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Aporia_filia

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Re: Wildlife
« Reply #300 on: July 28, 2020, 11:13:16 AM »
Quote
" It is obvious to those who regularly work with animals that there is no sharp difference between how human minds and other minds work. Even second order thinking (thinking about thinking) which is horribly difficult to rule in or out in animals occurs on a spectrum, as we regularly observe in people."

Agree! And that gives us, people who work/live with animals enough perspective to look at those actually rejecting the fact of an animal mind, like those "scientists" at the end of the  XIX Century rejecting a mind and a soul in those
living in tribes in lost forests.

Reginald

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Re: Wildlife
« Reply #301 on: July 29, 2020, 04:15:22 AM »
Two good books on the subject:

Divorce Among The Gulls https://www.amazon.com/Divorce-Among-Gulls-Uncommon-Nature/dp/0865474265

and

The Biological Basis of Human Behavior: Forging Links between Evolution and Behavior https://www.amazon.com/Biological-Roots-Human-Nature-Evolution/dp/0195062884


Reginald

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Re: Wildlife
« Reply #302 on: July 29, 2020, 04:24:56 AM »
I also ran across this article about consciousness (finally one I can largely get behind!) that talks about how it may have arisen gradually over deep time, rather than only inhering in humanity and closely-related species.

https://getpocket.com/explore/item/a-new-theory-explains-how-consciousness-evolved

Reginald

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Re: Wildlife
« Reply #303 on: July 29, 2020, 04:39:39 AM »
If AST is correct, 300 million years of reptilian, avian, and mammalian evolution have allowed the self-model and the social model to evolve in tandem, each influencing the other. We understand other people by projecting ourselves onto them. But we also understand ourselves by considering the way other people might see us. Data from my own lab suggests that the cortical networks in the human brain that allow us to attribute consciousness to others overlap extensively with the networks that construct our own sense of consciousness.

Alexander555

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Re: Wildlife
« Reply #304 on: August 05, 2020, 10:21:19 PM »
The first little pack of wolves in the country, after a very very very long time. The Forestland Daltons. https://www.hln.be/in-de-buurt/houthalen-helchteren/nieuwe-beelden-opgedoken-van-vier-wolvenwelpjes~ac8d0967/

kassy

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Re: Wildlife
« Reply #305 on: September 04, 2020, 02:32:01 PM »
Secrets of male elephant society revealed in the wild

Older male elephants have an important role to play in the survival of the species by passing on their skills and knowledge to younger males, a study of African elephants suggests.

Matriarchs lead groups of daughters and their calves, while males grow up and leave the herd.

Mature bull elephants play an important role in leading these younger males, researchers have found.

And their loss by poaching or hunting could have "disastrous impacts".

The study, published in the journal Scientific Reports suggests older bulls are likely to occupy a similar role in male society as matriarchs in female breeding herds.

"It has long been known that older females make more effective leaders of breeding herds due to their enhanced experience - we provide compelling support for a similar role of older males in the male society," said Connie Allen of the University of Exeter and charity Elephants for Africa.

The researchers investigated the behaviour of more than 1,250 male African savannah elephants travelling to and from the Boteti River in the Makgadikgadi Pans National Park, Botswana.

Lone male elephants accounted for a fifth of sightings on elephant pathways using camera traps, with adolescent males travelling along these routes less often than expected, suggesting lone travel is riskier for younger and less experienced males.

Mature adult bulls were more likely to travel at the front of groups of males, suggesting they may be important leaders with valuable ecological knowledge.

and more on:
https://www.bbc.com/news/science-environment-54018133
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Tor Bejnar

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Re: Wildlife
« Reply #306 on: September 11, 2020, 04:10:42 PM »
cross-post:
Discovery of new colonies by Sentinel2 reveals good and bad news for emperor penguins
https://zslpublications.onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/full/10.1002/rse2.176

Lots of information on how to find Emperor Penguin colonies using Sentinel 2 imaging with a complete list of known and recently discovered colonies.  I stumbled across this while searching for info on when we can expect to find new Sentinel 2 images for this upcoming season.
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vox_mundi

