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PSJ

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Re: Global Forest Watch
« Reply #200 on: August 24, 2019, 09:50:25 AM »
Great article in NYT about what satellite time series tell us about this year's fires in the Amazon

https://www.nytimes.com/interactive/2019/08/24/world/americas/amazon-rain-forest-fire-maps.html

PSJ

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Re: Global Forest Watch
« Reply #201 on: August 24, 2019, 09:52:31 AM »
And this one

kassy

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Re: Global Forest Watch
« Reply #202 on: August 24, 2019, 10:34:53 AM »
That 2011/2018 average map vs 2019 is really cool. You can clearly see this is human encroachment. Thx!
Þetta minnismerki er til vitnis um að við vitum hvað er að gerast og hvað þarf að gera. Aðeins þú veist hvort við gerðum eitthvað.

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Re: Global Forest Watch
« Reply #203 on: August 24, 2019, 06:57:06 PM »
NASA Earth Observatory image by Joshua Stevens, using MODIS data from NASA EOSDIS/LANCE and GIBS/Worldview, Fire Information for Resource Management System (FIRMS) data from NASA EOSDIS, and data from the Global Fire Emissions Database (GFED).⁣

Beware, this user bites.

Tom_Mazanec

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Re: Global Forest Watch
« Reply #204 on: August 25, 2019, 11:28:14 AM »
But 2003-2010 was actually worse than now?
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PSJ

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Re: Global Forest Watch
« Reply #205 on: August 25, 2019, 11:43:08 AM »
But 2003-2010 was actually worse than now?

Higher rates of deforestation then yes, but now as the original forest cover shrinks every unit of deforestation is much more serious as it shrinks the carbon sink and we are much closer to the tipping point of where the first might not produce enough water vapour to sustain itself as a first and turn into a Savannah.


Tom_Mazanec

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Re: Global Forest Watch
« Reply #206 on: September 04, 2019, 06:42:07 PM »
Ireland planning to plant 440 million trees over the next 20 years
https://thehill.com/policy/energy-environment/459591-ireland-planning-to-plant-440-million-trees-over-the-next-20-years
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A spokeswoman for the government’s Department of Communications Climate Action and Environment told the local newspaper that the “climate action plan commits to delivering an expansion of forestry planting and soil management to ensure that carbon abatement from land-use is delivered over the period 2021 to 2030 and in the years beyond.”

“The plan sets out key actions to be taken by the Department of Agriculture,” she continued, adding: “The target for new forestation is approximately 22 million trees per year. Over the next 20 years, the target is to plant 440 million.”

Giant Norway pension fund weighs Brazil divestment over Amazon deforestation
https://news.mongabay.com/2019/09/giant-norway-pension-fund-weighs-brazil-divestment-over-amazon-deforestation/
Quote
KLP, Norway’s largest pension fund, with over US$80 billion in assets, is saying it may divest from transnational commodities traders operating in Brazil such as Archer Daniels Midland (ADM), Bunge and Cargill, if they work with producers who contribute to deforestation. KLP has $50 million in shares and loans with the firms.
KLP is also reaching out to other investors to lobby them to use their financial influence to curb Amazon deforestation via supply chains. On August 28, Nordea, the largest asset management group in the Nordic region announced a temporary quarantine on Brazilian government bonds in response to this year’s Amazon fires.
International investment firms play a pivotal role in preserving or deforesting the Amazon. A new report found that mega-investment house BlackRock ranks among the top three shareholders in 25 of the largest public “deforestation-risk” companies, firms dealing in soy, beef, palm oil, pulp and paper, rubber and timber.
The Amazon deforestation process is complex. But it often proceeds by the following steps: land speculators invade the rainforest, illegally cut down and sell the most valuable timber, then set fire to the rest; they then can sell the land for 100-200 times its previous worth to cattle ranchers, who may eventually sell it to soy growers.
« Last Edit: September 04, 2019, 07:49:28 PM by Tom_Mazanec »
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Tom_Mazanec

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Re: Global Forest Watch
« Reply #207 on: September 06, 2019, 11:23:40 PM »
New report reveals northern Ecuadorian region has lost 61 percent of forests
https://news.mongabay.com/2019/09/new-report-reveals-northern-ecuadorian-region-has-lost-61-percent-of-forests/
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The Mache-Chindul Ecological Reserve maintains only 61 percent of its original plant cover. The area’s ecological significance is partly due to its sitting in a transition zone between humid tropical forests and seasonally dry forests.
In Cotacachi-Cayapas Park, a high level of conservation success represents a source of hope. Now the challenge is to connect the park to private reserves to guarantee protection of the most-threatened lowland forests.
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Tom_Mazanec

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Re: Global Forest Watch
« Reply #208 on: September 13, 2019, 10:36:27 PM »
World 'losing battle' on 2020 goal to cut deforestation
http://news.trust.org/item/20190912123534-rteig/
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The 2014 New York Declaration on Forests garnered more than 200 signatories among countries, companies and green groups, including the governments of Colombia, Norway and the United States and consumer goods giants such as McDonald's and Walmart.

