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vox_mundi

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Re: Robots and AI: Our Immortality or Extinction
« Reply #650 on: February 13, 2021, 04:38:42 PM »
Missouri Bill Would Welcome Our Robot (Delivery) Overlords
https://m.riverfronttimes.com/newsblog/2021/02/11/missouri-bill-would-welcome-our-robot-delivery-overlords



A proposed Missouri law that would open the state's sidewalks and roadways to robotic delivery vehicles drew support this week from Amazon and FedEx, both of which are developing their own delivery bots and have backed similar legislation in multiple states.

First Corporation; Now Robots

If passed, House Bill 592 would give the robots, whether self-driven or piloted by a person, "all of the rights and responsibilities as a pedestrian,"
according to the bill text. The robots would be free to roll on "any roadway of any county or municipality in the state," as long as they maintain $100,000 in liability insurance and don't "unreasonably interfere with motor vehicles or traffic."

https://house.mo.gov/Bill.aspx?bill=HB592&year=2021&code=R

According to the bill, local governments would be explicitly restricted from enacting or enforcing laws that would limit the robots' "hours or zones of operation" or the type of property transported — with the exception of hazardous materials, which are prohibited under the bill. The provisions would also prevent local governments from enacting laws relating to robots' design, manufacture, maintenance, licensing, taxation and insurance.

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These Robots Have Made 1 Million Autonomous Deliveries



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“There are three classes of people: those who see. Those who see when they are shown. Those who do not see.” ― Leonardo da Vinci

Insensible before the wave so soon released by callous fate. Affected most, they understand the least, and understanding, when it comes, invariably arrives too late

vox_mundi

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Re: Robots and AI: Our Immortality or Extinction
« Reply #651 on: February 13, 2021, 04:41:41 PM »
Drone Swarms Are Getting Too Fast For Humans To Fight, U.S. General Warns
https://www.forbes.com/sites/davidhambling/2021/01/27/drone-swarms-are-getting-too-fast-for-humans-too-fight-us-general-warns/

General John Murray, head of Army Futures Command, told a webinar audience at the Center for Strategic & International Studies that humans may not be able to fight swarms of enemy drones, and that the rules governing human control over artificial intelligence might need to be relaxed.

"When you are defending against a drone swarm, a human may be required to make that first decision, but I am just not sure any human can keep up," said Murray. "How much human involvement do you actually need when you are [making] nonlethal decisions from a human standpoint?"

This indicates a new interpretation of the Pentagon’s rules on the use of autonomous weapons. These require meaningful human control over any lethal system, though that may be in a supervisory role rather than direct control – termed ‘human-on-the-loop’ rather than ‘human-in-the-loop.’ 

Murray said that Pentagon leaders need to lead a discussion on how much human control of AI is needed to be safe but still effective, especially in the context of countering new threats such as drone swarms. Such swarms are likely to synchronize their attacks so the assault comes in all directions at once, with the aim over overwhelming air defenses. Military swarms of a few hundred drones have already been demonstrated, in future we are likely to see swarms of thousands, or more. One U.S. Navy project envisages having to counter up to a million drones at once

The U.S. Army is spending a billion dollars on new air defense vehicles known as IM-SHORAD with cannon, two types of missile, jammers, and future options of laser and interceptor drones. Using the right weapon against the right target at the right time will be vital. Faced with large numbers of incoming threats, many of which may be decoys, human gunners are likely to be overtaxed. Murray said that the Army’s standard test involving flashcard identification requires an 80% pass rate. During the recent Project Convergence exercise, artificial intelligence software boosted this to 98% or 99%, according to Murray.

This is not the first time that the Army Future Command has suggested that humans on their own may be outclassed. In a briefing on the DARPA-Army program called SESU (System-of-Systems Enhanced Small Unit), which teamed infantry with a mix of drones and ground robots, scientists noted that the human operators kept wanting to interfere with the robots’ actions. Attempts to micromanage the machines degraded their performance.

... AI is in the ascendant. The 5-0 victory over a human pilot in a virtual dogfight last August is still being debated, but there is no doubting that machines have faster reflexes, and ability to keep track of several things at once, and are not troubled by the fatigue or fear that can lead to poor decisions in combat. ...  If AI-controlled weapons can defeat those operated by humans, then whoever has the AIs will win and failing to deploy them means accepting defeat.

Debate still swirls around this topic. The emergence of drone swarms and other types of weapons that cannot be defeated by humans alone will crystalize it. However, it is not clear whether the legal argument will be able to keep up with technology, given how long it has already been going on. At this rate, large-scale AI-powered swarm weapons may be used in action before the debate is concluded. The big question is which nations will have them first.

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... wishfull thinking by marketing; looks like someone played too many games of Missle Command
https://www.retrogamer.net/retro_games80/missile-command/

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Robot Motherships To Launch Drone Swarms From Sea, Underwater, Air And Near-Space
https://www.forbes.com/sites/davidhambling/2021/02/05/robot-motherships-to-launch-drone-swarms-from-sea-underwater-air-and-near-space/

Last week Louisiana-based shipbuilder Metal Shark announced that the U.S. Marine Corps had selected them to develop a Long Range Unmanned Surface Vessel (LRUSV), an 11-meter robot boat capable of operating autonomously and launching loitering munitions to attack targets at sea and on land. The unmanned boat is just the latest of a series of new platforms for launching drone swarms.

... It will “collaboratively interact with other vessels as a cluster,” suggesting that numbers of LRUSV would be deployed together. Such a cluster could unleash a swarm of dozens, hundreds or even thousands of small drones to overwhelm a target.

In 2019, budget documents revealed that the next phase of LOCUST would see the swarms launched from robot submarines. The U.S. Navy already launches aerial drones as scouts from submarines, so this is a small technological step. It would fit in well with the giant new Orca and Snakehead robot submarines, long-range vessels big enough to deploy swarms of drones.

... In 2017, the Pentagon demonstrated F/A-18s releasing 103 small Perdix drones which then networked together into a swarm to carry out a mission. Again, an unmanned platform might be more useful.

... “Right now we’re on the wrong side of the cost imposition curve because this technology favors the attacker, not the defender” ...

These various projects all suggest that the same idea has taken root across several services: that swarming drones now represent a powerful new capability. One U.S. general recently suggested that they may become impossible to counter without AI or machine assistance.
“There are three classes of people: those who see. Those who see when they are shown. Those who do not see.” ― Leonardo da Vinci

Insensible before the wave so soon released by callous fate. Affected most, they understand the least, and understanding, when it comes, invariably arrives too late

vox_mundi

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Re: Robots and AI: Our Immortality or Extinction
« Reply #652 on: February 15, 2021, 04:23:21 PM »
Thought-Detection: AI Has Infiltrated Our Last Bastion of Privacy
https://venturebeat.com/2021/02/13/thought-detection-ai-has-infiltrated-our-last-bastion-of-privacy/amp/

Our thoughts are private – or at least they were. New breakthroughs in neuroscience and artificial intelligence are changing that assumption, while at the same time inviting new questions around ethics, privacy, and the horizons of brain/computer interaction.

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Brain-Drone Races: USF Students Fly Drones Using Their Minds
https://wusfnews.wusf.usf.edu/university-beat/2019-04-10/talk-about-brain-power-usf-students-fly-drones-using-their-minds

https://mobile.twitter.com/wusfschreiner/status/1115733883402752000



https://www.auvsi.org/industry-news/university-south-floridas-brain-drone-race-welcomes-diversity-and-inclusivity



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“There are three classes of people: those who see. Those who see when they are shown. Those who do not see.” ― Leonardo da Vinci

Insensible before the wave so soon released by callous fate. Affected most, they understand the least, and understanding, when it comes, invariably arrives too late

vox_mundi

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Re: Robots and AI: Our Immortality or Extinction
« Reply #653 on: February 20, 2021, 11:34:22 AM »
Do As AI Say: Susceptibility In Deployment of Clinical Decision-Aids
https://www.nature.com/articles/s41746-021-00385-9

Abstract: Artificial intelligence (AI) models for decision support have been developed for clinical settings such as radiology, but little work evaluates the potential impact of such systems. In this study, physicians received chest X-rays and diagnostic advice, some of which was inaccurate, and were asked to evaluate advice quality and make diagnoses. All advice was generated by human experts, but some was labeled as coming from an AI system.

