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yan

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Re: Anyone here working on any interesting building projects?
« Reply #200 on: May 10, 2014, 07:45:52 PM »
Bruce,
Thanks for your encouragements. In fact my "way of ecological" life today is very peacefull, easy and pleasant to live. It is my life 5 years ago that was very difficult to support ! (appartment in a big city, cars , road dangerous for bycicles, no garden, bad quality food, concrete everywhere, noise, urban life with superficial links ...).

Jim
About V2G, I don't think having 2 battery pack is complicated. The 2 packs will be clearly separated and will not work together: 1 for the car, 1 for the house. I rather think that industrial production will be simplified: car companys will produce hight volume, low cost EV. Electricity company will produce hight volume, low cost pack of inverters+battery for home equiped with solar pv.

sidd

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Re: Anyone here working on any interesting building projects?
« Reply #201 on: May 10, 2014, 09:36:50 PM »
Re: intake air for fireplace.

I have a wood burning fireplace in the basement. Chimney design is very good, two steel tubes inside one another. Inner vents, outer for makeup air. I think the intent was to ensure that even if the basement were sealed off, intake air would be available to prevent CO poisoning. But it works great, preheats intake air as well. I have not seen this design elsewhere. The company that made the fireplace , Preway, is unfortunately out of business.

sidd

Neven

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Re: Anyone here working on any interesting building projects?
« Reply #202 on: May 11, 2014, 08:49:19 AM »
Hello,

I have two questions regarding humidity management.

The first one  about the humidity sealing of the house. I heard both therories, that humidity should be able to go through the walls to allow you to see if water finds a way in, or that the house should be totaly sealed because when humidity leaves the house on the outside walls, it uses the heat of the house to evaporate. I have always prefered the first option, but I would like to hear what other people think about it. If you choose the first option, you also have to select materials that support humidity for the house finish.

Hello and welcome, Etienne.

What I've learned with regards to humidity, is that exterior walls should let water vapour out of the house, but not in. And so from outside to inside materials should be less and less humidity conducive, with at the end a vapour barrier of some sorts.

In our case we have (from outside to inside):

2 cm lime plaster
2.5 cm wooden planks
30 cm wood beams and cellulose
2 cm OSB (that's the vapour barrier)
2 cm loam plaster

Quote
The second question is about the ventilation and humidity. My house is a traditionnal concrete house with an ouside insulation built in 1999. I have an Aldes both ways ventilation that's very basic but already with a heat exchanger. Excepted when the temperature is permanently under 5°C, I am very happy to get the humidity out of the house. I get so much humidity from cooking, drying clothes, taking showers... I need a humidification maybe 3 weeks a year, excepted this year that was soo warm that I didn't need it at all.

The only danger I see from heat recovering ventilation systems is that they take out moisture out of the house. I've seen passive houses in winter where humidity falls below 30%. This is very unhealthy.

Quote
When using a wood stove it is very important that the air intake to the fire comes from outside the house.  Or else you take the warm air from the room where the firebox is and send it up the chimney!

External air intake is an absolute must when you have a ventilation system (or you get problems with pressure). If your house is airtight, you also don't want your wood stove to take out all the oxygen in the room. This is something I really dislike when I'm in a room with a wood stove with no external air intake.

BTW, I've read about some research years ago that the electric bicycle was the mode of transport with the highest EROEI. Better than all-electric or all-human.
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Andreas T

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Re: Anyone here working on any interesting building projects?
« Reply #203 on: May 11, 2014, 01:22:53 PM »
In rural southern Germany wood burning stoves are very common in new houses. My brother has the traditional brick and tile variety, you probably know Kachelofen in your part of Austria too, Neven. Usually there is a pot of water on top of the stove to avoid the air becoming too dry. Cold winter air coming into the house is very dry which ever way it gets in (sorry to state the obvious, we read enough about the arctic atmosphere here ;)).
Passive houses without a high temperature heat source would have to find other ways to add moisture (houseplants?). There are heat recovery systems I have read which also transfer water vapour from outgoing air to incoming air, but I expect that this gets too expensive for domestic systems.

Sorry if this is of topic here, but what is your experience with electric bike batteries, Yan? Is the amount of charge they can hold becoming less as they get older?

etienne

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Re: Anyone here working on any interesting building projects?
« Reply #204 on: May 11, 2014, 09:15:24 PM »
Hello,

Still about humidity management

This is the way I dry my clothes .

