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Anne

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Water wars
« on: May 23, 2014, 12:37:40 PM »
There doesn't seem to be a thread on this yet, so here's a horror story to start it off.  The battle has arisen because the city has spread rapidly to subsume a village with its own natural spring, the fresh water from which is needed by everyone.

Quote
Mexico City residents battle police over water

A confrontation between 1,500 police and residents of a village on Mexico City's western outskirts left more than 100 police injured in a battle over a water spring. Three police remained in intensive care Thursday, the city government said, and five people were under arrest.

It was the latest in a series of clashes over increasingly scarce water in the city of 9 million people, which must draw much of its supply from surrounding states.

The city grew so fast between the 1940s and the 1990s that once-independent villages like San Bartolo Ameyalco were swallowed up by the sprawl.

The centuries-old village has a natural water spring which it takes a great deal of pride in.

But Mexico City officials wanted to extend the municipal water system into the village, purportedly to supply underserved areas there.

But many residents suspect the city wants take their spring water to supply the explosive growth of apartment blocks, offices and shopping centers that have sprouted in the upscale developments nearby.

View galleryVillagers listen as community activists speak at a …
Villagers listen as community activists speak at a rally where residents were deciding how to respon …
Residents had managed to block the city's plan for a long time.

"This community has been deeply linked to water ever since it began," community activists wrote in a description of their town, whose name, Ameyalco, means "place where water springs forth" in the Nahuatl Indian language.
And of course commercial interests are implicated because truckers make a living from transporting spring water to other parts of the city.... Read the whole article at the link.
http://news.yahoo.com/mexico-city-residents-battle-police-over-water-144815836.html

This is just one of thousands, many far more serious.

Anne

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Re: Water wars
« Reply #1 on: May 23, 2014, 12:44:07 PM »
Sorry, I posted this in the wrong section - it would probably go better under Consequences.

[Edit by DungeonMaster : Done]
« Last Edit: May 23, 2014, 01:06:17 PM by DungeonMaster »

ccgwebmaster

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Re: Water wars
« Reply #2 on: May 23, 2014, 05:26:38 PM »
It took me a while to find it from a vague memory of having read it, but this article alludes to the potential for direct conflict within (as opposed to between, which is also a concern) societies over water:

http://www.theguardian.com/world/2009/jul/12/india-water-supply-bhopal

It's such a critical resource though - why would one not steal and fight for it, if you had no other choices? Why would a poorer person meekly accept their own death simply due to lack of affluence?

RaenorShine

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Re: Water wars
« Reply #3 on: May 23, 2014, 06:35:26 PM »
There are a a lot of areas in the world with the potential for inter-nation conflict over water, especially in the Middle East, Central Asia and  Northern Africa.

Wikipedia has a reasonable rundown on this for a start http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Water_conflict and highlights several flashpoints.

World Water has a large list of conflicts about water http://worldwater.org/water-conflict/

Anne

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Re: Water wars
« Reply #4 on: May 23, 2014, 06:36:06 PM »
Thanks for that article - I remember it now. There have been many others and I am certain we've seen nothing yet.

See also this brief article, which covers more than its headline suggests.
http://www.smithsonianmag.com/innovation/is-a-lack-of-water-to-blame-for-the-conflict-in-syria-72513729/?no-ist

and this very thoughtful one from the Guardian of February this year, which starts off by talking about California before going on to consider world problems.
Quote
(snip)  The Pacific Institute, which studies issues of water and global security, found a fourfold increase in violent confrontations over water over the last decade. "I think the risk of conflicts over water is growing – not shrinking – because of increased competition, because of bad management and, ultimately, because of the impacts of climate change," said Peter Gleick, president of the Pacific Institute.

