Arctic Sea Ice : Forum

Cryosphere => Arctic sea ice => Topic started by: DungeonMaster on March 23, 2013, 04:49:39 PM

Title: Glossary ... for newbies and others
Post by: DungeonMaster on March 23, 2013, 04:49:39 PM
I realized that it may be difficult for our new readers to understand most of abbreviations used here. So I suggest making a glossary !

For more terms you can refer to NSIDC's Glossary (http://nsidc.org/cgi-bin/words/glossary.pl). Or peruse the Global Cryosphere Watch Glossary (http://globalcryospherewatch.org/reference/glossary.php) (4141 entries from 26 sources; over 2200 are unique).

Please add terms and definitions below, I'll try to compile them in this first message (except the jokes). Please also provide links when you can.

An other Glossary is available for Antarctic here (http://forum.arctic-sea-ice.net/index.php/topic,251.msg4400.html#msg4400)

ABW - Arctic bottom water

AMO - Atlantic Multidecadal Oscillation

AMOC - Atlantic Meridional Overturning Circulation

AMSR - Advanced Microwave Scanning Radiometer

AO - Arctic Oscillation

ASI - Arctic Sea Ice - all the Ice floating in the Arctic Seas.

ASIB - Arctic Sea Ice Blog (http://neven1.typepad.com/)

ASIF - Arctic Sea Ice Forum

ASIG - Arctic Sea Ice Graphs page (https://sites.google.com/site/arcticseaicegraphs/)

AW - Atlantic water

AWI - Alfred Wegener Institute, an important research center in Germany

AWP - Albedo-Warming Potential

BOE - Blue Ocean Event

BS - Bering Strait (or when someone is talking nonsense) (or Blog Science (http://denialdepot.blogspot.com/))

CAA - Canadian Arctic Archipelago - Canadian islands in the North of America: Ellesmere, Victoria, Baffin and many others, except Greenland. CAA main waterways include the PGAS, Peary Channel, Amundsen Gulf, McClintock Channel and Gulf of Boothia.

CAB - Central Arctic Basin, the central part of the Arctic Ocean, bordering the CAA, Beaufort, Chukchi, East Siberian, Laptev, Kara, Barents and Greenland seas. It has several definitions of borders, mainly a smaller CAB (NSIDC/MASIE maps) or larger CAB (CT/Wipneus maps) versions, depending on demarcations with the other seas. It includes the Lincoln Sea and the Wandel Sea.

CAPIE - Cryosphere Today area per IJIS extent (crude melt pond and compactness measure)

CB - Century break (http://neven1.typepad.com/blog/2010/06/century-breaks.html), a drop of more than 100K (one hundred thousand) km2 in sea ice area or extent

CIS - Canadian Ice Service (https://www.canada.ca/en/environment-climate-change/services/ice-forecasts-observations.html)

CONUS - Continental (or contiguous, or conterminous) U.S., meaning the 48 states, not including Alaska

CR - Climate Reanalyzer

CT - Cryosphere Today (http://arctic.atmos.uiuc.edu/cryosphere/), a now-defunct website

DJF - December January February - winter (Meteorological calendar, northern hemisphere)

DLR - Downwelling Longwave (infra-red) Radiation

DMI - Danish Meteorological Institute

DRA - Data release area, the previously top secret US Navy submarine data showing measured thickness of sea ice. Released to scientists in 1992 by then Vice President of the US Al Gore.

DTC - Digital Temperature (or Thermistor) Chain, in the context of ice mass balance buoys

DTR - Diurnal Temperature Range - the difference between daily max and min temperatures.

EAIS - East Antarctic Ice Sheet

ECMWF (AKA Euro) - European Centre for Medium-Range Weather Forecasts

EEI - Earth energy imbalance, the difference between the amount of solar energy absorbed by Earth and the amount of energy the planet radiates to space as heat.

ENSO - El Nino Southern Oscillation

EPO - Eastern Pacific Oscillation

ESAS - East Siberian Arctic Shelf

ESS - East Siberian Sea

FDD - Freezing Degree Days. Sum of temps in C below freezing. Provides integrated intensity of cold.