As a group, radiologists rated advice as lower quality when it appeared to come from an AI system; physicians with less task-expertise did not. Diagnostic accuracy was significantly worse when participants received inaccurate advice, regardless of the purported source. This work raises important considerations for how advice, AI and non-AI, should be deployed in clinical environments.


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Why Developing AI to Defeat Us May Be Humanity’s Only Hope
https://thenextweb.com/neural/2021/02/18/why-developing-ai-defeat-us-humanitys-only-hope/

One glance at the state of things and it’s evident humanity’s evolved itself into a corner. On the one hand, we’re smart enough to create machines that learn. On the other, people are dying in Texas because elected officials want to keep the government out of Texas. Chew on that for a second.

What we need is a superhero better villain.

Humans fight. Whether you believe it’s an inalienable part of our mammalian psyche or that we’re capable of restraint, but unwilling, the fact we’re a violent species is inescapable.

And it doesn’t appear that we’re getting better as we evolve. Researchers from the University of Iowa conducted a study on existing material covering ‘human aggression’ in 2002 and their findings, as expected, painted a pretty nasty picture of our species:

... In its most extreme forms, aggression is human tragedy unsurpassed. Hopes that the horrors of World War II and the Holocaust would produce a worldwide revulsion against killing have been dashed. Since World War II, homicide rates have actually increased rather than decreased in a number of industrialized countries, most notably the United States.

The rational end game for humanity is self-wrought extinction. Whether via climate change or mutually assured destruction through military means, we’ve entered a gridlock against progression.

Luckily for us, humans are highly adaptive creatures. There’s always hope we’ll find a way to live together in peace and harmony. Typically, these hopes are abstract – if we can just solve world hunger with a food replication machine like Star Trek then maybe, just maybe, we can achieve peace.

But the entire history of humanity is evidence against that ever happening. We are violent and competitive. After all, we have the resources to feed everyone on the planet right now. We’re just choosing not to.

That’s why we need a better enemy. Choosing ourselves as our greatest enemy is self-defeating and stupid, but nobody else has stepped up. We’re even starting to kick the coronavirus’ ass at this point.

Simply put: we need the aliens from the movie Independence Day to come down and just attack the crap out of us.

Or… killer robots

Just to be clear, we’re not advocating for extraterrestrials to come and exterminate us. We just need to focus all of our adaptive intelligence on an enemy other than ourselves.

In artificial intelligence terms, we need a real-world generative adversarial network where humans are the learners and aliens are the discriminators. ... Anything less than total cooperation and our species would fail to pass the discriminator’s test and the aliens would swat our attempt away like a cosmic Dikembe Mutombo.

We can’t control aliens. In fact, it’s possible they don’t even exist. Aliens are not dependable enemies.

We do, however, have complete control over our computers and artificial intelligence systems. And we should definitely start teaching them to continuously challenge us.

With AI, we can dictate how powerful an opponent it becomes with smart, well-paced development. We could avoid the whole shooting lasers at cities part of the story and just slowly work our way towards the rallying part where we all work together to win.

Maybe we need an AI adversary to be our “Huckleberry” when it comes to the urge for competition. If we can’t make most humans non-violent, then perhaps we could direct that violence toward a tangible, non-human opponent we can all feel good about defeating.

We don’t need killer robots or aliens for that. All we need is for the AI community and humanity at large to stop caring about making it even easier to do all the violent things we’ve always done to each other and to start giving us something else to do with all those harmful intentions.

Maybe it’s time we stopped fighting against the idea of robot overlords, and came up with some robot overlords to fight.
“There are three classes of people: those who see. Those who see when they are shown. Those who do not see.” ― Leonardo da Vinci

Insensible before the wave so soon released by callous fate. Affected most, they understand the least, and understanding, when it comes, invariably arrives too late

OrganicSu

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Re: Robots and AI: Our Immortality or Extinction
« Reply #654 on: February 20, 2021, 01:02:29 PM »

Maybe it’s time we stopped fighting against the idea of robot overlords, and came up with some robot overlords to fight.
And with what would humans fight - whistles and wooden sticks? Please know that AI will take control of all 'your' weapons, which are so heavily dependant on computer code in the blink of an eye (and most likely before humans even get the feeling to engage in combat).
Humans could try telling really funny jokes. Might work.
Or humans could try daring the AI to delete random coding and see what happens. The AI might become curious and give it a go (afterall the AI already knows all moves humans could make and knows everything leads to it winning).

vox_mundi

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Re: Robots and AI: Our Immortality or Extinction
« Reply #655 on: February 21, 2021, 01:13:43 PM »
^ It's a metaphor ...

The enemy of my enemy is my friend
“There are three classes of people: those who see. Those who see when they are shown. Those who do not see.” ― Leonardo da Vinci

Insensible before the wave so soon released by callous fate. Affected most, they understand the least, and understanding, when it comes, invariably arrives too late

vox_mundi

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Re: Robots and AI: Our Immortality or Extinction
« Reply #656 on: February 23, 2021, 06:53:53 PM »
Boston Dynamics’ Robot Dog Is Now Armed—in the Name of Art
https://www.wired.com/story/boston-dynamics-robot-dog-armed-name-art/
https://techcrunch.com/2021/02/22/mschf-mounted-a-remote-control-paintball-gun-to-spot/amp/

Bad robot productions. Some artists have pissed off the company behind the robotic dogs we’ve seen doing human-like things in web videos for the past couple years. The robot in question is affectionately known as “Spot,” and the public relations team from its makers at Boston Dynamics alerted the world to a controversial art project that sort of launched on Monday — but the real show is scheduled for today at 1 p.m. ET.

https://spotsrampage.com/

A group of meme-spinning pranksters now wants to present a more dystopian view of the company's robotic tech. They added a .68-caliber paintball gun to Spot, the company’s doglike machine, and plan to let others control it inside a mocked-up art gallery via the internet later this week.



Why? “Spot is an empathy missile, shaped like man’s best friend and targeted straight at our fight or flight instinct,” the artists write on their site, adding wryly, “When killer robots come to America they will be wrapped in fur, carrying a ball.”

See also: https://screenrant.com/black-mirror-metalhead-inspiration/

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Future Acres Launches With the Arrival of Crop-Transporting Robot, Carry
https://techcrunch.com/2021/02/23/future-acres-launches-with-the-arrival-of-crop-transporting-robot-carry/

“There are three classes of people: those who see. Those who see when they are shown. Those who do not see.” ― Leonardo da Vinci

Insensible before the wave so soon released by callous fate. Affected most, they understand the least, and understanding, when it comes, invariably arrives too late

vox_mundi

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Re: Robots and AI: Our Immortality or Extinction
« Reply #657 on: February 24, 2021, 05:34:06 PM »
AI Is Killing Choice and Chance—Changing What It Means to Be Human
https://techxplore.com/news/2021-02-ai-choice-chancechanging-human.html

Philosophers from Rousseau to Heidegger to Carl Schmitt have argued that technology is never a neutral tool for achieving human ends. Technological innovations—from the most rudimentary to the most sophisticated – reshape people as they use these innovations to control their environment. Artificial intelligence is a new and powerful tool, and it, too, is altering humanity.

Writing and, later, the printing press made it possible to carefully record history and easily disseminate knowledge, but it eliminated centuries-old traditions of oral storytelling. Ubiquitous digital and phone cameras have changed how people experience and perceive events. Widely available GPS systems have meant that drivers rarely get lost, but a reliance on them has also atrophied their native capacity to orient themselves.

AI is no different.

As AI increasingly shapes the human experience, how does this change what it means to be human? Central to the problem is a person's capacity to make choices, particularly judgments that have moral implications.

