Support the Arctic Sea Ice Forum and Blog

Author Topic: Gardening  (Read 290189 times)

uniquorn

  • Nilas ice
  • Posts: 1452
    • View Profile
  • Liked: 696
  • Likes Given: 145
Re: Gardening
« Reply #750 on: August 08, 2019, 12:02:22 AM »
SOIL. SOIL. THE PERFECT SOIL!
Our plot is old hayfield with rock not far down. The difference between the beds we've composted on and those we haven't is stark. Nearly time to plant on the no-till experiment area. Will let you know how it goes.
Actually lots of things grew pretty well the first year but after that it got more challenging.

El Cid

  • Grease ice
  • Posts: 526
    • View Profile
  • Liked: 157
  • Likes Given: 41
Re: Gardening
« Reply #751 on: August 08, 2019, 08:05:21 AM »
SOIL. SOIL. THE PERFECT SOIL!
Our plot is old hayfield with rock not far down. The difference between the beds we've composted on and those we haven't is stark. Nearly time to plant on the no-till experiment area. Will let you know how it goes.
Actually lots of things grew pretty well the first year but after that it got more challenging.

I try to add some new layer of compost each year on existing beds (1-2 cm) if I can - that is the best soultion if you have enough compost.

If not, I try to grow some quick nitrogen fixer in a mix (like planting crimson clover with some mustard and phacelia either planted autumn or early spring), mow it down in May, water it in well, and then covering it with a black tarp for a few weeks (to germinate-and-kill the weeds and help decomposition) and then planting things into it during June-July for an autumn harvest (carrots, beets, brassicas, peas, beans, salads). This way fertility can be sustained...

Villabolo

  • New ice
  • Posts: 53
    • View Profile
    • Global Warming Basics
  • Liked: 9
  • Likes Given: 24
Re: Gardening
« Reply #752 on: August 16, 2019, 04:44:12 PM »
Concerning food storage, I suggest a 1 year supply of rice and/or wheat; a 2 month supply of canned food; a solar oven for cooking and a grinder for the wheat.

The wheat or rice should be packed in food grade buckets with Carbon Dioxide or oxygen absorbers put inside of them to keep weevils from infesting it. They can also be purchased in #10 size cans with a shelf life of 20 years.

Last, but not least, canned heirloom seeds for garden planting.

Bruce Steele

  • Nilas ice
  • Posts: 1443
    • View Profile
  • Liked: 112
  • Likes Given: 9
Re: Gardening
« Reply #753 on: August 16, 2019, 05:29:42 PM »
Villabolo, I would suggest dried beans to match your rice and wheat storage. Protein .
 Kinda off topic but several kilos of sea salt will keep a very long time. With that and a small supply of saltpeter you can cure meat for storage if the lights go out.  Also you can use the salt for kimchi or sauerkraut .
 

DrTskoul

  • Nilas ice
  • Posts: 1451
    • View Profile
  • Liked: 210
  • Likes Given: 60
Re: Gardening
« Reply #754 on: August 16, 2019, 05:31:19 PM »
And lots of vitamin C, as lemons dont store too well

etienne

  • Grease ice
  • Posts: 743
    • View Profile
    • About energy
  • Liked: 45
  • Likes Given: 1
Re: Gardening
« Reply #755 on: August 24, 2019, 07:50:25 AM »
Hello,
I have around my garden a quite long beech hedge that I cut once a year during the summer. I didn't do it yet this summer because of the heatwave, I always heard that trees don't support too well to be cut during heat waves.
Well, when pruning (is it the right verb) these beeches, I get a lot of biomass that I can't use. It makes jams in the crusher (too many leaves), it's too much work to crush it manually, I tried to put it directly in the compost but it reacted like a silo (which means that after a few months, the leaves where still green and in a good shape). So I bring it to the recycling center.
Any Idea before I start this yearly work ?
Thanks, best regards,
Etienne
Well, I also tried to burn it, but it is forbidden and makes a lot of smoke (not discreet at all). I know somebody doing it at night but I have neighbours (he doesn't), and I don't want to annoy them too much.
Well, I changed my strategy. I sort the branches and only keep the ones that are ok for my crusher and bring the others to the recycling center.
This year I have much less production from the hedge than the years before. I guess too warm weather during the spring is not soo good.

ghoti

  • Grease ice
  • Posts: 766
    • View Profile
  • Liked: 12
  • Likes Given: 15
Re: Gardening
« Reply #756 on: August 24, 2019, 07:20:44 PM »

Well, I changed my strategy. I sort the branches and only keep the ones that are ok for my crusher and bring the others to the recycling center.
This year I have much less production from the hedge than the years before. I guess too warm weather during the spring is not soo good.
I have a similar approach. I use a small electric chipper for branches up to 3cm diameter and the larger wood either goes to friends who have wood stoves or to the city's yard waste compost program.

