 36
Re: Places becoming less livable
« Reply #950 on: August 19, 2019, 06:11:15 PM »
When a hurricane approaches, the air tingles. The sea does strange things. In minutes, the sky can turn from azure blue to slate gray. Turbulence comes out of nowhere. You can picture what follows, and many photographers do, but you will find no images of catastrophe in Anastasia Samoylova’s “FloodZone.” She is looking for other things, the subtler signs of what awaits the populations that cluster along shorelines. What is it to live day by day on a climatic knife’s edge? What psychological state does it demand? Hurricanes are sudden and violent; sea-level rise is insidious and creeping. The low-level dread of slow change, and the shock of sudden extremes. Climate and weather.
https://www.newyorker.com/culture/photo-booth/life-in-miami-on-the-knifes-edge-of-climate-change-anastasia-samoylova

AUG 20
What U.S. Cities Facing Climate Disaster Risks Are Least Prepared?
New studies find cities most vulnerable to climate change disasters—heat waves, flooding, rising seas, drought—are the least prepared.
https://www.citylab.com/environment/2019/08/climate-impacts-resilient-cities-environmental-justice/596251/

Residents of Central America’s Dry Corridor are at a crossroads: stay in the drought-stricken region, where food insecurity and violence are rampant, or migrate.
Running along the Pacific Coast, the Dry Corridor includes parts of Guatemala, Honduras, El Salvador, and Nicaragua. According to the United Nations’ World Food Program (WFP), climate change is causing increasingly severe dry spells in the drought-prone region. 
https://www.circleofblue.org/2019/hotspots/hotspots-h2o-drought-and-unrest-push-residents-out-of-central-americas-dry-corridor/
« Last Edit: August 21, 2019, 12:25:29 AM by Tom_Mazanec »
SHARKS (CROSSED OUT) MONGEESE (SIC) WITH FRICKIN LASER BEAMS ATTACHED TO THEIR HEADS

Tom_Mazanec

  • Nilas ice
  • Posts: 1308
    • View Profile
    • Planet Mazanec
  • Liked: 262
  • Likes Given: 36
Re: Places becoming less livable
« Reply #951 on: August 27, 2019, 08:58:04 PM »
If your place is becoming less livable, move.
Now.
Move away from coastal areas while you still can, scientists sound warning on climate change
https://www.ibtimes.com/move-away-coastal-areas-while-you-still-can-scientists-sound-warning-climate-change-2818167
Quote
Ateam of scientists has urged people to retreat from the coastal areas while they still can in order to move out of harm’s way, rather than being forced to move after disasters triggered by climate change strike.

The trio of scientists wrote in a paper published in the journal Science, that an estimated 1 billion people will be forced to migrate away from their homes due to disasters associated with climatic change in the next 30 years. The only way to avoid that scenario, according to them, would be to start a planned retreat from the low-lying coastal cities now, rather than waiting for harm that is sure to come.

"Faced with global warming, rising sea levels, and the climate-related extremes they intensify, the question is no longer whether some communities will retreat — moving people and assets out of harm’s way — but why, where, when, and how they will retreat," the environmental scientists wrote in the paper.
SHARKS (CROSSED OUT) MONGEESE (SIC) WITH FRICKIN LASER BEAMS ATTACHED TO THEIR HEADS

Archimid

  • Nilas ice
  • Posts: 2255
    • View Profile
  • Liked: 248
  • Likes Given: 174
Re: Places becoming less livable
« Reply #952 on: August 29, 2019, 02:39:29 PM »
Re. moving:

Not gonna happen. Like everyone else, we have a reason why we are better off where we are.
I am an energy reservoir seemingly intent on lowering entropy for self preservation.

Klondike Kat

  • Grease ice
  • Posts: 687
    • View Profile
  • Liked: 33
  • Likes Given: 47
Re: Places becoming less livable
« Reply #953 on: August 29, 2019, 02:48:33 PM »
Re. moving:

Not gonna happen. Like everyone else, we have a reason why we are better off where we are.

Same here.  In a worst case scenario, people will be flocking to places like Michigan.