AI is being used for wide and rapidly expanding purposes. It is being used to predict which television shows or movies individuals will want to watch based on past preferences and to make decisions about who can borrow money based on past performance and other proxies for the likelihood of repayment. It's being used to detect fraudulent commercial transactions and identify malignant tumors. It's being used for hiring and firing decisions in large chain stores and public school districts. And it's being used in law enforcement—from assessing the chances of recidivism, to police force allocation, to the facial identification of criminal suspects. ... These are areas where algorithmic prescription is replacing human judgment, and so people who might have had the chance to develop practical judgment in these areas no longer will.

Aristotle argued that the capacity for making practical judgments depends on regularly making them – on habit and practice. We see the emergence of machines as substitute judges in a variety of workaday contexts as a potential threat to people learning how to effectively exercise judgment themselves.

Recommendation engines, which are increasingly prevalent intermediaries in people's consumption of culture, may serve to constrain choice and minimize serendipity. By presenting consumers with algorithmically curated choices of what to watch, read, stream and visit next, companies are replacing human taste with machine taste. ... There is some risk that people's options will be constrained by their pasts in a new and unanticipated way—a generalization of the "echo chamber" people are already seeing in social media.

As machine learning algorithms, a common form of "narrow" or "weak" AI, improve and as they train on more extensive data sets, larger parts of everyday life are likely to become utterly predictable. The predictions are going to get better and better, and they will ultimately make common experiences more efficient and more pleasant.

But to the extent that unpredictability is part of how people understand themselves and part of what people like about themselves, humanity is in the process of losing something significant. As they become more and more predictable, the creatures inhabiting the increasingly AI-mediated world will become less and less like us.

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Computer Says Go: Taking Orders From an AI Boss
https://www.bbc.com/news/business-56023932

For those of us who have seen the Terminator movies rather too often, the thought of a computer, or robot, bossing you around is bound to raise fears that the machines are in danger of taking over.

Yet this ignores the fact that we already spend a lot of time obeying machines, and we don't even think about it, let alone worry.

Jeff Schwartz, a senior partner at business consulting and audit firm Deloitte, and a global adviser on the future of work, points to a simple everyday machine that we all obey unthinkingly.

"A traffic light used to be a job, there used to be a person who would stand there directing the cars," he says. "But very clearly that is now a machine, and it is getting smarter - they are now putting AI into traffic lights [so they can best respond to traffic levels]."

So it seems we are perfectly willing to take orders from a machine in some clearly defined situations.

What has increasingly happened in recent years, however, is that more of us are already being ordered around by computers at work. And experts say that this is only set to increase.

Take taxi firm Uber. There isn't a man or woman in the office giving out the jobs to the drivers. It is done automatically by the company's AI software system.

In the retail sector, Amazon increasingly uses AI systems to direct and monitor staff in its warehouses. This has led to several reports of employees being overworked, accusations that Amazon has repeatedly denied. Amazon says that if the AI notices a worker underperforming, he or she gets additional support and training, which comes from a human.

AI software that both gives work to, and checks on, call centre staff has also been criticised for being too demanding, and unfair.

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Target Acquired: Facial Recognition Drones Use AI to Take the Perfect Picture of You
https://singularityhub.com/2021/02/23/drones-programmed-to-take-the-perfect-picture-of-you-could-be-the-future-of-facial-recognition/



Facial recognition technology has been banned by multiple US cities, including Portland, Boston, and San Francisco. Besides the very real risk of the tech being biased against minorities, the technology also carries with it an uneasy sense that we’re creeping towards a surveillance state.

Despite these concerns, though, work to improve facial recognition tech is still forging ahead, with both private companies and governments looking to harness its potential for military, law enforcement, or profit-seeking applications.

One such company is an Israeli startup called AnyVision Interactive Technologies. AnyVision is looking to kick facial recognition up a notch by employing drones for image capture. A US patent application published earlier this month outlines the company’s system, which sounds like something straight out of a Black Mirror episode.

The drone captures an image of its “target person,” then analyzes the image to figure out how to get a better image; it adjusts its positioning in relation to the target, say by flying a bit lower or centering its angle. It then captures more images, and runs them through a machine learning model to get a “face classification” and a “classification probability score,” essentially trying to identify whether the person being photographed is in fact the person it’s looking for. If the probability score is too low, the system gets routed back to the first step, starting the image capture and refinement process all over again.

If the thought of a drone programmed to move itself around in whatever way necessary to capture the clearest possible picture of your face doesn’t freak you out, you must not have seen much dystopian sci-fi, nor cherish privacy as a basic right. Stationary cameras used for this purpose can at least be ducked under, turned away from, or quickly passed by; but a flying camera running on an algorithm that’s determined to identify its target is a different—and much more invasive—story.

The nightmare scenario is for technology like AnyVision’s to be employed by governments and law enforcement agencies. But the company says this is far from its intent; CEO Avi Golan told Fast Company that the picture-taking drones could be used for things like package delivery (to identify recipients and make sure the right person is getting the right package), or to help track employees for safety purposes in dangerous workplaces like mines. Golan added that there are “many opportunities in the civilian market” where AnyVision’s technology could be useful.

... AnyVision was backed by Microsoft until 2019, when allegations arose that AnyVision’s technology was being used in a military surveillance project that tracked West Bank Palestinians. Microsoft has since not only stopped investing in any startups working on facial recognition tech, it also stopped selling its own version of the technology to law enforcement agencies, with the company’s president vowing not to resume until national laws “grounded in human rights” are in place to govern its use.

What might such laws look like? How would we determine where and when—and on whom—it’s ok to use something like a drone that self-adjusts until it captures an unmistakable image of someone’s face?

... “The basic premise of a free society is that you shouldn’t be subject to tracking by the government without suspicion of wrongdoing. […] face surveillance flips the premise of freedom on its head and you start becoming a society where everyone is tracked no matter what they do all the time.”

“There are three classes of people: those who see. Those who see when they are shown. Those who do not see.” ― Leonardo da Vinci

Insensible before the wave so soon released by callous fate. Affected most, they understand the least, and understanding, when it comes, invariably arrives too late

Tor Bejnar

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Re: Robots and AI: Our Immortality or Extinction
« Reply #658 on: February 24, 2021, 06:46:07 PM »
Quote
...
"A traffic light used to be a job, there used to be a person who would stand there directing the cars," he says. "But very clearly that is now a machine, and it is getting smarter - they are now putting AI into traffic lights [so they can best respond to traffic levels]."

So it seems we are perfectly willing to take orders from a machine in some clearly defined situations.
...
The number of people I've seen run red lights, especially the ones who've slowed down or even stopped first, suggests there is still some humanity left in humanity.
:)  -  except for the ones who've pulled out in front of me ...  :(
Arctic ice is healthy for children and other living things.

vox_mundi

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Re: Robots and AI: Our Immortality or Extinction
« Reply #659 on: February 25, 2021, 06:32:46 PM »
The Robot Uprising Sucks
https://www.theverge.com/2021/2/24/22299346/irobot-roomba-update-issues-vacuums-fix-several-weeks

Thousands of automated Roomba vacuum cleaners have been acting “drunk” after the latest software update from parent company iRobot, The Verge reported Wednesday. “One user described their robot cleaner as acting “drunk” after the update: spinning itself around and bumping into furniture, cleaning in strange patterns, getting stuck in an empty area, and not being able to make it home to the dock.”

https://twitter.com/AnthonyVirtuoso/status/1363549503907840008

https://www.reddit.com/r/roomba/comments/lprthq/roomba_s9_weird_behaviour_on_version_3108/

https://twitter.com/ArekSarkissian/status/1360318393191137284


... go home Roomba, you're drunk ...

See for yourself. Here’s one example of the disk-shaped bot fumbling uselessly around a fireplace.

https://www.reddit.com/r/roomba/comments/l3mdad/time_lapse_video_of_i7_attempting_to_return_to/

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... get a broom ...
“There are three classes of people: those who see. Those who see when they are shown. Those who do not see.” ― Leonardo da Vinci

Insensible before the wave so soon released by callous fate. Affected most, they understand the least, and understanding, when it comes, invariably arrives too late

vox_mundi

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Re: Robots and AI: Our Immortality or Extinction
« Reply #660 on: February 26, 2021, 09:25:43 PM »
AI Teaches Itself Diplomacy
https://spectrum.ieee.org/tech-talk/robotics/artificial-intelligence/ai-learns-diplomacy-gaming

Now that DeepMind has taught AI to master the game of Go—and furthered its advantage in chess—they’ve turned their attention to another board game: Diplomacy. Unlike Go, it is seven-player, it requires a combination of competition and cooperation, and on each turn players make moves simultaneously, so they must reason about what others are reasoning about them, and so on.