There are dozens of potential flashpoints, spanning the globe. In the Middle East, Iranian officials are making contingency plans for water rationing in the greater Tehran area, home to 22 million people....
Quote
The chances of countries going to war over water were slim – at least over the next decade, the national intelligence report said. But it warned ominously: "As water shortages become more acute beyond the next 10 years, water in shared basins will increasingly be used as leverage; the use of water as a weapon or to further terrorist objectives will become more likely beyond 10 years."

Gleick predicted such conflicts would take other trajectories. He expected water tensions would erupt on a more local scale.

"I think the biggest worry today is sub-national conflicts – conflicts between farmers and cities, between ethnic groups, between pastoralists and farmers in Africa, between upstream users and downstream users on the same river," said Gleick.

"We have more tools at the international level to resolve disputes between nations. We have diplomats. We have treaties. We have international organisations that reduce the risk that India and Pakistan will go to war over water but we have far fewer tools at the sub-national level."
There is much more - it's well worth reading the whole article.

and the 16 page US Government paper on Global Water Security referred to in the Guardian article:
http://www.dni.gov/files/documents/Special%20Report_ICA%20Global%20Water%20Security.pdf
Quote
Our Bottom Line:
During the next 10 years, many countries important to the United States will experience water problems—shortages, poor water quality, or floods—that will risk instability and state failure, increase regional tensions, and distract them from working with the United States on important US policy objectives. Between now and 2040, fresh water availability will not keep up with demand absent more effective management of water resources. Water problems will hinder the ability of key countries to produce food and generate energy, posing a risk to global food markets and hobbling economic growth. As a result of demographic and economic development pressures, North Africa, the Middle East, and South Asia will face major challenges coping with water problems.

Of course people will fight over this resource. My purpose in starting the thread was more by way of flagging it up for discussion. There is a powerful argument for rationing in areas of water stress. Often the stress isn't recognised because the supply comes from a poorer neighbour. Unsuitable crops are still being grown and affluent people are still using water as if it were a limitless resource, regardless of where it comes from.

As we enter a time when it looks as though there will be ever more water in the atmosphere, it is not going to fall where we want it, or when, or in manageable quantities. It seemed as if this issue warranted a thread of its own.

JimD

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Re: Water wars
« Reply #5 on: May 26, 2014, 03:38:16 PM »
Anne

One of he events which forced the Colorado Water Compact (a disaster which badly needs to be reworked today) was that the states of Arizona and California got so upset with each other over who owned the water in the river they both called out their National Guard troops and it came close to warfare.  Thus forcing the Federal Govt to step in. 

And it is getting worse both long term and short term.   Here at my house in Prescott, AZ we have had only 3 tenths of an inch of rain since the first of Dec last year.  And we are in the dry season now. 
We do not err because truth is difficult to see. It is visible at a glance. We err because this is more comfortable. Alexander Solzhenitsyn

How is it conceivable that all our technological progress - our very civilization - is like the axe in the hand of the pathological criminal? Albert Einstein

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Re: Water wars
« Reply #6 on: May 26, 2014, 04:28:24 PM »
See also this brief article [about Syria], which covers more than its headline suggests.
http://www.smithsonianmag.com/innovation/is-a-lack-of-water-to-blame-for-the-conflict-in-syria-72513729/?no-ist
Thanks.  Some other related things:

Hoerling et al (2012) have a paper about increased drought in the Mediterranean region, including the Eastern Mediterranean around Syria.  They report a dramatic increase in drought over the past century, they attribute half of it to warming from greenhouse gases, and they say that models show more drying in this region than any of the other 26 regions studied, over the course of the next century.

Another peer-reviewed paper on "The fatal synergy of war and drought in the eastern Mediterranean".  Quotes:

Quote
The last drought struck Syria between the years 2006 and 2011 ... In the poor hinterlands ... total crop failure caused by the multiyear drought affected up to 75 percent of farmers and herders ... pastoralists lost around 85 percent of their flocks, which were sold at a quarter of their cost. The story was repeated in the rain-fed northeast of the country, as well as in the middle north and in the southwest. This drove millions of small farmers and rural folks into extreme food insecurity; over a million people left the countryside. A survey of drought-affected regions showed that only 10 percent of houses in villages surveyed were occupied, mostly by old people and children ...