5 kg of clothes brings more or less 2 kg of water (1550 t/min spinning).

I guess this is why I don't have too much dry air problems.

Best regards, thank you for the answer.

Etienne

Neven

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Re: Anyone here working on any interesting building projects?
« Reply #205 on: May 11, 2014, 09:57:54 PM »
Quote
There are heat recovery systems I have read which also transfer water vapour from outgoing air to incoming air, but I expect that this gets too expensive for domestic systems.

Yes, they're called Rotationswärmetauscher in German. Hoval, for instance, has ventilation systems on offer with these heat exchangers that also exchange water vapour. But we'll be using the more exotic Ökolüfter (I've described it more thoroughly at the start of the thread).

Quote
In rural southern Germany wood burning stoves are very common in new houses. My brother has the traditional brick and tile variety, you probably know Kachelofen in your part of Austria too, Neven. Usually there is a pot of water on top of the stove to avoid the air becoming too dry.

Yes, those are awesome. We though about building a loam oven (also described earlier in this thread), but it would easily overheat our home. We're trying out the infrared heating panels, and if those aren't sufficient or satisfactory, we'll buy an air+water-heating wood stove.
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yan

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Re: Anyone here working on any interesting building projects?
« Reply #206 on: May 11, 2014, 10:41:42 PM »
Hello Etienne,

What is your heating system ? (I saw on your photo a traditionnal radiator, perhaps with gaz boiler system ?)

With a house made of "traditionnal" walls (concrete + polysterene ), humidity inside can't go trough the walls. So you will inevitably have sometime too much or or too few humidity (contrary to Neven's house or mine). What I see offenly when I visit houses of my customers is that heat or humidity regulators are not always easy to implement and consume electricity. And finally what seems to work the best is: open the window   ;)!

About electric bike and batterys:
My bike is a TwistLite Giant purchased in 2006. The original battery (panasonic 24V 9Ah NiMh) is 8 year old and is half his nominal capacity (45 km), but still working. I purchased a second new battery in 2012 (400 €) which is still 100% it's capacity. Globally my feeling is very positive with this "solution of transport". I estimate that my electric bike give me back 200 € / year because it is replacing my car (diesel) and very expensive parking tickets. But there are several another benefits: no trafic jam, no stress, "feeling" the nature/weather, good exercice (not too few, not too strong) for cardio-vascular...
« Last Edit: May 11, 2014, 10:48:02 PM by yan »

Jim Hunt

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Re: Anyone here working on any interesting building projects?
« Reply #207 on: May 12, 2014, 02:10:20 AM »
Hi Yan,

About V2G, I don't think having 2 battery pack is complicated. The 2 packs will be clearly separated and will not work together: 1 for the car, 1 for the house. I rather think that industrial production will be simplified: car companys will produce hight volume, low cost EV. Electricity company will produce hight volume, low cost pack of inverters+battery for home equiped with solar pv.

To save clogging up this thread further with "battery" related stuff I've just started a dedicated thread on the topic:

"Distributed Energy Storage (or S2H/S2G/V2H/V2G for short)"
Reality is merely an illusion, albeit a very persistent one - Albert Einstein

Laurent

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Re: Anyone here working on any interesting building projects?
« Reply #208 on: August 11, 2014, 11:24:28 PM »
Video of a builder in the wild. Pretty impressive with few tools.

ghoti

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Re: Anyone here working on any interesting building projects?
« Reply #209 on: September 24, 2014, 01:44:20 AM »
The person who designed and installed my solar domestic hot water system a few years ago is now designing, building and selling zero carbon homes. In order to prove the design and get practice building it he's building one for his family home. They are blogging about it as they go and I figure people here would probably be interesting in seeing it.

http://www.ecogenbuild.ca/?page_id=2

The build progress posts are on the Recent Posts links in reverse order.

GeoffBeacon

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Re: Anyone here working on any interesting building projects?
« Reply #210 on: October 19, 2014, 05:37:37 PM »
I'm arguing for separate developments for those that aim to have low carbon footprints:

Quote
In developed countries, new settlements damage the world. Building them brings materials from the world marketplace, causing destruction of nature and atmospheric pollution. The greenhouse gasses emitted by sourcing these materials cause the emission of large amount of greenhouse gasses.

