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Author Topic: Sea Level Rise and Social Cost of Carbon  (Read 290232 times)

bluesky

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Re: Sea Level Rise and Social Cost of Carbon
« Reply #900 on: August 09, 2019, 11:08:39 PM »
In Carbon Brief, mention of a new Nature Climate Change paper on SLR. Acceleration of SLR started in the 60ies, 30 years earlier than current belief and primarily causes by acceleration of the westerlies in the Southern Hemisphere generating upwelling of more deep cold water absorbing more heat therefore generating more oceanic thermal expansion. Contribution of ice melting did happen in the 1930ies as a late response of the end of the LIA, but ice melting did not contribute in the 50ies and 60ies and has been contributing again since the early 90ies. Acceleration of westerlies could be climate change (human) induced , but the causality is not proven for the moment
https://www.carbonbrief.org/global-sea-level-rise-began-accelerating-30-years-earlier-than-previously-thought

DrTskoul

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Re: Sea Level Rise and Social Cost of Carbon
« Reply #901 on: August 10, 2019, 03:57:42 AM »
Science: The ocean’s tallest waves are getting taller

Quote
In the Southern Ocean, the trends are particularly strong. For instance, although average wind speeds there have increased by 2 centimeters per second each year, the speed of the top 10% fastest winds has increased by 5 centimeters per second per year. And although average wave heights there have increased by just 0.3 centimeters per year, the top 10% highest has grown by an average of 1 centimeter per year—a growth of 30 centimeters since 1985, they report today in Science.
The trends could be bad news for coastal communities, which face serious risks from sea level rise and extreme storm events, Young says. If oceanic winds are stronger and waves are taller, storms could be far more damaging.


DrTskoul

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Re: Sea Level Rise and Social Cost of Carbon
« Reply #902 on: August 10, 2019, 04:01:55 AM »
Ocean at the Door: New Homes and the Rising Sea

PDF: 2019 Research Report by Climate Central and Zillow

Quote
Connecticut is developing risk zones more than 3x faster than safer locations

Delaware, Mississippi, New Jersey, Rhode Island are developing risk zones more than 2x faster than safer locations

Maine, New Hampshire, and South Carolina are developing risk zones faster than safer locations

New Jersey, Florida, and North Carolina have allowed the most homes built in risk zones, more than 9,000 since 2010

24 cities—including New York, Tampa, Virginia Beach, Charleston, and Galveston—have allowed at least 100 homes built in risk zones since 2010



bligh8

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Re: Sea Level Rise and Social Cost of Carbon
« Reply #903 on: August 10, 2019, 06:09:39 AM »
Gatta love Zillow .. put out a report like this,  then try to sell ya waterfront properity.

The wave in the above post, that kinda wave hurts boats, that thing is breaking and tumbling heavily.  knockdown a sailboat & stove in freeboard on bulk carriers, that's how they break within Ocean currents, the gulf stream's North wall comes to mind.

bligh   

TerryM

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Re: Sea Level Rise and Social Cost of Carbon
« Reply #904 on: August 10, 2019, 08:37:10 AM »
<snipped>

The wave in the above post, that kinda wave hurts boats, that thing is breaking and tumbling heavily.  knockdown a sailboat & stove in freeboard on bulk carriers, that's how they break within Ocean currents, the gulf stream's North wall comes to mind.

bligh


I've never seen a wave like that bligh - but then they're probably the last thing that many ever see.
Terry

Tom_Mazanec

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Re: Sea Level Rise and Social Cost of Carbon
« Reply #905 on: August 21, 2019, 12:51:54 AM »
The East Coast is sinking under water—this photographer is documenting it as it disappears
In “On the Edge,” photographer J. Henry Fair shows how sea-level rise is slowly eating away at coastal communities and landscapes.
https://www.fastcompany.com/90391923/the-east-coast-is-sinking-under-water-this-photographer-is-documenting-it-as-it-disappears
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sidd

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Re: Sea Level Rise and Social Cost of Carbon
« Reply #906 on: August 21, 2019, 07:58:44 AM »
Time to revise calculations for coastal realestate financing doom down again.

Another bit that concerns me is flooding inland after more violent precipitation events. But that's for another thread.

sidd

bligh8

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Re: Sea Level Rise and Social Cost of Carbon
« Reply #907 on: August 21, 2019, 02:55:46 PM »

Another bit that concerns me is flooding inland after more violent precipitation events. But that's for another thread.

sidd

Hey...seems others are concerned as well ..

