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wili

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Re: Places becoming less livable
« Reply #1200 on: February 24, 2021, 05:43:17 PM »
New evidence shows fertile soil gone from Midwestern farms

Quote
a third of all cropland in that region had lost its topsoil

https://www.mprnews.org/story/2021/02/24/npr-new-evidence-shows-fertile-soil-gone-from-midwestern-farms
"A force de chercher de bonnes raisons, on en trouve; on les dit; et après on y tient, non pas tant parce qu'elles sont bonnes que pour ne pas se démentir." Choderlos de Laclos "You struggle to come up with some valid reasons, then cling to them, not because they're good, but just to not back down."

Shared Humanity

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Re: Places becoming less livable
« Reply #1201 on: February 24, 2021, 08:20:50 PM »
New evidence shows fertile soil gone from Midwestern farms

Quote
a third of all cropland in that region had lost its topsoil

https://www.mprnews.org/story/2021/02/24/npr-new-evidence-shows-fertile-soil-gone-from-midwestern-farms

It is not just that the topsoil is gone but the soil that does exist is dead soil. Due to the use of herbicides and pesticides the soil microbiome is destroyed.

El Cid

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Re: Places becoming less livable
« Reply #1202 on: February 24, 2021, 10:51:40 PM »
New evidence shows fertile soil gone from Midwestern farms

It is not just that the topsoil is gone but the soil that does exist is dead soil. Due to the use of herbicides and pesticides the soil microbiome is destroyed.

Good news is: the soil microbiome can be quite quickly restored by regenerative agriculture, and places could become more liveable!

better soil, better food, better place

Shared Humanity

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Re: Places becoming less livable
« Reply #1203 on: February 25, 2021, 12:17:16 AM »
New evidence shows fertile soil gone from Midwestern farms

It is not just that the topsoil is gone but the soil that does exist is dead soil. Due to the use of herbicides and pesticides the soil microbiome is destroyed.

Good news is: the soil microbiome can be quite quickly restored by regenerative agriculture, and places could become more liveable!

better soil, better food, better place


Let me know how those conversations you with ADM go regarding monocropping and genetically modified corn that is able to withstand higher applications of herbicides.

sidd

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Re: Places becoming less livable
« Reply #1204 on: February 25, 2021, 01:22:00 AM »
Re:  the soil that does exist is dead soil

Yes. I have travel extensively in the midwest, and on occasion i walk over to the edge of a field and grab a handful of soil. Not a thing lives in in it, it is dead, dead, dead. Even when the soil is beautiful black, as in parts of Iowa, or indiana, or illinois.

When they spray the fields for potatoes, unprotected humans are not allowed in the fields for three days.

sidd

The Walrus

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Re: Places becoming less livable
« Reply #1205 on: February 25, 2021, 06:33:20 PM »
Re:  the soil that does exist is dead soil

Yes. I have travel extensively in the midwest, and on occasion i walk over to the edge of a field and grab a handful of soil. Not a thing lives in in it, it is dead, dead, dead. Even when the soil is beautiful black, as in parts of Iowa, or indiana, or illinois.

When they spray the fields for potatoes, unprotected humans are not allowed in the fields for three days.

sidd

If the soil is truly in that bad of shape, why are agricultural yields still rising? 

kassy

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Re: Places becoming less livable
« Reply #1206 on: February 26, 2021, 02:07:48 PM »
Is it? It is hard to tell because every year is different weather wise. Next time add a link.
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gerontocrat

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Re: Places becoming less livable
« Reply #1207 on: February 26, 2021, 03:05:17 PM »
Re:  the soil that does exist is dead soil

Yes. I have travel extensively in the midwest, and on occasion i walk over to the edge of a field and grab a handful of soil. Not a thing lives in in it, it is dead, dead, dead. Even when the soil is beautiful black, as in parts of Iowa, or indiana, or illinois.

When they spray the fields for potatoes, unprotected humans are not allowed in the fields for three days.

sidd

If the soil is truly in that bad of shape, why are agricultural yields still rising?
Genetically engineered crops,
More and more fertilisers,
More and more irrigation using water above the natural aquifer and other groundwater replenishment rates,
More and more herbicides and pesticides including the Neonicotinoids***

Results
- more corn, more soya.
- more run-off into water courses that can get so bad the water source goes eutrophic,
- insect decline including those insects that pollinate 40% of all the food we eat.
- disruption of the web of life (e.g. decline in bird populations - à la "Silent Spring")
- which keeps on going for far more years than one would expect.

