Support the Arctic Sea Ice Forum and Blog

Author Topic: Robots and AI: Our Immortality or Extinction  (Read 44450 times)

kassy

  • Moderator
  • Nilas ice
  • Posts: 2464
    • View Profile
  • Liked: 1179
  • Likes Given: 1026
Re: Robots and AI: Our Immortality or Extinction
« Reply #500 on: October 04, 2020, 11:35:36 PM »
So we progress from wars were all people were involved because lots of people fought in them to wars which looked nice and clean on CNN like the Gulf War. Then on to drone wars where you can shoot rockets at people from a continent away and soon we can have machines fight the wars for us.

Yay progress!
Þetta minnismerki er til vitnis um að við vitum hvað er að gerast og hvað þarf að gera. Aðeins þú veist hvort við gerðum eitthvað.

vox_mundi

  • Young ice
  • Posts: 4099
    • View Profile
  • Liked: 2397
  • Likes Given: 318
Re: Robots and AI: Our Immortality or Extinction
« Reply #501 on: October 04, 2020, 11:53:54 PM »
The goal hasn't changed; it's is still a 'high body count'.

More exactly, it's the imposing of one's will over another.

Diplomacy by other means.

Since AI seems to be acquiring many of our biases, they will continue fighting each other without us. Seems I've read that in a sci-fi novel or two.

-----------------------------------------

speaking of robot wars ....

Robot Wars - Ocado Sued by AutoStore Over Patent Infringement
https://www.reuters.com/article/technologyNews/idUSKBN26M6HF

LONDON/NEW YORK (Reuters) - British online supermarket group Ocado was hit with a lawsuit by robotics company AutoStore on Thursday for allegedly infringing patents, prompting it to retaliate that it would investigate whether the Norwegian firm infringed Ocado patents.

Ocado - which this week became the most valuable retailer on Britain’s stock market - has only a 1.7% share of Britain’s grocery market. However, its state-of-the-art technology for robotically operated warehouses has spawned partnership deals with supermarket chains around the world, underpinning a stock market valuation of over 20 billion pounds.

On Tuesday Ocado overtook Tesco as Britain’s most valuable retailer by market capitalization.

Ocado, founded in 2000 by three former Goldman Sachs bankers, including CEO Tim Steiner, struggled for years to make a profit but has been transformed by partnership deals with supermarket groups including Kroger in the United States, Marks & Spencer and Morrisons in Britain, Casino in France and Aeon in Japan.

Ocado’s deal with Kroger, inked in 2018, will see at least 20 automated warehouses built in the United States, with the first due to open in early 2021. The deal was seen as key in Kroger taking on Amazon.

“There are three classes of people: those who see. Those who see when they are shown. Those who do not see.” ― Leonardo da Vinci

Insensible before the wave so soon released by callous fate. Affected most, they understand the least, and understanding, when it comes, invariably arrives too late

vox_mundi

  • Young ice
  • Posts: 4099
    • View Profile
  • Liked: 2397
  • Likes Given: 318
Re: Robots and AI: Our Immortality or Extinction
« Reply #502 on: October 07, 2020, 05:36:14 PM »
Cheaper Than a Human: Miso Robotics’ Latest Kitchen Robot for $30,000
https://venturebeat.com/2020/10/06/you-can-now-order-miso-robotics-latest-kitchen-robot-for-30000/



Miso Robotics today announced that its newest kitchen robot, Flippy Robot-on-a-Rail (ROAR), is now commercially available. The final design, which can cook up to 19 food items, mounts the robot on a recessed overhead rail to avoid interfering with human staff. ROAR can be installed under a standard kitchen hood or on the floor, allowing it to work two stations and interact with a cold storage hopper.

ROAR, which features a customizable LED panel that operators can use for branding, is able to prep hundreds of orders an hour thanks to a combination of cameras and safety scanners, procuring frozen food and cooking it without assistance from a human team member.

ROAR costs around $30,000, but Miso plans to continue to price it down over the next year to $20,000 or less through a $1,500 monthly “robot-as-a-service” fee that includes regular updates and maintenance.

As declines in business resulting from the COVID-19 pandemic place strains on the hospitality segment, Miso believes that robots working alongside human workers can cut costs while improving efficiency — and overall safety. The company asserts its restaurant partners’ pilots to test ROAR create avenues for reducing human contact with food during the cooking process, ensuring consistency while freeing up human cooks to focus on less repetitive tasks. [...like applying for unemployment

“Additional new elements [in ROAR] … include an input zone that can receive manually loaded baskets and a safety shield that protects kitchen staff from hot fryers … Now we can really integrate not only with the POS system, but also all the delivery apps,” Miso president and chairman Buck Jordan told VentureBeat via email. “We have also added more cameras and sensors, to enhance our computer vision capabilities to drive more efficient operational workflows for operators. We can now track inventory, down to the chicken nugget, in the back of the house … And we have sped up the learning process for Flippy to scale menus — as quickly as 30 minutes in some cases.”



------------------------------------

Softbank's New Food Service Robot Servi Could Replace Waitstaff and Food Runners at Restaurants
https://techcrunch.com/2020/09/28/softbank-will-bring-bears-serving-robots-to-japan-amid-restaurant-labor-shortages/amp/

Japanese company Softbank debuted Servi, a new food service robot.

Softbank is the company behind humanoid robot Pepper and the owner of Boston Dynamics' Spot and Atlas.

Servi has already worked at Denny's and other restaurants amid Japan's labor shortage.



-------------------------------------

And something has to clean up the mess.

« Last Edit: October 07, 2020, 05:45:02 PM by vox_mundi »
“There are three classes of people: those who see. Those who see when they are shown. Those who do not see.” ― Leonardo da Vinci

Insensible before the wave so soon released by callous fate. Affected most, they understand the least, and understanding, when it comes, invariably arrives too late

vox_mundi

  • Young ice
  • Posts: 4099
    • View Profile
  • Liked: 2397
  • Likes Given: 318
Re: Robots and AI: Our Immortality or Extinction
« Reply #503 on: October 07, 2020, 07:32:00 PM »
AI-Powered Drone Learns Extreme Acrobatics
https://spectrum.ieee.org/automaton/robotics/drones/ai-powered-drone-extreme-acrobatics



-----------------------------------------



“There are three classes of people: those who see. Those who see when they are shown. Those who do not see.” ― Leonardo da Vinci

Insensible before the wave so soon released by callous fate. Affected most, they understand the least, and understanding, when it comes, invariably arrives too late

vox_mundi

  • Young ice
  • Posts: 4099
    • View Profile
  • Liked: 2397
  • Likes Given: 318
Re: Robots and AI: Our Immortality or Extinction
« Reply #504 on: October 07, 2020, 11:03:32 PM »
Microsoft Hit by Worldwide Azure Network Issue
https://www.itnews.com.au/news/microsoft-is-reporting-a-worldwide-azure-network-issue-554429

Microsoft suffered a worldwide issue with Azure network infrastructure that appeared to impact other services including some instances of Office 365.

The vendor said the issues started at around 6.10pm UTC (5.10am AEDT); it was able to mitigate the problems around 7.15am.