FJL - Franz Josef Land, a group of islands to the east of Svalbard

FRIS - Filchner-Ronne Ice Shelf, Atlantic part of WAIS (Filchner the eastern outlet, Ronne the western by the peninsula (both having gently sloping submarine outlets)

FYI - First-year ice

GAC -  Great Arctic Cyclone

GAAC - Great Arctic Anti-Cyclone (result of persistent high pressure)

GCM - General Circulation Model, or Global Climate Model. The sort of model used to make IPCC temperature projections.

GFS - Global Forecast System (US weather forecast model)

gice - One of the PIOMAS output files, containing the distribution of thicknesses in each grid cell

GIS - Greenland Ice Sheet

HFO - Heavy fuel oil

High Arctic - "hard to melt" arctic seas, including the CAB, CAA, Beaufort Sea, Chukchi Sea, ESS, Laptev Sea, Kara Sea

hPa - hectopascal, a unit of pressure

ICESat - Ice Cloud and land Elevation Satellite. The precursor to CryoSat 2, used to validate PIOMAS

IJIS - IARC-JAXA Information System run by the International Arctic Research Center (IARC), University of Alaska, and the Japan Aerospace Exploration Agency (JAXA)

IMB - Ice Mass Balance buoy

IS - Ice stream

JAXA - Japan Aerospace eXploration Agency

JIS - Jakobshavn Isbrae (or Ice Stream)

JJA - June July August - summer (Meteorological calendar, northern hemisphere)

LFO - Light fuel oil

MAM - March April May - spring (Meteorological calendar, northern hemisphere)

MIZ - Marginal Ice Zone

MSLP - Mean Sea Level Pressure

MYI - Multi-Year Ice

NAO - North Atlantic Oscillation

NAVGEM -  Navy Global Environmental Model

NEW -  Northeast Water Polynya

NH - Northern Hemisphere.

NEGIS - North-East Greenland Ice Stream

NOW - North Water Polynya

NP - North Pole

NSR - Northern Sea Route

NWP - North West Passage

OLR - Outgoing Longwave (infra-red) Radiation

OMG - Oceans are Melting Greenland

OSISAF - Ocean and Sea Ice Satellite Application Facility

OWFE - Open Water Formation Efficiency. A measure of the melt season thinning that leads to a percentage of open water in the Arctic ocean.

PAC -  Persistent Arctic Cyclone

PDO - Pacific Decadal Oscillation

Peripheral Seas - "easy to melt" arctic seas - Sea of Okhotsk, Bering Sea, Hudson Bay, Baffin  Bay, Gulf of St. Lawernce, Greenland Sea, Barents Sea

PGAS - Prince Gustav Adolf Sea, in the CAA bordering the CAB

PICT - PIOMAS volume per Cryosphere Today area (crude average thickness measure)

PIG - Pine Island Glacier, Blocking one specific steep and deep outlet of WAIS below sea level, and the other sensitive outlet nearby is Thwaites glacier.

PIJAMAS - PIOMAS volume per JAXA sea ice extent (crude average thickness measure)

PIOMAS - Pan Arctic Ice Ocean Modelling and Assimilation System (http://psc.apl.washington.edu/wordpress/research/projects/arctic-sea-ice-volume-anomaly/).

PNA - Pacific North American pattern

PSC - Polar Science Center, University of Washington (PIOMAS)

PV - Polar Vortex

QBO - Quasi Biennial Oscillation

RILE - Rapid Ice Loss Event. An event where area or extent shows marked drops faster than the long term trend, these can take years to play out in the models and rarely end with a totally ice free Arctic.

RIS - Ross Ice Shelf, Pacific part of WAIS (with at least 3 gently sloping submarine outlets)

SAT - Surface air temperature

SFW - Stratospheric Final Warming

SH - Southern Hemisphere.

SIA - Sea ice area

SIC - Sea ice concentration

SIE - Sea ice extent

SIMB - Seasonal Ice Mass Balance buoy

SIT - Sea ice thickness

SIV - Sea ice volume

SLP - Sea level pressure

SMB - Surface mass balance

SMOS - Soil Moisture and Ocean Salinity, ESA satellite

SOI - Southern Oscillation Index

SON - September October November - autumn (Meteorological calendar, northern hemisphere)

SoO - Sea of Okhotsk

SST - Sea surface temperature

SSTa - Sea surface temperature anomaly

SSW - Sudden Stratospheric Warming

SW - ShortWave radiation - sunlight otherwise known as insolation.