A monoculture desert. Enjoy your bio-diesel and feed-lot beef.

___________________________________________________________________
*** https://www.nationalgeographic.com/environment/article/widely-used-insecticides-may-be-a-threat-to-mammals-too

These widely used insecticides may be a threat to mammals too
Neonicotinoids are already accused of contributing to widespread insect declines. But there’s evidence they can also harm rabbits, birds, and deer.

"Para a Causa do Povo a Luta Continua!"
"And that's all I'm going to say about that". Forrest Gump
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vox_mundi

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Re: Places becoming less livable
« Reply #1208 on: February 27, 2021, 01:27:10 AM »
The Louvre Moves Its Treasures as Climate Change Brings More Floods to Paris
https://news.trust.org/item/20210226085732-pyja5



The Paris museum is relocating many artworks not on display to a storage facility in northern France designed to stand up to global warming impacts

... When the River Seine that runs through Paris overflowed this month, officials at the Louvre Museum were relieved some of their most valuable items were safely stored in northern France.

The world's largest and most visited museum, with almost 10 million visitors annually, had already transported some 100,000 at risk art pieces to the new Louvre Conservation Center in Lievin, some 190 km north. The reason? Climate change.

"The current floods show once again how necessary it is to protect our art works from flooding," said Jean-Luc Martinez, Director of the Louvre, which owns about 620,000 artworks, only 35,000 of which are on display in the Parisian former palace.

"Soon this flood danger will - once and for all - be behind us," he told the Thomson Reuters Foundation.

With climate change, scientists say heavy rains that cause flooding are set to become more frequent, threatening riverside gems like the Louvre, Notre Dame cathedral and the Musee d'Orsay - home to the world's greatest Impressionist paintings.

The problem is not unique to Paris. Italy built flood barriers to protect Venice's historic city centre after salty sea water damaged St Mark's Basilica, while London's Tate galleries sit on flood-prone sites. [

"We have a lot of museums whose collections will be affected if they are not stored properly," said Mechtild Rossler, director of the UNESCO World Heritage Centre, which supports landmark buildings recognised by the U.N. cultural agency.

By mid-2021, Louvre officials hope 250,000 at-risk paintings, sculptures and tapestries - including the Venus de Milo - will be in their new, $120 million home, where they will be safe from floods, heatwaves and other extreme weather.

The Louvre Conservation Center is set to become one of Europe's largest art training and research centres, visited by museum specialists, conservators and academics from around the world, as well as offering art refuge for countries in conflict.



---------------------------------------------

Money Down the Drain: Flood-Prone Miami to Spend Billions Tackling Sea Level Rise
https://phys.org/news/2021-02-flood-prone-miami-billions-tackling-sea.html

The US city of Miami is to invest billions of dollars to tackle its vulnerability to rising sea levels, a reality that already affects the daily lives of residents used to constant flooding.

Miami-Dade County Mayor Daniella Levine-Cava said Friday she will protect communities hardest hit by rising sea levels, which eat away at beaches and leave residents particularly vulnerable to flooding during hurricane season.

"We must continue to focus on restoration, preservation and protection of this sacred space," she told a news conference.

"And so we will be together investing billions of dollars... in our infrastructure so that we can lift this community and others that are so affected by sea level rise," she added.

She cited "adaptation action areas" as a first priority to be studied, which would include raising low-lying roads, and waterproofing and converting southern Florida's widely used septic tanks into sewage systems.

The city of Miami Beach—which is part of Miami-Dade County—invested millions of dollars in raising the level of many of its streets in 2016.
« Last Edit: February 27, 2021, 11:06:41 PM by vox_mundi »
“There are three classes of people: those who see. Those who see when they are shown. Those who do not see.” ― Leonardo da Vinci

Insensible before the wave so soon released by callous fate. Affected most, they understand the least, and understanding, when it comes, invariably arrives too late

sidd

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Re: Places becoming less livable
« Reply #1209 on: February 27, 2021, 05:16:55 AM »
Re:  why are agricultural yields still rising?

monocrop corp ag views the soil as a medium to be infused with fertilizer, herbicide and pesticide to raise the maximum amount of GMO crops. Anything else alive in the soil is an unwanted component to be killed as efficiently as possible. And this "works" for some definitions of "work" as in bushels per acre.

sidd

vox_mundi

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Re: Places becoming less livable
« Reply #1210 on: March 11, 2021, 06:34:58 PM »
Deep-Sea 'Roombas' Will Comb Ocean Floor for DDT Waste Barrels Near Catalina Island
https://phys.org/news/2021-03-deep-sea-roombas-ocean-floor-ddt.html

Public calls for action have intensified since the Los Angeles Times reported that the nation's largest manufacturer of DDT once dumped its waste into the deep ocean. As many as half a million barrels could still be underwater today, according to old records and a recent University of California, Santa Barbara study that provided the first real glimpse of this pollution bubbling 3,000 feet under the sea.