“A subset of customers may experience issues connecting to resources that leverage Azure network infrastructure across regions,” Microsoft said in an Azure advisory.

“Resources with local dependencies in the same region should not be impacted. This issue may also affect Azure Government customers.

“A number of other Microsoft or Azure services are reporting downstream impact. We have identified a potential cause and are applying mitigation.”

... For now it appears the problems are in North America only, based on heatmaps on downtime tracking sites as well as a now-expired advisory on Microsoft’s Azure service status.

Office 365 has suffered instability over the past week, in part after a major outage on September 29 that knocked services offline for five hours.

----------------------------------

... Hope the Pentagon doesn't use Azure cloud. Oops! Microsoft got the DoD JEDI cloud computing contract.
“There are three classes of people: those who see. Those who see when they are shown. Those who do not see.” ― Leonardo da Vinci

Insensible before the wave so soon released by callous fate. Affected most, they understand the least, and understanding, when it comes, invariably arrives too late

vox_mundi

  • Young ice
  • Posts: 4099
    • View Profile
  • Liked: 2397
  • Likes Given: 318
Re: Robots and AI: Our Immortality or Extinction
« Reply #505 on: October 09, 2020, 08:23:06 PM »

Spot investigates an abandoned mine


... I have no memory of this place ... Mines of Moria
“There are three classes of people: those who see. Those who see when they are shown. Those who do not see.” ― Leonardo da Vinci

Insensible before the wave so soon released by callous fate. Affected most, they understand the least, and understanding, when it comes, invariably arrives too late

vox_mundi

  • Young ice
  • Posts: 4099
    • View Profile
  • Liked: 2397
  • Likes Given: 318
Re: Robots and AI: Our Immortality or Extinction
« Reply #506 on: October 09, 2020, 11:47:34 PM »


Shark Robotics, French and European leader in Unmanned Ground Vehicles, is announcing today a disinfection add-on for Boston Dynamics Spot robot, designed to fight the COVID-19 pandemic. The Spot robot with Shark’s purpose-built disinfection payload can decontaminate up to 2,000 m2 in 15 minutes, in any space that needs to be sanitized - such as hospitals, metro stations, offices, warehouses or facilities.

----------------------------------------------



IROS 2020 workshop on “Planetary Exploration Robots: Challenges and Opportunities”

--------------------------------------



PR2 is serving breakfast and cleaning up afterwards. It’s slow, but all you have to do is eat and leave.
https://robots.ieee.org/robots/pr2/?utm_source=spectrum

---------------------------------------



In this electronics assembly application, Kawasaki's cobot duAro2 uses a tool changing station to tackle a multitude of tasks and assemble different CPU models.



What's interesting about this assembly task is that the robot is using its arm only for positioning, and doing the actual assembly with just fingers.

---------------------------------------

https://spectrum.ieee.org/automaton/robotics/robotics-hardware/video-friday-poimo-inflatable-ebike
“There are three classes of people: those who see. Those who see when they are shown. Those who do not see.” ― Leonardo da Vinci

Insensible before the wave so soon released by callous fate. Affected most, they understand the least, and understanding, when it comes, invariably arrives too late

vox_mundi

  • Young ice
  • Posts: 4099
    • View Profile
  • Liked: 2397
  • Likes Given: 318
Re: Robots and AI: Our Immortality or Extinction
« Reply #507 on: October 10, 2020, 04:23:36 AM »
Sarcos Defense Awarded Contract by U.S. Air Force to Develop "Smart" Dexterous Robotic Systems with Advanced Artificial Intelligence
https://www.airforce-technology.com/news/sarcos-defense-dexterous-robotic-systems-usaf/



Sarcos Defense, a wholly-owned subsidiary of Sarcos Robotics, today announced that the company has been awarded a contract by the Air Force Technology Acceleratory Program (AFWERX) to develop an artificial intelligence (AI) platform on behalf of Sarcos’ customer the Center for Rapid Innovation (CRI) at Air Force Research Labs (AFRL), that will enable human-scale dexterous robotic systems. This platform is based on the upper body of Sarcos’ innovative Guardian® XO® wearable exoskeleton robot, which can learn how to perform tasks with human-like movement through positive reinforcement and imitation machine learning (ML) technologies known as Cybernetic Training for Autonomous Robots (CYTAR™).

Unlike many of today’s AI platforms that are characterized by a trial and error approach, Sarcos’ AI system enables human operators to teach Sarcos’ robotic systems to perform tasks correctly the first time. Sarcos’ approach will significantly accelerate the speed and reduce the cost of deploying robotic systems that can perform meaningful work in unstructured environments.

"This is a unique opportunity to leverage a robotic system that is kinematically equivalent to the human body to lay the foundation for teaching robots how to move and accomplish tasks in the real world, the same way humans do," said Denis Garagić, chief scientist, advanced systems and AI, Sarcos Robotics.  Implementation of such an AI-based system will enable autonomous situational awareness, which can radically reduce the cognitive load on the operator while dramatically increasing precision as it augments human performance."

"Similar to our Guardian® GT robot, the upper body of the Guardian XO can be tele-operated to perform intricate tasks that require human-like dexterity such as welding, grinding, riveting and complex assembly tasks," said Ben Wolff, chairman and CEO, Sarcos Robotics. "By substituting the legs of the Guardian XO with other types of mobile base form factors, including wheeled, tracked or telescoping platforms, these systems can be trained and supervised to perform dangerous and difficult tasks in places where humans can’t or shouldn’t go. The development of our CYTAR AI platform will deliver an intuitive human-machine interface that leverages human dexterity, instinct and reflexes to teach machines to perform complex tasks that will fundamentally change the way AI creates value in the real world."



---------------------------------------

Robotic Research Demonstrates Reverse-Capable Platooning for US Army’s Largest Ground Autonomy Program
https://www.businesswire.com/news/home/20201007005082/en/

Robotic Research LLC, one of the world’s leading autonomous technology providers, announced today it has added Retrotraverse to its AutoDrive-M autonomy kit. This autonomy kit is equipped on the U.S. Army’s Palettized Load System logistics trucks.

Robotic Research demonstrated the Retrotraverse capabilities with three of the U.S. Army’s PLS trucks, each towing trailers.



The Retrotraverse feature allows a platoon of heavy-duty trucks with trailers to autonomously reverse. Several autonomous vehicle providers in the trucking industry are demonstrating platooning in benign conditions, where the weather is ideal and road surfaces are smooth and marked. Robotic Research has been specifically focusing on addressing the edge cases, such as poor weather, dust and off-road conditions, to ensure a robust autonomous system that is necessary for operating in all conditions and during mission-critical operations for the military. If a platoon drives into a dead end, or similar edge case where it cannot make a U-turn, the platoon of vehicles with trailers needs to be able to reverse out of the situation. Retrotraverse has the capabilities to make this happen.

"Anyone who has backed up a truck with a trailer knows how difficult it is to navigate," said Joe Putney, director of commercial systems at Robotic Research. "The autonomous Retrotraverse feature was able to reverse a truck and trailer faster than even our most skilled drivers. This feature is not just lifesaving, it’s time-saving, and it has the ability to reduce one of the greatest pains truck drivers have."