The 2006-2011 drought is widely credited by academic and mainstream writers to have catalyzed the insurrections and fed the war ... The areas that were most strongly affected by the drought were also the hotbeds of the insurrection. They are today under the domination of armed groups, some of which are linked to Al Qaeda.

And this is from the popular media, but still interesting. From the first episode of James Cameron's TV series, "The Years of Living Dangerously":

Quote
FATTEN: [translated] We used to own farmland in Syria. The rains were very good. And the land was well watered. And then, suddenly, the drought occurred. The land became like a desert, a salt wasteland. I can’t even describe how terrible it was.

MOHAMMED: [translated] I was around 17. We lost the land. Our way of life changed completely.

THOMAS FRIEDMAN: Have you ever seen anything like that before?

FATTEN: [translated] No. I’d been there for years. This was the first time such a drought happened. The first time. We spoke out about the drought, saying the government must help. But no one gave a damn. Instead, they brought us in for interrogation. And in the end, they detained us for two months.

Anne

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Re: Water wars
« Reply #7 on: May 31, 2014, 04:54:39 PM »
Withholding water is being used as a weapon in the battle for Syria:
Quote
The Turkish government recently cut off the flow of the Euphrates River, threatening primarily Syria but also Iraq with a major water crisis. Al-Akhbar found out that the water level in Lake Assad has dropped by about six meters, leaving millions of Syrians without drinking water.

Two weeks ago, the Turkish government once again intervened in the Syrian crisis. This time was different from anything it had attempted before and the repercussions of which may bring unprecedented catastrophes onto both Iraq and Syria.

Violating international norms, the Turkish government recently cut off the water supply of the Euphrates River completely. In fact, Ankara began to gradually reduce pumping Euphrates water about a month and half ago, then cut if off completely two weeks ago, according to information received by Al-Akhbar.
Quote
The reservoirs are expected to run out of water completely by tonight or tomorrow morning at the latest.
Meanwhile, water supplies in auxiliary reservoirs in al-Khafsa are close to being depleted and the reservoirs are expected to run out of water completely by tonight or tomorrow morning at the latest. This threatens to leave seven million Syrians without access to water. Also, Tishrin Dam stopped receiving any water which blocked its electricity generating turbines, decreasing the power supply in Aleppo and its countryside, further intensifying the already severe imbalance in the power supply.

In Raqqa, the northern side of Lake Assad is today completely out of service. Two million Syrians living in the region covering the villages of Little Swaydiya to the east until al-Jarniya to the west could lose their drinking water supply. “Losing water supplies in the dam means that the silt in the lake will dry off which would pressure its structure, subjecting it to fissures and eventually total collapse,” Al-Akhbar sources warned, adding “it is crucial to shut down the dam to stop its collapse.”

However, shutting down the dam (if ISIS agrees) will only lead to a human and ecological (zoological and agricultural) catastrophe in Syria and in Iraq.

According to information obtained by Al-Akhbar, Aleppo locals (who had already launched many initiatives to reach solutions for a number of local issues) began a race against time to recommend solutions for the problem, including putting the thermal plant at al-Safira back to work, which may convince ISIS to spare the Euphrates Dam turbines, and in turn preserve current water levels in the lake.

In case it succeeds, such a step would only rescue whatever water and structures are left, and would ward off further repercussions of the crisis that has already started. A halt to the water supply is now inevitable and can’t be resolved unless the Turkish government takes the decision to resume pumping Euphrates water.

More here at Al-Akhbar: Link

Shared Humanity

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Re: Water wars
« Reply #8 on: May 31, 2014, 09:11:47 PM »
I think the importance of this discussion cannot be overstated and I have just caught up with this thread. Having said this, it has triggered a profound depression regarding this topic. Much of the discussions on the Consequence and Policy categories deals with how human civilization will or  ought to react to the challenges we face.