Mozi

  • New ice
  • Posts: 42
    • View Profile
  • Liked: 20
  • Likes Given: 2
Re: Places becoming less livable
« Reply #954 on: August 29, 2019, 05:28:31 PM »
Re. moving:

Not gonna happen. Like everyone else, we have a reason why we are better off where we are.

Of course, but if you live in an area that will be affected at some point you will have reasons why you would be better off somewhere else, and at that point it would have been better to have already moved.

Archimid

  • Nilas ice
  • Posts: 2255
    • View Profile
  • Liked: 248
  • Likes Given: 174
Re: Places becoming less livable
« Reply #955 on: August 29, 2019, 06:30:37 PM »
Nope, my brain will create a nice illusion where I'll be fine. So would most people's brain. It's a defense mechanism. The same applies to the climate change argument at all scales.

Once the climate reality superimposes over the illusion I create, then I'll run.
I am an energy reservoir seemingly intent on lowering entropy for self preservation.

Tom_Mazanec

  • Nilas ice
  • Posts: 1308
    • View Profile
    • Planet Mazanec
  • Liked: 262
  • Likes Given: 36
Re: Places becoming less livable
« Reply #956 on: August 29, 2019, 06:46:36 PM »
Nope, my brain will create a nice illusion where I'll be fine. So would most people's brain. It's a defense mechanism. The same applies to the climate change argument at all scales.

Once the climate reality superimposes over the illusion I create, then I'll run.

And get three cents on the dollar for your property.
SHARKS (CROSSED OUT) MONGEESE (SIC) WITH FRICKIN LASER BEAMS ATTACHED TO THEIR HEADS

Archimid

  • Nilas ice
  • Posts: 2255
    • View Profile
  • Liked: 248
  • Likes Given: 174
Re: Places becoming less livable
« Reply #957 on: August 29, 2019, 06:52:36 PM »
If that.
I am an energy reservoir seemingly intent on lowering entropy for self preservation.

vox_mundi

  • Nilas ice
  • Posts: 1365
    • View Profile
  • Liked: 470
  • Likes Given: 100
Re: Places becoming less livable
« Reply #958 on: August 29, 2019, 09:01:39 PM »
Warsaw Sewage Plant Malfunction Contaminates Vistula River
https://phys.org/news/2019-08-warsaw-sewage-malfunction-contaminates-vistula.html

Polish authorities on Thursday were warning residents in cities along the Vistula river that runs into the Baltic Sea of a "crisis" situation after Warsaw's new sewage collection plant malfunctioned.

The sewage is being discharged at about 3,000 liters (nearly 800 gallons) a second at Warsaw's northern edge and goes north without affecting the city's waters, authorities said.

"There is no reason for panic and there is no threat to the health of Warsaw residents," Warsaw Mayor Rafal Trzaskowski said.

Experts were working to fix the malfunction at the sewage plant, which will take longer than three days, according to Trzaskowski.

It wasn't immediately clear what caused the sewage collection system, including an emergency backup, to fail.



------------------------

Chinese-Owned Nickel Plant Spills Waste Into Papua New Guinea Bay

Waste from a nickel plant in Papua New Guinea owned by Metallurgical Corporation of China spilled into the adjacent Basamuk Bay over the weekend, three sources told Reuters on Aug. 28.

Locals noticed red discharge clouding parts of the bay that is next to the Ramu Nickel plant in Madang, Papua New Guinea, a local indigenous person who took photographs of the spillage told Reuters.Papua New Guinea officials have sealed off the area around a Chinese-owned nickel plant in the north of the country after the leakage of potentially toxic slurry that has turned the ocean red.

The Mineral Resources Authority said on Thursday it had cordoned off a portion of Basamuk Bay in the north of the country, while emergency tests are carried out to determine the scale of environmental damage.

The water and coastline were dyed ochre red by the slurry, which is said to have overflowed from tanks at the Ramu Nickel refinery for almost an hour.



During a meeting in Beijing last week, the China Metallurgical Group asked visiting Papua New Guinea officials to approve plans to expand production capacity.

The project was commissioned in 2012 and delayed for almost two years by a legal challenge. Local landowners had tried to block the project because waste from the plant is dumped in the ocean rather than landfill.