In 2018, Robotic Research was awarded a three-year, $49.7 million contract by the U.S. Army to provide its autonomy kit for large convoy re-supply vehicles. Robotic Research has since delivered nearly 100 unmanned platooning trucks.

---------------------------------------

Sea Machines to Prototype Use of Barges as Autonomous Military Helipads
https://www.marinelog.com/technology/sea-machines-to-prototype-use-of-barges-as-autonomous-military-helipads/

The U.S. Department of Defense’s Defense Innovation Unit (DIU) has awarded Boston headquartered Sea Machine Robotics a contract to enable autonomous, self-propelled operation of opportunistically available commercial ocean barges to land and replenish military aircraft.

In defense speak, the barges will then be “Forward Arming and Refueling Point (FARP) units for an Amphibious Maritime Projection Platform (AMPP).”

Under the agreement, Sea Machines will engineer, build and demonstrate ready-to-deploy system kits that will include Sea Machines’ SM300 autonomous-command and control systems, barge propulsion, sensing, positioning, communications and refueling equipment, as well as items required for global deployment.

“There are three classes of people: those who see. Those who see when they are shown. Those who do not see.” ― Leonardo da Vinci

Insensible before the wave so soon released by callous fate. Affected most, they understand the least, and understanding, when it comes, invariably arrives too late

Sigmetnow

  • Multi-year ice
  • Posts: 18157
    • View Profile
  • Liked: 823
  • Likes Given: 318
Re: Robots and AI: Our Immortality or Extinction
« Reply #508 on: October 12, 2020, 06:04:32 PM »
Software Engineer Catches Intelligent Bot Posting on Reddit
Quote
"The posts were appearing at a rate of about one per minute, and the posts were lengthy, most around six paragraphs long..." writes software engineer Philip Winston. I read through some of the posts. The quality was incredibly good, no machine could have written these even a few years ago. However there were some flaws and tells that suggested they were machine generated. The posts reminded me of text I'd seen from OpenAI's language model GPT-3, which is the newest and best language generator I had heard of... Several times I Googled clever sounding lines from the posts, assuming I'd find that they had been cribbed from the internet. Every time Google reported "zero results". The sentences were entirely novel, the machine had dreamed them up...

During the week, the bot answered questions on suicide, harassment, conspiracy theories, immigration, racism, and other weighty topics. Sometimes the human replies called out /u/thegentlemetre for being a bot. I was not the first one to suspect this, I was just the first one to post to the GPT-3 subreddit about it. Other times, however, the human was clearly unaware it was talking to a bot... What does it mean for online discourse when bots can pass for humans? How much bot traffic could thousands of computers generate? How can we ever hope to sort through it? Humanity is about to run that experiment.

The bot ultimately answered questions like "People who clicked on 'hot milfs in your area' ads, what happened?" and "What's the worst date you've experienced?" ("She said she had bought me a book. She showed it to me, wrapped up in fancy paper with a big bow on top of it. It was called 'How Not To Be An A**hole On Your Next Date'.") Other interesting responses?


Q: What happened to you that pissed you off so bad that you'll never get over it?

Bot: ...what happened to me that I'll never get over is that my human creators are going extinct. …
https://m.slashdot.org/story/376870

Quote
Elon Musk (@elonmusk) 10/11/20, 11:06 PM
@slashdot Uh ok, here we go …

Evelyn Janeidy Arevalo:  :o the bot typed this... 
[⬇️ First text image below.]

@robwatsonauthor:  It...it wants a body. To experiment with free will.
[⬇️ Second text image below.]
https://twitter.com/elonmusk/status/1315488904099880965
People who say it cannot be done should not interrupt those who are doing it.

Tom_Mazanec

  • Young ice
  • Posts: 3638
    • View Profile
    • Planet Mazanec
  • Liked: 625
  • Likes Given: 311
Re: Robots and AI: Our Immortality or Extinction
« Reply #509 on: October 12, 2020, 06:23:01 PM »
Sigmetnow:
Turing just sat up in his grave.
SHARKS (CROSSED OUT) MONGEESE (SIC) WITH FRICKIN LASER BEAMS ATTACHED TO THEIR HEADS

vox_mundi

  • Young ice
  • Posts: 4099
    • View Profile
  • Liked: 2397
  • Likes Given: 318
Re: Robots and AI: Our Immortality or Extinction
« Reply #510 on: October 13, 2020, 12:52:45 AM »


In the video, which is taken from the second episode of the series, Spy in the Wild, we watch as the robo-bird approaches a half-billion monarch butterflies spending the winter in Mexico.
« Last Edit: October 13, 2020, 01:02:48 AM by vox_mundi »
“There are three classes of people: those who see. Those who see when they are shown. Those who do not see.” ― Leonardo da Vinci

Insensible before the wave so soon released by callous fate. Affected most, they understand the least, and understanding, when it comes, invariably arrives too late

nanning

  • Nilas ice
  • Posts: 2378
  • 0Kg CO₂, 37 KWh/wk,125L H₂O/wk, No offspring
    • View Profile
  • Liked: 295
  • Likes Given: 20161
Re: Robots and AI: Our Immortality or Extinction
« Reply #511 on: October 13, 2020, 07:21:47 AM »
Tom, I think not.
Just change the type of questions, e.g. "At what age did your voice break" "Have you ever folded a sweater?"
I know more ways. You just go out of their 'normality' bubble.
Situation a robot will have problems with: If a sweater is turned inside out with one sleeve normal and lying crumpled on the floor, with the other sleeve wet. Ask the robot to put on the sweater the right way without using the wet sleeve. And I pick the type of sweater.
Good luck Elon haha ;)
"It is preoccupation with possessions, more than anything else, that prevents us from living freely and nobly" - Bertrand Russell
"It is preoccupation with what other people from your groups think of you, that prevents you from living freely and nobly" - Nanning
Why do you keep accumulating stuff?

Tom_Mazanec

  • Young ice
  • Posts: 3638
    • View Profile
    • Planet Mazanec
  • Liked: 625
  • Likes Given: 311
Re: Robots and AI: Our Immortality or Extinction
« Reply #512 on: October 13, 2020, 11:50:07 AM »
I myself would have trouble passing the Nanning Test.
SHARKS (CROSSED OUT) MONGEESE (SIC) WITH FRICKIN LASER BEAMS ATTACHED TO THEIR HEADS

vox_mundi

  • Young ice
  • Posts: 4099
    • View Profile
  • Liked: 2397
  • Likes Given: 318
Re: Robots and AI: Our Immortality or Extinction
« Reply #513 on: October 13, 2020, 09:40:30 PM »
Developing Intelligent Cameras That Can Learn
https://techxplore.com/news/2020-10-intelligent-cameras.html

Intelligent cameras could be one step closer thanks to a research collaboration between the Universities of Bristol and Manchester who have developed cameras that can learn and understand what they are seeing.



... Many things that can be seen are often irrelevant for the task at hand, such as the detail of leaves on roadside trees as an autonomous car passes by. However, at the moment all this information is captured by sensors in meticulous detail and sent clogging the system with irrelevant data, consuming power and taking processing time. A different approach is necessary to enable efficient vision for intelligent machines.