When I read JimD and the near armed conflict that occurred between California and Arizona and the above comment about Turkey using water as a weapon of war with Syria, I begin to fear for this world.

For years I would entertain friends and family as I would argue that recent human evolution is a myth. What we see as evolution, the wonderful technology we have employed to construct this awesome civilization, is not evolution in a biological sense. We are the same basic brutes we were 10,000, 20,000 years ago. The only difference is we know more things, have better toys and more lethal weapons.

I have always enjoyed the outdoors. I go camping regularly and have been in wilderness areas for up to 2 weeks. If you enjoy doing these things and you're ever stuck out in the wilderness, remember what survival experts call 'the Rule of Threes'.

1. You can live 3 minutes without air.
2. You can survive 3 days without water.
3. You can make it 3 weeks without food.

Battles over water can kill vast populations very quickly. Our brutish nature will be our undoing.

John_The_Elder

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Re: Water wars
« Reply #9 on: June 01, 2014, 12:07:12 AM »
Anne can you verify the source of your information in Post #7? I can not find any mention of this in main stream news.

John
John

Anne

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Re: Water wars
« Reply #10 on: June 01, 2014, 12:29:23 AM »
The link is in the post. Al-Akhbar is a Lebanese newspaper.
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Al_Akhbar_(Lebanon) You will see from wikipedia an allegation that the paper is an apologist for Assad.

Perhaps we should treat it with caution if it's not been published in any western news source? But western news sources aren't everywhere at once and aren't interested in publishing everything.  They have their own agendas. Not speaking Arabic I'm not able to verify any other source. I should have given a caveat when posting. 

Sigmetnow

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Re: Water wars
« Reply #11 on: June 01, 2014, 04:57:03 PM »
Not a "war", but an interesting story of Colorado Springs unearthing its namesake water source after half a century.  Will it be usable? 
My worry:  Will it be buried again?

http://blogs.gazette.com/sidestreets/2014/06/01/hope-flows-for-tahama-springs-restoration-despite-tainted-water-tests/
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Daniel

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Re: Water wars
« Reply #12 on: June 02, 2014, 09:12:40 AM »
Sao Paolo, Brazil seems to be in trouble too after driest summer since 1930:
Maybe not leading to war but already causing great harm to the poorest. Violent protests (against the World cup) may be fuelled by water shortages.

http://www.theguardian.com/sustainable-business/sao-paulo-water-shortage-world-cup

Anne

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Re: Water wars
« Reply #13 on: June 09, 2014, 12:56:16 PM »
An earlier thread refers to some studies which may be relevant here:
Re: Influence of climate change on human violence

Also, free to view film Blue Gold: World Water Wars (2013)
Quote
SUMMARY:

Wars of the future will be fought over water as they are over oil today, as the source of human survival enters the global marketplace and political arena. Corporate giants, private investors, and corrupt governments vie for control of our dwindling supply, prompting protests, lawsuits, and revolutions from citizens fighting for the right to survive. Past civilizations have collapsed from poor water management. Can the human race survive?

Award-winning featured documentary narrated by Malcolm McDowell. Global Warming is an issue of 'how' we live, the water crisis is an issue of 'if' we live.

Shared Humanity

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Re: Water wars
« Reply #14 on: June 09, 2014, 03:04:28 PM »
"Past civilizations have collapsed from poor water management. Can the human race survive?"


The human race can but civilization can't.

icefest

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Re: Water wars
« Reply #15 on: June 09, 2014, 03:15:50 PM »
Some parts of civilisation will survive. Like the Byzantine Empire survived the Roman, like Chichen Itza survived the 'collapse' of the Mayans.

It's more a question home much/far will collapse and how many will die.
Open other end.