SWE - Snow Water Equivalent

TDD - Thawing Degree Days.  Sum of temps in C above freezing. Provides integrated intensity of warmth.

THC - Thermohaline Circulation

TPV - Tropopause Polar Vortex

TPW - Total Precipitable Water

UKMO - United Kingdom Meteorological Office

WAA - Warm Air Advection

WACC - Warm Arctic, Cold Continents

WAIS - The whole West Antarctic Ice Sheet

WIPD - Whole ice pack detachment

ZIS - Zachariae Isstrom (or Ice Stream)
Title: Re: Glossary ... for newbies and others
Post by: Neven on March 23, 2013, 09:52:11 PM
I set it to sticky.  :)

Here are a few:

SIC - sea ice concentration

SIE - sea ice extent

SIA - sea ice area

SoO - Sea of Okhotsk

ESS - East Siberian Sea

CT - Cryosphere Today

CAPIE - Cryosphere Today area per IJIS extent (crude melt pond and compactness measure)

PICT - PIOMAS volume per Cryosphere Today area (crude average thickness measure)

AW - Atlantic water

BS - Bering Strait (or when someone is talking nonsense)

ASIB - Arctic Sea Ice Blog

ASIF - Arctic Sea Ice Forum

ASIG - Arctic Sea Ice Graphs page
Title: Re: Glossary ... for newbies and others
Post by: Pmt111500 on March 24, 2013, 03:56:32 AM
The Antarctica Main Glaciers (or Ice Streams)

*FRIS - Filchner-Ronne Ice Shelf, Atlantic part of WAIS (Filchner the eastern outlet, Ronne the western by the peninsula (both having gently sloping submarine outlets)
*RIS - Ross Ice Shelf, Pacific part of WAIS (with at least 3 gently sloping submarine outlets)

The 'backdoors'(aka 'weak underbelly') to both of them (There's a gap in the Antarctic Mountains) are:
*PIG - Pine Island Glacier, Blocking one specific steep and deep outlet of WAIS below sea level, and the other sensitive outlet nearby is
*Thwaites glacier. These are also the most northern outlets of  the

*WAIS - The whole West Antarctic Ice Sheet

for 'completeness' sake...
*EAIS - East Antarctic Ice Sheet with two largest outlets
*Mertz Glacier (that shed the C-28 iceberg just 2010) and
*Lambert Glacier (to
*Amery Ice Shelf towards Indian Ocean)
and numerous minor ones (most sit firmly on rock.)
Title: Re: Glossary ... for newbies and others
Post by: ChrisReynolds on March 24, 2013, 08:02:16 AM
Both of these two are from papers - so unless you want me to link to papers I can't provide a general info link.

RILE - Rapid Ice Loss Event. An event where area or extent shows marked drops faster than the long term trend, these can take years to play out in the models and rarely end with a totally ice free Arctic.
OWFE - Open Water Formation Efficiency. A measure of the melt season thinning that leads to a percentage of open water in the Arctic ocean.

PIOMAS - Pan Arctic Ice Ocean Modelling and Assimilation System.
http://psc.apl.washington.edu/wordpress/research/projects/projections-of-an-ice-diminished-arctic-ocean/ (http://psc.apl.washington.edu/wordpress/research/projects/projections-of-an-ice-diminished-arctic-ocean/)

ICESat - Ice Cloud and land Elevation Satellite. The precursor to CryoSat 2, used to validate PIOMAS.
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/ICESat (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/ICESat)

DRA - Data release area, the previously top secret US Navy submarine data showing measured thickness of sea ice. Release to scientists in 1992 by then Vice President of the US Al Gore.
http://nsidc.org/scicex/history.html (http://nsidc.org/scicex/history.html)

GCM - General Circulation Model, or Global Climate Model. The sort of model used to make IPCC temperature projections.
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/General_circulation_model (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/General_circulation_model)


Seasons:
Meteorological calendar, northern hemisphere.
DJF - December January February - winter.
MAM - March April May - spring.
JJA - June July August - summer
SON - September October November - autumn.