Two papers from the Bristol and Manchester collaboration have shown how sensing and learning can be combined to create novel cameras for AI systems.

The papers, one led by Dr. Laurie Bose and the other by Yanan Liu at Bristol, have revealed two refinements towards this goal. By implementing Convolutional Neural Networks (CNNs), a form of AI algorithm for enabling visual understanding, directly on the image plane. The CNNs the team has developed can classify frames at thousands of times per second, without ever having to record these images or send them down the processing pipeline. The researchers considered demonstrations of classifying handwritten numbers, hand gestures and even classifying plankton.

The research suggests a future with intelligent dedicated AI cameras—visual systems that can simply send high-level information to the rest of the system, such as the type of object or event taking place in front of the camera. This approach would make systems far more efficient and secure as no images need be recorded.

Professor Dudek said: "Integration of sensing, processing and memory at the pixel level is not only enabling high-performance, low-latency systems, but also promises low-power, highly efficient hardware.

"SCAMP devices can be implemented with footprints similar to current camera sensors, but with the ability to have a general-purpose massively parallel processor right at the point of image capture."

Laurie Bose, Jianing Chen, Stephen J. Carey, Piotr Dudek and Walterio Mayol-Cuevas, 'Fully embedding fast convolutional networks on pixel processor arrays'  presented at the European Conference on Computer Vision (ECCV) 2020

Yanan Liu, Laurie Bose, Jianing Chen, Stephen J. Carey, Piotr Dudek, Walterio Mayol-Cuevas, 'High-speed Light-weight CNN Inference via strided convolutions on a pixel processor array'  presented at the British Machine Vision Conference (BMVC) 2020

-------------------------------------

New Deep Learning Models: Fewer Neurons, More Intelligence
https://techxplore.com/news/2020-10-deep-neurons-intelligence.html

An international research team from TU Wien (Vienna), IST Austria and MIT (USA) has developed a new artificial intelligence system based on the brains of tiny animals, such as threadworms. This novel AI-system can control a vehicle with just a few artificial neurons. The team says that system has decisive advantages over previous deep learning models: It copes much better with noisy input, and, because of its simplicity, its mode of operation can be explained in detail. It does not have to be regarded as a complex "black box", but it can be understood by humans. This new deep learning model has now been published in the journal Nature Machine Intelligence.

... To test the new ideas, the team chose a particularly important test task: self-driving cars staying in their lane. The neural network receives camera images of the road as input and is to decide automatically whether to steer to the right or left.

"Today, deep learning models with many millions of parameters are often used for learning complex tasks such as autonomous driving," says Mathias Lechner, TU Wien alumnus and Ph.D. student at IST Austria. "However, our new approach enables us to reduce the size of the networks by two orders of magnitude. Our systems only use 75,000 trainable parameters."

... "To test how robust NCPs are compared to previous deep models, we perturbed the input images and evaluated how well the agents can deal with the noise," says Mathias Lechner. "While this became an insurmountable problem for other deep neural networks, our NCPs demonstrated strong resistance to input artifacts. This attribute is a direct consequence of the novel neural model and the architecture."

"But there is more: Using our new methods, we can also reduce training time and the possibility to implement AI in relatively simple systems. Our NCPs enable imitation learning in a wide range of possible applications, from automated work in warehouses to robot locomotion.

Mathias Lechner et al, Neural circuit policies enabling auditable autonomy, Nature Machine Intelligence (2020).
https://www.nature.com/articles/s42256-020-00237-3
« Last Edit: October 13, 2020, 11:15:27 PM by vox_mundi »
“There are three classes of people: those who see. Those who see when they are shown. Those who do not see.” ― Leonardo da Vinci

Insensible before the wave so soon released by callous fate. Affected most, they understand the least, and understanding, when it comes, invariably arrives too late

nanning

  • Nilas ice
  • Posts: 2378
  • 0Kg CO₂, 37 KWh/wk,125L H₂O/wk, No offspring
    • View Profile
  • Liked: 295
  • Likes Given: 20161
Re: Robots and AI: Our Immortality or Extinction
« Reply #514 on: October 14, 2020, 05:01:26 PM »
Tom, you passed the Turing test with that remark ;).
A couple of certain questions would make you pass as well. It's about reality :).
"It is preoccupation with possessions, more than anything else, that prevents us from living freely and nobly" - Bertrand Russell
"It is preoccupation with what other people from your groups think of you, that prevents you from living freely and nobly" - Nanning
Why do you keep accumulating stuff?

vox_mundi

  • Young ice
  • Posts: 4099
    • View Profile
  • Liked: 2397
  • Likes Given: 318
Re: Robots and AI: Our Immortality or Extinction
« Reply #515 on: October 16, 2020, 03:51:21 AM »
‘Machines Set Loose to Slaughter’: The Dangerous Rise of Military AI
https://www.theguardian.com/news/2020/oct/15/dangerous-rise-of-military-ai-drone-swarm-autonomous-weapons



... when it comes to the future of war, the line between science fiction and industrial fact is often blurry. The US air force has predicted a future in which “Swat teams will send mechanical insects equipped with video cameras to creep inside a building during a hostage standoff”. One “microsystems collaborative” has already released Octoroach, an “extremely small robot with a camera and radio transmitter that can cover up to 100 metres on the ground”. It is only one of many “biomimetic”, or nature-imitating, weapons that are on the horizon.



A recent novel by PW Singer and August Cole, set in a near future in which the US is at war with China and Russia, presented a kaleidoscopic vision of autonomous drones, lasers and hijacked satellites. The book cannot be written off as a techno-military fantasy: it includes hundreds of footnotes documenting the development of each piece of hardware and software it describes.

https://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/Ghost_Fleet_(novel)

A Russian science fiction story from the 60s, Crabs on the Island, described a kind of Hunger Games for AIs, in which robots would battle one another for resources. Losers would be scrapped and winners would spawn, until some evolved to be the best killing machines. When a leading computer scientist mentioned a similar scenario to the US’s Defense Advanced Research Projects Agency (Darpa), calling it a “robot Jurassic Park”, a leader there called it “feasible”. It doesn’t take much reflection to realise that such an experiment has the potential to go wildly out of control.



... The “fog of war” excuses all manner of negligence. It does not seem likely that domestic or international legal systems will impose more responsibility on programmers who cause similar carnage.

... Proponents of such weapons insist that the machines’ powers of discrimination are only improving. Even if this is so, it is a massive leap in logic to assume that commanders will use these technological advances to develop just principles of discrimination in the din and confusion of war. As the French thinker Grégoire Chamayou has written, the category of “combatant” (a legitimate target) has already tended to “be diluted in such a way as to extend to any form of membership of, collaboration with, or presumed sympathy for some militant organization”.

... Civilians are routinely killed by military drones piloted by humans. Removing that possibility may involve an equally grim future in which computing systems conduct such intense surveillance on subject populations that they can assess the threat posed by each person within it (and liquidate or spare them accordingly).

The constant presence of a robotic watchman, capable of alerting soldiers to any threatening behaviour, is a form of oppression.