The lifestyles of the residents in new developments are also damaging. Even if these newcomers wanted to live a world-friendly life-style, they would find it impossible because the other residents are mostly the affluent who live high-carbon lifestyles with a high level of car ownership. Consequently these developments do not have the facilities and organisation necessary for low-carbon lifestyles such as local shops and public transport.
http://www.brusselsblog.co.uk/the-green-settlement-handbook/
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Zythryn

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Re: Anyone here working on any interesting building projects?
« Reply #211 on: October 19, 2014, 08:21:23 PM »
While I see the benefits to an entire development built to be low carbon, I also think building in established neighborhoods has a place.

Humans are competitive animals.
With my current house, which is about 50% better than a "built to code" house, I talk with my neighbors about the small amount of energy we use.  This encourages others to improve their own energy use.

We are at the start of a project to build a net-zero house.  One of our goals is to use it to educate.  Show people that the house an look and act normal in every way, and not cost tons more to be a healthier, cheaper to maintain, more durable house.

We need the zero carbon build pioneers.
We also need to get the mainstream buyers thinking about using less energy.

GeoffBeacon

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Re: Anyone here working on any interesting building projects?
« Reply #212 on: October 21, 2014, 10:43:50 AM »
Zythryn

Yes. Of course "building in established neighborhoods has a place" but will you be able to get you neighbours to

1. Give up their cars
2. Bring in public transport
3. Open local shops.
2. Create local jobs
3. Grow food locally.

These things are not easy in car owning suburbs but essential for a low-carbon lifestyle

Related link http://www.brusselsblog.co.uk/a-parable-of-four-villages/
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mark

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Re: Anyone here working on any interesting building projects?
« Reply #213 on: October 21, 2014, 06:55:46 PM »
Neven - I am very envious of your project - at the moment I'm just trying to get my house watertight after being done over by a builder who was meant to have done the work!

Anyhow one thing I have always wanted to do is make my house thermally efficient and with that in mind I saw a coup[le of television programmes on specialist home builds - one had the whole garden underlaid with pipework at @1.5m depth and a heat recovery system that supplied the heat for the whole house in winter. But the one I liked most of all was the simplest - in order to keep the cost down of keeping the house warmer in winter and cooler in summer, the ventilation system drew its air from a large duct laid down the 50m of the entrance drive at a depth of 1.5m again where the temperature (if I rmember correctly) didnt stray much during the year from 8C this meant that the house could be kept cool in summer and any heating in the winter at least drew air in at @8C - which during the night and sub zero temperatures was a substantial energy saving. I wish I had kept a record of the programme!!

Sorry if this has already been mentioned - I read the first page of posts but then skipped to the last. But thought it may interest you

Neven

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Re: Anyone here working on any interesting building projects?
« Reply #214 on: October 21, 2014, 09:08:37 PM »
Anyhow one thing I have always wanted to do is make my house thermally efficient and with that in mind I saw a coup[le of television programmes on specialist home builds - one had the whole garden underlaid with pipework at @1.5m depth and a heat recovery system that supplied the heat for the whole house in winter.

My neighbours have that system and are very satisfied with it. Only downside is you can't plant any trees.

Quote
But the one I liked most of all was the simplest - in order to keep the cost down of keeping the house warmer in winter and cooler in summer, the ventilation system drew its air from a large duct laid down the 50m of the entrance drive at a depth of 1.5m again where the temperature (if I rmember correctly) didnt stray much during the year from 8C this meant that the house could be kept cool in summer and any heating in the winter at least drew air in at @8C - which during the night and sub zero temperatures was a substantial energy saving. I wish I had kept a record of the programme!!

Sorry if this has already been mentioned - I read the first page of posts but then skipped to the last. But thought it may interest you
[/quote]

I thought about doing this, pipes leading to the greenhouse, and the ventilation taking its air from the somewhat warmer than outside greenhouse, but this was too much wishful thinking. I might still do something with underground piping for the greenhouse.

But I'm such a slow builder that the greenhouse will probably be built 2 years from now.

I have now started building the kitchen, and still need to lay the oak floor after that, build that shower stall in the bathroom that is still bugging me, and then we'll finally have running water and can move in.

I'll post some images soon of the interior building I've done with wood and loam in the past couple of months. A lot of work, but I'm pleased with the result.
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mark

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Re: Anyone here working on any interesting building projects?
« Reply #215 on: October 21, 2014, 11:55:57 PM »
My house is 120 years old made of brick and still needs a lot of work - I too have flooring to lay and a kitchen to build so my sympathies are with you. Once finished I will sell it and then hopefully find a project where I can let loose my ideas!

