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Apocalypse4Real

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Google Earth Mapping
« on: June 17, 2013, 05:46:26 PM »
I am attempting to take the AMRS2 imagery and overlay it in Google Earth and am using the AMRS2 tiff file.

So far, I have played with OkMap, Maptiler, and Geotiff GUI, but have not gotten farther than having OkMap getting it into a Google Earth kmz, but not having the correct coordinates as the initial points in Google Earth - which centers somewhere in Africa - not 90 N.

Any suggestions?


Espen

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Re: Google Earth Mapping
« Reply #1 on: June 24, 2013, 10:34:46 PM »
Apocalypse4Real;

How about getting the Modis images into Google Earth/ Google Map? Because the Arctic map section is so poor, especially Ellesmere Island and North Greenland, any solutions?
Have a ice day!

danp

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Re: Google Earth Mapping
« Reply #2 on: July 08, 2013, 09:04:39 AM »
Thanks to my crash course in processing raw MODIS files, I understand how annoying a task like this can be.  Both AMSR2 and MODIS2 processed tiles are available as GeoTIFFs, which sounds like what you were trying to use.  So they have embedded the appropriate coordinates if you can just get a tool working.

The problem may be that the images are in a polar stereoscopic projection, rather than what google earth wants (geographic Mercator, "EPSG:4326").  I've wound up using GDAL for all such transformations: it's a powerful bunch of command-line tools for Linux or Mac (and perhaps Windows), but not particularly user-friendly if you're not used to that.  It appears that it can output .kmz files itself via the gdal2tiles.py script, but I ran into some glitches in a brief test.

-Dan

Artful Dodger

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Re: Google Earth Mapping
« Reply #3 on: July 09, 2013, 05:28:40 PM »
I am attempting to take the AMRS2 imagery and overlay it in Google Earth and am using the AMRS2 tiff file.

So far, I have played with OkMap, Maptiler, and Geotiff GUI, but have not gotten farther than having OkMap getting it into a Google Earth kmz, but not having the correct coordinates as the initial points in Google Earth - which centers somewhere in Africa - not 90 N.

Any suggestions?

Hi A4R,

Do you want Sea ice concentration from AMSR2? In fact, AMSR2 provides 8 downstream products as Level 3 data: (in both 10km/0.1deg and 25km/0.25deg resolution)
  • Total Precipitable Water
  • Cloud Liquid Water
  • Precipitation
  • Sea Surface Temperature
  • Sea Surface Wind speed
  • Sea Ice Concentration
  • Snow Depth
  • Soil Moisture Content
So which day do you want to see? I'll send you a sample .kmz file  ;)
Cheers!
Lodger

Laurent

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Re: Google Earth Mapping
« Reply #4 on: October 22, 2013, 09:21:06 PM »
You may be interested to try these two softwares :
Panoply :
http://www.giss.nasa.gov/tools/panoply/
Panoply is a program that locates on predefined maps of geographic coordinates. Using data sets netCDF-3, you can view details of more than 75 local and global maps. Configurable, it allows you to use the color tables CPT, PAL, ACT or CWC. The maps thus generated can then be exported in various formats (GIF, JPEG, PDF, PNG, PS, KMZ, AVI, MOV ...)

Worldwind
http://worldwindcentral.com/wiki/NASA_World_Wind_Download
NASA World Wind is a software dedicated to the projection of the satellite images from NASA. A simple interface, we can go through the globe while projecting eg latest weather images from NASA.
World Wind is clearly focused on the geographic features of our planet with many animations and layers available either in climatology, forest fires and agriculture ...
A less general public and scientific software that proves exciting to follow the news of our planet as seen by satellites.