Re: Precipitation trends
« Reply #28 on: Today at 02:47:32 PM »

bligh

bligh8

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Re: Sea Level Rise and Social Cost of Carbon
« Reply #908 on: August 27, 2019, 05:28:37 PM »
                           Staten Island seawall: Designing for climate change
                                            Updated 14th July 2019


"By 2025, New York's Staten Island will be fortified by a towering seawall running 5.3 miles along the coast, an engineering feat designed to ward off a growing threat.
The climate crisis is predicted to create more powerful and extreme weather systems all over the world, and coastal engineers are racing to respond with structures to reduce their impact.
The first seawalls were built centuries ago, though there are now, arguably, greater assets to protect and more people living along vulnerable coastlines than ever before.
A recent report by the Center for Climate Integrity estimated it could cost the US more than $400 billion over the next 20 years to protect coastal communities."

                                                 "Staten Island's new wall
When Hurricane Sandy smashed into the US East Coast in 2012, Staten Island was overwhelmed by massive waves that swept away properties and killed 24 of the dozens of people who eventually died in the storm.
With a population of almost half a million, low-lying Staten Island was no match for the waves whipped up in New York Harbor, one of which reached a record 32.5 feet high."

"Mostly granite is being used but in some cases we are using vegetation -- a particular type of vegetation from the trees there," Pareeth said.


"The design of seawalls has evolved over time, from rock -- which is still used -- to interlocking concrete units, including the Tetrapods commonly seen in Japan. When rock isn't available, concrete can be more cost-efficient, allowing large numbers of correctly-sized parts to be produced.

"In recent years there's been a greater push towards natural solutions -- using dunes, mangroves and man-made reefs alongside man-made walls to help calm the sea.
"We're not only building a structure that is functional in an engineering sense but it's functional in an environmental sense," said Matt Eliot, a coastal engineer and direct of Seashore Engineering based in Perth, Australia. "We're using that to look for what habitats we can encourage to make it better for the plants and animals in the area."
In some cases, holes and crevices are being built into the walls to encourage nature to grow around them. Other designs seek to reduce the impact of waves before they hit."

More within the article
https://www.cnn.com/style/article/staten-island-seawall-climate-crisis-design/index.html



 

Tom_Mazanec

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Re: Sea Level Rise and Social Cost of Carbon
« Reply #909 on: August 27, 2019, 08:49:01 PM »
Sea Level Rise Task Force Wraps Up, Will Urge Jacksonville To Curb Emissions
https://news.wjct.org/post/sea-level-rise-task-force-wraps-will-urge-jacksonville-curb-emissions
Quote
Jacksonville’s state mandated sea level rise task force has wrapped up its work, approving the remaining proposals in a list of recommendations that will eventually go before City Council.

The group also agreed to urge the City to reduce its contributions to climate change.
Well, I guess for Florida this is big progress!
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Tom_Mazanec

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Re: Sea Level Rise and Social Cost of Carbon
« Reply #910 on: September 04, 2019, 06:39:25 PM »
The country disappearing under rising tides
http://www.bbc.com/future/story/20190829-bangladesh-the-country-disappearing-under-rising-tides
Quote
Bangladesh has been a vulnerable state for much of its short existence. People in this flood-prone country have coped with rising water levels with a combination of innovation, flexibility and resilience – but the extremes the environment is now throwing at them might be beyond anyone’s endurance.

As climate change accelerates, the pressures on rural Bangladeshis mount. Where previously people might have been able to move away for the worst of seasonal flooding, the regularity of waterlogging is making it impossible to farm. Crop varieties cannot cope with the saltwater, and career alternatives are limited.
SHARKS (CROSSED OUT) MONGEESE (SIC) WITH FRICKIN LASER BEAMS ATTACHED TO THEIR HEADS

wolfpack513

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Re: Sea Level Rise and Social Cost of Carbon
« Reply #911 on: September 07, 2019, 09:32:02 PM »
AVISO(JASON-3) global mean sea level updated through July 5, 2019.  You can see the slight jump the past 12 months due to the El Niño.  Level has also been above the linear trend for 4 years now.  With Acceleration GMSL should continue to outpace 1993-2019 linear regression.