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Re: Wildlife
« Reply #307 on: September 13, 2020, 03:16:24 PM »
Scientists Baffled by Orcas Ramming Sailing Boats Near Spain and Portugal
https://www.theguardian.com/environment/2020/sep/13/killer-whales-launch-orchestrated-attacks-on-sailing-boats
https://amp.theguardian.com/environment/2020/sep/13/the-tale-of-the-killer-whales



In the last two months, from the Strait of Gibraltar to Galicia, orcas have been harassing yachts, damaging vessels and injuring crew; and sailors have sent distress calls after worrying encounters.

... On 29 July, off Cape Trafalgar, Victoria Morris was crewing a 46ft delivery boat that was surrounded by nine orcas. The cetaceans rammed the hull for over an hour, spinning the boat 180 degrees, disabling the engine and breaking the rudder, as they communicated with loud whistling.

It felt, she said, “totally orchestrated”. Earlier that week, another boat in the area reported a 50-minute encounter; the skipper said the force of the ramming “nearly dislocated the helmsman’s shoulder”.

At 11.30 the previous night, British couple Beverly Harris and Kevin Large’s 40ft yacht was brought to a sudden halt, then spun several times; Harris felt the boat “raise a little”.

Earlier that evening, Nick Giles was motorsailing alone when he heard a horrific bang “like a sledgehammer”, saw his wheel “turning with incredible force”, disabling the steering as his 34ft Moody yacht spun 180 degrees. He felt the boat lift and said he was pushed around without steering for 15 minutes.

... On 30 August, a French-flagged vessel radioed the coastguard to say it was “under attack” from killer whales. Later that day, a Spanish naval yacht, Mirfak, lost part of its rudder after an encounter with orcas under the stern.
“There are three classes of people: those who see. Those who see when they are shown. Those who do not see.” ― Leonardo da Vinci

Insensible before the wave so soon released by callous fate. Affected most, they understand the least, and understanding, when it comes, invariably arrives too late

gerontocrat

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Re: Wildlife
« Reply #308 on: September 19, 2020, 08:17:13 AM »
Wildlife needs habitat - that's a problem, for wildlife.

https://www.theguardian.com/environment/2020/sep/19/shocking-wilderness-the-size-of-mexico-lost-worldwide-in-just-13-years-study-finds
'Shocking': wilderness the size of Mexico lost worldwide in just 13 years, study finds

Researchers say loss of 1.9m square kilometres of intact ecosystems will have ‘profound implications’ for biodiversity

Quote
The loss of 1.9m square kilometres (735,000 sq miles) of intact ecosystems would have “profound implications” for the planet’s biodiversity, the study’s authors said.

Using mostly satellite imagery, 17 scientists across six countries examined the human footprint across the globe and how it had changed between 2000 and 2013. Almost 20% of the earth’s surface had deteriorated, the study found, while human pressure had eased on only six per cent of the planet. Russia, Canada, Brazil, and Australia held the largest intact areas, together responsible for 60% of the world’s most untouched places.

Some 1.1m sq km (425,000 sq miles) of wilderness identified from imagery in 2000 had some human impact 13 years later. Tropical savannahs and grasslands lost the most area to human pressure, the study, published in the journal One Earth, found.

Lead researcher Brooke Williams, of the University of Queensland, told the Guardian: “We were expecting there to be high levels of intact ecosystem and wilderness loss, but the results were shocking. “We found substantial area of intact ecosystems had been lost in just 13 years – nearly two million square kilometres – which is terrifying to think about. Our findings show that human pressure is extending ever further into the last ecologically intact and wilderness areas.”

Rainforests in Indonesia and Papua New Guinea that were both rich with species had lost large areas to human activities. Conversion of habitats to cash crops, including palm oil, was a big contributor to the losses.

The study did not try to identify the cause of the losses, but Williams said the direct clearing of landscapes for farming was a known major driver.