Anne

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Re: Water wars
« Reply #16 on: June 09, 2014, 04:06:19 PM »
The film linked above (Blue Gold) highlights the pernicious activities of the multinationals who have gained control of the water supply in many countries around the world, sometimes at the behest of the World Bank, and argues for de-privatisation, for local activism and management, for people to learn which watershed they are on, where their drinking water comes from and where their waste water goes, and to grow only crops suitable to the local water supply. If you control your water the water companies will have nothing to sell you.  So long as there is a functioning state there will be tough legal battles all along the way. (And the situation is more complex anyway.) But a community that has control of its water supply stands a better chance of surviving.

Laurent

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Re: Water wars
« Reply #17 on: June 13, 2014, 12:56:36 AM »
Extremists in Iraq now control the country's rivers
http://www.newscientist.com/article/dn25722-extremists-in-iraq-now-control-the-countrys-rivers.html?cmpid=RSS|NSNS|2012-GLOBAL|environment#.U5ouCoZJzlc

Laurent

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Re: Water wars
« Reply #18 on: June 18, 2014, 06:09:09 PM »
Indian officals order Coca-Cola plant to close for using too much water
http://www.theguardian.com/environment/2014/jun/18/indian-officals-coca-cola-plant-water-mehdiganj

RaenorShine

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Re: Water wars
« Reply #19 on: June 19, 2014, 11:04:20 AM »
Jeff Masters has a blog on the Syrian civil war

http://www.wunderground.com/blog/JeffMasters/comment.html?entrynum=2703

Quote
Drought in Syria: a Major Cause of the Civil War?
Syria's devastating civil war that began in March 2011 has killed over 200,000 people, displaced at least 4.5 million, and created 3 million refugees. While the causes of the war are complex, a key contributing factor was the nation's devastating 2006 - 2011 drought, one of the worst in the nation's history ........

Lynn Shwadchuck

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Re: Water wars
« Reply #20 on: June 21, 2014, 03:32:32 AM »
Good idea for a thread, Anne. There's a good report from Ethiopia in Harper's July issue. The journalist put himself in harm's way asking too many questions about the rice fields in the delta at Gambella.

Letter from Gambella — From the July 2014 issue
The Man Who Stole the Nile
An Ethiopian billionaire’s outrageous land grab
By Frederick Kaufman

"The government owns all the land in Ethiopia. They cannot sell it, but they can lease as much of it as they want. By leasing to the Sheikh, the directorate had given Al Amoudi’s food grab the federal stamp of approval. Though the terms of the deal have never been released, the annual price per hectare has been estimated at no more than seven dollars. In Zambia, by comparison, the average hectare leases for about $1,250 a year."

Egypt has repeatedly stopped Ethiopia from damning the White Nile, as recently as 2011. The Sheik is farming rice in the delta at Gambella to sell to Saudi Arabia. In fact, Kaufman talked to a very frightened, but angry man there who was spreading a rumor that the sheik is simply a stooge of the Saudi royal family.

"Each acre of rice requires a million gallons of water a season, which means the Sheikh’s project could eventually suck more than a trillion gallons from the Nile. From November to February, the farm would extract more than 10 percent of the White Nile’s total flow. In a dry year, even more."

Basically sending Ethiopia's (and Egypt's) water to the Saudis in the form of a food commodity – rice.
Still living in the bush in eastern Ontario. Gave up on growing annual veggies. Too much drought.

Sigmetnow

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Re: Water wars
« Reply #21 on: June 21, 2014, 09:52:20 PM »
"Water war bubbling up between California and Arizona"
So far, just legal rumblings about various water pacts.  For example, how much money might be needed to pay to leave agricultural land fallow, to save water for the many US states dependent on the Colorado River's dwindling flow?

http://www.latimes.com/business/hiltzik/la-fi-hiltzik-20140620-column.html#page=1
People who say it cannot be done should not interrupt those who are doing it.