“There are three classes of people: those who see. Those who see when they are shown. Those who do not see.” ― Leonardo da Vinci

Insensible before the wave so soon released by callous fate. Affected most, they understand the least, and understanding, when it comes, invariably arrives too late

vox_mundi

  • Nilas ice
  • Posts: 1365
    • View Profile
  • Liked: 470
  • Likes Given: 100
Re: Places becoming less livable
« Reply #959 on: August 30, 2019, 12:27:24 PM »
Draft UN Report Warns of Rising Seas, Storm Surges, Melting Permafrost
https://phys.org/news/2019-08-seas-storm-surges-permafrost.html

... Destructive changes already set in motion—some irreversible—could see a steady decline in fish stocks, a hundred-fold or more increase in the damages caused by superstorms, and hundreds of millions of people displaced by rising seas, according to the new UN Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC) "special report" on oceans and Earth's frozen zones, known as the cryosphere.

As the 21st century unfolds, melting glaciers will first give too much and then too little to billions who depend on them for fresh water, it finds.

Without deep cuts to manmade emissions, at least 30 percent of the northern hemisphere's surface permafrost could melt by century's end, unleashing billions of tonnes of carbon and accelerating global warming even more.



... Shanghai, Ningbo, Taizhou and another half-dozen major coastal cities in China, for example, are highly vulnerable to future sea level rise, which is projected to add a metre by 2100 compared to the late 20th century global watermark, if CO2 emissions continue unabated. Mumbai and other coastal Indian cities are in harm's way as well.

Even in the United States, where billions are being spent to protect New York, Miami and other exposed cities, such efforts could easily be overwhelmed, say experts.

Quote
... "There is a pervasive thread in the US right now promoted by techno-optimists who think we can engineer our way out of this problem, ... But the US is not ready for a metre of sea level rise by 2100"

- Michael Mann - Director - Earth System Science Center - Pennsylvania State University

... By 2050, many low-lying megacities and small island nations will experience "extreme sea level events" every year, even under the most optimistic emissions reduction scenarios, the report concludes.

By 2100, "annual flood damages are expected to increase by two to three orders of magnitude," or 100 to 1,000 fold, the draft summary for policymakers says.
“There are three classes of people: those who see. Those who see when they are shown. Those who do not see.” ― Leonardo da Vinci

Insensible before the wave so soon released by callous fate. Affected most, they understand the least, and understanding, when it comes, invariably arrives too late

Tom_Mazanec

  • Nilas ice
  • Posts: 1308
    • View Profile
    • Planet Mazanec
  • Liked: 262
  • Likes Given: 36
Re: Places becoming less livable
« Reply #960 on: September 01, 2019, 12:49:54 AM »
Leaked Draft of U.N. Climate Report Says Warming Oceans Are ‘Poised to Unleash Misery’
http://nymag.com/intelligencer/2019/08/leaked-un-draft-warming-oceans-could-unleash-misery.html
Quote
The report, which leaked to the French News agency AFP and focuses on the oceans and the planet’s stores of frozen water known as the cryosphere, states that if warming isn’t halted at 1.5 degrees Celsius, sea levels will rise high enough to displace around 280 million people. (If perspective is needed, that’s four times the current number of worldwide refugees, which is a record high. And that’s to say nothing of other forms of climate displacement.) By 2100, the draft states that “annual flood damages are expected to increase by two to three orders of magnitude.” That means flood damages will increase either 100- or 1,000-fold — in a world where king tides are already causing cities like Miami to flood on a regular basis, and where Indonesia just announced announced a new inland capital because Jakarta is sinking. By 2050, low-lying cities and small island nations will face “extreme sea-level events” every year. At two degrees, the report anticipates that the frequency of extreme El Niño events will double, leading to greater risk of forest fires and cyclones.
SHARKS (CROSSED OUT) MONGEESE (SIC) WITH FRICKIN LASER BEAMS ATTACHED TO THEIR HEADS