Co-author Prof James Watson, also of the University of Queensland and the global conservation group the Wildlife Conservation Society, said: ‘The data does not lie. Humanity keeps on shrinking the amount of land that other species need to survive.”

“In a time of rapid climate change, we need to proactively secure the last intact ecosystems on the planet, as these are critical in the fight to stop extinction and halt climate change,” Watson said. Looking across 221 nation states, only 26 had at least half of their land intact, the study found. In 2013, 41% of the world’s surface was either wilderness or was mostly intact.

Williams, who is also a conservationist at the Wildlife Conservation Society, said the losses undermined efforts to mitigate climate change because intact lands acted as storage spaces for carbon dioxide. She said: “Proactively protecting Earth’s intact ecosystems is humanity’s best mechanism for protecting against climate change, ensuring large-scale ecological and evolutionary processes persist, and safeguarding biological diversity into the future.”

The paper’s authors write: “Halting the loss of intact ecosystems cannot be achieved alongside current trajectories of development, population growth, and resource consumption.”

Prof Bill Laurance, the director of James Cook University’s centre for tropical environmental and sustainability science in Queensland, who was not involved in the study, said its findings were scary. “Humans are trashing much of the planet – no doubt about that,” he said. “The tropics are under particular pressure, and it’s not just forest destruction but also the loss of other habitat types, such as tropical savannahs and native grasslands, that are occurring apace.”

He said it was notable that tropical grasslands were heavily impacted because these were more easily converted to pasture or farmland. Declines in rainforests in south-east Asia were also “among the biologically richest ecosystems on Earth”. One example, he said, was the rainforests of Sumatra that were home to critically endangered species of orangutan, as well as tigers, elephants and rhinos. That country’s forests were either gone or being devastated.

He said: “If we don’t halt such changes, we’re going to see the continued rapid disruption and loss of Earth’s ecosystems, including the biologically richest habitats on the planet. And along with that will be continued declines in the quality of life for people.”

The study comes after research earlier this week found that protected areas around the world, such as national parks and world heritage areas, were becoming isolated. Only about 10% of the world’s protected areas were connected to similar habitats outside their borders. The research, in the journal Nature Climate Change, warned that as the globe warmed, species would look to move. But if protected areas were isolated, those species would have nowhere to go.

https://www.nature.com/articles/s41467-020-18457-x
Just ten percent of the global terrestrial protected area network is structurally connected via intact land
Quote
Abstract
Land free of direct anthropogenic disturbance is considered essential for achieving biodiversity conservation outcomes but is rapidly eroding. In response, many nations are increasing their protected area (PA) estates, but little consideration is given to the context of the surrounding landscape. This is despite the fact that structural connectivity between PAs is critical in a changing climate and mandated by international conservation targets. Using a high-resolution assessment of human pressure, we show that while ~40% of the terrestrial planet is intact, only 9.7% of Earth’s terrestrial protected network can be considered structurally connected. On average, 11% of each country or territory’s PA estate can be considered connected. As the global community commits to bolder action on abating biodiversity loss, placement of future PAs will be critical, as will an increased focus on landscape-scale habitat retention and restoration efforts to ensure those important areas set aside for conservation outcomes will remain (or become) connected.
« Last Edit: September 19, 2020, 08:27:56 AM by gerontocrat »
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Tom_Mazanec

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Re: Wildlife
« Reply #309 on: September 19, 2020, 12:43:36 PM »
Weasel mother (miscalled 'ferret') rescues her baby:

It ain't easy being a Mom.
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Reginald

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Re: Wildlife
« Reply #310 on: September 27, 2020, 05:00:12 PM »
Brainiacs, not birdbrains: Crows possess higher intelligence long thought a primarily human attribute

STAT, By Sharon Begley, September 24, 2020

https://www.statnews.com/2020/09/24/crows-possess-higher-intelligence-long-thought-primarily-human/

Whether crows, ravens, and other “corvids” are making multipart tools like hooked sticks to reach grubs, solving geometry puzzles made famous by Aesop, or nudging a clueless hedgehog across a highway before it becomes roadkill, they have long impressed scientists with their intelligence and creativity.

