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Author Topic: Astronomical news  (Read 9077 times)

b_lumenkraft

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Re: Astronomical news
« Reply #100 on: July 07, 2019, 03:35:53 PM »
This one blew my mind.

Are Alien Civilizations Sending Signals in Bacteria? with Dr. Robert Zubrin


gerontocrat

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Re: Astronomical news
« Reply #101 on: July 07, 2019, 04:29:13 PM »
This one blew my mind.

Are Alien Civilizations Sending Signals in Bacteria? with Dr. Robert Zubrin

If they are, they are even dumber than wot we is.
"Para a Causa do Povo a Luta Continua!"
"And that's all I'm going to say about that". Forrest Gump
"Damn, I wanted to see what happened next" (Epitaph)

b_lumenkraft

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Re: Astronomical news
« Reply #102 on: July 07, 2019, 04:33:33 PM »
LOL! ;D ;D ;D

pikaia

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Re: Astronomical news
« Reply #103 on: July 07, 2019, 05:01:41 PM »

kassy

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Re: Astronomical news
« Reply #104 on: July 07, 2019, 06:09:25 PM »
Cool!

Regarding the bacteria you would have to send generalized bacteria everywhere which precludes adding extra info and you cannot really edit stuff when you do not know what is there.

The mind was blown by the colorfulness of the theory?

SteveMDFP

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Re: Astronomical news
« Reply #105 on: July 07, 2019, 07:04:56 PM »
Cool!

Regarding the bacteria you would have to send generalized bacteria everywhere which precludes adding extra info and you cannot really edit stuff when you do not know what is there.

The mind was blown by the colorfulness of the theory?

It strikes me as quite plausible that life was seeded across the galaxy, possibly naturally, possibly intentionally.  A life form could use amino acids of the D-isomer variety, but all life here uses L isomers.  Similar handedness preference applies to sugar molecules.  All life here uses the C-A-T-G alphabet for DNA coding, but other "languages" are perfectly feasible.

If life arose on Earth in multiple places, one might expect descendants to have competing alphabet systems.  There's no sign of that today. 

As mirror-image building blocks would likely have toxic effects on consumers of plant life, any eater of plants (or higher on the food chain) would have trouble surviving.  Only those having the same "language" as plants would likely survive.  But why should today's plants be uniform?  Either life arose only once (or maybe a few times), or the planet was seeded with organisms having our currently universal "language."

It's quite remarkable that some life forms (e.g., tardigraves) are well-adapted to survive in space, and resume life functions when in a suitable environment.  Why should evolution favor such traits?

kassy

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Re: Astronomical news
« Reply #106 on: July 07, 2019, 09:49:49 PM »
All life that evolved here came from the same source so that is why they are uniform, they have a shared ancestor somewhere.

Chemical mirroring is very different from processes like matter antimatter destruction.

uniquorn

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Re: Astronomical news
« Reply #107 on: July 11, 2019, 09:18:47 PM »
Marine scientists at the Woods Hole Oceanographic Insti­tution who explore Earth’s hydrothermal vents have been working with NASA to devise autonomous underwater vehicles that could work on both Earth and Europa. The agency just announced a $7.6 million, five-year collaboration with WHOI to have space and ocean researchers brainstorm the science and technology needed for future Europa missions.

https://www.wired.com/story/forget-the-moon-we-should-go-to-jupiters-idyllic-europa/

b_lumenkraft

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Re: Astronomical news
« Reply #108 on: July 11, 2019, 09:30:32 PM »
Wow, that's great! \o/

b_lumenkraft

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Re: Astronomical news
« Reply #109 on: July 13, 2019, 01:28:51 PM »
Quote
Today (July 11), the Hayabusa2 spacecraft performed a 2nd touchdown on the surface of asteroid Ryugu. The touchdown occurred at 10:06 JST at the onboard time and was successful. Below we show images taken before and after the touchdown. As this is a quick bulletin, more detailed information will be given in the future.
Link >> http://www.hayabusa2.jaxa.jp/en/topics/20190711e_PPTD_ImageBulletin/