Tom_Mazanec

  • Nilas ice
  • Posts: 1308
    • View Profile
    • Planet Mazanec
  • Liked: 262
  • Likes Given: 36
Re: Places becoming less livable
« Reply #961 on: September 02, 2019, 06:34:29 PM »
Asia Should Fix Its Megacities, Not Move Them
https://www.bloomberg.com/opinion/articles/2019-08-31/indonesia-should-fix-jakarta-rather-than-shifting-capital
Quote
Indonesia’s capital Jakarta suffers these urban ills more acutely than most, which is why President Joko Widodo announced a plan last week to shift the government 900 miles away, to a relatively undeveloped section of Borneo. Indonesia isn’t the first Asian country to move its official capital and won’t be the last. But evacuating government officials and their families won’t solve the problems of Jakarta, Bangkok, Dhaka or any other megacity. Given how many people will continue to live in those urban conurbations, the focus has to remain on fixing what ails them.
SHARKS (CROSSED OUT) MONGEESE (SIC) WITH FRICKIN LASER BEAMS ATTACHED TO THEIR HEADS

kassy

  • Grease ice
  • Posts: 623
    • View Profile
  • Liked: 179
  • Likes Given: 267
Re: Places becoming less livable
« Reply #962 on: September 04, 2019, 04:03:01 PM »
A land without water: the scramble to stop Jordan from running dry

...

Half a century ago, Azraq was legendary. Historical photos show ponds flanked by thick clusters of reeds and squat date palms. A shot from 1965, which hangs today in a local lodge, shows a man waist-deep in Shishan Pool. He is fishing, his net suspended in mid-air. All of this — Azraq’s mudflats, marshes and pools — depended on reserves of underground water replenished by yearly rains. In the early 1980s, Jordan’s government began drilling wells near Azraq and pumping millions of cubic metres of water annually from the aquifers — underground layers of porous rock and sediment. Farmers began unfettered pumping of their own.

Soon, the aquifer was losing water faster than rains could refill it. In 1987, the springs that fed the two main pools in northern Azraq stopped flowing. By 1990, the pools dried up. Today, the water table has dropped from the surface to tens of metres below ground. This is happening not just in Azraq, but in aquifers across Jordan.

...

Wells that tap the aquifers supply nearly 60% of the water consumed in the country, with the rest coming from surface-water supplies such as the Sea of Galilee and the River Jordan (see ‘Without water’). Some 45% of the water usage goes to agriculture. Meanwhile, municipal water networks lose roughly half their water to theft and leaks.

...

Of Jordan’s 12 groundwater basins, 10 are being pumped at a deficit. Overall, groundwater is being extracted at twice the rate that it is replenished, according to the Jordanian water ministry. At this pace, the looming question for Jordan’s aquifers is not if they will be depleted, but when.

...

To Al-Younes, who grew up in Azraq, the restoration (with water they are pumping from the aquifer... K ) is a feeble attempt to revive a place long ago destroyed by lack of foresight. She left Azraq in the early 2000s, following her children to Amman, where opportunity abounded in comparison to the dusty stopover that Azraq has become.

“You have to think about the future, about the people who will live here,” Al-Younes says. “Unfortunately, no one thinks this way at all.”

https://www.nature.com/articles/d41586-019-02600-w

Interesting article on Jordan with a rather depressing conclusion.
Þetta minnismerki er til vitnis um að við vitum hvað er að gerast og hvað þarf að gera. Aðeins þú veist hvort við gerðum eitthvað.

Tom_Mazanec

  • Nilas ice
  • Posts: 1308
    • View Profile
    • Planet Mazanec
  • Liked: 262
  • Likes Given: 36
Re: Places becoming less livable
« Reply #963 on: September 04, 2019, 07:52:37 PM »
You would think making weather warmer would make the world's most northerly town more livable
A climate-change frontier in the world's northernmost town
https://www.reuters.com/video/2019/09/03/a-climate-change-frontier-in-the-worlds?videoId=595527021&videoChannel=118169
Quote
The world's northernmost town of Longyearbyen in Svalbard is struggling to cope with the effects of climate change. Icebergs are toppling into warming waters and thawing permafrost alongside unpredictable weather conditions leave a constant threat of what residents see as 'unnatural' disasters - like avalanches. Alex Fraser reports.
SHARKS (CROSSED OUT) MONGEESE (SIC) WITH FRICKIN LASER BEAMS ATTACHED TO THEIR HEADS