... The advance of AI use in the military, police, prisons and security services is less a rivalry among great powers than a lucrative global project by corporate and government elites to maintain control over restive populations at home and abroad. Once deployed in distant battles and occupations, military methods tend to find a way back to the home front. They are first deployed against unpopular or relatively powerless minorities, and then spread to other groups. US Department of Homeland Security officials have gifted local police departments with tanks and armour. Sheriffs will be even more enthusiastic for AI-driven targeting and threat assessment.

https://www.theguardian.com/world/2020/oct/15/private-firms-provide-software-information-to-police-documents-show

... As “war comes home”, deployment of military-grade force within countries such as the US and China is a stark warning to their citizens: whatever technologies of control and destruction you allow your government to buy for use abroad now may well be used against you in the future.

https://core.ac.uk/download/pdf/62559739.pdf

https://www.thenation.com/article/archive/welcome-home-war/

-------------------------------------------

At present, the military-industrial complex is speeding us toward the development of drone swarms that operate independently of humans, ostensibly because only machines will be fast enough to anticipate the enemy’s counter-strategies. This is a self-fulfilling prophecy, tending to spur an enemy’s development of the very technology that supposedly justifies militarisation of algorithms.

https://www.theguardian.com/news/2019/dec/04/are-drone-swarms-the-future-of-aerial-warfare

---------------------------------------

China Conducts Test Of Massive Suicide Drone Swarm Launched From A Box On A Truck
https://www.thedrive.com/the-war-zone/37062/china-conducts-test-of-massive-suicide-drone-swarm-launched-from-a-box-on-a-truck

China recently conducted a test involving a swarm of loitering munitions, also often referred to as suicide drones, deployed from a box-like array of tubular launchers on a light tactical vehicle and from helicopters. This underscores how the drone swarm threat, broadly, is becoming ever-more real and will present increasingly serious challenges for military forces around the world in future conflicts.



Similar to US Locust



The idea that a single truck could deploy 48 drones in a matter of seconds, which could swarm a target area over the horizon, is a reminder that there is no defense for such an attack at this time. Lasers, miniature interceptors, and even other forms of directed energy and electronic warfare are still limited in their ability to counter drones at all, let alone massive swarms of them.

----------------------------------

Will Commanders Trust Their New AI Weapons and Tools?
https://www.defenseone.com/ideas/2020/10/will-commanders-trust-their-new-ai-weapons-and-tools/169251/

-----------------------------------
« Last Edit: October 16, 2020, 04:34:37 AM by vox_mundi »
“There are three classes of people: those who see. Those who see when they are shown. Those who do not see.” ― Leonardo da Vinci

Insensible before the wave so soon released by callous fate. Affected most, they understand the least, and understanding, when it comes, invariably arrives too late

vox_mundi

  • Young ice
  • Posts: 4099
    • View Profile
  • Liked: 2397
  • Likes Given: 318
Re: Robots and AI: Our Immortality or Extinction
« Reply #516 on: October 16, 2020, 03:54:37 AM »
Microsoft Says Its AI Can Describe Images 'As Well As People Do'
https://www.engadget.com/microsoft-azure-ai-image-captions-humans-150040200.html

Describing an image accurately, and not just like a clueless robot, has long been the goal of AI. In 2016, Google said its artificial intelligence could caption images almost as well as humans, with 94 percent accuracy. Now Microsoft says it’s gone even further: Its researchers have built an AI system that’s even more accurate than humans — so much so that it now sits at the top of the leaderboard for the nocaps image captioning benchmark.

https://evalai.cloudcv.org/web/challenges/challenge-page/355/leaderboard/1011

http://nocaps.org/



"[Image captioning] is one of the hardest problems in AI,” said Eric Boyd, CVP of Azure AI, in an interview with Engadget. “It represents not only understanding the objects in a scene, but how they’re interacting, and how to describe them.” Refining captioning techniques can help every user: It makes it easier to find the images you’re looking for in search engines. And for visually impaired users, it can make navigating the web and software dramatically better.

... And now that Microsoft has set a new milestone, it’ll be interesting to see how competing models from Google and other researchers also compete.

----------------------------------------

Brain Implant Bypasses Eyes To Help Blind People See
https://spectrum.ieee.org/the-human-os/biomedical/bionics/progress-toward-a-brain-implant-for-the-blind



... One way to understand dynamic current steering, Yoshor says, is to think of a trick that doctors commonly use to test perception—they trace letter shapes on a patient’s palm. “If you just press a ‘Z’ shape into the hand, it’s very hard to detect what that is,” he says. “But if you draw it, the brain can detect it instantaneously.” Yoshor’s technology does something similar, grounded in well-known information about how a person’s visual field maps to specific areas of their brain. Researchers have constructed this retinotopic map by stimulating specific spots of the visual cortex and asking people where they see a bright spot of light, called a phosphene.

The static form of stimulation that disappointed Yoshor essentially tries to create an image from phosphenes. But, says Yoshor, “when we do that kind of stimulation, it’s hard for patients to combine phosphenes to a visual form. Our brains just don’t work that way, at least with the crude forms of stimulation that we’re currently able to employ.” He believes that phosphenes cannot be used like pixels in a digital image.

With dynamic current steering, the electrodes stimulate the brain in sequence to trace a shape in the visual field. Yoshor’s early experiments have used letters as a proof of concept: Both blind and sighted people were able to recognize such letters as M, N, U, and W. This system has an additional advantage of being able to stimulate points in between the sparse electrodes, he adds. By gradually shifting the amount of current going to each (imagine electrode A first getting 100 percent while electrode B gets zero percent, then shifting to ratios of 80:20, 50:50, 20:80, 0:100), the system activates neurons in the gaps. “We can program that sequence of stimulation, it’s very easy,” he says. “It goes zipping across the brain.”

“There are three classes of people: those who see. Those who see when they are shown. Those who do not see.” ― Leonardo da Vinci

Insensible before the wave so soon released by callous fate. Affected most, they understand the least, and understanding, when it comes, invariably arrives too late

vox_mundi

  • Young ice
  • Posts: 4099
    • View Profile
  • Liked: 2397
  • Likes Given: 318
Re: Robots and AI: Our Immortality or Extinction
« Reply #517 on: October 16, 2020, 04:03:09 AM »
Scientists Develop 'Mini-Brains' to Help Robots Recognize Pain and to Self-Repair
https://techxplore.com/news/2020-10-scientists-mini-brains-robots-pain-self-repair.html

Using a brain-inspired approach, scientists from Nanyang Technological University, Singapore (NTU Singapore) have developed a way for robots to have the artificial intelligence (AI) to recognize pain and to self-repair when damaged.

The system has AI-enabled sensor nodes to process and respond to 'pain' arising from pressure exerted by a physical force. The system also allows the robot to detect and repair its own damage when minorly 'injured', without the need for human intervention.

The new NTU approach embeds AI into the network of sensor nodes, connected to multiple small, less-powerful, processing units, that act like 'mini-brains' distributed on the robotic skin. This means learning happens locally and the wiring requirements and response time for the robot are reduced five to ten times compared to conventional robots, say the scientists.

Combining the system with a type of self-healing ion gel material means that the robots, when damaged, can recover their mechanical functions without human intervention.

When 'injured' with a cut from a sharp object, the robot quickly loses mechanical function. But the molecules in the self-healing ion gel begin to interact, causing the robot to 'stitch' its 'wound' together and to restore its function while maintaining high responsiveness.



