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crandles

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Records and oddities
« on: December 22, 2013, 12:43:14 AM »
CT area has reached 5th highest daily area anomaly, the 4 higher days are consecutive days in 2007:

2007.9672   1.8403077
2007.9644   1.7662096
2007.9698   1.7593303
2007.9727   1.7178568
2013.9644   1.6992683

It was exactly the same time of year. That may not be a co-incident but there are other times of year when there are high anomalies: near .3 .5 and .6 of a year seem to feature quite frequently among high anomalies as well as near the end of the year. Didn't find any rounding to 0.1 of a year until 427th highest anomaly. I guess it isn't too surprising for there to be a change in the seasonal pattern over a long period of time.

AbruptSLR

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Re: Records and oddities
« Reply #1 on: December 22, 2013, 04:11:06 PM »
I would like to note that while the Antarctic sea ice area/extent (and most certainly volume) are trending at historical (recorded history) highs; the most significant reason for this is that the circumpolar winds around Antarctic are abnormally high primarily due to the recurrence of the Antarctic ozone hole (because the winds push the sea ice away from ice generating locations, thus allowing more ice to generate).  Furthermore, as these high winds contribute both to increased up-welling and to the reduction in AABW (both of which contribute to the current acceleration of grounded Antarctic ice); the fact that Antarctic SIA/SIE are high supports the position that the SLR contribution from Antarctica is continuing to accelerate.

Also, I would like to note that GCM projections indicate that the Antarctic SIA/SIE should begin to decrease by 2070 (assuming that the ozone hole heals itself by then as is currently projected).
“It is not the strongest or the most intelligent who will survive but those who can best manage change.”
― Leon C. Megginson

Laurent

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Re: Records and oddities
« Reply #2 on: January 09, 2014, 01:24:56 PM »
NASA | The Coldest Place in the World

Hefaistos

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Re: Records and oddities
« Reply #3 on: July 08, 2018, 01:41:48 PM »
NASA | The Coldest Place in the World


Now even colder, new record low has been registered at -97.8 C
"Scientists recorded this extreme temperature on the ice sheet deep in the middle of Antarctica during the long, dark polar winter. As they report this week in Geophysical Research Letters, the team thinks this is about as cold as it can possibly get in our corner of the solar system."

https://news.nationalgeographic.com/2018/06/coldest-place-earth-measured-temperature-antarctica-science/

neal

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Re: Records and oddities
« Reply #4 on: March 29, 2022, 02:52:47 PM »
40 C warmer than typical at Concordia Station--Antarctica

Stephan

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Re: Records and oddities
« Reply #5 on: March 30, 2022, 08:36:43 PM »
It looks like a data error to be later eraded - but it isn't.     :(
It is too late just to be concerned about Climate Change

be cause

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Re: Records and oddities
« Reply #6 on: March 31, 2022, 01:59:07 AM »
March in NI was already the sunniest on record on the 29th .. and now the coldest night of the winter is upon us , courtesy of the Arctic . b.c.

 oops .. possibly the wrong place .
2007 + 5 = 2012 + 4 = 2016 + 3 = 2019 + 2 = 2021 + 1 .. it's 2022 !

  don't panic  ..   life's not organic !

Aluminium

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Re: Records and oddities
« Reply #7 on: August 19, 2022, 12:48:30 PM »
Sometimes in forecasts I noticed significant negative anomalies in the Antarctic, but -7.4°C is something new for me.

kassy

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Re: Records and oddities
« Reply #8 on: August 19, 2022, 04:55:02 PM »
What amount of C would a more normal significant anomaly be?
Þetta minnismerki er til vitnis um að við vitum hvað er að gerast og hvað þarf að gera. Aðeins þú veist hvort við gerðum eitthvað.

Aluminium

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Re: Records and oddities
« Reply #9 on: August 19, 2022, 05:39:56 PM »
-2...-5 °C. It's hard to expect more significant anomaly for such a large region. Antarctica is bigger than Europe and I didn't even count surrounding seas. Also because of climate change a positive anomaly would be much less odd. In addition, current sea ice extent is relatively low.