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Author Topic: Water wars  (Read 33701 times)

vox_mundi

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Re: Water wars
« Reply #100 on: May 21, 2019, 09:42:00 AM »
Millions Without Water in Libya as Armed Group Cuts Off Supply 
https://www.theguardian.com/world/2019/may/21/millions-without-water-libya-armed-group-cuts-off-supply

Water supplies to the Libyan capital and surrounding cities have been cut off after an armed group stormed a control room, leaving millions of people without water as summer temperatures begin to climb.

The gunmen arrived on Sunday at the control room in Jafara run by a consortium known as the Great Man-Made River project, which transports water via a vast underground network of pipes from the Sahara into Tripoli, a city of more than 2 million people, and other coastal areas. The group forced staff to shut down the water pipes connected to underground wells.

As a result of the attack water will not just be cut to Tripoli, but also to Gharyan and some other western mountain cities. It is not known how long it will take to restore supplies, but the incident underlines the vulnerability of Libya’s civil fabric to a prolonged war. The authority previously warned it was finding it difficult to repair leaks due to the fighting. Libya periodically suffers from water outages.


https://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/Great_Man-Made_River
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Alexander555

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Re: Water wars
« Reply #101 on: May 25, 2019, 11:06:34 AM »
And by next year many of these cities will lose their main source of water, groundwater. How is that going to unfold ? I think China will be happy in the future that they had a 1 child policy. Maybe not good for a capitalist system that needs constant growth. But for their survival it probably was a good step. https://timesofindia.indiatimes.com/city/bengaluru/water-scarcity-hits-govt-hospitals-in-hyd-ktaka-sterilisation-camp-scrapped/articleshow/69488745.cms

gerontocrat

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Re: Water wars
« Reply #102 on: May 25, 2019, 12:01:24 PM »
Millions Without Water in Libya as Armed Group Cuts Off Supply 
https://www.theguardian.com/world/2019/may/21/millions-without-water-libya-armed-group-cuts-off-supply
The water brought into the cities from the Sahara is fossil water, i.e. not replaced when extracted. How long before it is exhausted I do not know, though Wikipedia says "Independent estimates indicate that the aquifer could be depleted of water in as soon as 60 to 100 years. Analysts say that the costs of the $25 billion groundwater extraction system are 10% those of desalination." Much will depend on the quantity of the water used  for irrigated agriculture.

https://www.nasa.gov/multimedia/imagegallery/image_feature_562.html
"Fossil Water" in Libya
Quote
In the 1950s, oil exploration in Libya turned up another valuable resource: water. Huge aquifers, underground deposits of sand and rock that also contain water, lurked underneath the scorching sands. The Libyan government weighed the costs of bringing water up from the aquifers against transporting water from Europe and desalination of salt water, and chose the aquifers as the most cost-effective option.

Water hiding in aquifers can actually be cleaner than water resting in above-ground reservoirs because the process of percolating through soil and rock can remove impurities. Water can rest underground in aquifers for thousands or even millions of years. When geologic changes seal the aquifer off from further "recharging," the water inside is sometimes called "fossil water." Radiocarbon dating has revealed that some of Libya's aquifer water has been there for 40,000 years, since before the end of the last ice age.

https://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/Great_Man-Made_River
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Tom_Mazanec

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Re: Water wars
« Reply #103 on: May 31, 2019, 12:51:51 AM »
SHARKS (CROSSED OUT) MONGEESE (SIC) WITH FRICKIN LASER BEAMS ATTACHED TO THEIR HEADS

kassy

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Re: Water wars
« Reply #104 on: June 09, 2019, 11:00:16 AM »
Heatstroke kills monkeys as India suffers in searing temperatures

...

The monkeys died in Joshi Baba forest range in Madhya Pradesh state where the thermometer reached 46 Celsius (114 Fahrenheit).

District forest officer P. N. Mishra said the primates were believed to have fought with a rival troop over access to a water source.

"This is rare and strange as herbivores don't indulge in such conflicts," Mishra told NDTV network.

...

In Jharkhand state, a man stabbed six others after he was stopped from filling extra water barrels at a public tank, media reported Saturday.

On Friday, a 33-year-old man died after a similar fight in Tamil Nadu state.

https://phys.org/news/2019-06-heatstroke-monkeys-india-searing-temperatures.html
Þetta minnismerki er til vitnis um að við vitum hvað er að gerast og hvað þarf að gera. Aðeins þú veist hvort við gerðum eitthvað.

gerontocrat

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Re: Water wars
« Reply #105 on: June 17, 2019, 05:24:42 PM »
Violence is increasing

https://packages.trust.org/running-dry/index.html
Competing for water on a thirsty planet

Quote
Around the world, fresh water is fast becoming a dangerously scarce resource, driving a surge in fights to secure supplies and fears over rising numbers of deaths in water conflicts.
In the 1990s, conflicts driven by water scarcity led to about 350 deaths, in places from Yemen to Nigeria, according to the chronology based on news reports and other sources.

But in the last five years, at least 3,000 people - and perhaps more than 10 times that many, if estimates of refugee deaths by Medicins Sans Frontieres are included - have died in clashes related to water in a huge range of countries, it noted.

"We see conflicts over water, unfortunately, almost everywhere around the world now as competition grows over the scarce resource," said Peter Gleick, co-founder of the California-based Pacific Institute.

"If you look at the number of conflicts over water in the past few decades, it's going up exponentially."
"Para a Causa do Povo a Luta Continua!"
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sidd

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Re: Water wars
« Reply #106 on: July 06, 2019, 05:46:48 PM »
Different kinda war:

"virtual water exports – the molecules of H20 embedded in exported goods, alongside those rendered unusable by the production of those goods – amount to a net 95.4 billion cubic meters a year, according to data collected by the Water Footprint Network, a group that encourages thriftier usage. This makes India a bigger exporter of water than far better-endowed countries such as Brazil, Russia, the U.S. and Canada, and represents nearly four times the 25 billion cubic meters consumed by India’s households and industrial enterprises."

https://www.bloomberg.com/opinion/articles/2019-07-06/india-is-the-world-s-biggest-exporter-of-water-despite-shortages

sidd