"These barrels are full of toxic chemicals that could be causing illness among ocean wildlife and even humans. Ignoring it or claiming it's just too difficult to deal with is not an option," said Sen. Dianne Feinstein, D-Calif., who has pushed numerous agencies to make this issue a priority. "The Biden administration has indicated it's interested in taking action, and I intend to stay on them."

... The Scripps expedition this month will deploy two high-tech robots that will comb large swaths of the ocean floor with sonar—"think of them as underwater Roombas," Terrill said. They will yield high-resolution data that will help his team of oceanographers, engineers and hydrographers determine where to send the robots back down for more detailed photos.

Each robot can run autonomously underwater for about 12 to 16 hours before needing half a day to recharge. Terrill and his team have choreographed a NASCAR-like system, in which one robot will always be mapping the seafloor while the other recharges, offloads its data and is recalibrated by the scientists on deck.

The plan, in fact, is to post the data almost immediately onto a NOAA-run repository usually used for live-time hurricane updates, oil spills and other major disasters. And within 30 days of the expedition, more polished data will made available on the National Centers for Environmental Information's website.

David Valentine, whose UC Santa Barbara research team first came across the barrels, said this map will help scientists figure out where to focus further sediment and chemical studies

One critical question whose answer remains elusive is how much the DDT dumped in the deep ocean has been harming wildlife.

Trying to answer that question anew is Allan Chartrand, an eco-toxicologist who first estimated the extent of the dumping in the 1980s, when he was a regulatory scientist for the California Regional Water Quality Control Board.

Chartrand has been reexamining his old reports that found high levels of DDT in three species of deep-water fish—puzzle pieces from the past that could help inform the questions still haunting the public today.

Fellow scientists continue to find significant amounts of DDT-related compounds in Southern California dolphins, and a recent study concluded that cancer growth in sea lions is somehow exacerbated by all the DDT and other persistent chemicals accumulating in their blubber.

Scientists at the California Cooperative Oceanic Fisheries Investigations program, which has maintained an enormous database of underwater specimens for the last 70 years, have also started reviewing decades of archived samples with fresh eyes. One of the program's most extensively sampled stations could be next to, and possibly on top of, part of the DDT dumpsite.

For decades, the nation's largest DDT maker operated its plant on the border of Los Angeles and Torrance. A $140 million Superfund battle in the 1990s exposed the company's disposal of toxic waste through sewage pipes that poured into the sea—but all the DDT that was dumped into the deep ocean had drawn comparatively little attention.

Renewed outcry has focused on both the dumpsite and the Superfund site, which is still awaiting cleanup after more than 20 years of meetings and high-level studies.

... "We also need to find out who can still be held liable for the deeper pollution," said Shelley Luce, president of Heal the Bay. "I want to know: Who's going to pay? For the studies, the education, and ideally, remediation."

-------------------------------------------------

Reminds me of a toxicology study I ran at the Superfund site of DDT manufacturer Montrose Chemical in Henderson, NV.

Montrose is the same source as the Pacific pollution.


https://cumulis.epa.gov/supercpad/SiteProfiles/index.cfm?fuseaction=second.cleanup&id=0900993

https://www.jstor.org/stable/23700103?seq=1

https://m.lasvegassun.com/news/1998/may/26/contaminants-could-have-affected-lake-mead-fish/

https://ndep.nv.gov/uploads/env-sitecleanup-active-bmi-olin/2019-closedpond-postclosure-rpt.pdf
« Last Edit: March 11, 2021, 06:51:53 PM by vox_mundi »
“There are three classes of people: those who see. Those who see when they are shown. Those who do not see.” ― Leonardo da Vinci

Insensible before the wave so soon released by callous fate. Affected most, they understand the least, and understanding, when it comes, invariably arrives too late

be cause

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Re: Places becoming less livable
« Reply #1211 on: March 15, 2021, 08:05:47 PM »
from the Guardian ..