I'll be 'lurking' (I seem to be good at that!) with interest.

skanky

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Re: Anyone here working on any interesting building projects?
« Reply #216 on: October 22, 2014, 10:27:39 AM »
My house is 120 years old made of brick and still needs a lot of work - I too have flooring to lay and a kitchen to build so my sympathies are with you. Once finished I will sell it and then hopefully find a project where I can let loose my ideas!

I'll be 'lurking' (I seem to be good at that!) with interest.

There are people who will sink a pipe for a ground sourced heat pump straight down (assuming the ground type is okay) so you don't take up the whole garden. These systems are best suited to under floor heating though, so you'd want to rule it in or out before you do your floor.

Laurent

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Re: Anyone here working on any interesting building projects?
« Reply #217 on: October 31, 2014, 09:24:32 PM »
There is a guy on the blog that is looking for some infos for some heaters (rocket).

I found these videos, it is in French but you don't have to understand the language the film speaks for itself.



It does sound a bit like a joke, Barnabé is melting aluminium with leafs :



 ;)
« Last Edit: October 31, 2014, 09:35:49 PM by Laurent »

Neven

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Re: Anyone here working on any interesting building projects?
« Reply #218 on: December 24, 2014, 11:51:13 PM »
I'll post some images soon of the interior building I've done with wood and loam in the past couple of months. A lot of work, but I'm pleased with the result.

A bit later than I wanted, but here are some images of the interior building with wood and loam. It really was a lot of work. My wife made all the insulation materials, mixing the loam with the wood shavings and a bit of water, while I made all the walls, covered them with lathes, and installed all the electric wiring etc.

It took us twice as much time as we initially thought (3 months instead of 6 weeks), but all in all it was worth it, as we have learned a lot, saved a lot of money and energy, did the whole interior building practically 100% environmentally friendly, and nothing beats the satisfaction of DIY.

Unfortunately we couldn't do the loam plaster ourselves, and this was quite horrible. So much moisture in the house, such an incredible mess, workers not caring about the details (it took my wife 3 weeks to get all of it fixed). But this too was cheap and unbeatable from an eco point of view.

So here are some of the pictures showing the process and end result:





















Here's some of the stuff we've done after that, putting in 2" high constructions for the oak floors, basically wooden posts with 1/2" hemp strips under them for sound insulation, infilled with a mix of sand and loam to get some more heat/cold retaining mass into the house:




 




We're now busy finishing the kitchen and the bathroom (I'll have more on that in a couple of weeks, the shower stall I wrote about earlier, is going to be real interesting, different from what I had in mind initially, as that wasn't going to work), then we have to do around 500 square feet of oak floor, sand and oil all the floors, and then mid-January the plumber is coming to connect us to the water mains, and we should be able to move in before the end of the month.

I hope we'll make it. I have no (mental) energy left! As expected. :D
« Last Edit: February 05, 2015, 08:45:15 PM by Neven »
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Neven

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Re: Anyone here working on any interesting building projects?
« Reply #219 on: February 05, 2015, 10:13:34 PM »
We're now busy finishing the kitchen and the bathroom (I'll have more on that in a couple of weeks, the shower stall I wrote about earlier, is going to be real interesting, different from what I had in mind initially, as that wasn't going to work), then we have to do around 500 square feet of oak floor, sand and oil all the floors, and then mid-January the plumber is coming to connect us to the water mains, and we should be able to move in before the end of the month.

I hope we'll make it. I have no (mental) energy left! As expected. :D
OK, we made it!   :)

It was a nightmare with Murphy's Law doing its thing at every turn, but we managed to finish things enough to be able to move in, exhausted and all. Here's a couple of images with the oak floor installed and oiled:









An interesting period starts now, as we're testing and tweaking all the new stuff, like the heat pump that heats our water, the rain water pump, the heating and most of all, the device I looked forward to most: the Ökolüfter decentral heat recovery ventilation system I described almost two years ago in this comment (tempus fugit).

Here are a couple of images, and my experiences so far below that:







Basically, the upper fan sucks in air from the house through a polyethylene membrane in the metal drum, and the lower fan presses fresh air through the same membrane. This sucking and pushing causes the drum to turn, and so the membrane takes up around 90% of the heat of the air leaving the house, the drum turns to the next fan and the membrane transfers this heat to the incoming air. Some humidity is transferred as well, so the house doesn't dry out (a big downside of heat recovery ventilation systems).