VaughnAn

  • New ice
  • Posts: 64
    • View Profile
  • Liked: 32
  • Likes Given: 323
Re: Places becoming less livable
« Reply #964 on: September 05, 2019, 09:13:52 PM »
This video is from 2017.  From all the things happening in northern Canada I do not think conditions have improved:


This is scary stuff. 

vox_mundi

  • Nilas ice
  • Posts: 1365
    • View Profile
  • Liked: 470
  • Likes Given: 100
Re: Places becoming less livable
« Reply #965 on: September 08, 2019, 08:40:12 PM »
'It Can Kill You in Seconds': The Deadly Algae on Brittany's Beaches
https://www.theguardian.com/environment/2019/sep/08/it-can-kill-you-in-seconds-the-deadly-algae-on-brittanys-beaches

For decades, potentially lethal green algae has amassed in shallow bays on Brittany’s beautiful north-western coast. ... When the algae decomposes, pockets of toxic gas get trapped under its crust — potentially fatal to humans if they step on it.

This summer, six Brittany beaches were closed because of a mass of dangerous seaweed. The bay of Saint-Brieuc was the focus, with bulldozers piling so much algae into dumper trucks on the beach that an inland treatment centre, where seaweed is dried out and disposed of, briefly closed due to an unbearable stench. The centre blamed the foul odour on the method used to collect the algae, which had mixed in mud and sand. Local residents complained the smell was so bad it woke them up at night.

Quote
... “When I was 16, I used to bring a boat here with my uncle,” Ollivro said. “In those days, it was all about natural beauty and you didn’t see seaweed piled up. It’s a shame this place has come to be associated with death.”

... Jean-René Auffray, 50, was fit and preparing for a long-distance race when he set out on an afternoon jog from his home near the beach in Hillion. His dog returned alone and his wife and children went out to search for him. The area where he was found had already seen over 30 wild boar die in algal sludge five years before, with a likely link to rotting seaweed.



Last year, after a legal battle, the death of another man, Thierry Morfoisse, was ruled to have been a workplace accident linked to the seaweed. Morfoisse died suddenly while he was driving a truck transporting algae away from a beach in 2009.

... Another victim, a 27-year-old vet was dragged unconscious from a patch of rotting algae a metre deep in 2009. The horse he was riding collapsed and died within minutes from fumes given off by the sludge on the beach.

--------------------

Hydrogen Sulfide
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Hydrogen_sulfide

Hydrogen sulfide is a broad-spectrum poison, meaning that it can poison several different systems in the body, although the nervous system is most affected. The toxicity of H2S is comparable with that of carbon monoxide.[35] It binds with iron in the mitochondrial cytochrome enzymes, thus preventing cellular respiration.

... At 100–150 ppm the olfactory nerve is paralyzed after a few inhalations, and the sense of smell disappears, often together with awareness of danger.

... Concentrations over 1000 ppm cause immediate collapse with loss of breathing, even after inhalation of a single breath ... and a high probability of death.

Diagnostic of extreme poisoning by H2S is the discolouration of copper coins in the pockets of the victim.
“There are three classes of people: those who see. Those who see when they are shown. Those who do not see.” ― Leonardo da Vinci

Insensible before the wave so soon released by callous fate. Affected most, they understand the least, and understanding, when it comes, invariably arrives too late

Tom_Mazanec

  • Nilas ice
  • Posts: 1308
    • View Profile
    • Planet Mazanec
  • Liked: 262
  • Likes Given: 36
Re: Places becoming less livable
« Reply #966 on: September 09, 2019, 05:29:08 PM »
No Trees, No Shade, No Relief in Cities as Climate Heats Up
https://www.usnews.com/news/best-states/maryland/articles/2019-09-05/no-trees-no-shade-no-relief-in-cities-as-climate-heats-up?utm_source=Sailthru&utm_medium=email&utm_campaign=Issue:%202019-09-06%20Smart%20Cities%20Dive%20Newsletter%20%5Bissue:22870%5D&utm_term=Smart%20Cities%20Dive
Quote
To cool neighborhoods, you could remove those materials or replace them with heat-repellent versions. Or you could prevent some of the sun's heat energy from reaching those materials in the first place. Trees -- especially dense clusters of large trees with expansive canopies, like those common in Baltimore's wealthier northern neighborhoods -- offer the best hope for doing that.