Now the birds can add one more feather to their brainiac claims: Research unveiled on Thursday in Science finds that crows know what they know and can ponder the content of their own minds, a manifestation of higher intelligence and analytical thought long believed the sole province of humans and a few other higher mammals.

Lewis

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Re: Wildlife
« Reply #311 on: September 27, 2020, 05:57:45 PM »
Weasel mother (miscalled 'ferret') rescues her baby:

It ain't easy being a Mom.

Hard to really tell, it could also be stoat, but its all from the same family anyways. Loved the video.

Tom_Mazanec

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Re: Wildlife
« Reply #312 on: October 04, 2020, 05:13:03 PM »
Another stoat:

and here are a couple foxes who like the same thing:
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nanning

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Re: Wildlife
« Reply #313 on: October 04, 2020, 06:20:05 PM »
Thanks for that Reginald.
My view on birds' intelligence, character and creativity is rather different than that of civilisation. Not just corvids.
I have a lot of personal special experiences (understatement). Ongoing. Now the birds around here have recognized me as a completely different human because I really 'see' them and exhibit no supremacy, and they have started singing during the day, even spring songs, which is completely new to me in Oktober. I have been outside for years and never experienced that. I can explain how I've done it. Not simple.
I live in the north of The Netherlands.

edit: I am elated for 3 weeks now. hard to fathom.
« Last Edit: October 04, 2020, 06:25:33 PM by nanning »
"It is preoccupation with possessions, more than anything else, that prevents us from living freely and nobly" - Bertrand Russell
"It is preoccupation with what other people from your groups think of you, that prevents you from living freely and nobly" - Nanning
Why do you keep accumulating stuff?

be cause

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Re: Wildlife
« Reply #314 on: October 07, 2020, 12:08:14 PM »
Enjoyed the tailwind of Alex today as the ravens returned to the farm . They were demonstrating tumbling techniques again . After lunch the local crows and rooks were tumbling by the hundred . I saw triple 360' spins by rooks .. their joy was unbounded . b.c.
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nanning

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Re: Wildlife
« Reply #315 on: October 08, 2020, 06:00:35 AM »
Thanks for giving us that observation be cause. Wonderful.
Q- Do you also have birds singing when the day starts? I'm curious wether or not this happens in other high latitude places too.


And thanks again Reginald for that important article. Very interesting.
"It is preoccupation with possessions, more than anything else, that prevents us from living freely and nobly" - Bertrand Russell
"It is preoccupation with what other people from your groups think of you, that prevents you from living freely and nobly" - Nanning
Why do you keep accumulating stuff?

Tom_Mazanec

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Re: Wildlife
« Reply #316 on: October 08, 2020, 11:24:06 AM »
nanning:
I believe birds do. It is called “the dawn chorus”.
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nanning

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Re: Wildlife
« Reply #317 on: October 08, 2020, 11:46:13 AM »
Tom, I meant in October, or after the equinox.
Did you hear it this morning?
"It is preoccupation with possessions, more than anything else, that prevents us from living freely and nobly" - Bertrand Russell
"It is preoccupation with what other people from your groups think of you, that prevents you from living freely and nobly" - Nanning
Why do you keep accumulating stuff?

Tom_Mazanec

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Re: Wildlife
« Reply #318 on: October 08, 2020, 12:15:38 PM »
Don’t hear it as much as when I was a kid.
What I really hear is a kind of “dusk chorus”...insects making a loud chittering sound. Even heard it at the total eclipse a few years ago.
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Tor Bejnar

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Re: Wildlife
« Reply #319 on: October 08, 2020, 03:32:52 PM »
It is just before 9 am (local time), my office window is open (here in North Florida), and birds are chirping in the woods.  The only sad bit is my neighbor is having some work done and the contractors are running a generator out in the woods.  (It may be needed fence repair [re-installation] caused by Hurricane Michael 2 years ago - their 1/2 acre fenced yard had fences down in three places due to falling trees.) 

But I hear various song birds singing away.