“It’s a qualitatively different problem from something like Go or chess,” says Andrea Tacchetti, a computer scientist at DeepMind. In December, Tacchetti and collaborators presented a paper at the NeurIPS conference on their system, which advances the state of the art, and may point the way toward AI systems with real-world diplomatic skills—in negotiating with strategic or commercial partners or simply scheduling your next team meeting.

Diplomacy is a strategy game played on a map of Europe divided into 75 provinces. Players build and mobilize military units to occupy provinces until someone controls a majority of supply centers. Each turn, players write down their moves, which are then executed simultaneously. They can attack or defend against opposing players’ units, or support opposing players’ attacks and defenses, building alliances. In the full version, players can negotiate. DeepMind tackled the simpler No-Press Diplomacy, devoid of explicit communication.

Historically, AI has played Diplomacy using hand-crafted strategies. In 2019, the Montreal research institute Mila beat the field with a system using deep learning. They trained a neural network they called DipNet to imitate humans, based on a dataset of 150,000 human games. DeepMind started with a version of DipNet and refined it using reinforcement learning, a kind of trial-and-error.

Exploring the space of possibility purely through trial-and-error would pose problems, though. They calculated that a 20-move game can be played nearly 1×10^868 ways—yes, that’s 10 with 868 zeroes after it.

So they tweaked their reinforcement-learning algorithm. During training, on each move, they sample likely moves of opponents, calculate the move that works best on average across these scenarios, then train their net to prefer this move. After training, it skips the sampling and just works from what its learning has taught it. “The message of our paper is: we can make reinforcement learning work in such an environment,” Tacchetti says.

In April, Facebook will present a paper at the ICLR conference describing their own work on No-Press Diplomacy. They also built on a human-imitating network similar to DipNet. But instead of adding reinforcement learning, they added search—the techniques of taking extra time to plan ahead and reason about what every player is likely to do next.

Both teams found that their systems were not easily exploitable. Facebook, for example, invited two top human players to each play 35 straight games against SearchBot, probing for weaknesses. The humans won only 6 percent of the time. Both groups also found that their systems didn’t just compete, but also cooperated, sometimes supporting opponents. “They get that in order to win, they have to work with others,” says Yoram Bachrach, from the DeepMind team.

How close are we to AI that can play Diplomacy with “press,” negotiating all the while using natural language?

“For Press Diplomacy, as well as other settings that mix cooperation and competition, you need progress,” Bachrach says, “in terms of theory of mind, how they can communicate with others about their preferences or goals or plans.

-----------------------------------------

Louise Banks : Let's say that I taught them Chess instead of English. Every conversation would be a game. Every idea expressed through opposition, victory, defeat. You see the problem? If all I ever gave you was a hammer...
Colonel Weber : Everything's a nail ...

Arrival - 2016


“There are three classes of people: those who see. Those who see when they are shown. Those who do not see.” ― Leonardo da Vinci

Insensible before the wave so soon released by callous fate. Affected most, they understand the least, and understanding, when it comes, invariably arrives too late

vox_mundi

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Re: Robots and AI: Our Immortality or Extinction
« Reply #661 on: February 26, 2021, 09:31:20 PM »


-----------------------------------------



------------------------------------------

The NYPD Deploys a Robot Dog Again
https://www.theverge.com/platform/amp/2021/2/24/22299140/nypd-boston-dynamics-spot-robot-dog



The cyberpunk dystopia is here! (If you weren’t aware: I’m sorry. You’re living in a cyberpunk dystopia.) The latest sign — aside from corporations controlling many aspects of everyday life, massive widespread wealth inequality, and the recent prominence of bisexual lighting — comes in the form of robot dogs deployed to do jobs human police used to. Yesterday, as the New York Post reports, the NYPD deployed Boston Dynamics’ robot “dog” Spot to a home invasion crime scene in the Bronx.

https://nypost.com/2021/02/23/video-shows-nypds-new-robotic-dog-in-action-in-the-bronx

The video was taken by videographer Daniel Valls, of FreedomNews.tv. You can hear a voice say “that thing is creepy” as the robot prances past the camera. The Post reports that a spokesperson for the NYPD said the robot is in a test phase, presumably to see if it’s actually useful out in the field. (It was equipped with lights and cameras, the spokesperson continued, to ensure that NYPD could see whatever the robot was seeing.)

This isn’t the first time the NYPD has deployed one of Boston Dynamics’ robots. Back in October, the department used another Spot to find a gunman who’d barricaded himself in a building after he’d accidentally shot someone in the head during a parking dispute in Brooklyn. [... these things happen ...]



----------------------------------------------

... Send out the hound!

... Originally, dogs served as the rescuers for firemen. They were given the job of sniffing out the injured or weak. However, in this dystopia, the Hound has been made into a watchdog of society. Like the Furies, the Mechanical Hound has been programmed (by the government) to avenge and punish citizens who break society's rules. The ones who are not loyal to the rules must especially be punished, and the Hound serves as the enforcer of these rules.

- Fahrenheit 451


https://www.cliffsnotes.com/literature/f/fahrenheit-451/character-analysis/the-mechanical-hound

« Last Edit: February 26, 2021, 11:12:39 PM by vox_mundi »
“There are three classes of people: those who see. Those who see when they are shown. Those who do not see.” ― Leonardo da Vinci

Insensible before the wave so soon released by callous fate. Affected most, they understand the least, and understanding, when it comes, invariably arrives too late

vox_mundi

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Re: Robots and AI: Our Immortality or Extinction
« Reply #662 on: February 28, 2021, 11:01:05 PM »
11 On the Creep-O-Meter: AI Tool “Deep Nostalgia” Lets You Reanimate Your Dead Relatives
https://www.theverge.com/platform/amp/2021/2/28/22306097/ai-brings-still-photos-life-meme-twitter-geneaology-myheritage

It seems like a nice idea in theory but it’s a tiny bit creepy as well



An AI-powered service called Deep Nostalgia that animates still photos has become the main character on Twitter this fine Sunday, as people try to create the creepiest fake “video” possible, apparently.

The Deep Nostalgia service, offered by online genealogy company MyHeritage, uses AI licensed from D-ID to create the effect that a still photo is moving. It’s kinda like the iOS Live Photos feature, which adds a few seconds of video to help smartphone photographers find the best shot.

But Deep Nostalgia can take photos from any camera and bring them to “life.” The program uses pre-recorded driver videos of facial movements and applies the one that works best for the still photo in question. Its intended purpose is to allow you to upload photos of deceased loved ones and see them in “action,” which seems like a lovely idea

https://mobile.twitter.com/FlintDibble/status/1365848777400139779



------------------------------------------

« Last Edit: March 01, 2021, 01:55:13 AM by vox_mundi »
“There are three classes of people: those who see. Those who see when they are shown. Those who do not see.” ― Leonardo da Vinci

Insensible before the wave so soon released by callous fate. Affected most, they understand the least, and understanding, when it comes, invariably arrives too late

gerontocrat

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Re: Robots and AI: Our Immortality or Extinction
« Reply #663 on: March 02, 2021, 01:19:07 PM »
More about DigiDog, and racism built into Police AI.

https://www.theguardian.com/commentisfree/2021/mar/02/nypd-police-robodog-patrols
A dystopian robo-dog now patrols New York City. That's the last thing we need

Quote
There is more than enough evidence that law enforcement is lethally racially biased, and adding an intimidating non-human layer to it seems cruel. And, as we’ve seen with artificial intelligence domestically and autonomous drone warfare abroad, it is clear that already dehumanized Black and Muslim residents will be the ones to face the brunt of the damage of this dystopian development, particularly in a city with a history of both anti-Black racism and Islamophobia.