This helps partly explain why in Baltimore, the coolest neighborhood has 10 times more tree canopy than the hottest neighborhood. In temperature readings taken by researchers at Portland State University in Oregon and the Science Museum of Virginia on one particularly hot day in August 2018, there was an 8 degree Fahrenheit difference between the coolest and hottest neighborhoods in the city.
Quote
U.S. cities are losing 29 million trees every year, and many cities are struggling to reverse their dwindling canopies, according to an investigation by NPR and the University of Maryland's Howard Center for Investigative Journalism. Between 2009 and 2014, 44 states lost tree cover in urban areas, according to the U.S. Forest Service, though Baltimore bucked the trend with a small increase between 2007 and 2015.
SHARKS (CROSSED OUT) MONGEESE (SIC) WITH FRICKIN LASER BEAMS ATTACHED TO THEIR HEADS

Tom_Mazanec

  • Nilas ice
  • Posts: 1308
    • View Profile
    • Planet Mazanec
  • Liked: 262
  • Likes Given: 36
Re: Places becoming less livable
« Reply #967 on: September 11, 2019, 09:28:31 PM »
Glowing fish? Alaskans say 'times have changed'
https://www.eenews.net/stories/1061111693
Quote
The Arctic beach at this small Inupiaq village was so wide, when Frank Oxereok Jr. was a boy, large planes could easily land on it.

Four decades later, the Bering Sea has claimed about 90% of the beach that shields residents from the ferocious offshore storms that slam into this remote hamlet, which as the westernmost town on the U.S. mainland is about 56 miles from Russia.

"Now we can barely drive two four-wheelers side by side during high water," lamented Oxereok, the mayor of Wales, during a town meeting last month with Sen. Lisa Murkowski (R-Alaska).

The story of Wales' shrinking beach is a familiar one throughout the Seward Peninsula, a sparsely populated tract of land that's home to about a dozen coastal villages and the regional hub of Nome. Life here is being upended by the accelerated pace of climate change; Alaska is warming twice as fast as the rest of the world.

FLIGHT TO THE FUTURE
https://packages.trust.org/flight-to-the-future/index.html
Quote
Somaliland, a self-declared republic of 4 million people in the Horn of Africa, is one of the world's most vulnerable places to climate change. Poor and drought-hit, and without legal status as a country, it is struggling to adapt for the future.

As the Syria-sized republic battles worsening weather crises and growing migration within and out of the region, it is racing to find ways to stem a tide of climate migrants, keep people on ever-less-productive land and create new jobs for the unemployed.
« Last Edit: September 11, 2019, 10:01:15 PM by Tom_Mazanec »
SHARKS (CROSSED OUT) MONGEESE (SIC) WITH FRICKIN LASER BEAMS ATTACHED TO THEIR HEADS

Tom_Mazanec

  • Nilas ice
  • Posts: 1308
    • View Profile
    • Planet Mazanec
  • Liked: 262
  • Likes Given: 36
Re: Places becoming less livable
« Reply #968 on: September 13, 2019, 10:23:03 PM »
A Shantytown’s Warning About Climate Change and Poverty from Hurricane-Ravaged Bahamas
https://insideclimatenews.org/news/11092019/poverty-climate-change-bahamas-hurricane-dorian-risk-recovery-global-warming
Quote
The devastation was so widespread across Great Abaco and Grand Bahama islands that recovery crews were only beginning to get into many areas more than a week later and only a few dozen bodies had been formally counted. The thousands of people unaccounted for and the descriptions of bodies amid the debris suggested a far higher death toll.