Laurent

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Re: Water wars
« Reply #22 on: June 24, 2014, 10:55:26 PM »
Water, Water Everywhere, Nor Any Drop to Drink....
http://www.bbc.com/news/science-environment-27978124

Sigmetnow

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Re: Water wars
« Reply #23 on: June 29, 2014, 08:08:56 PM »
Found this page outlining 100 years of federal and interstate wrangling regarding the Colorado River and the Central Arizona [water] Project.  Apportionment laws seem quite... fluid.

http://www.cap-az.com/index.php/law-of-the-river
People who say it cannot be done should not interrupt those who are doing it.

Anne

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Re: Water wars
« Reply #24 on: July 02, 2014, 06:33:42 PM »
More on Turkey shutting down the Euphrates water supply to Syria. I don't know how reliable this news source is, so please treat with caution.
Quote
The water level of the Euphrates Lake has decreased by six metres in the body of the dam, RMC reported.

Criticism of the Turkish government has been voiced by civil society activists in Northern Syria concerning Turkey’s control of the River Euphrates. In recent weeks, the Turks have stopped the flow of water into Syria from the mighty river, which has its source in Turkey’s Taurus Mountains before flowing into Syria and on into Iraq. The Euphrates is the main source of water for the Northern Syrian province of Raqqa.

“This threatens us with a real disaster within the next few days,” said Abu Mohamed, a local activist from Raqqa. He pointed out that half of the villages in the district currently have no water available for residential use or agricultural purposes.
1 July
http://www.globalresearch.ca/water-wars-directed-against-syria-and-iraq-turkeys-control-of-the-euphrates-river/5389357

Worth noting that Robert Fisk reporting from Aleppo referred to the shutdown a few days ago in The Independent.
Quote
...Plenty of food since the army broke the siege of Aleppo. No water for six days since the Turks sealed off the watercourse from the dam north of the border. Children and old women carry plastic tubs of the stuff from government-delivered water tanks.
15 June
http://www.independent.co.uk/voices/comment/robert-fisk-how-does-tony-blair-get-away-with-his-lies-9538846.html

Laurent

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Re: Water wars
« Reply #25 on: July 02, 2014, 07:25:55 PM »
Water supply key to outcome of conflicts in Iraq and Syria, experts warn
http://www.theguardian.com/environment/2014/jul/02/water-key-conflict-iraq-syria-isis

Laurent

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Re: Water wars
« Reply #26 on: July 03, 2014, 08:36:20 PM »

Laurent

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Re: Water wars
« Reply #27 on: July 04, 2014, 07:23:08 PM »
Iran to spend $500 million to save shrunken Lake Urmia
http://www.newscientist.com/article/dn25850-iran-to-spend-500-million-to-save-shrunken-lake-urmia.html?cmpid=RSS|NSNS|2012-GLOBAL|environment#.U7bhIVFJzlc

Laurent

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Re: Water wars
« Reply #28 on: July 16, 2014, 11:43:09 PM »

Laurent

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Anne

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Re: Water wars
« Reply #30 on: July 19, 2014, 08:14:56 PM »
Ugh. This is awful. Anyone out there able to confirm the truth of this report?
WATER WARS? | Riots, deaths in South Africa
http://www.interaksyon.com/article/91508/water-wars--riots-deaths-in-south-africa

ccgwebmaster

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Re: Water wars
« Reply #31 on: August 03, 2014, 03:06:27 PM »
Ugh. This is awful. Anyone out there able to confirm the truth of this report?
WATER WARS? | Riots, deaths in South Africa
http://www.interaksyon.com/article/91508/water-wars--riots-deaths-in-south-africa

I dunno about truth or not - but it doesn't read as though it's necessarily linked to climate change. The article is more suggestive of growing urban population and increasingly stressed/deficient infrastructure in relation to that.

