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Author Topic: Public Event in the Netherlands: "Mathematics of Planet Earth 2013"  (Read 2151 times)

Wipneus

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Mainly of interest for those living in the Netherlands. Translated where needed.

The Platform Wiskunde Nederland (Dutch organization for mathematics), an organisation jointly founded by the the Koninklijk Wiskundig Genootschap (Royal Mathematics Society, KWG) and the Nederlandse Vereniging van Wiskundeleraren (Dutch Association of Mathematics Teachers, NvvW), makes an effort to improve the public image of  mathematics and mathematicians in the Netherlands.

As part of the MPE2013 (Mathematics of Planet Earth 2013) a public event is held:
time: 21st December 2013; 12:30-17:30
place: Educatorium Utrecht

Main speaker: Ken Golden

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Mathematics and the melting polar ice caps

In September of 2012, the area of the Arctic Ocean covered by sea ice reached its lowest level ever recorded in more than three decades of satellite measurements. In fact, compared to the 1980's and 1990's, this represents a loss of more than half of the summer Arctic sea ice pack. While global climate models generally predict sea ice declines over the 21st century, the precipitous losses observed so far have significantly outpaced most projections.

Prof. Ken Golden (Dept. of Mathematics, Univ. of Utah, USA) will discuss how mathematical models of composite materials and statistical physics are being used to study key sea ice properties and advance how sea ice is represented in climate models. This work is helping to improve projections of the fate of Earth's ice packs, and the response of polar ecosystems. In addition, an exciting video from a 2012 Antarctic expedition where sea ice properties were measured will be shown.

The parallel sessions are interesting too:

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Ute Ebert: How thunderstorms create antimatter

Carel Eijgenraam: Optimal dike heights in the Netherlands

Arjen Doelman: Climate change, desertification and billiard

Target is a general, non-mathematics audience. I am not associated with the PWN in any way, but for me there seem to be few excuses not to go. 

Information and reservations:
http://www.platformwiskunde.nl/home_mpe2013.htm
MPE2013:
http://mpe2013.org/about-mpe2013/

JimD

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Re: Public Event in the Netherlands: "Mathematics of Planet Earth 2013"
« Reply #1 on: November 26, 2013, 04:52:25 PM »
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...makes an effort to improve the public image of  mathematics and mathematicians in the Netherlands....

Way off topic but I couldn't resist.  This should help.  I couldn't bring myself to look for guys for you.  Someone else will have to do that.  ;D

http://cltampa.com/dailyloaf/archives/2012/07/26/top-10-sexiest-female-scientists#.UpTBKEnn_VI

We do not err because truth is difficult to see. It is visible at a glance. We err because this is more comfortable. Alexander Solzhenitsyn

How is it conceivable that all our technological progress - our very civilization - is like the axe in the hand of the pathological criminal? Albert Einstein

Tom_Mazanec

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Re: Public Event in the Netherlands: "Mathematics of Planet Earth 2013"
« Reply #2 on: September 24, 2019, 09:46:29 PM »
Here is why the Netherlands are so worried about AGW:
Dutch reinforce major dike as seas rise, climate changes
https://www.apnews.com/4758c0d3504d44079a0e5a58c11cf1a6
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Mark Klein Breteler, a dike expert and project manager at Deltares, the water research center that built and uses the flume, said the new design of the Afsluitdijk needs to handle everything that climate change throws at it.

“We know about sea level rise but also the storminess of this area is increasing, so wind speeds are higher and we get larger waves,” he said.

This kind of innovation and the constant care needed to maintain the Netherland’s thousands of miles of dikes and levees does not come cheap. The government has earmarked nearly 18 billion euros ($20 billion) to fund such projects for the period from 2020-2033.
SHARKS (CROSSED OUT) MONGEESE (SIC) WITH FRICKIN LASER BEAMS ATTACHED TO THEIR HEADS