Nonetheless, the world lost more than 26 million hectares of trees - an area the size of Britain - each year from 2014-2018.

That represented a 43% jump in the global rate of tree loss compared with the period 2001-2013, said the report issued on Thursday ahead of a U.N. climate summit on Sept. 23.
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Tom_Mazanec

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Re: Global Forest Watch
« Reply #209 on: September 21, 2019, 02:00:10 AM »
Trump Wants to Log an Enormous Alaska Forest. These Native Women Traveled 3,000 Miles to Stop It.
https://www.motherjones.com/politics/2019/09/trump-wants-to-log-an-enormous-alaska-forest-these-native-women-traveled-3000-miles-to-stop-it/
Quote
“If we had dressed in office clothing to meet the standards of DC,” says Wanda Culp, who wore vibrant red, blue, and black robes, “we would have just melted into the crowds that were going into those offices every 15 to 30 minutes.”

In March, Culp and three other indigenous women traveled to Washington, DC, from their home in Southeast Alaska, to meet with lawmakers in an attempt to persuade them to protect the Tongass National Forest. As part of a delegation organized by Women’s Earth and Climate Action Network (WECAN), a nonprofit group that engages women worldwide in environmental advocacy, they walked the halls of Congress wearing formal Tlingit regalia instead of pantsuits and plain dresses. “We stood out that way,” explains Culp, who is part of the Tlingit people. “We couldn’t be ignored.”
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Tom_Mazanec

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Re: Global Forest Watch
« Reply #210 on: December 31, 2019, 09:03:32 PM »
Regrowth of Logged Amazon Forests is Much Slower than Previously Thought
https://e360.yale.edu/digest/regrowth-of-logged-amazon-forests-is-much-slower-than-previously-thought
Quote
The study, published in the journal Ecology, said that after 60 years of regrowth, the secondary Amazon forests studied by researchers stored only 40 percent as much carbon as undisturbed woodlands and had only half as much biodiversity. The study — conducted by scientists at the Federal University of Pará, the Brazilian Agricultural Research Corporation, and Lancaster University in the United Kingdom — also showed that secondary forests absorbed less carbon dioxide during droughts than undisturbed forests.
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sidd

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Re: Global Forest Watch
« Reply #211 on: February 13, 2020, 08:32:15 AM »
China forests show increase in soil carbon: doi: 10.5194/bg-17-715-2020

open access

" eight permanent forest plots, which represent boreal (1998–2014), temperate (1992–2012), subtropical (1987–2008), and tropical forest biomes (1992–2012) across China. SOC contents increased significantly from the 1990s to the 2010s, mostly in the upper 0–20 cm soil depth, "

" averaged SOC stocks increased significantly from 125.2±85.2 Mg C ha−1 in the 1990s to 133.6±83.1 Mg C ha−1 in the 2010s across the forest plots, with a mean increase of 127.2–907.5 kg C ha−1 yr−1. This SOC accumulation resulted primarily from increasing leaf litter and fallen logs, which accounts 3.6 %–16.3 % of above-ground net primary production"

and soilC increases as deep as they studied, down to 100cm:

"We further compared SOC stocks of the whole soil profile between 1990s and 2010s at a depth of 0–40 cm in the boreal site, 0–60 cm in the subtropical site, and 0–100 cm in the temperate and tropical sites (Fig. 3). The SOC stocks of all sampling sites in the 2010s were higher than those in the 1990s"

"SOC accumulation rates in the subtropical and tropical sites were relatively higher than those in the boreal and temperate sites (Fig. 3). The greatest increase in SOC stock occurred in the subtropical evergreen old-growth forest (907.5±60.1 kg C ha−1 yr−1), and the least in the temperate deciduous oak forest (127.2±25.3 kg C ha−1 yr−1; Table S3)"

"The SOC stocks within the top 20 cm increased by 2.4–12.6 Mg C ha−1 across the forests during the past 2 decades, with an annual accumulation rate of 332.4±200.2 kg C ha−1. If all soil horizon profiles were included, the soils may have been found to have sequestered 3.6 %–16.3 % of the annual net primary production across the investigated sites, and the averaged accumulated rate (421.2 kg C ha−1 yr−1) may have been more than one-half of the vegetation C uptake rate (702.0 kg C ha−1 yr−1) in China's forests"

sidd

nanning

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Re: Global Forest Watch
« Reply #212 on: February 13, 2020, 01:44:49 PM »
^^
Quote
This SOC accumulation resulted primarily from increasing leaf litter and fallen logs
SOC means Soil Organic Carbon

Interesting.
If changes are found at 100cm depth, they likely result from something else than the direct effects of anthropogenic atmospheric events (AGW, heavy metals, increased precipitation) from the past 150 years I think.
Perhaps the fungal networks changed? That idea is supported by "The greatest increase in SOC stock occurred in the subtropical evergreen old-growth forest". Old forests have extensive old fungal networks if I'm correct.
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