Laurent

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Re: Water wars
« Reply #32 on: September 12, 2014, 08:52:11 AM »

Sigmetnow

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Re: Water wars
« Reply #33 on: November 29, 2014, 02:48:34 PM »
Quote
Water War Amid Brazil Drought Leads to Fight Over Puddles

Brazil’s Jaguari reservoir has fallen to its lowest level ever, laying bare measurement posts that jut from exposed earth like a line of dominoes. The nation’s two biggest cities are fighting for what little water is left.

Sao Paulo state leaders want to tap Jaguari, which feeds Rio de Janeiro’s main source. Rio state officials say they shouldn’t suffer for others’ mismanagement. Supreme Court judges have summoned the parties to Brasilia for a mediation session this week.
http://www.bloomberg.com/news/2014-11-25/water-war-amid-brazil-drought-leads-to-fight-over-puddles.html
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Laurent

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Re: Water wars
« Reply #34 on: December 17, 2014, 02:20:03 PM »

Laurent

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Re: Water wars
« Reply #35 on: December 30, 2014, 11:45:52 AM »
Last call of the oasis.
http://www.takepart.com/lastcall

Sigmetnow

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Re: Water wars
« Reply #36 on: December 31, 2014, 01:15:50 AM »
The Politics of Drinking-Water.  Historical (mostly U.S.) and current.
http://m.theatlantic.com/technology/archive/2014/12/the-politics-of-drinking-water/384081/
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Laurent

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Re: Water wars
« Reply #37 on: January 12, 2015, 10:21:11 AM »

Laurent

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Re: Water wars
« Reply #38 on: January 19, 2015, 10:33:54 PM »

wili

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Re: Water wars
« Reply #39 on: January 19, 2015, 11:03:21 PM »
No mention of Sao Paulo that I could see.
"A force de chercher de bonnes raisons, on en trouve; on les dit; et après on y tient, non pas tant parce qu'elles sont bonnes que pour ne pas se démentir." Choderlos de Laclos "You struggle to come up with some valid reasons, then cling to them, not because they're good, but just to not back down."

Laurent

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Re: Water wars
« Reply #40 on: January 22, 2015, 11:40:54 AM »

Sigmetnow

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Re: Water wars
« Reply #41 on: January 24, 2015, 01:52:11 AM »
World Economic Forum Ranks Water Crises as Top Global Risk
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More than nuclear weapons or a global disease pandemic, impairments to water supplies and punishing cycles of flood, drought, and water pollution are now viewed by heads of state, nonprofit leaders, and chief executives as the most serious threat to business and society.
http://www.circleofblue.org/waternews/2015/world/world-economic-forum-ranks-water-crises-as-top-global-risk/
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Sigmetnow

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Re: Water wars
« Reply #42 on: January 26, 2015, 08:43:08 PM »
Lack of Drinking Water Is Killing More People in Nigeria Than Boko Haram
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The lack of running water killed more people in Nigeria last year than Boko Haram.

While the terror campaign claimed more than 4,000 lives, the shortage of potable water and poor sanitation led to about 73,000 deaths, according to WaterAid, a London-based nonprofit.

The water deficit isn’t limited to isolated areas in the country’s vast north. In Lagos, about 15 million of the coastal metropolis’ 21 million have limited access to piped water.
http://www.bloomberg.com/news/2015-01-26/nigerian-water-shortage-is-bigger-killer-than-boko-haram-cities.html
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Sigmetnow

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Re: Water wars
« Reply #43 on: January 30, 2015, 07:55:47 PM »
Knowing, and lessening, the "water footprint" of what you buy will likely become the next big movement.
Stephen Leahy researched the topic for his new book.
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The water footprint of 500ml of bottled water is 5.5 litres: 0.5 for the water in the bottle and another five contaminated in the process of making the plastic bottle from oil. The five litres consumed in making the bottle are as real water as the 500ml you might drink but hardly anyone in business or government accounts for it.
http://www.theguardian.com/sustainable-business/2014/dec/08/water-amounts-incredible-valuable-oil-scarcity
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Shared Humanity

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Re: Water wars
« Reply #44 on: January 31, 2015, 03:45:11 PM »
The five litres consumed in making the bottle are as real water as the 500ml you might drink but hardly anyone in business or government accounts for it.