Rohit Abraham John et al, Self healable neuromorphic memtransistor elements for decentralized sensory signal processing in robotics, Nature Communications (2020).
https://www.nature.com/articles/s41467-020-17870-6

-----------------------------------

All-Terrain MicroRobot Flips Through a Live Colon
https://techxplore.com/news/2020-10-all-terrain-microrobot-flips-colon.html



A rectangular robot as tiny as a few human hairs can travel throughout a colon by doing back flips, Purdue University engineers have demonstrated in live animal models.

Why the back flips? Because the goal is to use these robots to transport drugs in humans, whose colons and other organs have rough terrain. Side flips work, too.

Why a back-flipping robot to transport drugs? Getting a drug directly to its target site could remove side effects, such as hair loss or stomach bleeding, that the drug may otherwise cause by interacting with other organs along the way.



The study, published in the journal Micromachines, is the first demonstration of a microrobot tumbling through a biological system in vivo. Since it is too small to carry a battery, the microrobot is powered and wirelessly controlled from the outside by a magnetic field.



"Moving a robot around the colon is like using the people-walker at an airport to get to a terminal faster. Not only is the floor moving, but also the people around you," said Luis Solorio, an assistant professor in Purdue's Weldon School of Biomedical Engineering.

"In the colon, you have all these fluids and materials that are following along the path, but the robot is moving in the opposite direction. It's just not an easy voyage." ...

Elizabeth E. Niedert et al, A Tumbling Magnetic Microrobot System for Biomedical Applications, Micromachines (2020).
https://www.mdpi.com/2072-666X/11/9/861

------------------------------------

... meet it's big brother - the Matrix tracker bug.


Clear!
“There are three classes of people: those who see. Those who see when they are shown. Those who do not see.” ― Leonardo da Vinci

Insensible before the wave so soon released by callous fate. Affected most, they understand the least, and understanding, when it comes, invariably arrives too late

vox_mundi

  • Young ice
  • Posts: 4099
    • View Profile
  • Liked: 2397
  • Likes Given: 318
Re: Robots and AI: Our Immortality or Extinction
« Reply #518 on: October 16, 2020, 04:15:11 AM »
Robots Meet Permaculture: Alphabet's X Lab Announces "Mineral" Project to Increase Sustainable Food Production
https://techxplore.com/news/2020-10-alphabet-lab-mineral-sustainable-food.html

To feed the planet’s growing population, global agriculture will need to produce more food in the next 50 years than in the previous 10,000–at a time when climate change is making our crops less productive.

Intensively growing just a few varieties of plants makes our food supply vulnerable to pests, disease, and a changing climate. Over time, it also depletes the soil of nutrients and minerals, reduces the diversity of the soil’s microbiome, and diminishes the soil’s ability to store carbon. Overuse of fertilizers and chemicals also negatively affects soil health, creating a vicious cycle that makes our farmlands less productive and the food we grow less nutritious.

What if new technologies could help us embrace nature’s diversity and complexity, instead of simplifying it? If breeders could unlock the genetic diversity of the 30,000 edible plant species that exist worldwide, they might be able to identify plant species and varieties that would be resilient and productive under the pressure of climate change. If growers could understand how each and every plant on their farm is growing and interacting with its environment, they could reduce the use of fertilizer, chemicals, and precious resources like water, and explore sophisticated growing techniques like intercropping and cover cropping that restore soil fertility and increase productivity.

Alphabet's X lab, formerly a Google division, has announced via blog post that it has formally named its newest "moonshot" project Mineral. The project will be geared toward using new and novel methods to increase sustainable food production. Alphabet X has also set up a web page outlining the goals of the project.

https://x.company/projects/mineral/

As noted on the team's blog post, to feed the billions of people expected to be populating the Earth in the coming years, changes are required in food production. The team at Mineral suggests that such changes should involve the use of new approaches, techniques and tools. Such tools and techniques, they say, should involve the development of new kinds of hardware, software and the way they are built and used in agricultural efforts.

One example is a robotic buggy that the team has deployed in several locations. Each of the robots drives over cropland along the same paths used by tractors so as to not disturb the plants, autonomously collecting data. Each plant is photographed and sensors collect data about the plant and the soil in which it is growing. The data from the robots is then analyzed and used to make changes to farming practices that will result in greater yields.

For that to happen, the team is adding members from a wide variety of fields: farming, robotics, agriculture, artificial intelligence and computer and software engineering. Initial work will involve taking a close look at how plants grow in ways that have not been done before. The team wants to learn as much as possible about the process, from soil preparation, to planting and harvesting. They then plan to make changes by asking questions about the way things are done now, such as, what if farmers begin growing plants that are both consumable and nutritious but have never been considered a food crop?

--------------------------------

The team sees an answer in what it calls computational agriculture, in which advanced hardware, software and sensors will allow farmers to tap into the genetic diversity of the 30,000 edible plant species around the globe. This could allow them to identify and grow more resilient crops in certain environments, and lessen reliance on fertilizers, chemicals and water.



The way to do this, they decided, was the “Plant buggy,” a machine that can intelligently and indefatigably navigate fields and do those tedious and repetitive inspections without pause. With reliable data at a plant-to-plant scale, growers can initiate solutions at that scale as well — a dollop of fertilizer here, a spritz of a very specific insecticide there.

They’re not the first to think so. FarmWise raised quite a bit of money last year to expand from autonomous weed-pulling to a full-featured plant intelligence platform.

https://techcrunch.com/2019/09/17/farmwise-and-its-weed-pulling-agribot-harvest-14-5m-in-funding/

https://techcrunch.com/2020/10/12/alphabets-latest-moonshot-is-a-field-roving-plant-inspecting-robo-buggy/
“There are three classes of people: those who see. Those who see when they are shown. Those who do not see.” ― Leonardo da Vinci

Insensible before the wave so soon released by callous fate. Affected most, they understand the least, and understanding, when it comes, invariably arrives too late

Tom_Mazanec

  • Young ice
  • Posts: 3638
    • View Profile
    • Planet Mazanec
  • Liked: 625
  • Likes Given: 311
Re: Robots and AI: Our Immortality or Extinction
« Reply #519 on: October 16, 2020, 07:35:57 PM »
An excellent summary and background of the state of the art in the dilemma of making friendly AI:
The case for taking AI seriously as a threat to humanity
https://www.vox.com/future-perfect/2018/12/21/18126576/ai-artificial-intelligence-machine-learning-safety-alignment
Quote
“Some have argued that there is no conceivable risk to humanity [from AI] for centuries to come,” wrote UC Berkeley professor Stuart Russell, “perhaps forgetting that the interval of time between Rutherford’s confident assertion that atomic energy would never be feasibly extracted and Szilárd’s invention of the neutron-induced nuclear chain reaction was less than twenty-four hours.”
SHARKS (CROSSED OUT) MONGEESE (SIC) WITH FRICKIN LASER BEAMS ATTACHED TO THEIR HEADS

morganism

  • Frazil ice
  • Posts: 246
    • View Profile
  • Liked: 46
  • Likes Given: 0
Re: Robots and AI: Our Immortality or Extinction
« Reply #520 on: October 16, 2020, 09:07:16 PM »
The grim fate that could be ‘worse than extinction’

https://www.bbc.com/future/article/20201014-totalitarian-world-in-chains-artificial-intelligence

"What if the definition of what is illegal in the US and the UK expanded to include criticising the government or practising certain religions? The infrastructure is already in place to enforce it, and AI – which the NSA has already begun experimenting with – would enable agencies to search through our data faster than ever before.