Ah, they've cut down (and are cutting up) a couple (damaged) trees, too.  And too much noise - no more songbird singing reaches my ears.
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nanning

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Re: Wildlife
« Reply #320 on: October 08, 2020, 04:15:14 PM »
Thanks for that Tor. I figured something like that. I mean that it's likely depending on the climiate. You're at 30° north but I'm at 53° north, I think that makes a significant difference.

Just now I've returned from my usual sitting outside for a couple of hours. It was pouring with rain. High winds. 15°C. And yes, the birds came singing. And I was whistling. Under an umbrella. This has been happening every day for 4 weeks now. Even buzzard(s) have come, sit in a tree and do their 'singing' three times now.  Corvids are very interested and part of the sounds. It are ALL the bird species that come by to sing. Some really beautiful. I hear this great tit's song which I only associate with spring: https://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/File:Parus_major.ogg

Some people around here have noticed but no-one has said anything about it to me. Just one person who said that it is nice to be part of nature, and I explained that that is impossible because without technology I can not survive at this latitude.

Tor, do they do chainsawing that every day? How are you? ;)

edit: remember that they only sing around me. when I'm gone, the birdsong is gone. how to cope with that?
« Last Edit: October 08, 2020, 04:22:40 PM by nanning »
"It is preoccupation with possessions, more than anything else, that prevents us from living freely and nobly" - Bertrand Russell
"It is preoccupation with what other people from your groups think of you, that prevents you from living freely and nobly" - Nanning
Why do you keep accumulating stuff?

kassy

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Re: Wildlife
« Reply #321 on: October 08, 2020, 04:43:12 PM »
So they come to learn some new tunes. :)

Just enjoy it.
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nanning

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Re: Wildlife
« Reply #322 on: October 08, 2020, 06:43:36 PM »
Thanks for responding kassy. That's all it is, you think? Nothing more? Then you should be able to reproduce my experience ;).
I've been whistling outside for years and suddenly this happened and goes on for every day for 4 weeks now, where ever I go. I have passed many tests before this started I expect. And I can give a list of my ideas about those possible tests.
And yes, I'm enjoying it with all of me.
Just struggling with the extreme importance of this and the whole experience in general. Almost overwhelming. But in a nice way :) :) :)

edit: :)
« Last Edit: October 08, 2020, 06:55:22 PM by nanning »
"It is preoccupation with possessions, more than anything else, that prevents us from living freely and nobly" - Bertrand Russell
"It is preoccupation with what other people from your groups think of you, that prevents you from living freely and nobly" - Nanning
Why do you keep accumulating stuff?

Tom_Mazanec

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Re: Wildlife
« Reply #323 on: October 08, 2020, 07:57:16 PM »
Where do you live, nanning? I thought Holland but isn't 53 degrees too far north for there?
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nanning

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Re: Wildlife
« Reply #324 on: October 09, 2020, 06:52:34 AM »
Why not take your atlas from the bookshelf and see for yourself. Or go to Nasa worldview. Come on Tom, atlasses are great fun ;)
You won't find a country named "Holland" because it doesn't exist. It is an old made-up name that commerce went to use for global recognition. "Holland" isn't even a province. The original "Holland" people were the conquerors from the south who violently stole most land from the Frisians.
"It is preoccupation with possessions, more than anything else, that prevents us from living freely and nobly" - Bertrand Russell
"It is preoccupation with what other people from your groups think of you, that prevents you from living freely and nobly" - Nanning
Why do you keep accumulating stuff?

kassy

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Re: Wildlife
« Reply #325 on: October 09, 2020, 10:50:27 AM »
Sadly i cannot even do the ´bouwvakker´ whistle.  :'(
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Re: Wildlife
« Reply #326 on: October 09, 2020, 11:37:43 AM »
Wow, the Netherlands are in the Fifties North. That’s like Calgary or Edmonton in this hemisphere.
What are your winters like, nanning? Spring in June, summer in July and autumn in August and then enough winter to make a baby?  ;D
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Re: Wildlife
« Reply #327 on: October 09, 2020, 03:01:28 PM »
Wow, the Netherlands are in the Fifties North. That’s like Calgary or Edmonton in this hemisphere.
What are your winters like, nanning? Spring in June, summer in July and autumn in August and then enough winter to make a baby?  ;D
Northern Europe has  the Gulf Stream / North Atlantic drift that keeps our climate - especially winters, several degrees warmer than an equivalent latitude on e.g. the East coast of North America.