El Cid

  • Grease ice
  • Posts: 526
    • View Profile
  • Liked: 157
  • Likes Given: 41
Re: Gardening
« Reply #757 on: August 26, 2019, 07:16:05 AM »
re: what to do with big branches?

You could always put them the into a purposefully untidy heap at a corner of the garden and leave it like that, great place for snakes, frogs, bumblebees, etc. After a couple of years it starts breaking down and every few years you could move it and take the compost from under it

OR:

heap it up and put a lots of greens (grasscuttings, weeds etc) on it. Same as before: after 2-3 years move it and repeat the process and collect the black gold from under the heap

Neven

  • Administrator
  • First-year ice
  • *****
  • Posts: 7134
    • View Profile
    • Arctic Sea Ice Blog
  • Liked: 696
  • Likes Given: 457
Re: Gardening
« Reply #758 on: August 26, 2019, 08:18:21 AM »
And don't forget to pee over it.  ;D
Il faut comparer, comparer, comparer, et cultiver notre jardin

El Cid

  • Grease ice
  • Posts: 526
    • View Profile
  • Liked: 157
  • Likes Given: 41
Re: Gardening
« Reply #759 on: August 26, 2019, 09:43:09 AM »
And don't forget to pee over it.  ;D

absolutely! you will need all the nitrogen you can get (for free)!

like this:

Aporia_filia

  • New ice
  • Posts: 68
    • View Profile
  • Liked: 37
  • Likes Given: 0
Re: Gardening
« Reply #760 on: August 29, 2019, 01:48:34 PM »
Love explosion!!!  :o :D

Aporia_filia

  • New ice
  • Posts: 68
    • View Profile
  • Liked: 37
  • Likes Given: 0
Re: Gardening
« Reply #761 on: August 29, 2019, 02:05:55 PM »
There is a not well known agricultural approach called syntropic agriculture. Also suitable for gardens. I'm learning from it and trying different seeds before really starting a project.
As you all know, the soil is the main part in the game. With this theory you try to copy the behavior of a forest but using all edible varieties you can. So you don't touch the soil, only adding mulch, and when it goes on it's own you wouldn't even have to add compost or manure.


https://agendagotsch.com/en/

http://adam.nz/syntropy?fbclid=IwAR04e321jvSZgGv93I0zDKXCwyayVdwL5sCY5LLaYBoSJLkxo9WPVTvZqz0


Aporia_filia

  • New ice
  • Posts: 68
    • View Profile
  • Liked: 37
  • Likes Given: 0
Re: Gardening
« Reply #762 on: August 29, 2019, 02:38:27 PM »
Wageningen University has a lot of different free on-line courses. I found "Soil4Life" a fantastic introduction to knowledge about soils. As they are free I suppose they wouldn't mind if I share some of the videos with you. The course, of course, offers lots of ways to find more information about specific items. I encourage you all to have a look at their offer.

« Last Edit: August 29, 2019, 03:11:46 PM by Aporia_filia »

Aporia_filia

  • New ice
  • Posts: 68
    • View Profile
  • Liked: 37
  • Likes Given: 0
Re: Gardening
« Reply #763 on: August 29, 2019, 02:45:49 PM »
Another one

Aporia_filia

  • New ice
  • Posts: 68
    • View Profile
  • Liked: 37
  • Likes Given: 0
Re: Gardening
« Reply #764 on: August 30, 2019, 10:15:20 AM »
Sorry, for some reason the last video is not complete. But here in the attachment you can find some more info about different life forms in the soil (Macrofauna)

This is a very interesting video comparing old agricultural practices with modern industrial agriculture and what it means to soil:
RECARE Project-Soil Erosion in Spain (2015). Video (8:26).  

Aporia_filia

  • New ice
  • Posts: 68
    • View Profile
  • Liked: 37
  • Likes Given: 0
Re: Gardening
« Reply #765 on: August 30, 2019, 10:55:03 AM »
Good Land Management to Reduce Disasters in Tajikistan (2015). Video (10:00). 

Don't miss this one  ;). Allow biodiversity and a bit of common sense and the difference is enormous.

El Cid

  • Grease ice
  • Posts: 526
    • View Profile
  • Liked: 157
  • Likes Given: 41
Re: Gardening
« Reply #766 on: August 30, 2019, 05:21:15 PM »
aporia,

Thanks for the videos!