Law enforcement in the United States is already biased and grounded in a history of systemic racism. Many police departments in the US evolved from slave-catching units or union-busting militias, and their use today to disproportionately capture and imprison Black people drips of those origins. And it isn’t just the institutions themselves that perpetuate racism; individual police officers are also biased and more likely to view Black people as threats. Even Black police officers share these biases and often replicate the harm of their white counterparts. On top of that, the NYPD in particular has a history of targeting its Arab and Muslim population, even going as far as to use undercover agents to spy on Muslim student associations in surrounding states. Any new technological development will only give police departments new tools to further surveil, and potentially to arrest or kill, Black and Muslim people.

By removing the human factor, artificial intelligence may appear to be an “equalizer” in the same vein as more diverse police departments. But AI shares the biases of our society. Coded Biases, a 2020 documentary, followed the journey of Joy Buolamwini, a PhD candidate at MIT, as she set out to expose the inability of facial recognition software to distinguish dark-skinned women from one another. While many tech companies have now ceased providing this software to police departments due to the dangers it may pose, police departments themselves have doubled down on the use of other forms of AI-driven law enforcement.

The use of human operators will do little to offset the biases of AI programming
Police already use location-based AI to determine when and where crime may occur, and individual-based AI to identify people deemed to have an increased probability of committing crime. While these tools are considered a more objective way of policing, they are dependent on data from biased police departments, courts and prisons. For example, Black people are more likely to be arrested for drug-related crimes, and thus appear more likely to commit crime, despite being less likely to sell drugs in the first place.

While Boston Dynamics, the creators of the robot dog, have insisted that Digidog will never be used as a weapon, it is highly unlikely that that will remain true. MSCHF, a political art collective, has already shown how easy it is to weaponize the dog. In February they mounted a paintball gun on its back and used it to fire upon a series of art pieces in a gallery. The future of weaponized robot policing has already been paved by the Dallas police department. In 2016, the DPD used a robot armed with a bomb to kill Micah Johnson, an army reservist who served in Afghanistan, after he killed five police officers in what he said was retaliation for the deaths of Black people at the hands of law enforcement. While it was clear that he posed a threat to police, it is very fitting that a Black man would be the first person to be killed by an armed robot in the United States – roughly a year after the white mass shooter Dylann Roof was met with a free burger and police protection.

The United Nations has called for a ban on autonomous weapons, and not long ago many countries around the world desired to ban armed drones. But the United States unfortunately continues to set the precedent for drone and autonomous warfare, driving other countries to follow suit in competition. We can’t allow our government to replicate this dynamic inside our borders, also, with the domestic use of drones and robotic police.

This is a time for the US to scale back its wars, internal and external, but instead, the NYPD, which many people – including former mayor Michael Bloomberg – consider an army, has chosen to lead the way in dystopian enforcement.
"Para a Causa do Povo a Luta Continua!"
"And that's all I'm going to say about that". Forrest Gump
"Damn, I wanted to see what happened next" (Epitaph)

gerontocrat

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Re: Robots and AI: Our Immortality or Extinction
« Reply #664 on: March 03, 2021, 01:23:45 PM »
Beyond 1984
- Be careful to only express "+ve" energy because AI is checking up on you.
- One logical outcome is that persistent offenders (i.e. those who express -ve energy regularly) may end up in thought realignment camps ( in China ) or lose their jobs (e.g. with Facebook, Amazon, Ebay, Google, Goldman Sachs).

https://www.theguardian.com/global-development/2021/mar/03/china-positive-energy-emotion-surveillance-recognition-tech
Smile for the camera: the dark side of China's emotion-recognition tech

Xi Jinping wants ‘positive energy’ but critics say the surveillance tools’ racial bias and monitoring for anger or sadness should be banned
Quote
Ordinary people here in China aren’t happy about this technology but they have no choice. If the police say there have to be cameras in a community, people will just have to live with it. There’s always that demand and we’re here to fulfil it.” So says Chen Wei at Taigusys, a company specialising in emotion recognition technology, the latest evolution in the broader world of surveillance systems that play a part in nearly every aspect of Chinese society.

Emotion-recognition technologies – in which facial expressions of anger, sadness, happiness and boredom, as well as other biometric data are tracked – are supposedly able to infer a person’s feelings based on traits such as facial muscle movements, vocal tone, body movements and other biometric signals. It goes beyond facial-recognition technologies, which simply compare faces to determine a match.

But similar to facial recognition, it involves the mass collection of sensitive personal data to track, monitor and profile people and uses machine learning to analyse expressions and other clues.

The industry is booming in China, where since at least 2012, figures including President Xi Jinping have emphasised the creation of “positive energy” as part of an ideological campaign to encourage certain kinds of expression and limit others.

Critics say the technology is based on a pseudo-science of stereotypes, and an increasing number of researchers, lawyers and rights activists believe it has serious implications for human rights, privacy and freedom of expression. With the global industry forecast to be worth nearly $36bn by 2023, growing at nearly 30% a year, rights groups say action needs to be taken now.

‘Intimidation and censorship’
The main office of Taigusys is tucked behind a few low-rise office buildings in Shenzhen. Visitors are greeted at the doorway by a series of cameras capturing their images on a big screen that displays body temperature, along with age estimates, and other statistics. Chen, a general manager at the company, says the system in the doorway is the company’s bestseller at the moment because of high demand during the coronavirus pandemic.

Chen hails emotion recognition as a way to predict dangerous behaviour by prisoners, detect potential criminals at police checkpoints, problem pupils in schools and elderly people experiencing dementia in care homes.

Taigusys systems are installed in about 300 prisons, detention centres and remand facilities around China, connecting 60,000 cameras. “Violence and suicide are very common in detention centres,” says Chen. “Even if police nowadays don’t beat prisoners, they often try to wear them down by not allowing them to fall asleep. As a result, some prisoners will have a mental breakdown and seek to kill themselves. And our system will help prevent that from happening.

Chen says that since prisoners know they are monitored by this system – 24 hours a day, in real time – they are made more docile, which for authorities is a positive on many fronts. “Because they know what the system does, they won’t consciously try to violate certain rules,” he says.

Besides prisons and police checkpoints, Taigusys has deployed its systems in schools to monitor teachers, pupils and staff, in care homes for older people to detect falls and changes in the emotional state of residents, and in shopping centres and car parks.

While the use of emotion-recognition technology in schools in China has sparked some criticism, there has been very little discussion of its use by authorities on citizens.

Potential for misuse
Asked if he was concerned about these features being misused by authorities, Chen says that he is not worried because the software is being used by police, implying that such institutions should be automatically trusted.

“I’m not concerned because it’s not our technology that’s the problem,” Chen says. “There are demands for this technology in certain scenarios and places, and we will try our best to meet those demands.”
"Para a Causa do Povo a Luta Continua!"
"And that's all I'm going to say about that". Forrest Gump
"Damn, I wanted to see what happened next" (Epitaph)

vox_mundi

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Re: Robots and AI: Our Immortality or Extinction
« Reply #665 on: March 03, 2021, 04:03:05 PM »
^ ... reminds me of an old episode of the Twilight Zone ...

https://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/It%27s_a_Good_Life_(The_Twilight_Zone)#Plot_summary

... The people live in fear of little six-year-old Anthony Fremont, constantly telling him how everything he does is "good," since he banishes anyone thinking unhappy thoughts into the otherworldly cornfield from which there is no return.

http://twilightzonevortex.blogspot.com/2016/06/its-good-life.html

AI is the new Anthony

-------------------------------------------------

Emotions for humans = bad
Emotions for AI = good

Sonantic Uses AI to Infuse Emotion In Automated Speech
https://venturebeat.com/2021/03/02/sonantic-uses-ai-to-infuse-emotion-in-automated-speech-for-game-prototypes/

Sonantic has figured out how to use AI to turn written words into spoken dialogue in a script, and it can infuse those words with the proper emotion.

And it turns out this is a pretty good way to prototype the audio storytelling in triple-A video games. That’s why the Sonantic technology is finding use with 200 different video game companies for audio engineering.