Air pollution
Beijing skies turn orange as sandstorm and pollution send readings off the scale
Capital of China suffers ‘hazardous’ levels of air pollution with authorities issuing second-highest safety alert

A woman walks along a pedestrian bridge during Beijing’s morning rush hour. Air pollution in China’s capital soared off the charts on Monday.
00:45
Sandstorm and pollution turn Beijing sky orange – video
Helen Davidson in Taipei, and agencies
@heldavidson
Mon 15 Mar 2021 04.51 GMT

504
A massive sandstorm has combined with already high air pollution to turn the skies in Beijing an eerie orange, and send some air quality measurements off the charts.

Air quality indexes recorded a “hazardous” 999 rating on Monday as commuters travelled to work through the thick, dark air across China’s capital and further west.

Chinese meteorological authorities issued its second highest alert level shortly before 7.30am, staying in place until midday. A broader warning for sand and dust blowing in from the western desert regions was put in effect until Tuesday morning.


When Beijing’s realtime air quality index (AQI) showed a reading of 999, Tokyo recorded 42, Sydney 17 and New York 26. Hong Kong and Taiwan recorded “moderate” readings of 66 and 87, respectively.

Levels of PM2.5, the small air pollution particles that infiltrate the lungs, were recorded above 600 micrograms in many parts of the city, reaching a 24-hour average of 200 before midday. The World Health Organization recommends average daily concentrations of just 25.

The sandstorm blown in from the desert stretching into Inner Mongolia saw concentrations of the larger PM10 particles surpass 8,000 micrograms according to state media.

Visitors pose for a shot with the Forbidden City at Jingshan Park in the background.
Visitors pose for a shot with the Forbidden City at Jingshan Park in the background. Photograph: Tingshu Wang/Reuters
State media reported at least 341 people were reported missing in neighbouring Mongolia, which was also hit by sandstorms, and flights were grounded out of Hohhot in inner Mongolia.

On social media several people shared screenshots of other air quality indexes showed readings of more than 9,000, officially “beyond index”.

Some residents in Ningxia, in China’s west, said they woke up in the middle of the night feeling as though they couldn’t breathe. One commenter on Weibo joked that they felt like they needed to learn how to ride a camel.


Sandstorms are relatively common at this time of year, and usually attributed to winds blowing across the Gobi desert, but long-term residents said they had not seen one of this severity in years.


Large-scale deforestation is also considered a factor in the spring dust storms, and China has been trying to reforest and restore the ecology of the region in order to limit how much sand is blown into the capital.

Beijing has planted a “great green wall” of trees to trap incoming dust, and tried to create air corridors that channel the wind and allow sand and other pollutants to pass through more quickly.


Beijing and surrounding regions have been suffering from high levels of pollution in recent weeks, with the city shrouded in smog during the national session of parliament which began earlier this month.

Tangshan, China’s top steelmaking city and a major source of pollution in Beijing and Hebei, said on Saturday it would punish local enterprises for failing to carry out emergency anti-smog measures.

« Last Edit: March 15, 2021, 08:10:54 PM by be cause »
2007 + 5 = 2012 + 4 = 2016 + 3 = 2019 + 2 = 2021 + 1 =  ' if only we could have seen it coming ' ...

sidd

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Re: Places becoming less livable
« Reply #1212 on: March 17, 2021, 02:08:58 AM »
Racial inequalities to climate impacts: Redfin on flood risk and redlining

"parts of the U.S. that were designated undesirable for mortgage lending under the racist 1930s-era practice known as redlining"

"This disproportionately impacts people of color, who are more likely to live in formerly redlined areas than in formerly greenlined areas. "

"the Fair Housing Act of 1968 outlawed discimination in the housing market"

"governments have focused flood-protection funds on areas with higher property values"

https://www.redfin.com/news/redlining-flood-risk/

sidd


vox_mundi

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Re: Places becoming less livable
« Reply #1213 on: March 20, 2021, 02:11:01 AM »
'You Can't Escape the Smell': Mouse Plague Grows to Biblical Proportions Across Eastern Australia
https://www.theguardian.com/australia-news/2021/mar/19/you-cant-escape-the-smell-mouse-plague-grows-to-biblical-proportions-across-eastern-australia

Drought, fire, the Covid-19 pestilence and an all-consuming plague of mice. Rural New South Wales has faced just about every biblical challenge nature has to offer in the last few years, but now it is praying for another – an almighty flood to drown the mice in their burrows and cleanse the blighted land of the rodents. Or some very heavy rain, at least.

It seems everyone in the rural towns of north-west NSW and southern Queensland has their own mouse war story. In posts online, they detail waking up to mouse droppings on their pillows or watching the ground move at night as hundreds of thousands of rodents flee from torchlight beams.