Spring in June - definitely not

The Canterbury Tales: General Prologue
BY GEOFFREY CHAUCER

Here bygynneth the Book of the tales of Caunterbury

Whan that Aprille with his shoures soote,
The droghte of March hath perced to the roote,
And bathed every veyne in swich licóur
Of which vertú engendred is the flour;
Whan Zephirus eek with his swete breeth
Inspired hath in every holt and heeth
The tendre croppes, and the yonge sonne
Hath in the Ram his halfe cours y-ronne,
And smale foweles maken melodye,
That slepen al the nyght with open ye,
So priketh hem Natúre in hir corages,
Thanne longen folk to goon on pilgrimages,
And palmeres for to seken straunge strondes,
To ferne halwes, kowthe in sondry londes;
And specially, from every shires ende
Of Engelond, to Caunterbury they wende,
The hooly blisful martir for to seke,
That hem hath holpen whan that they were seeke.
"Para a Causa do Povo a Luta Continua!"
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Tom_Mazanec

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Re: Wildlife
« Reply #328 on: October 09, 2020, 03:39:35 PM »
For those who were not born in the 14th Century, here is what that means:

Quote
People want to go on religious pilgrimages to spiritual places in the springtime, when the April rains have soaked deep into the dry ground to water the flowers’ roots; and when Zephyrus, the god of the west wind, has helped new flowers to grow everywhere; and when you can see the constellation Aries in the sky; and when the birds sing all the time. Some people go to other countries, but many people in England choose to go to the city of Canterbury in southeastern England to visit the remains of Thomas Becket, the Christian martyr who had the power of healing people.

or if you want a literal line by line:

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1         Whan that Aprill with his shoures soote
                  When April with its sweet-smelling showers
2         The droghte of March hath perced to the roote,
                 Has pierced the drought of March to the root,
3         And bathed every veyne in swich licour
                 And bathed every vein (of the plants) in such liquid
4         Of which vertu engendred is the flour;
                 By which power the flower is created;
5         Whan Zephirus eek with his sweete breeth
                 When the West Wind also with its sweet breath,
6         Inspired hath in every holt and heeth
                 In every wood and field has breathed life into
7         The tendre croppes, and the yonge sonne
                 The tender new leaves, and the young sun
8         Hath in the Ram his half cours yronne,
                 Has run half its course in Aries,
9         And smale foweles maken melodye,
                 And small fowls make melody,
10         That slepen al the nyght with open ye
                 Those that sleep all the night with open eyes
11         (So priketh hem Nature in hir corages),
                 (So Nature incites them in their hearts),
12         Thanne longen folk to goon on pilgrimages,
                 Then folk long to go on pilgrimages,
13         And palmeres for to seken straunge strondes,
                 And professional pilgrims to seek foreign shores,
14         To ferne halwes, kowthe in sondry londes;
                 To distant shrines, known in various lands;
15         And specially from every shires ende
                 And specially from every shire's end
16         Of Engelond to Caunterbury they wende,
                 Of England to Canterbury they travel,
17         The hooly blisful martir for to seke,
                 To seek the holy blessed martyr,
18         That hem hath holpen whan that they were seeke.
                 Who helped them when they were sick.
SHARKS (CROSSED OUT) MONGEESE (SIC) WITH FRICKIN LASER BEAMS ATTACHED TO THEIR HEADS

kassy

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Re: Wildlife
« Reply #329 on: October 09, 2020, 05:49:21 PM »
LOL

Back in school i really really hated medieval dutch because well they only did phonetic spelling. But just read it out loud and it is easier.
Þetta minnismerki er til vitnis um að við vitum hvað er að gerast og hvað þarf að gera. Aðeins þú veist hvort við gerðum eitthvað.