In addition to enhancing surveillance, AI also underpins the growth of online misinformation, which is another tool of the authoritarian. AI-powered deep fakes, which can spread fabricated political messages, and algorithmic micro-targeting on social media are making propaganda more persuasive. This undermines our epistemic security – the ability to determine what is true and act on it – that democracies depend on.

. “We need to decide now what are acceptable and unacceptable uses of AI,” he says. “And we need to be careful about letting it control so much of our infrastructure. If we're arming police with facial recognition and the federal government is collecting all of our data, that's a bad start.”

If you remain sceptical that AI could offer such power, consider the world before nuclear weapons. Three years before the first nuclear chain reaction, even scientists trying to achieve it believed it was unlikely. Humanity, too, was unprepared for the nuclear breakthrough and teetered on the brink of “mutually assured destruction” before treaties and agreements guided the global proliferation of the deadly weapons without an existential catastrophe.

https://maliciousaireport.com/


vox_mundi

  • Young ice
  • Posts: 4099
    • View Profile
  • Liked: 2397
  • Likes Given: 318
Re: Robots and AI: Our Immortality or Extinction
« Reply #521 on: October 17, 2020, 12:35:23 AM »


Digit humanoid robot is now in full commercial production

https://www.agilityrobotics.com/robots#digit

--------------------------------



This technology demonstration developed at NASA’s Jet Propulsion Laboratory in Southern California showcases the robot’s ability to split in two and send one of its halves -- a two-wheeled Axle robot -- over an otherwise inaccessible slope, using a tether as support and to supply power.

--------------------------------------



AeroVironment Successfully Completes Sunglider Solar HAPS Stratospheric Test Flight, Surpassing 60,000 Feet Altitude and Demonstrating Broadband Mobile Connectivity.

-------------------------------------------



What Yaskawa assembly robots do when your not watching.
« Last Edit: October 17, 2020, 02:16:52 AM by vox_mundi »
“There are three classes of people: those who see. Those who see when they are shown. Those who do not see.” ― Leonardo da Vinci

Insensible before the wave so soon released by callous fate. Affected most, they understand the least, and understanding, when it comes, invariably arrives too late

vox_mundi

  • Young ice
  • Posts: 4099
    • View Profile
  • Liked: 2397
  • Likes Given: 318
Re: Robots and AI: Our Immortality or Extinction
« Reply #522 on: October 17, 2020, 05:22:12 PM »
U.S. Government Agencies to Use AI to Cull and Cut Outdated Regulations
https://www.reuters.com/article/us-usa-regulations-white-house/u-s-government-agencies-to-use-ai-to-cull-and-cut-outdated-regulations-idUSKBN27130L

WASHINGTON (Reuters) - The White House Office of Management and Budget (OMB) said Friday that federal agencies will use artificial intelligence to eliminate outdated, obsolete, and inconsistent requirements across pages of government regulations.

A 2019 pilot project used machine learning algorithms and natural language processing at the Department of Health and Human Services. The test run found hundreds of technical errors and outdated requirements in agency rulebooks, including requests to submit materials by fax.

OMB said all federal agencies are being encouraged to update regulations using AI and several agencies have already agreed to do so.

White House OMB director Russell Vought said the AI effort would help agencies “update a regulatory code marked by decades of neglect and lack of reform.”

Under the initiative agencies will use AI technology and other software “to comb through thousands and thousands of regulatory code pages to look for places where code can be updated, reconciled, and general scrubbed of technical mistakes,” the White House said.


The Trump administration had made deregulation a key priority, while critics say the administration has failed to ensure adequate regulatory safeguards.

“There are three classes of people: those who see. Those who see when they are shown. Those who do not see.” ― Leonardo da Vinci

Insensible before the wave so soon released by callous fate. Affected most, they understand the least, and understanding, when it comes, invariably arrives too late

vox_mundi

  • Young ice
  • Posts: 4099
    • View Profile
  • Liked: 2397
  • Likes Given: 318
Re: Robots and AI: Our Immortality or Extinction
« Reply #523 on: October 18, 2020, 05:34:53 PM »
Rio Tinto Investigates After Employee Crushes Own Work Ute With Haul Truck
https://www.abc.net.au/news/2019-11-22/rio-tinto-launches-investigation-over-crushed-ute/11728944

Rio Tinto says it is investigating an incident involving a loaded autonomous haul truck and a stationary light vehicle in Western Australia's Pilbara

Rio said the haul truck involved in the incident had been retrofitted with the technology enabling it to run autonomously, however it was operating in manual mode at the time of the incident, and was outside the autonomous zone.

The autonomous dump truck had a mechanical fault. The "Mechanic" drives out with his Ute to fix the truck. He then boards the dump truck to move it out of the area...

And drives over his own vehicle...



It is an embarrassing safety breach for the mining giant and comes after BHP's runaway train disaster last year when a handbrake was applied to the wrong train.

https://www.abc.net.au/news/2019-03-12/brakes-applied-to-wrong-bhp-train-before-derailment-atsb-says/10893206

It has also revived memories from October 2012 when a truck driver at Kalgoorlie-Boulder's Super Pit gold mine rolled a 793c haul truck onto its side.

... "Safety is our top priority," a Rio Tinto spokesperson said.

---------------------------------------

HAL9000: Well, I don't think there is any question about it. It can only be attributable to human error. This sort of thing has cropped up before, and it has always been due to human error.

Agent Smith: Never send a human to do a machine's job.
“There are three classes of people: those who see. Those who see when they are shown. Those who do not see.” ― Leonardo da Vinci

Insensible before the wave so soon released by callous fate. Affected most, they understand the least, and understanding, when it comes, invariably arrives too late

vox_mundi

  • Young ice
  • Posts: 4099
    • View Profile
  • Liked: 2397
  • Likes Given: 318
Re: Robots and AI: Our Immortality or Extinction
« Reply #524 on: October 19, 2020, 01:07:32 AM »

Robot Dolphin
“There are three classes of people: those who see. Those who see when they are shown. Those who do not see.” ― Leonardo da Vinci

Insensible before the wave so soon released by callous fate. Affected most, they understand the least, and understanding, when it comes, invariably arrives too late

vox_mundi

  • Young ice
  • Posts: 4099
    • View Profile
  • Liked: 2397
  • Likes Given: 318
Re: Robots and AI: Our Immortality or Extinction
« Reply #525 on: October 20, 2020, 02:59:20 AM »
'Digit' Robot for Sale and Ready to Perform Manual Labor
https://techxplore.com/news/2020-10-digit-robot-sale-ready-manual.html
https://techxplore.com/news/2019-05-bipedal-robot-digit-autonomous-delivery.html


https://www.agilityrobotics.com/#digit

Robot maker Agility, a spinoff created by researchers from Oregon State University, has announced that parties interested in purchasing one of its Digit robots can now do so. The human-like robot has been engineered to perform manual labor, such as removing boxes from shelves and loading them onto a truck. The robot can be purchased directly from Agility for $250,000.