... In Gulargambone, north of Dubbo, Naav Singh arrives five hours early for work at the 5Star supermarket to clean up after the uninvited vermin visitors.

“We don’t want to go inside in the morning sometimes. It stinks, they will die and it’s impossible to find all the bodies … Some nights we are catching over 400 or 500,” he says.

Before opening, Singh must empty the store’s 17 traps, sweep up the droppings and throw out any products the mice have attacked.

... After years of drought, rural NSW and parts of Queensland enjoyed a bumper crop due to the recent wet season. But this influx of new produce and grains has led to an explosion in the mouse population. Locals say they started noticing the swarms up north in October and the wave of rodents has been spreading south ever since, growing to biblical proportions.

... Locals are hopeful that heavy rains in the region this week, and more storms forecast in the coming days, will bring the months of infestation to an end.
“There are three classes of people: those who see. Those who see when they are shown. Those who do not see.” ― Leonardo da Vinci

Insensible before the wave so soon released by callous fate. Affected most, they understand the least, and understanding, when it comes, invariably arrives too late

sidd

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Re: Places becoming less livable
« Reply #1214 on: March 20, 2021, 06:32:27 AM »
Clearly they need an army of cats.

Or perhaps a Pied Piper, as long as the bill is paid.

sidd

kassy

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Re: Places becoming less livable
« Reply #1215 on: March 31, 2021, 11:35:09 PM »
https://theconversation.com/seriously-ugly-heres-how-australia-will-look-if-the-world-heats-by-3-c-this-century-157875

Quote
The damage is already evident. Since records began in 1910, Australia’s average surface temperature has warmed by 1.4℃, and its open ocean areas have warmed by 1℃. Extreme events – such as storms, droughts, bushfires, heatwaves and floods – are becoming more frequent and severe.
Þetta minnismerki er til vitnis um að við vitum hvað er að gerast og hvað þarf að gera. Aðeins þú veist hvort við gerðum eitthvað.

interstitial

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Re: Places becoming less livable
« Reply #1216 on: April 01, 2021, 02:55:01 AM »
Well 1 C of warming was the original goal before they were forced to compromise to 1.5 C and eventually 2 C.

vox_mundi

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Re: Places becoming less livable
« Reply #1217 on: April 01, 2021, 03:05:06 PM »
A Third of Global Farmland at 'High' Pesticide Pollution Risk
https://phys.org/news/2021-03-global-farmland-high-pesticide-pollution.html

A third of the planet's agricultural land is at "high risk" of pesticide pollution from the lingering residue of chemical ingredients that can leach into water supplies and threaten biodiversity, according to research published Monday.

Researchers in Australia modelled pollution risk across 168 countries with data on the usage of 92 active pesticide ingredients and found "widespread global pesticide pollution risk".

They highlighted several acutely vulnerable ecosystems in South Africa, China, India, Australia and Argentina, at the nexus of high pollution risk, high water scarcity and high biodiversity.

The study, published in Nature Geoscience, found that overall 64 percent of global agricultural land —approximately 24.5 million square kilometres (9.4 million sq miles)—was at risk of pesticide pollution from more than one active ingredient, and 31 percent is at high risk.

"It is significant because the potential pollution is widespread and some regions at risk also bear high biodiversity and suffer from water scarcity," said lead author Fiona Tang, of the University of Sydney's School of Civil Engineering.

... Regions were considered to be high risk if residues of at least one of the pesticide ingredients were estimated to be at least 1,000 times greater than concentrations that would produce no effect.

"The higher the risk score, the higher the probability for a non-target species to experience an effect," Tang told AFP, adding that this may not be as severe as death.

Researchers said estimates of elevated contamination in Russia, Ukraine and Spain meant nearly 62 percent of European agricultural land (2.3 million square kilometres) is at high risk of pesticide pollution.

Risk of pesticide pollution at the global scale, Nature Geoscience (2021).
https://www.nature.com/articles/s41561-021-00712-5
“There are three classes of people: those who see. Those who see when they are shown. Those who do not see.” ― Leonardo da Vinci

Insensible before the wave so soon released by callous fate. Affected most, they understand the least, and understanding, when it comes, invariably arrives too late

vox_mundi

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Re: Places becoming less livable
« Reply #1218 on: April 04, 2021, 04:52:34 PM »
Florida Emergency as Phosphate Plant Pond Leak Threatens Radioactive Flood
https://www.theguardian.com/us-news/2021/apr/03/florida-emergency-piney-point-phosphate-plant-pond-leak-radioactive-flood-ron-desantis

The governor of Florida, Ron DeSantis, declared a state of emergency on Saturday after a significant leak at a large pond at the old Piney Point phosphate mine threatened to burst a system that stores water polluted with radioactive materials.