NH - Northern Hemisphere.
SH - Southern Hemisphere.

FUBAR - the state of the arctic ice pack in recent years.  ;)

PS - there was a map of the Arctic people were recommending. Perhaps it would be an idea to include resources like that here. Or maybe we need a 'backgrounder' sticky post for newbies.
Title: Re: Glossary ... for newbies and others
Post by: ChrisReynolds on March 24, 2013, 08:23:59 AM
Atmospheric and Ocean Modes.

AO - Arctic Oscillation
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Arctic_oscillation (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Arctic_oscillation)

NAO - North Atlantic Oscillation
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/North_Atlantic_oscillation (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/North_Atlantic_oscillation)

ENSO - El Nino Southern Oscillation
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Southern_Oscillation_Index (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Southern_Oscillation_Index)

PDO - Pacific Decadal Oscillation
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Pacific_decadal_oscillation (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Pacific_decadal_oscillation)

PNA - Pacific North American pattern
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Pacific%E2%80%93North_American_teleconnection_pattern (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Pacific%E2%80%93North_American_teleconnection_pattern)

QBO - Quasi Biennial Oscillation
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Quasi_biennial_oscillation (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Quasi_biennial_oscillation)

AMO - Atlantic Multi Decadal Oscillation
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Atlantic_multidecadal_oscillation (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Atlantic_multidecadal_oscillation)

some others

DTR - Diurnal Temperature Range - the difference between daily max and min temperatures.
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Diurnal_temperature_range (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Diurnal_temperature_range)

OLR - Outgoing Longwave (infra-red) Radiation
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Outgoing_longwave_radiation (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Outgoing_longwave_radiation)

DLR - Downwelling Longwave (infra-red) Radiation

SW - ShortWave radiation - sunlight otherwise known as insolation.
Title: Re: Glossary ... for newbies and others
Post by: ivica on March 24, 2013, 08:50:29 AM
FYI - First year ice
MYI - Multy year ice

(Fast Ice, Nilas... covered by  NSIDC's Glossary)

IS - Ice stream
JIS - Jakobshavn ice stream
ZIS - Zacharian ice stream
NEGIS - North-east Greenland ice stream

KISS - Keep it simple, stupid (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/KISS_principle)   :-)
Title: Re: Glossary ... for newbies and others
Post by: Jim Williams on March 24, 2013, 11:00:25 AM
FUBAR - the state of the arctic ice pack in recent years.  ;)

Technically, that is: Fucked Up Beyond All Recognition.  The Arctic Ice Pack is merely an example.
Title: Re: Glossary ... for newbies and others
Post by: DungeonMaster on March 24, 2013, 10:52:34 PM
OK, first set of compilation done (jokes apart).

Please add links when you can...

I'd also love to have clear and simple graphs about :
- AO and AMO,
- extent and area,
If anyone can provide some images or links ? Perhaps on Wikipedia ?

Ivica, what is ZIS ?? Never read about this...
Title: Re: Glossary ... for newbies and others
Post by: ChrisReynolds on March 25, 2013, 06:32:50 PM
I've a long weekend coming up, will add links then.
Title: Re: Glossary ... for newbies and others
Post by: ivica on March 25, 2013, 07:05:00 PM
...Ivica, what is ZIS ?? Never read about this...

ZIS is in article "Zachariæ Isstrøm Further Retreat" with link given by Jim Hunt here:
https://forum.arctic-sea-ice.net/index.php/topic,42.msg307.html#msg307
Title: Re: Glossary ... for newbies and others
Post by: JMP on March 28, 2013, 11:02:05 AM
Many thanks! to Nevin and everyone! 
Glossary = Great idea!