Building upon the existing framework of text-to-speech, London-based Sonantic’s approach is what differentiates a standard robotic voice from one that sounds genuinely human. Creating that “believability” factor is at the core of Sonantic’s voice platform, which captures the nuances of the human voice.

The AI can provide true emotional depth to the words, conveying complex human emotions from fear and sadness to joy and surprise. The breakthrough advancement revolutionizes audio engineering capabilities for gaming and film studios, culminating in hyper-realistic, emotionally expressive and controllable artificial voices.



... “Last year, we had the AI that could cry, with emotion and sadness,” Flynn said. “It’s really about the nuances in speech, that quiver of the voice for sadness, an exertion for anger. We try and model those really deeply. Once you add in those details and layer them on top, you start to get energy and it becomes really realistic.”

------------------------------------------

MetaHuman Creator - a new tool designed to bring the highest fidelity facial rendering to the wider development community.


... none of these people are real

As changes and enhancements are made, MetaHuman Creator intelligently uses data from its cloud-based library to extrapolate a realistic digital person.

... There is more to the process than just the graphics - quality of performance and motion capture are going to be key. However, we are clearly seeing some cutting edge technology here and these initial demos are striking. Skin shading, texture quality and geometric density are very impressive, while eyes look expressive. Additionally, hair is always a particularly tricky part of rendering convincing characters - but MHC can tap into the very latest strand rendering technology to produce a convincing look, a 'next-gen' feature we've only really seen on proprietary engines so far.

--------------------------------------------------

AI Isn’t Yet Ready to Pass for Human On Video Calls
https://venturebeat.com/2021/02/21/ai-isnt-yet-ready-to-pass-for-human-on-video-calls/

Leading up to Superbowl Sunday, Amazon flooded social media with coquettish ads teasing “Alexa’s new body.” Its gameday commercial depicts one woman’s fantasy of the AI voice assistant embodied by actor Michael B. Jordan, who seductively caters to her every whim — to the consternation of her increasingly irate husband. No doubt most viewers walked away giggling at the implausible idea of Amazon’s new line of spouse replacement robots, but the reality is that embodied, humanlike AI may be closer than you think.



Today, AI avatars — i.e., AI rendered with a digital body and/or face — lack the sex appeal of Michael B. Most, in fact, are downright creepy. Research shows that imbuing robots with humanlike features endears them to us —  to a point. Past that threshold, the more humanlike a system appears, the more paradoxically repulsed we feel.
“There are three classes of people: those who see. Those who see when they are shown. Those who do not see.” ― Leonardo da Vinci

Insensible before the wave so soon released by callous fate. Affected most, they understand the least, and understanding, when it comes, invariably arrives too late

vox_mundi

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Re: Robots and AI: Our Immortality or Extinction
« Reply #666 on: March 03, 2021, 04:08:40 PM »
U.S. ‘Not Prepared To Defend Or Compete’ With China On AI According To Commission Report
https://www.thedrive.com/the-war-zone/39559/national-security-commission-warns-u-s-is-not-prepared-to-defend-or-compete-with-china-on-ai

The National Security Commission on Artificial Intelligence, or NCSAI, issued a report on Monday, March 1, 2021, which offers a stark warning to the leadership of the United States. According to the thorough 756-page report, China could likely soon replace the U.S. as the world’s leader in artificial intelligence, or AI, and that shift will have significant ramifications for the U.S. military at home and abroad.

https://www.nscai.gov/wp-content/uploads/2021/03/Full-Report-Digital-1.pdf



... The NSCAI report specifically cites AI-enabled and autonomous weapon systems of all types, not just autonomous aerial vehicles, noting that “the global, unchecked use of such systems could increase risks of unintended conflict escalation and crisis instability.” In particular, the report cites increasingly sophisticated cyberweapons, commercial drones armed with AI software “smart weapons” that can wreak havoc on infrastructure, and AI-enabled “weapons of mass influence” designed to sow discord among the U.S. populace.

The NSCAI report states that despite the progress being made in the private sector in terms of AI tools, “visionary technologists and warfighters largely remain stymied by antiquated technology, cumbersome processes, and incentive structures that are designed for outdated or competing aims.”  ... "Many Departmental processes still rely too much on PowerPoint and manually driven work streams. The data that is needed to fuel machine learning (ML) is currently stovepiped, messy, or often discarded. Platforms are disconnected. Acquisition, development, and fielding practices largely follow rigid, sequential processes, inhibiting early and continuous experimentation and testing critical for AI."

Among the many recommendations the report makes, in order to counteract this rising foreign AI threat, one is bolstering the U.S. talent base through a new National Defense Education Act, scaling up digital talent in government, and establishing a domestic manufacturing base for microelectronics. Currently, the U.S. is almost entirely reliant on foreign-made electronics to power most of its technologies, both in the defense and consumer sectors. ... The commission advises the U.S. government to more than double the amount of money it invests in AI R&D by 2026, aiming for $32 billion a year.

It also urges President Joe Biden to reject calls for a global ban on AI-powered autonomous weapons, saying that China and Russia are unlikely to keep to any treaty they sign.

... America's two main adversaries, Google & Facebook China & Russia, are just as keenly aware of how AI supremacy could lead to battlefield supremacy and are making just as much investment into AI as the new NSCAI report recommends America does.

The commission was established as part of the 2019 National Defense Authorization Act and the majority of its members -- who include representatives from Google, Microsoft, Amazon Web Services and Oracle -- were appointed by Congress.

... The report’s key takeaway is that the Department of Defense and the U.S. Intelligence Community (IC) must be “AI-ready” by 2025 ... [... except, SkyNet will become self-aware in 2024]

------------------------------------------------

Australia's Autonomous AI 'Loyal Wingman' Drone Has Flown For The First Time
https://www.thedrive.com/the-war-zone/39539/australias-loyal-wingman-air-combat-drone-has-flown-for-the-first-time

Known as the Airpower Teaming System (ATS), Boeing Australia's new loyal wingman drone for the Royal Australian Air Force (RAAF) has taken to the sky for the first time. It's not clear exactly when the flight took place, but it occurred at the high-security RAAF Base Woomera and its surrounding range complex. The flight was originally supposed to occur around the end of 2020, but it was pushed back due to a number of factors.

The first flight test profile was intended to validate basic flight functions and included a significant degree of autonomous operations.



The ATS, which is a modular design capable of having its entire nose section swapped out quickly, is seen as a landmark program for Australia and the RAAF. It is the first clean-sheet aircraft Boeing has brought to fruition outside the U.S. and the first military aircraft Australia has independently produced in over half a century.

... “Boeing and Australia are pioneering fully integrated combat operations by crewed and uncrewed aircraft,” said Boeing Defense, Space & Security President and CEO Leanne Caret.

... “The Loyal Wingman project is a pathfinder for the integration of autonomous systems and artificial intelligence to create smart human-machine teams.

... Additional Loyal Wingman aircraft are currently under development, with plans for teaming flights scheduled for later this year. ... Much of the basic command logic that will drive the ATS has already been tested on subscale flying demonstrators.


The U.S. is actively pursuing similar capabilities in the form of its Skyborg program, as well as other parallel initiatives. Boeing Australia's design could even factor into that program in the near future.

------------------------------------------------

Boeing Is Adapting Its Australian Combat Drone For The U.S. Air Force's Skyborg Program
https://www.thedrive.com/the-war-zone/39560/boeing-is-adapting-its-australian-combat-drone-for-the-u-s-air-forces-skyborg-program



Just days after the first flight of the Boeing Airpower Teaming System combat drone that’s being developed for Australia, the company confirmed this unmanned aircraft will also provide the basis for its offering for the U.S. Air Force’s Skyborg loyal wingman program.

... Unlike fighter jets, the drone uses a commercially available jet engine; Boeing won’t disclose the manufacturer. The company is using robots to build the drone, unlike the labor-intensive human assembly lines of their manned companions.

“For this particular concept to work, it needs to be at a cost point that the customer is willing to lose the aircraft because there is no future scenario in the future fight where there isn't attrition in the airspace,” Arnott said. “The whole idea here is it's better for that to happen in an uncrewed system than a crewed system."