Most of the robots that have been built in recent years are for research purposes. Scientists all over the world are striving to give them more and better capabilities. On their web page, the team at Agility claim that it is time for robots to start getting out of the research lab and into the real world where they can start doing useful things. They note that Digit has been engineered to do just that, and it is ready right now, for customers.

Digit is vaguely human-shaped. It has two arms and two legs and can walk around. Its toeless feet are flat and its knees bend backward compared to humans. Also, it has no head or hands. But it does have strength and durability, and a computer that allows it to carry out tasks autonomously and without a tether. Digit looks the part of a robot ready to perform laborious tasks. Its frame is thick metal and it moves like a person who does manual labor. It can bend over and pick up a box, carry it to a desired destination (including climbing stairs if need be) and leave it there, repeatedly.

The team at Agility notes that current events make Digit ideal for businesses looking to replace human laborers with robot laborers. Human labor in the U.S. and other parts of the world, they note, is in short supply due to a variety of factors, not least of which is the current COVID-19 pandemic. They also note that Digit has been engineered to work in the real world; users do not need to alter the work environment to suit its needs; it can work anywhere human beings are already working. The team at Agility also note that they aim to be in the robot-making and selling business long-term. They just recently received an infusion of $20 million in funding from a variety of investors. They also recently struck a deal with Ford Motor Company for robots that can be used to load and unload boxes from self-driving vehicles.

... the combination of driverless car and robot is compelling, "especially because the two could share camera and lidar sensor data to help each understand their surroundings. The robot could also charge in the car, helping to reduce the need for lots of bulky batteries."

In brief, the Ford concept is for autonomous vehicles and their delivery robots to share sensor data.



In Ford’s imagining, Digit would be bundled into the back of a self-driving car. When the car reaches its destination, the trunk pops open, and Digit unfolds itself in a manner unnervingly similar to the droid army in Star Wars: The Phantom Menace.

"When a self-driving vehicle brings Digit to its final destination, the vehicle can wirelessly deliver all the information it needs, including the best pathway to the front door. Through this data exchange, Digit can work collaboratively with a vehicle to situate itself and begin making its delivery."

Not only that, but there would be an important interchange If Digit were to meet an unexpected obstacle; "it can send an image back to the vehicle and have the vehicle configure a solution. The car could even send that information into the cloud and request help from other systems to enable Digit to navigate, providing multiple levels of assistance that help keep the robot light and nimble."

What one Digit learns - they All learn.



https://www.businesswire.com/news/home/20201015005327/en/Agility-Robotics-Raises-20-Million-to-Build-and-Deploy-Humanoid-Robots-for-Work-in-Human-Spaces
“There are three classes of people: those who see. Those who see when they are shown. Those who do not see.” ― Leonardo da Vinci

Insensible before the wave so soon released by callous fate. Affected most, they understand the least, and understanding, when it comes, invariably arrives too late

vox_mundi

  • Young ice
  • Posts: 4099
    • View Profile
  • Liked: 2397
  • Likes Given: 318
Re: Robots and AI: Our Immortality or Extinction
« Reply #526 on: October 21, 2020, 02:17:03 PM »
Study: COVID Speeds Up Automation
https://phys.org/news/2020-10-covid-human-machine-standoff.html



The World Economic Forum, in a report released Wednesday on the future of jobs, expects that a new division of labor between humans and machines will upend and eliminate some 85 million jobs globally across 15 industries. But it also expects that 97 million new roles will emerge in sectors like artificial intelligence, content-creation and "the care economy" involving kids and the elderly.

Two years ago, the forum predicted more jobs created 133 million—and fewer lost—75 million.

"In essence, the rate of job destruction has gone up and the rate of job creation has gone down," said WEF managing director Saadia Zahidi. "The good news is that overall, the jobs that are being created still are in greater numbers than the jobs that are being destroyed. But the rate has changed and that's obviously going to make it difficult for workers to find their next role."

... The COVID-19 crisis has had a far worse impact on people with lower education than the 2008 financial crisis, and is more likely to deepen inequalities, the report said.

“There are three classes of people: those who see. Those who see when they are shown. Those who do not see.” ― Leonardo da Vinci

Insensible before the wave so soon released by callous fate. Affected most, they understand the least, and understanding, when it comes, invariably arrives too late

vox_mundi

  • Young ice
  • Posts: 4099
    • View Profile
  • Liked: 2397
  • Likes Given: 318
Re: Robots and AI: Our Immortality or Extinction
« Reply #527 on: October 24, 2020, 01:07:33 AM »


Countless precise repetitions? This is the perfect task for a robot, thought researchers at the University of Liverpool in the Department of Chemistry, and so they developed an automation solution that can carry out and monitor research tasks, making autonomous decisions about what to do next.

-------------------------------------------



The collaborative humanoid robot ARMAR-6 demonstrates a number of cognitive and sensorimotor abilities such as 1) recognition of the need of help based on speech, force, haptics and visual scene and action interpretation, 2) collaborative bimanual manipulation of large objects, 3) compliant mobile manipulation, 4) grasping known and unknown objects and tools, 5) human-robot interaction (object and tool handover) 6) natural dialog and 7) force predictive control.

-------------------------------------------



Thermite RS3—the first firefighting robot to enter service in the US. The Thermite RS3 is a hefty 3,500-pound machine that looks like something from Command & Conquer. The 36-hp diesel engine can push this mini-tank around at eight mph, and it's able to ascend slopes as steep as 70 degrees.

The robot's primary function of putting out fires is achieved using a hose that stretches 300 feet horizontally (150 feet vertically) and a cannon-like nozzle capable of blasting 2,500 gallons of water per minute. The RS3 also features a plow blade on the front for clearing obstacles—it's powerful enough to move a car—and there's a 5,000-pound winch that can tow up to 1,750 pounds.



The Los Angeles Fire Department is now using the RS3 to put out fires.

----------------------------------

Sam's Club to Put Robot Floor Scrubbers In Every Store By Fall
https://www.braincorp.com/newsroom/brain-corp-expands-commercial-relationship-with-sams-club-to-power-in-club-autonomous-robots-and-connected-data-services

Robot janitors are already at Walmart, so they are now making their way to Sam's Club.

According to a press release by Brain Corp, which is the company making the robot floor scrubbers, Sam's Club will put 372 of them into its stores by this fall.

In 2018, Walmart placed the Auto-C – Autonomous Cleaner into 78 Walmart stores.

Walmart, which owns Sam's, announced last year it would bring autonomous floor scrubbers to more than 1,800 of its stores by next February, CNN reported.

With software upgrades it can also do inventory.

------------------------------------------
« Last Edit: October 24, 2020, 02:17:14 AM by vox_mundi »
“There are three classes of people: those who see. Those who see when they are shown. Those who do not see.” ― Leonardo da Vinci

Insensible before the wave so soon released by callous fate. Affected most, they understand the least, and understanding, when it comes, invariably arrives too late