Just now needed to look up:
SST  = Sea Surface Temperature
 

Stumbled upon this list: http://www.nodc.noaa.gov/General/mhdj_acronyms3.html (http://www.nodc.noaa.gov/General/mhdj_acronyms3.html) 
Thought it might be a help.  :) 

-John
Title: Re: Glossary ... for newbies and others
Post by: Jim Pettit on March 28, 2013, 03:30:33 PM
Stumbled upon this list: http://www.nodc.noaa.gov/General/mhdj_acronyms3.html (http://www.nodc.noaa.gov/General/mhdj_acronyms3.html) 
Thought it might be a help.  :) 
I'll give them props for these two:
MERMAid:   Metadata Enterprise Resource Management Aid
SeaBASS:   SeaWiFS Bio-optical Archive and Storage System

...but:
SANTA CLAuS: Studies in ANTarcticA: Coupled Linkages Among micro(u)organismS

Seriously?  :)

Well, despite the obvious stretches, it's a great resource, anyway...
Title: Re: Glossary ... for newbies and others
Post by: frankendoodle on April 17, 2013, 07:53:52 PM
Common chemical abbr.

CO2 = Carbon Dioxide

CH4 = Methane

SO2 = Sulfur Dioxide

Methane Clathrate =  Methane Yydrate, Hydromethane, methane ice, fire ice, natural gas hydrate, or gas hydrate. A solid clathrate compound (more specifically, a clathrate hydrate) in which a large amount of methane is trapped within a crystal structure of water, forming a solid similar to ice (CH4•5.75H2O)

Common Mass/Volume abbr.

ppm = parts per million (mass/molar fraction)

mkm2 = one million square kilometers

Mt = Megatonne = one million metric tonnes (unit of mass) = MMT (million metric tonnes)

Gt = Gigatonne = one billion metric tonnes (unit of mass) i.e. 24.5 GtCO2 (twenty four billion, five-hundered million tonnes of carbon dioxide)

km3 = one cubic kilometer (unit of volume)

1 km3 of water = 1 kGt of water
1.0 km3 of ice = 0.90 Gt

Common Weather abbr.

hPa = 100 Pascals (unit of pressure) = 100 N/m2 (100 Newtons per square meter) Normal pressure usually borders around 1000 hPa

kPa = 1000 Pascals

Bar = 100,000 Pa or 1000 hPa or 100 kPa

millibar = Mbar = 0.001 of a Bar 

Title: Re: Glossary ... for newbies and others
Post by: Rick Aster on April 20, 2013, 01:17:06 AM
A couple of weather terms:

SLP - sea level pressure
SSW - sudden stratospheric warming http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Sudden_stratospheric_warming (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Sudden_stratospheric_warming)

And a link for hPa: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Pascal_%28unit%29 (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Pascal_%28unit%29)
Title: Re: Glossary ... for newbies and others
Post by: lanevn on May 04, 2013, 12:54:16 PM
Anyone know minimum size of polynya to be excluded from SIE number?
Title: Re: Glossary ... for newbies and others
Post by: PhilGChapman on June 11, 2013, 01:04:07 AM
CAB - Central Arctic Basin
Title: Re: Glossary ... for newbies and others
Post by: Tor Bejnar on July 22, 2013, 12:33:54 AM
Arctic maps are referenced in the ASIF "Background » Arctic Maps" thread:  http://forum.arctic-sea-ice.net/index.php/topic,417.0.html (http://forum.arctic-sea-ice.net/index.php/topic,417.0.html)  edit: other maps are available on the Arctic Sea Ice Graphs (ASIG) site (https://sites.google.com/site/arcticseaicegraphs/) linked at the top of this page.
Title: Re: Glossary ... for newbies and others
Post by: Rick Aster on May 19, 2015, 04:14:49 PM
albedo: the reflectivity of a surface, measured as the ratio of reflected light to incident light, with 0 indicating perfect absorption and 1 indicating perfect reflection. http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Albedo (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Albedo)

Useful reference values:

.04 charcoal
.50-.70 sea ice
.80-.90 fresh snow
Title: Re: Glossary ... for newbies and others
Post by: Peter Ellis on May 19, 2015, 04:40:27 PM
Anyone know minimum size of polynya to be excluded from SIE number?
It doesn't work like that. 

For SIE, the sensor looks at a given pixel of ice and measures the percentage of ice within that pixel.  If it's over 15%, then it counts as ice, and if it's below 15% it counts as open water.