vox_mundi

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Re: Wildlife
« Reply #330 on: October 10, 2020, 10:46:45 PM »


“There are three classes of people: those who see. Those who see when they are shown. Those who do not see.” ― Leonardo da Vinci

Insensible before the wave so soon released by callous fate. Affected most, they understand the least, and understanding, when it comes, invariably arrives too late

vox_mundi

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Re: Wildlife
« Reply #331 on: October 10, 2020, 11:04:22 PM »
... birds do it; bees do it ...

Birds Share Food With Less Fortunate Conspecifics
https://phys.org/news/2020-10-birds-food-fortunate-conspecifics.html

People aren't the only ones who show sympathy. Birds also seem to care about the fate of conspecifics. They notice how much food the others already have and then share theirs with individuals that were not given any. "They seem to take the each other's perspective into account in their decision, and thus seem to show sympathy," said Utrecht-based biologist Jorg Massen in an experiment with azure-winged magpies. He published his findings together with colleagues from the University of Vienna and the Swedish Lund University on September 30 in Scientific Reports.

To investigate prosociality in birds, Massen subjected azure-winged magpies to an experiment. He gave one azure-winged magpie an abundance of mealworms—a popular delicacy for these birds—the other magpies also had access to mealworms or were given nothing at all. The magpie then had the opportunity to share the portion of mealworms with conspecifics through a wire mesh.

The researchers discovered that the magpies are inclined to share food with their peers. They differentiate, however, between whether others have food or do not have food, and subsequently cater to that lack. "Females mainly shared with the others if they had nothing. The males always shared. We think the latter has to do with 'advertisement': 'Look at me being generous.' With the females, it's mainly to help the other if they have nothing."

The azure-winged magpies are more inclined to share food as a response to begging, but it turns out that even without begging, the magpies share food with conspecifics that are less fortunate. This shows that azure-winged magpies might truly notice the need of others, even without begging behavior. "They seem to include the perspective of the other in their decision," says Massen. "They may even show what we call sympathy."

Massen's work not only shows that azure-winged magpies can exhibit prosocial behavior just like people, but also that they may well have the same motivation as people have to do so. "This could indicate that they may be able to empathize with the situation in which their peers find themselves and act accordingly, perhaps with sympathetic motivations. Further tests are however needed to truly investigate whether birds show empathy and sympathy."

The research also confirms what scientists previously found in other animal species: So-called cooperative breeders that raise their young together have a strong tendency to help each other. "This also applies to humans. Like they say: 'It takes a village to raise a child.' You see it in hunter-gatherers, but also in our contemporary society: We also take our children to daycare and schools. Because we let our children grow up in groups, we have become prosocial and can work well together. We now also see this in the azure-winged magpies."

Jorg J. M. Massen et al. Azure-winged magpies' decisions to share food are contingent on the presence or absence of food for the recipient, Scientific Reports (2020).
https://www.nature.com/articles/s41598-020-73256-0
“There are three classes of people: those who see. Those who see when they are shown. Those who do not see.” ― Leonardo da Vinci

Insensible before the wave so soon released by callous fate. Affected most, they understand the least, and understanding, when it comes, invariably arrives too late

nanning

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Re: Wildlife
« Reply #332 on: October 11, 2020, 09:23:17 AM »
Very interesting article vox. Thanks for posting.

Two points of critique about this (imo) non-scientific research. 1. It is possible that the birds recognise a common enemy, since they're captive, and change their behaviour. 2. Have they exaclty defined what they mean by "sympathy" and "empathy"? I think not. So how do they know what they are 'measuring' and how can they find a researched characteristic when it is not exactly defined.

Very interesting article nonetheless and to me not very surprising.
Accepting the outcome of perceived (unique) human characteristics in living nature as reality, is something that humans have a very hard time with because it clashes with our perceived superiority as a species, as I have observed in depth. The brain doesn't want internal 'sparks' and will do its best to maintain the stable world view, even if it is wrong and shows cognitive dissonance. One needs to be extremely honest, flexible and scientific to be able to accept it, and take the consequences to all other parts of ones belief systems/world view.