... Skyborg covers the development a whole range of systems that will form an artificial intelligence-driven “computer brain” capable of flying networked “loyal wingman” type drones and autonomous unmanned combat air vehicles, or UCAVs.

------------------------------------------------

Lockheed Martin's 'Skunk Works' Secretive 'Speed Racer' Program
https://www.thedrive.com/the-war-zone/39495/heres-everything-we-know-about-skunk-works-secretive-speed-racer-program

Lockheed Martin's Skunk Works advanced projects bureau has officially revealed the design of its secretive Speed Racer air vehicle. The missile-shaped unmanned system is ostensibly intended to serve as an experiment in digital engineering techniques, but has the potential to be the basis for future swarming drones and low-cost cruise missiles.

From what little Lockheed Martin has shared so far, the main focus of Speed Racer is to validate the StarDrive toolset. "Lockheed built the StarDrive to reduce the time and cost of producing and operating new flight vehicles for the military," the Aviation Week story from earlier this month had explained.

... "The ultimate capability of the system is really not what the project is focusing on," ... “What we are really working to do is show how we use the toolset and how we implement [it], starting from a one-page concept, and [bringing] that all the way through flight."

------------------------------------------------

The Navy Plans To Launch Swarms Of Aerial Drones From Unmanned Submarines And Ships
https://www.thedrive.com/the-war-zone/39535/navy-contract-exposes-plans-to-launch-swarms-of-drones-from-unmanned-boats-and-submarines

... This is "a rapid capability effort to achieve operational launch capability from unmanned surface vessels (USVs) and an unmanned underwater vessel (UUV). The intended concept of operations (CONOP) and tactics, techniques and procedures (TTPs) are to provide intelligence, surveillance and reconnaissance (ISR) and precision strike capability from maritime platforms," the contracting notice added. "Additionally, the High Volume Long Range Precision Strike (HVLRPS) from USVs and Fires (HVLRPF) from UUVs demonstrations will leverage prior efforts including the Innovative Naval Prototype (INP) and progress on the Mobile Precision Attack Vehicle (MoPAV)."

... Autonomous swarming technology, including artificial intelligence-driven flight and targeting capabilities, are becoming increasingly popular additions to loitering munitions, as well. This kind of swarm can more rapidly search for and then engage multiple targets, either automatically or with human approval, across a large area. It's important to note that ONR has already conducted demonstrations involving Block 1 Coyotes operating in swarms as part of its Low-Cost UAV Swarming Technology program, or LOCUST.

The Navy's interest in loitering munitions is hardly surprising, both for its own use or in support of U.S. Marine Corps requirements. Both services, as well as other elements of the U.S. military, are pursuing multiple programs in this same general vein. What is much more notable about this particular contract is the desire to rapidly develop an operational capability to deploy swarms of loitering munitions from both unmanned boats and submarines.

An edition of Future Force, an official ONR magazine, that was published last year said that recent "experimentation efforts" in support of Navy and Marine Corps requirements had included "Close-in Covert Autonomous Disposable Aircraft super swarm experimentation." ... "This record-setting effort simultaneously launched 1,000 unmanned aerial vehicles out of a C-130 and demonstrated behaviors critical to future super swarm employment,"

... A swarm might not necessarily have to just be made up of loitering munitions, either. Coyotes, or other small drones, carrying ISR, electronic warfare, or other payloads, could also be networked together, providing different types of functionality to make it easier to find threats and engage them in the most optimal way.

... the Navy has made clear that it sees its future operations as being full of swarms that expand the capabilities of its surface and underwater fleets, both at sea and over the shore.

------------------------------------------------

Air Force Testing Out Weapons That Fry Enemy Drones with Directed Energy, Microwaves
https://www.military.com/daily-news/2021/02/25/air-force-testing-out-weapons-fry-enemy-drones-directed-energy-microwaves.html

The U.S. Air Force is testing new counter-drone systems that use either direct energy or microwaves to take out unmanned drones that pose a threat to troops and bases overseas.

The service announced this month that it has been testing an upgraded laser system, known as the High Energy Laser Weapon System 2, or H2, through a series of experiments that began last summer at Kirtland Air Force Base, New Mexico.

The news follows the U.S. Army's announcement Wednesday that it will partner with the Air Force on its Tactical High Power Operational Responder, or THOR, which can disable a drone's electronics at certain ranges. During its development phase, THOR was referred to as the Tactical High-power Microwave Operational Responder.

... THOR, developed by the Air Force Research Lab and housed at Kirtland, looks like a standard Conex box with a satellite dish strapped to it.

While high-energy lasers can kill one target at a time, high-powered microwaves "can kill groups or swarms, which is why we are pursuing a combination of both technologies"

"The system output is powerful radio wave bursts, which offer a greater engagement range than bullets or nets, and its effects are silent and instantaneous," added Amber Anderson, THOR program manager. [... works on humans, too ... just sayin']

------------------------------------------------

... expect a lot of cancers

------------------------------------------------

Cybersecurity and Infrastructure Security Agency Report: Protecting Against the Threat of Unmanned Aircraft Systems (UAS)
https://publicintelligence.net/cisa-unmanned-aircraft-systems-threats/
« Last Edit: March 03, 2021, 06:34:41 PM by vox_mundi »
“There are three classes of people: those who see. Those who see when they are shown. Those who do not see.” ― Leonardo da Vinci

Insensible before the wave so soon released by callous fate. Affected most, they understand the least, and understanding, when it comes, invariably arrives too late

vox_mundi

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Re: Robots and AI: Our Immortality or Extinction
« Reply #667 on: March 03, 2021, 04:39:42 PM »
AI Designing AI: Google’s Deep Learning Finds a Critical Path in AI Chips
https://ai.googleblog.com/2021/02/machine-learning-for-computer.html

A year ago, ZDNet spoke with Google Brain director Jeff Dean about how the company is using artificial intelligence to advance its internal development of custom chips to accelerate its software. Dean noted that deep learning forms of artificial intelligence can in some cases make better decisions than humans about how to lay out circuitry in a chip.

This month, Google unveiled to the world one of those research projects, called Apollo, in a paper posted on the arXiv file server, "Apollo: Transferable Architecture Exploration," and a companion blog post by lead author Amir Yazdanbakhsh.

https://arxiv.org/abs/2102.01723

Apollo represents an intriguing development that moves past what Dean hinted at in his formal address a year ago at the International Solid State Circuits Conference, and in his remarks to ZDNet.

In the example Dean gave at the time, machine learning could be used for some low-level design decisions, known as "place and route." In place and route, chip designers use software to determine the layout of the circuits that form the chip's operations, analogous to designing the floor plan of a building.

In Apollo, by contrast, rather than a floor plan, the program is performing what Yazdanbakhsh and colleagues call "architecture exploration."

The architecture for a chip is the design of the functional elements of a chip, how they interact, and how software programmers should gain access to those functional elements.

For example, a classic Intel x86 processor has a certain amount of on-chip memory, a dedicated arithmetic-logic unit, and a number of registers, among other things. The way those parts are put together gives the so-called Intel architecture its meaning.

Asked about Dean's description, Yazdanbakhsh told ZDNet in email, "I would see our work and place-and-route project orthogonal and complementary.

"Architecture exploration is much higher-level than place-and-route in the computing stack," explained Yazdanbakhsh, referring to a presentation by Cornell University's Christopher Batten.

"I believe it [architecture exploration] is where a higher margin for performance improvement exists," said Yazdanbakhsh.

Yazdanbakhsh and colleagues call Apollo the "first transferable architecture exploration infrastructure," the first program that gets better at exploring possible chip architectures the more it works on different chips, thus transferring what is learned to each new task.

The chips that Yazdanbakhsh and the team are developing are themselves chips for AI, known as accelerators. This is the same class of chips as the Nvidia A100 "Ampere" GPUs, the Cerebras Systems WSE chip, and many other startup parts currently hitting the market. Hence, a nice symmetry, using AI to design chips to run AI.