As of Tuesday, 5,400 people had been evacuated to New Providence, home to Nassau, the nation's capital. Emergency response officials estimated 4,000 people remained on Great Abaco, where living conditions, including lack of food, running water and electricity, were becoming increasingly dire.
SHARKS (CROSSED OUT) MONGEESE (SIC) WITH FRICKIN LASER BEAMS ATTACHED TO THEIR HEADS

Sebastian Jones

  • Frazil ice
  • Posts: 307
    • View Profile
  • Liked: 51
  • Likes Given: 35
Re: Places becoming less livable
« Reply #969 on: September 17, 2019, 04:51:07 AM »
Savoonga is a Yupik village on the north shore of St. Lawrence Island, just south of the Bering Strait. Its residents have made a living from the sea, and the ice, since the rising seas formed St. Lawrence Island at the end of the Pleistocene. Alert members of the forum will be aware that the Bering Sea has failed to freeze normally the past two winters. We also know that this  lack of sea ice has had ecological consequences- the ice hosts algae, which feed phytoplankton which feeds zooplankton and which sustains the extraordinarily rich marine life of the Bering Sea. Without the ice, the algae struggle and the consequences reverberate up the food chain until even the people of Savoonga face uncertain, even troubling times. The linked article is intended to part of a series that examines the effects of climate change in this exquisitely sensitive region.
https://www.seattletimes.com/seattle-news/as-bering-sea-ice-melts-nature-is-changing-on-a-massive-scale-and-alaska-crab-pots-are-pulling-up-cod/

Tom_Mazanec

  • Nilas ice
  • Posts: 1308
    • View Profile
    • Planet Mazanec
  • Liked: 262
  • Likes Given: 36
Re: Places becoming less livable
« Reply #970 on: September 18, 2019, 07:09:05 PM »
UK will see four heatwaves a year and twice as many flash floods by 2070s, Met Office predicts
https://www.independent.co.uk/news/uk/home-news/uk-weather-met-office-climate-change-defra-environment-agency-a9107446.html
Quote
“Extreme weather events, such as higher maximum daily temperatures and intense rainfall events leading to flash flooding, are projected to be serious consequences of climate change affecting the UK in coming decades,” said Lizzie Kendon, a climate scientist at the Met Office.

“The new 2.2 km projections will allow us to look at the potential for local temperature extremes to exceed 40C.”
SHARKS (CROSSED OUT) MONGEESE (SIC) WITH FRICKIN LASER BEAMS ATTACHED TO THEIR HEADS

Tom_Mazanec

  • Nilas ice
  • Posts: 1308
    • View Profile
    • Planet Mazanec
  • Liked: 262
  • Likes Given: 36
Re: Places becoming less livable
« Reply #971 on: September 21, 2019, 12:40:06 AM »
Slimy lakes and dead dogs: climate crisis has brought the season of toxic algae
https://www.theguardian.com/environment/2019/sep/18/toxic-algae-climate-change-slimy-lakes-dead-dogs
Quote
“We believe climate change is really having a huge impact on the occurrence and growth of these blooms,” said Anne Schechinger, a senior analyst for the Environmental Working Group (EWG). “We know the incidence of blooms is just going to keep going up and up.”

A report by the EWG found toxic algae blooms have apparently grown in size and frequency multifold since 2010. Reports of algae outbreaks are up 22% compared to this same time last year.

“It really is a national problem,” said Schechinger. “It essentially affects everybody.”

Climate Change Is Already Hurting Our National Parks
https://talkingpointsmemo.com/cafe/climate-change-national-parks
Quote
National parks are at the forefront of the climate crisis in our country, from melting glaciers to record flooding to disastrous wildfires. These regions offer an early view of climate change’s devastating impact on our land. According to a recent study by the National Parks Conservation Association, 80 percent of our more than 400 national parks are experiencing changes in climate through extreme trends in temperature, precipitation, or early onset of spring. In fact, temperatures in national parks are warming twice as fast as in the rest of the country, causing harm to irreplaceable park resources.
« Last Edit: September 21, 2019, 01:11:33 AM by Tom_Mazanec »
SHARKS (CROSSED OUT) MONGEESE (SIC) WITH FRICKIN LASER BEAMS ATTACHED TO THEIR HEADS