I was horrified at seeing all the bare soil in the Spanish orange plantations when I visited Spain and I wrote about it upthread. Absolute nonsense

syntropic agriculture: this is basically a succession based agroforestry system utilizing well known regenerative agriculture principles: have succession, don't leave the soil bare, have biodiversity, no mechanical or chemical disturbance, etc. Nothing new here but nice videos. Unfortunately most farmers still think in terms of ploughing and monocultures and pesticides/herbicides, so they are very far from this...maybe in a 100 yrs more farms will look like this one in Brazil
« Last Edit: August 30, 2019, 07:53:59 PM by El Cid »

Aporia_filia

  • New ice
  • Posts: 68
    • View Profile
  • Liked: 37
  • Likes Given: 0
Re: Gardening
« Reply #767 on: August 31, 2019, 12:41:09 PM »
That's the word, 'horrified'
I lived for a while near those orange fields, saw the transformation and it was scary as hell. You see how all life disappears from the soil and every where. No more insects, no more birds, no more wild flowers. And the extraordinary taste of the oranges also disappear.

El Cid

  • Grease ice
  • Posts: 526
    • View Profile
  • Liked: 157
  • Likes Given: 41
Re: Gardening
« Reply #768 on: August 31, 2019, 02:46:44 PM »
I plant (clovers, alfalfa, phacelia,) etc around my fruit trees and cut these a few times a year and put some of the cuttings around my trees in a 1-2 m circle which keeps the weeds at bay and fertilizes the trees. The trees seem to like it :)
Also, the flowering plants (especially phacelia and clovers) are constantly visited by all sorts of beetles and bees. I have at least 3 types of bumblebees in my garden, and these guys are amazing. They work from dawn till dusk, even when temps are only 10C, when the normal bees are unwilling to do anything.

Biodiversity should be key, but instead we have these huge monocultures...sad

And thanks for these videos, i have never heard about this guy (Ernst Götsch) but he seems to be a true agri-hero in the mould of Masanobu Fukuoka

El Cid

  • Grease ice
  • Posts: 526
    • View Profile
  • Liked: 157
  • Likes Given: 41
Re: Gardening
« Reply #769 on: September 03, 2019, 09:13:23 AM »
I was thinking about syntropic agroforestry and I realized that many of its practices need to be tweaked to work in temperate climates. There is much more rain, sunlight and higher temps in the tropics, so you can't use SA practices here as easily. I came across a nice article that basically summarizes what I think about SA in temperate climates:

https://transformativeadventures.org/2018/11/06/syntropic-permaculture-in-temperate-climates/


Tor Bejnar

  • Young ice
  • Posts: 2975
    • View Profile
  • Liked: 307
  • Likes Given: 166
Re: Gardening
« Reply #770 on: September 21, 2019, 10:17:12 PM »
Don't know where to post this, think it's OT here, but it's about plants ...  :-\

Increased atmospheric vapor pressure deficit reduces global vegetation growth
    Wenping Yuan, et al.
Quote
Abstract
Atmospheric vapor pressure deficit (VPD) is a critical variable in determining plant photosynthesis. Synthesis of four global climate datasets reveals a sharp increase of VPD after the late 1990s. In response, the vegetation greening trend indicated by a satellite-derived vegetation index (GIMMS3g), which was evident before the late 1990s, was subsequently stalled or reversed. Terrestrial gross primary production derived from two satellite-based models (revised EC-LUE and MODIS) exhibits persistent and widespread decreases after the late 1990s due to increased VPD, which offset the positive CO2 fertilization effect. Six Earth system models have consistently projected continuous increases of VPD throughout the current century. Our results highlight that the impacts of VPD on vegetation growth should be adequately considered to assess ecosystem responses to future climate conditions.
(entire paper at the link)
Arctic ice is healthy for children and other living things.

etienne

  • Grease ice
  • Posts: 743
    • View Profile
    • About energy
  • Liked: 45
  • Likes Given: 1
Re: Gardening
« Reply #771 on: September 22, 2019, 08:06:20 AM »
This is a major worry, not the VPD as a concept, but the feeling I have that hedges for sure don't grow so much the last years, and new trees have problems to become big enough to reach to the ground water. We had at least 2 very dry years and the impact is terrible. It's nice to say that trees are the perfect machine to capture CO2, but it's not so easy to start it.

etienne

  • Grease ice
  • Posts: 743
    • View Profile
    • About energy
  • Liked: 45
  • Likes Given: 1
Re: Gardening
« Reply #772 on: September 22, 2019, 08:14:09 AM »
This is a typical weather graph. It's going to rain in 2 days since quite a long time ago.