It is this kind of quote that kind of irritates me. Businesses account for everything and I can assure Stephen that the businesses that are in the production stream to produce that bottle of water have accounted for every cost and as long as they can make a profit, and the profits in the bottled water industry are huge, they will make the product.

The solutions to many of these problems are for the consumer to account for it. Disregarding the leaching of BPA, an endocrine disrupter, into the bottled water, tap water is essentially free in comparison.

Do you want companies to quit making bottled water? Stop buying it.

I work at a community college in the Chicago area. Throughout all of the campus buildings, they have drinking fountains that include dispensing locations for filling glasses and bottles. The one I use is just adjacent to a vending area that sells,you guessed it, bottled water for $1.00 per bottle. You can find a vending machine employee adding bottled water to the machine every day.

WTF?????

« Last Edit: January 31, 2015, 03:50:58 PM by Shared Humanity »

Sigmetnow

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Re: Water wars
« Reply #45 on: February 04, 2015, 10:14:12 PM »
California:
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Imperial County and the Imperial Irrigation District announced a settlement in a long-running legal battle Tuesday, ending 12 years of litigation over a water transfer deal and its effects on the shrinking Salton Sea.
http://www.desertsun.com/story/news/environment/2015/02/03/qsa-settlement-imperial-county/22829969/
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Laurent

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Re: Water wars
« Reply #46 on: February 22, 2015, 04:23:54 PM »

Shared Humanity

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Re: Water wars
« Reply #47 on: February 22, 2015, 06:19:14 PM »
California:
Quote
Imperial County and the Imperial Irrigation District announced a settlement in a long-running legal battle Tuesday, ending 12 years of litigation over a water transfer deal and its effects on the shrinking Salton Sea.
http://www.desertsun.com/story/news/environment/2015/02/03/qsa-settlement-imperial-county/22829969/

I believe that, given the monumental challenges confronting us as a result of AGW, officials need to think bigger then planting grass on the shores. If they want to preserve the Salton Sea ecosystem and Laguna Salada to the south in Mexico, both of which are highly saline seas (far more saline  than the ocean) that sit below sea level, they should begin construction of a canal from the Gulf of California that connects first Laguna Salada and then later, the Salton Sea. They  could control the amount of water that flows in from the gulf so as not to flood the entire Salton Sea basin which sits below sea level. Let more water flow in during dry times. restrict flow in wet periods. This would have the effect of lowering saline levels as well.
« Last Edit: February 22, 2015, 07:58:09 PM by Shared Humanity »

JimD

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Re: Water wars
« Reply #48 on: February 23, 2015, 06:30:55 PM »
To play the devils advocate a bit here.

Given the scale of our problems is there any real likelyhood we won't just punt on this?  Won't we be overcome by so many other problems which are worse and more pressing and just let this slide?  Is this not the path we are on where we will just have to let most festering problems fester?

We do not have the wealth to rebuild our infrastructure, nor the will to reduce our population, nor the intelligence to reduce our standards of living.

The drying out of the southwest would perhaps make this a moot point in any case.  Thirty more years of drought and there will be no Salton Sea anyway?
We do not err because truth is difficult to see. It is visible at a glance. We err because this is more comfortable. Alexander Solzhenitsyn

How is it conceivable that all our technological progress - our very civilization - is like the axe in the hand of the pathological criminal? Albert Einstein

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Re: Water wars
« Reply #49 on: February 23, 2015, 07:37:29 PM »
The Salton Sea is the result of a man-made oops. There was no historical era "sea" there before we started monkeying with the Colorado River.