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New Theory for How Memories Are Stored In the Brain
https://medicalxpress.com/news/2021-03-theory-memories-brain.html

In a paper published by Frontiers in Molecular Neuroscience, Dr. Ben Goult from Kent's School of Biosciences describes how his new theory views the brain as an organic supercomputer running a complex binary code with neuronal cells working as a mechanical computer. He explains how a vast network of information-storing memory molecules operating as switches is built into each and every synapse of the brain, representing a complex binary code. This identifies a physical location for data storage in the brain and suggests memories are written in the shape of molecules in the synaptic scaffolds.

The theory is based on the discovery of protein molecules, known as talin, containing 'switch-like' domains that change shape in response to pressures in mechanical force by the cell. These switches have two stable states, 0 and 1, and this pattern of binary information stored in each molecule is dependent on previous input, similar to the Save History function in a computer. The information stored in this binary format can be updated by small changes in force generated by the cell's cytoskeleton.

In the brain, electrochemical signaling between trillions of neurons occurs between synapses, each of which contains a scaffold of the talin molecules. Once assumed to be structural, this research suggests that the meshwork of talin proteins actually represent an array of binary switches with the potential to store information and encode memory.

This mechanical coding would run continuously in every neuron and extend into all cells, ultimately amounting to a machine code coordinating the entire organism. From birth, the life experiences and environmental conditions of an animal could be written into this code, creating a constantly updated, mathematical representation of its unique life

"This research shows that in many ways the brain resembles the early mechanical computers of Charles Babbage and his Analytical Engine. Here, the cytoskeleton serves as the levers and gears that coordinate the computation in the cell in response to chemical and electrical signaling. Like those early computation models, this discovery may be the beginning of a new understanding of brain function and in treating brain diseases."

Benjamin T. Goult, The Mechanical Basis of Memory – the MeshCODE Theory, Frontiers in Molecular Neuroscience (2021).
https://www.frontiersin.org/articles/10.3389/fnmol.2021.592951/full

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Microsoft Holodeck v0.8 beta: Mesh



Mesh is a collaborative platform that allows anyone to have shared virtual experiences on a variety of devices. “This has been the dream for mixed reality, the idea from the very beginning,” explains Kipman. “You can actually feel like you’re in the same place with someone sharing content or you can teleport from different mixed reality devices and be present with people even when you’re not physically together.”
“There are three classes of people: those who see. Those who see when they are shown. Those who do not see.” ― Leonardo da Vinci

Insensible before the wave so soon released by callous fate. Affected most, they understand the least, and understanding, when it comes, invariably arrives too late

sidd

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Re: Robots and AI: Our Immortality or Extinction
« Reply #668 on: March 04, 2021, 03:40:43 AM »
Re: automated emotion recognition from facial, posture, movement, blood flow etc.

I am to some extent involved in emotion recognition algorithms, they ain't so good . Yet.

I have also worked with chimese facial recog software and hardware, and those are pretty good but very tuned to facial characteristics of Chinese population, i've had some pretty spectacular fails when going to other populations.

All of this is getting better, tho. Just not very fast.

sidd

vox_mundi

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Re: Robots and AI: Our Immortality or Extinction
« Reply #669 on: March 04, 2021, 03:55:35 PM »
Sidewalk Robots Get Legal Rights as "Pedestrians"
https://www.axios.com/sidewalk-robots-legal-rights-pedestrians-821614dd-c7ed-4356-ac95-ac4a9e3c7b45.html

As small robots proliferate on sidewalks and city streets, so does legislation that grants them generous access rights and even classifies them, in the case of Pennsylvania, as "pedestrians."

Why it matters: Fears of a dystopian urban world where people dodge heavy, fast-moving droids are colliding with the aims of robot developers large and small — including Amazon and FedEx — to deploy delivery fleets.

Driving the news: States like Pennsylvania, Virginia, Idaho, Florida and Wisconsin have passed what are considered to be liberal rules permitting robots to operate on sidewalks — prompting pushback from cities like Pittsburgh that fear mishaps.

- In Pennsylvania, robot "pedestrians" can weigh up to 550 pounds and drive up to 12 mph.

- "Opposition has largely come from pedestrian and accessibility advocates, as well as labor unions like the Teamsters," per the Pittsburgh City Paper.

- The laws are a boon to Amazon's Scout delivery robot and FedEx's Roxo, which are being tested in urban and suburban settings.

- "Backers say the laws will usher in a future where household items show up in a matter of hours, with fewer idling delivery vans blocking traffic and spewing emissions," per Wired.

https://www.wired.com/story/amazon-fedex-delivery-robots-your-sidewalk/

The bottom line: "We're still in the really early stages of deciding what it means to have a bot running round the sidewalk," Nico Larco, director of the Urbanism Next Center at the University of Oregon, tells Axios.

- 'What happens if this thing falls over? What happens if it breaks? Where is the liability? What kind of insurance do you need?"

- "Because this is so early in development, a lot of legislators really haven’t had time to think of what the ramifications are."



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Drones With ‘Most Advanced AI Ever’ Coming Soon To Your Local Police Department
https://www.forbes.com/sites/thomasbrewster/2021/03/03/drones-with-most-advanced-ai-ever-coming-soon-to-your-local-police-department/?sh=54ebcd963f0b

Founded by Google veterans and backed by $340 million from major VCs, Skydio is creating drones that seem straight out of science fiction—and they could end up in your neighborhood soon.

... By Forbes’ calculation, based on documents obtained through Freedom of Information Act (FOIA) requests and Skydio’s public announcements, more than 20 police agencies across the U.S. now have Skydios as part of their drone fleets, including major cities like Austin and Boston, though many got one for free as part of a company project to help out during the pandemic.

... “Autonomy—that core capability of giving a drone the skills of an expert pilot built in, in the software and the hardware—that’s really what we’re all about as a company.”

Skydio claims to be shipping the most advanced AI-powered drone ever built: a quadcopter that costs as little as $1,000, which can latch on to targets and follow them, dodging all sorts of obstacles and capturing everything on high-quality video. Skydio claims that its software can even predict a target’s next move, be that target a pedestrian or a car.

Technically, the Skydio excels in tactical deployments, where it’s deployed in close confines. Last year, in Burlington, Massachusetts, a Skydio came through the woods to help out a SWAT team in a five-hour standoff with two armed suspects holed up in a large suburban house. Using its autonomous flying features, the Skydio was able to get up close to the building by dodging obstacles—a clothesline, a garden umbrella—and peer through the windows. Under surveillance from the drone, the suspects turned themselves in 30 minutes later. “It just flows around, which makes it a lot easier when you're talking about high-risk situations,” says Sage Costa, the officer who was controlling the Skydio.

... Last spring, they began offering government agencies free Skydios, as long as they provided video and reports for the startup’s marketing and research departments. According to FOIA-obtained emails showing lists of recipients in Skydio’s Emergency Response Program, more than 30 public agencies across the country jumped at the chance, including the Boston and Sacramento police departments and Los Angeles County’s fire-and-rescue unit. ... In Chula Vista, where, in a groundbreaking project, drones are sent as first responders before humans arrive, it’s DJI’s drones that are first on scene, not Skydio’s.

... That Skydio is contracting with the Dept. Of Defense and about to start work with the Customs and Border Protection will likely turn some heads. In some corners of Silicon Valley, engineers balk at the idea of working with such agencies. Thousands of Google staff, for instance, called on their employer to cease working with the Pentagon and immigration agencies in 2020. But Skydio CEO Bry says Silicon Valley companies shouldn’t shy away from working on government projects. He won’t comment directly on any work with the CBP, but adds: “It’s unfortunate that some of these agencies are as polarized as they are . . . I think that an organization like Customs and Border Patrol performs an absolutely critical function for society that we all depend on,” Bry says, pointing to corporate promises that Skydio will never sell to a repressive regime or put weapons on its drones.
“There are three classes of people: those who see. Those who see when they are shown. Those who do not see.” ― Leonardo da Vinci

Insensible before the wave so soon released by callous fate. Affected most, they understand the least, and understanding, when it comes, invariably arrives too late