And it works! There is definitely enough fresh air coming in, even at the Ökolüfter's lowest position, which is around 80 m3/hr. Now, our house has a volume of around 225 m3, which amounts to an air change rate of 0.35. The inventor of the passive house, Dr. Feist, required an air change rate of 0.3-0.4, so we're already doing good.

Some say you should have an air exchange of at least 30 m3/h per person, a Swiss institute mentioned 22-36 m3/h per person, others say more. I just look at the Green Eye CO2 measuring device I bought a while ago:



With 80 m3/h (perhaps slightly lower) we have a total CO2 concentration that varies between 800 and 1100 ppm every day. Below 1000 ppm is 'normal' according to the Green Eye, above that is 'poor'. I'd like the concentration to be lower than 800 ppm (my brain needs oxygen for the translation work and blogging I do), but for that I'd need to increase the Ökolüfter's air exchange rate. The downside of that is that the device becomes a lot less quiet when turned up.

I'm very sensitive to these kinds of noises (the PC I built myself for instance is almost 100% passive, with the only moving part a big CPU fan that kicks in at a certain temperature) and so I'm happy with 80 m3/h for now. But I will try to reduce the noise level and have asked the manufacturer for advice.

If anyone would like to have more details on the installation process, just let me know.

The great thing about heat recovery ventilation systems is that you don't lose a lot of energy while letting fresh air into your home. During the first few days of living in our home we had to ventilate all the time by opening the windows, because the CO2 concentration was exceeding 2000 ppm, which is really unhealthy. This was a real PITA, and we also lost a lot of heat in the process. That's not so great as the outside temps are freezing at night and during some days as well.

This has been our view ever since we moved in last week:



Beautiful, but somewhat cold.  :)

However, thanks to the Ökolüfter and just two infra red heating panels with a total capacity of 1100 W, we manage to keep the temperature between 18 and 20 °C! That's really the result I was hoping for. It means that we'd need to heat the house with 1000-1500 W for 2 months at most, and that's it. Of course, this amounts to 12-18 kWh a day (and add to that what the heat pump needs to heat the 300 L water storage tank), which IMO is too much. Sure, we have 5.25 kWp of PV capacity, but it produces less than 5 kWh per day right now, which means this energy will have to be produced by coal.

We're going to see how things go for a while longer this winter (I'm hoping for some very low temps as a test), and then we'll have to decide before next winter whether we want to install the wood oven system (20% of the wood energy goes to heating the air, 80% to heating water using a water heat exchanger in the 300 L water storage tank) I wrote about here.

So, this is our building project so far. I hope to have the energy to set up a website/blog that describes the alternative building aspects of the project, with a lot of data, etc. It's amazing what one can accomplish on the eco/energy level for a reasonable price. Not easy, but doable. I hope it will prove to be a solid foundation for a healthy, sustainable lifestyle that inspires others.
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lisa

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Re: Anyone here working on any interesting building projects?
« Reply #220 on: February 22, 2015, 08:28:54 PM »
I have a new project.  I'm going to be starting the work on a aquaponics system next month. 

I live in a 1500 sqft 100-yr old bungalow in a blue-collar neighborhood of central Lansing, Michigan.  My yard is very small, but I have a guerrilla-garden in the empty lot across the street. 

I've been interested in aquaponics for a while.  I'm going to put the tank in my basement, against the back (south) wall, and feed the water lines up to the greenhouse that's on the south side of the house. 

I'll come back with pictures when I have them!

Laurent

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Re: Anyone here working on any interesting building projects?
« Reply #221 on: April 30, 2015, 12:47:40 PM »
They are working on an interesting building...a castle !  ;D

etienne

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Re: Anyone here working on any interesting building projects?
« Reply #222 on: November 19, 2017, 02:55:38 PM »
I'm also working on a project "EnergiewabenGR" that aims to define a local energy management model for renewable energy. The idea is to find ways to adapt consumption to production.

Since smart meters are not active yet, we are mainly working on a model, but what I wanted to talk about is a Smappee product (www.smappee.com) that we use to mesure the electricity load curve of buildings.

Data are provided by 5 minutes.

The systems also can mesure PV production if you have any, and can open electricity sockets when solar production is available.