Once accepted, one then has to take all other lifeforms into account in all ones actions, especially higher intelligence lifeforms. And find a balance and better understanding. The level of intelligence is very weakly correlated with the size of the brain. One should hunt down ones' anthropomorphy to have a more realistic view.
From my observations I conclude that the birds have much free time and there's much more information in their seemingly simple songs and sounds than we think. We just don't have the ears & eyes interpretation and sensory range to see it. Have you never wondered how those seemingly identical birds can tell each other apart? It is extremely tempting but one should never project human behaviour onto other lifeforms (anthropomorhism, cultural projection).
"It is preoccupation with possessions, more than anything else, that prevents us from living freely and nobly" - Bertrand Russell
"It is preoccupation with what other people from your groups think of you, that prevents you from living freely and nobly" - Nanning
Why do you keep accumulating stuff?

vox_mundi

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Re: Wildlife
« Reply #333 on: October 25, 2020, 03:12:13 PM »
Change in ocean currents, water temperature, overfishing, pollution? ...

Thousands of Seals Found Dead In Namibia
https://phys.org/news/2020-10-thousands-dead-namibia.html

An estimated 7,000 Cape fur seals have been discovered dead at a breeding colony in central Namibia, scientists said on Saturday.

Conservationist Naude Dreyer of the charity Ocean Conservation Namibia began noticing dead seals littering the sandy beaches of the Pelican Point colony near Walvis Bay city in September.

Then in the first two weeks of October he found large numbers of seal foetuses at the colony, Dr. Tess Gridley from the Namibian Dolphin Project told AFP by phone.

Fur seals normally give birth between mid-November and mid-December.

Gridley estimated that between 5,000 and 7,000 female seals had miscarried young with more still being found.

The cause of the mass die off is yet to be established but scientists suspect anything from pollutants or bacterial infection to malnutrition.

Some of the dead females found were "thin-looking, emaciated, with very little fat reserves", said Gridley.

In 1994 some 10,000 seals died and 15,000 foetuses were aborted in a mass die off that was linked to starvation suspected to have resulted from a shortage of fish as well as from a bacterial infection at another breeding colony, the Cape Cross, some 116 kilometres (72 miles) north of the central tourist town Swakopmund
“There are three classes of people: those who see. Those who see when they are shown. Those who do not see.” ― Leonardo da Vinci

Insensible before the wave so soon released by callous fate. Affected most, they understand the least, and understanding, when it comes, invariably arrives too late

Sigmetnow

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Re: Wildlife
« Reply #334 on: October 31, 2020, 02:15:16 AM »
People who say it cannot be done should not interrupt those who are doing it.

kassy

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Re: Wildlife
« Reply #335 on: October 31, 2020, 10:04:43 AM »
Nice design, too bad about the material.
Þetta minnismerki er til vitnis um að við vitum hvað er að gerast og hvað þarf að gera. Aðeins þú veist hvort við gerðum eitthvað.

Tom_Mazanec

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Re: Wildlife
« Reply #336 on: November 03, 2020, 12:55:13 PM »
As If the Platypus Couldn’t Get Any Weirder
https://gizmodo.com/as-if-the-platypus-couldn-t-get-any-weirder-1845529134
Quote
The platypus is nature’s crazy quilt, as this strange creature looks like about a half-dozen different animals all rolled into one. Turns out that platypuses were hiding yet another conspicuous feature: THEY CAN FREAKIN’ GLOW IN THE DARK.

I once saw a cartoon of God (long beard, halo etc.) and two angels, one majestic angel talking to God and the other, crosseyed and bucktoothed, holding a picture of a platypus.
Caption was "George here has an idea for a new animal for you to create. He calls it a platypus."
SHARKS (CROSSED OUT) MONGEESE (SIC) WITH FRICKIN LASER BEAMS ATTACHED TO THEIR HEADS