So in theory, you could have  a pixel that's 15.00001% covered in ice, and there happens to be a 100 metre square polynya within the ice-covered part, which would push it down below the threshold and thus the whole pixel would now be counted as water.

Alternatively, you could have a long thin polynya (say a crack that's 1km wide and 50km long) that stretches across multiple pixels but doesn't bring any of them below the 15% threshold, in which case it would be entirely missed by the SIE measure.

Sea ice area weights each pixel by the percentage coverage, and so will in theory pick up polynyas of any size, no matter how big or small - however that measure is easily confused by melt ponds.
Title: Re: Glossary ... for newbies and others
Post by: chalambar on July 10, 2015, 05:12:33 AM
What is meant by the term, "export"?
Title: Re: Glossary ... for newbies and others
Post by: Neven on July 10, 2015, 11:35:29 AM
Hi chalambar, and welcome.

Export is transport of ice floes out of the Arctic Ocean towards the Atlantic Ocean through Fram Strait (between Greenland and Svalbard) and Victoria Channel (between Svalbard and Franz Josef Land) where waters are warmer and the ice melts completely.

There can also be some export through Nares Strait towards Baffin Bay, or through the channels and straits of the Canadian Arctic Archipelago, but melting out is not guaranteed.
Title: Re: Glossary ... for newbies and others
Post by: chalambar on July 10, 2015, 03:25:00 PM
Thank you, Neven.
Title: Re: Glossary ... for newbies and others
Post by: Nick_Naylor on July 14, 2015, 06:11:37 PM
I hope this is the right locations, as this is not exactly a glossary item, but here is a very nice primer on sea ice formation and behavior:

https://notendur.hi.is/thorstur/teaching/glac/sea_ice.pdf
Title: Re: Glossary ... for newbies and others
Post by: Neven on July 15, 2015, 06:58:55 PM
Neven,

I just wanted to the time zone displayed in this forum.

Sourabh, if you go to Profile->Summary->Modify Profile->Look and Layout, you'll see the time that is displayed for this forum (it's CET) and offset it to display your time zone.

Next time ask under The Forum in the Off-topic Category, please.
Title: Re: Glossary ... for newbies and others
Post by: Sourabh on July 15, 2015, 07:31:49 PM
Okie dokie. Thanks
Title: Re: Glossary ... for newbies and others
Post by: Tor Bejnar on July 20, 2015, 05:29:05 PM
What does "Charctic" mean?  As in "Charctic SIE loss today is 1.63 million Km^2"
and http://nsidc.org/arcticseaicenews/charctic-interactive-sea-ice-graph/ (http://nsidc.org/arcticseaicenews/charctic-interactive-sea-ice-graph/)

There are some other funny jargon words used on this blog.  Sure wish folks who use them would define them here!
Title: Re: Glossary ... for newbies and others
Post by: Peter Ellis on July 20, 2015, 06:10:50 PM
It doesn't mean anything special, it's just a title for one particular graph produced by the NSIDC (which you linked).  It simply stands for CHart of the ARCTIC.
Title: Re: Glossary ... for newbies and others
Post by: Tor Bejnar on July 20, 2015, 06:25:53 PM
Thanks.  I thought that might be the case, but I couldn't find a definition anywhere (even on NSIDC pages).
Title: Re: Glossary ... for newbies and others
Post by: SCYetti on February 23, 2016, 03:08:19 PM
glos·sa·ry
An alphabetical list of terms or words found in or relating to a specific subject, text, or dialect, with explanations; a brief dictionary.
Title: Re: Glossary ... for newbies and others
Post by: RoxTheGeologist on April 06, 2016, 08:40:28 PM

Please can you add a definition for "Century Break"?