El Cid

  • Grease ice
  • Posts: 526
    • View Profile
  • Liked: 157
  • Likes Given: 41
Re: Gardening
« Reply #773 on: September 22, 2019, 09:46:59 AM »
...and new trees have problems to become big enough to reach to the ground water. We had at least 2 very dry years and the impact is terrible. It's nice to say that trees are the perfect machine to capture CO2, but it's not so easy to start it.

If you can increase the organic matter (or we could say carbon) content of your soil, then that soil will be able to store more water for longer. To do that you need to grow lots of plants all year around as plants pump carbon into the soil. I suggest planting various cover crops around the trees, eg sunnhemp and sudangrass during summer, wheat plus some clover for the fall-winter-spring period, etc. and cutting these crops when the time comes and immediately replanting them with a new, different cover crop mix. The cut crops should partly be used to mulch around the trees (1-2-3 m radius, 10-20 cm thick), that will help them a lot with nutrients and water retention, the rest can stay on the ground where they fall.
I plant my new trees during autumn and water them only the first year and even then only if it does not rain for a good while (2 weeks). After the first year there should be no problems at all in the temperate zone and no additional watering is needed for trees (unless you live in the medieterranean or a very dry zone).

etienne

  • Grease ice
  • Posts: 743
    • View Profile
    • About energy
  • Liked: 45
  • Likes Given: 1
Re: Gardening
« Reply #774 on: September 22, 2019, 05:49:08 PM »
You will find bellow a picture of a two years old hazel that recieved more or less 10 liters of water every 3 weeks this summer.
I used to plant such trees end of August if they are in a pot because we always had a lot of rain in september.

sidd

  • Young ice
  • Posts: 4864
    • View Profile
  • Liked: 288
  • Likes Given: 0
Re: Gardening
« Reply #775 on: September 22, 2019, 10:24:12 PM »
Re: 10-20 cm thick mulch

I am always advised by arborists not to put down more than an inch or two of mulch ... ?

sidd

El Cid

  • Grease ice
  • Posts: 526
    • View Profile
  • Liked: 157
  • Likes Given: 41
Re: Gardening
« Reply #776 on: September 23, 2019, 12:52:25 PM »
sidd,

Arborists usually (by profession) mean woodchip mulch and I agree with them that too thick a layer could cause problems as it takes a long time to break down and might become almost impenetrable to water for a while.

I advocated grass cuttings /cut greens as mulch and if you make it 20 cm thick it quickly (1 month or 2) collapses to 2-5 cm especially during the warm season if you have rain.

It is my experience, that if you put down 5-10 cm woodchips, weeds easily grow through that and it will be very difficult to handle the situation. On the other hand, if you have 20 or even better, 30 cm of cut weeds/grass/greens around the trees, it heats upsomewhat and kills all the weeds underneath and chokes them and by the time the mulch collapses (becomes much thinner) nothing or not much will be there to grow through it.

Also if you have an orchard you can have lots of greens around the trees (grass, clovers, alfalfa, etc) that is easy to cut and put around the trees (mow-and-blow style). I think this is the best and easiest solution for trees. (vegetables are a different matter)

vox_mundi

  • Nilas ice
  • Posts: 1489
    • View Profile
  • Liked: 540
  • Likes Given: 105
Re: Gardening
« Reply #777 on: October 09, 2019, 04:46:53 PM »
Researchers Find Multiple Effects on Soil from Manure from Cows Administered Antibiotics
https://phys.org/news/2019-10-multiple-effects-soil-manure-cows.html

A new study led by Colorado State University and the University of Idaho found multiple effects on soils from exposure to manure from cows administered antibiotics, including alteration of the soil microbiome and ecosystem functions, soil respiration and elemental cycling.

The team also saw changes in how plants allocated carbon below ground and take up nitrogen from the soil. In addition, they observed a decrease in ecosystem carbon use efficiency. This means that when antibiotics are used, less carbon is stored in the soil and more is lost to the atmosphere as carbon dioxide.

... Scientists took samples over the course of seven days, and found that in the presence of antibiotics, carbon traveled into the above ground plant material, to the roots of the plants, into the soil and respired back out as carbon dioxide much faster than any of the others.

... "There was much less of that new carbon retained in the system compared with other soils we sampled"

It's often thought that manure is a helpful fertilizer, and that it adds nutrients and carbon to soil but this benefit might be offset if antibiotics are administered to livestock.

Carl Wepking et al, Prolonged exposure to manure from livestock‐administered antibiotics decreases ecosystem carbon‐use efficiency and alters nitrogen cycling, Ecology Letters (2019)
“There are three classes of people: those who see. Those who see when they are shown. Those who do not see.” ― Leonardo da Vinci

Insensible before the wave so soon released by callous fate. Affected most, they understand the least, and understanding, when it comes, invariably arrives too late