It should be able to detect when different systems are on or off (refrigerator, washmachine...), but it takes some times to have it work properly and it's too early for me to give you any feed back on this.

There are other controls, but always with sockets like turning them on/off at a specific time, when the sun does up/down, when some system is on.

Bellow you'll find my consumption of yesterday. The highest peak is related to cooking, the second one to the  vacuum cleaner.

It also defines a base load.

I'm not sure that this will help me to save much energy, but it is interesting. I found the product very interesting and the price is ok (furthermore I didn't have have to pay for it).

Neven

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Re: Anyone here working on any interesting building projects?
« Reply #223 on: November 21, 2017, 10:13:06 PM »
That looks pretty cool, Etienne. I love measuring stuff.

How are the sockets opened/closed? Via radio or the power lines themselves?

I'll probably buy something like this in a year or so.
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Jim Hunt

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Re: Anyone here working on any interesting building projects?
« Reply #224 on: November 22, 2017, 02:30:44 PM »
That looks pretty cool, Etienne. I love measuring stuff.

What is the state of play regarding "smart meter" rollout in Austria? Do you have one for example?

Same question for Etienne, in France I assume.
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ghoti

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Re: Anyone here working on any interesting building projects?
« Reply #225 on: November 22, 2017, 05:17:18 PM »
Almost all of the province of Ontario, Canada has smart meters because time of use charges are the norm. My local distribution company analyses the current usage patterns to determine what classes of devices are consuming the electricity. This is possible even though none of the devices are "smart".

Here's mine for last month as an example:

etienne

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Re: Anyone here working on any interesting building projects?
« Reply #226 on: November 22, 2017, 06:22:26 PM »
How are the sockets opened/closed? Via radio or the power lines themselves?

For the communication with the sockets, I believe that it is radio controlled. 433.92 Mhz. Don't know how far that frequency can go. This is an issue for us because we try to limit electro-magnetic waves in the house.

etienne

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Re: Anyone here working on any interesting building projects?
« Reply #227 on: November 22, 2017, 06:24:49 PM »

What is the state of play regarding "smart meter" rollout in Austria? Do you have one for example?

Same question for Etienne, in France I assume.

Well, I live in Luxembourg. Here we have a crazy situation because smart meters are being installed, but the communication infrastructure is not ready. So somebody came last week to my house to read the value on the smart meter to inform the utility company of my consumption.

etienne

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Re: Anyone here working on any interesting building projects?
« Reply #228 on: November 22, 2017, 06:30:49 PM »
Almost all of the province of Ontario, Canada has smart meters because time of use charges are the norm. My local distribution company analyses the current usage patterns to determine what classes of devices are consuming the electricity. This is possible even though none of the devices are "smart".

Here's mine for last month as an example:

Do you feel that your appliances have been recognised correctly ? The Smappee tries it also, but this doesn’t work so well yet. Since the user manual says that it needs at least one month to have it right, I won’t discuss this too much yet.

etienne

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Re: Anyone here working on any interesting building projects?
« Reply #229 on: November 22, 2017, 06:32:39 PM »
Electricity seems to be cheap in Ontario. In Luxembourg, I pay 0.15 EUR/kWh.

ghoti

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Re: Anyone here working on any interesting building projects?
« Reply #230 on: November 23, 2017, 01:45:08 AM »
Electricity seems to be cheap in Ontario. In Luxembourg, I pay 0.15 EUR/kWh.
That's just the price for the electricity. The other charges on the monthly bill like delivery charges and taxes double the amount. That's Canadian dollars so still that's not very high.

Neven

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Re: Anyone here working on any interesting building projects?
« Reply #231 on: November 23, 2017, 09:04:08 AM »
I don't know how smart my meter is. I talk to it, but it never says anything back.  ;)

It looks pretty modern, but as with Etienne, once a year someone from the utility pays a visit, sticks a little gadget into the meter, and leaves with the data.

As for rollout in Austria, I have no idea.
« Last Edit: November 23, 2017, 09:11:30 AM by Neven »
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Re: Anyone here working on any interesting building projects?
« Reply #232 on: November 23, 2017, 10:26:58 AM »
I don't know how smart my meter is. I talk to it, but it never says anything back.  ;)

Mine shows me pretty pictures! More over on the PV + battery (+ EV!) thread:

https://forum.arctic-sea-ice.net/index.php/topic,2162.msg134625.html

Reality is merely an illusion, albeit a very persistent one - Albert Einstein