Okay. Yes. I am a noob and my google skills all seem to come full circle.
Title: Re: Glossary ... for newbies and others
Post by: Neven on April 07, 2016, 09:59:57 AM
Welcome, Rox. I've added the definition and here's a link (http://neven1.typepad.com/blog/2010/06/century-breaks.html) to the provenance of the term.
Title: Re: Glossary ... for newbies and others
Post by: RoxTheGeologist on April 09, 2016, 11:19:36 PM
Thanks Neven! It did have me snookered.
Title: Re: Glossary ... for newbies and others
Post by: andy_t_roo on April 10, 2016, 02:14:03 PM
a low resolution labeled picture showing which areas of the arctic are refereed to by each of the area graphs would be nice

as eg : https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Barents_Sea (https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Barents_Sea) doesn't list actually what area is talked about, but we're quite happy to list the amount of ice in it at https://sites.google.com/site/arcticseaicegraphs/regional (https://sites.google.com/site/arcticseaicegraphs/regional)

perhaps something like a labeled version of the following?
(https://forum.arctic-sea-ice.net/proxy.php?request=http%3A%2F%2Farctic.atmos.uiuc.edu%2Fcryosphere%2FIMAGES%2Fregion.mask.gif&hash=27d29e652d91a46d975576c2bea1fd6b)

Title: Re: Glossary ... for newbies and others
Post by: Meirion on April 10, 2016, 03:54:21 PM
Does this help?
Title: Re: Glossary ... for newbies and others
Post by: Neven on April 10, 2016, 06:34:43 PM
a low resolution labeled picture showing which areas of the arctic are refereed to by each of the area graphs would be nice

as eg : https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Barents_Sea (https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Barents_Sea) doesn't list actually what area is talked about, but we're quite happy to list the amount of ice in it at https://sites.google.com/site/arcticseaicegraphs/regional (https://sites.google.com/site/arcticseaicegraphs/regional)

perhaps something like a labeled version of the following?
(https://forum.arctic-sea-ice.net/proxy.php?request=http%3A%2F%2Farctic.atmos.uiuc.edu%2Fcryosphere%2FIMAGES%2Fregion.mask.gif&hash=27d29e652d91a46d975576c2bea1fd6b)

I've been wanting/planning to do this for ages, but somehow never did. I'll make a labelled map and add it to the Regional Graphs page. Thanks for reminding me, Andy.
Title: Re: Glossary ... for newbies and others
Post by: Wipneus on April 10, 2016, 07:07:37 PM
For my work on regional area and extent I needed a name for ice that is not in those 14 well-known regions. Instead of lumping them as  "other", I defined a few more regions (inspired by NSIDC's MASIE).

Extra regions are:

pacf: Open Pacific Ocean     
japn: Japanese/Yellow Sea       
alsk: Gulf of Alaska             
atln: Open Atlantic Ocean     
main: Gulf of Maine             
balt: Baltic Sea                 
lake: Lakes

The lakes should have been defined anyway as a separate domain anyway, IMO.
Title: Re: Glossary ... for newbies and others
Post by: Neven on April 12, 2016, 12:11:31 AM
I've been wanting/planning to do this for ages, but somehow never did. I'll make a labelled map and add it to the Regional Graphs page. Thanks for reminding me, Andy.

Map is added to the Regional Graphs (https://sites.google.com/site/arcticseaicegraphs/regional) page:

(https://sites.google.com/site/arcticseaicegraphs/regional/Arctic%20regions.png?attredirects=0)

Title: Re: Glossary ... for newbies and others
Post by: iamlsd on April 12, 2016, 04:38:09 AM
Yah this map is great - I finally know where and what people are talking about - at least a little better anyway. Thanks very much :)
Title: Re: Glossary ... for newbies and others
Post by: oren on April 15, 2016, 12:09:05 PM
And add to that the acronyms that had me baffled in the beginning:
ESS = East Siberian Sea
CAA = Canadaian Archipelago
CAB = Central Arctic basin
Title: Re: Glossary ... for newbies and others
Post by: Neven on April 15, 2016, 04:35:35 PM
And add to that the acronyms that had me baffled in the beginning:
ESS = East Siberian Sea
CAA = Canadaian Archipelago
CAB = Central Arctic basin

I've added CAB. The other two were already in there.
Title: Re: Glossary ... for newbies and others
Post by: Tor Bejnar on April 15, 2016, 05:37:20 PM
CAA is the Canadian Arctic Archipelago, for those interested in the detail.