Officials ordered more than 300 homes evacuated and closed off a highway near the large reservoir in the Tampa Bay area north of Bradenton. Residents who live around the Piney Point reservoir received an alert via text saying to leave the area immediately because the collapse was “imminent”.

George Kruse, a Manatee county commissioner, said he was at the plant on Saturday with other officials and had to clear the area quickly.

“We determined that it was no longer safe to be anywhere near Piney Point, so we all kind of raced off the stacks as fast as we could,” Kruse said in a Facebook video.

The pond at the old Piney Point phosphate mine sits in a stack of phosphogypsum, a waste product from manufacturing fertilizer that is radioactive. It contains small amounts of naturally occurring radium and uranium. The stacks can also release large concentrations of radon gas.

Hopes said that if the pond collapsed, it could destabilize other areas in the plant. “The pond is basically salt water,” he said.  That’s not the case for the other two pools.”

The wastewater in the other ponds would need to be treated to reduce ammonium content and other materials, Hopes said.

In 2016, more than 200m gallons of contaminated waste water from another fertilizer plant in central Florida leaked into one of the state’s main aquifers after a massive sinkhole opened up in a pond of a phosphogypsum stack.
“There are three classes of people: those who see. Those who see when they are shown. Those who do not see.” ― Leonardo da Vinci

Insensible before the wave so soon released by callous fate. Affected most, they understand the least, and understanding, when it comes, invariably arrives too late

Sigmetnow

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Re: Places becoming less livable
« Reply #1219 on: April 05, 2021, 03:47:15 PM »
Florida to see flood insurance hikes under Risk Rating 2.0
“It allows us to set accurately sound rates and communicate flood risk better than we ever have before.”
Quote
More than a million Floridians will see their flood insurance premium rise next year, FEMA said Thursday.

The good news is, most will see increases of less than $120 a year. The bad news is that homeowners will likely see annual rate hikes like that for the foreseeable future.

The National Flood Insurance Program, which underwrites most flood insurance policies in the U.S., is changing the way it calculates what each property has to pay. The new strategy, called Risk Rating 2.0, is meant to help pull the program out of its $20 billion debt and encourage people to live in safer, less flood-prone homes.

The new program will stop charging flood insurance premiums based solely on whether a home is within or outside of a flood zone and instead consider a range of factors like distance from the ocean, rainfall flooding and the cost to rebuild a home.
...

Andy Neal, chief actuary of the NFIP, said in the press conference that they expect half of the policies to be at their full, proper price in five years, with 90% of policies at full risk in 10 years.

This reflects one of the major findings of the Risk Rating 2.0 revamp: higher-value homes are generally underpaying for flood insurance and lower-value homes are generally overpaying.

The riskiest (and therefore most expensive) properties to insure are more likely to be homes that are expensive to rebuild, Neal said. That price, known as the replacement cost, is the same figure home insurers use to come up with premiums. Now flood insurance will do the same, which is likely to raise the cost of insurance for those homes.
...

However, the new Risk Rating 2.0 strategy appears to have some new protections to prevent the sins of the past. For one, congress’s 18% annual cap keeps premiums from rising overnight.

Under Risk Rating 2.0, the maximum for a single-family home’s annual premium would be about $12,000 a year, a number that could change going forward. Currently, there is no cap for a maximum policy, and Maurstad said the maximum annual policy price tops $45,000.
...

Del Schwalls, the immediate past chair of the Florida Floodplain Managers Association, praised FEMA for joining the private flood insurance market by charging customers the proper amount for their policies.

“I think this is exactly what we’ve been asking for, and at times begging for,” he said. “Now people aren’t subsidized into a false sense of security. If you tell them their risk is insanely high but they’re paying $1,200 a year, their gut tells them you’re wrong.”
https://www.bradenton.com/news/state/florida/article250359391.html
People who say it cannot be done should not interrupt those who are doing it.

morganism

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Re: Places becoming less livable
« Reply #1220 on: April 12, 2021, 10:49:31 PM »
Retreat from coastlines? Politicians don’t want to talk about it.
Why managed retreat is still a political third rail.

https://grist.org/climate/retreat-from-coastlines-politicians-dont-want-to-talk-about-it/