And add to that the acronyms that had me baffled in the beginning:
ESS = East Siberian Sea
CAA = Canadaian Archipelago
CAB = Central Arctic basin
Title: Re: Glossary ... for newbies and others
Post by: Flocke on April 16, 2016, 11:01:27 AM
FJL - Franz Josef Land
WLA - ? (http://forum.arctic-sea-ice.net/index.php/topic,1493.msg73948.html#msg73948 (http://forum.arctic-sea-ice.net/index.php/topic,1493.msg73948.html#msg73948))
Title: Re: Glossary ... for newbies and others
Post by: Neven on April 16, 2016, 11:58:10 AM
FJL - Franz Josef Land
WLA - ? (http://forum.arctic-sea-ice.net/index.php/topic,1493.msg73948.html#msg73948 (http://forum.arctic-sea-ice.net/index.php/topic,1493.msg73948.html#msg73948))

Does anyone use FJL as an acronym? I've added it to the glossary nonetheless. Yes, and I saw that WLA too and had no idea what it meant.  :D
Title: Re: Glossary ... for newbies and others
Post by: Andreas T on April 16, 2016, 02:21:53 PM
Kann es sein dass Plinius vergessen hat dass hier nicht deutsch gesprochen wird? WLA koennte WarmLuftAdvection  heissen.

my guess is that WLA is the german for Warm Air Advection
Title: Re: Glossary ... for newbies and others
Post by: Neven on April 16, 2016, 03:03:11 PM
Das wäre schon möglich, Andreas!

From the context I figured he meant something along those lines.
Title: Re: Glossary ... for newbies and others
Post by: oren on April 16, 2016, 03:27:22 PM
CAA is the Canadian Arctic Archipelago, for those interested in the detail.

And add to that the acronyms that had me baffled in the beginning:
ESS = East Siberian Sea
CAA = Canadaian Archipelago
CAB = Central Arctic basin

Yeah sorry, thanks for the correction.
Title: Re: Glossary ... for newbies and others
Post by: etienne on June 18, 2016, 08:34:53 AM
Hello,

Could you also explain what is the lower line in the JAXA AMSR2 Artic Sea Ice Melt and total extend made by Wipneus ?
Thanks,

Etienne
Title: Re: Glossary ... for newbies and others
Post by: Neven on June 18, 2016, 11:06:14 AM
Hi Etienne,

The answer is in the Home brew AMSR2 (http://forum.arctic-sea-ice.net/index.php/topic,382.2050.html) thread, and in my latest blog post (http://neven1.typepad.com/blog/2016/06/2016-melting-momentum-part-1.html) on the ASIB. Basically it's a graphical display of the blue and grey on those JAXA maps that show where the surface is melting.

Cheers,

Neven
Title: Re: Glossary ... for newbies and others
Post by: Tor Bejnar on July 11, 2016, 11:28:13 PM
Sea Ice Glossary (http://www.whoi.edu/arcticedge/arctic_west03/facts/facts_ice.html)
by C. A. Linder and associated with a 2003 expedition to the far South.

Defines about 30 types of sea ice and related terms, but doesn't include melange!
Title: Re: Glossary ... for newbies and others
Post by: Jim Hunt on July 12, 2016, 09:02:59 AM
Weather forecasting models

GFS - Global Forecast System

ECMWF (AKA Euro) - European Centre for Medium-Range Weather Forecasts

UKMO - United Kingdom Meteorological Office

NAVGEM -  Navy Global Environmental Model

See the sidebar at MeteoCiel (http://meteociel.fr/) for a few more!
Title: Re: Glossary ... for newbies and others
Post by: Neven on July 12, 2016, 11:14:19 AM
Thanks, Jim. Added those to the top post.
Title: Re: Glossary ... for newbies and others
Post by: slow wing on July 14, 2016, 12:27:38 PM
Weather forecasting models

GFS - Global Forecast System

ECMWF (AKA Euro) - European Centre for Medium-Range Weather Forecasts

UKMO - United Kingdom Meteorological Office

NAVGEM -  Navy Global Environmental Model

See the sidebar at MeteoCiel (http://meteociel.fr/) for a few more!
Thanks. Tropical Tidbits,
http://www.tropicaltidbits.com/analysis/models/ (http://www.tropicaltidbits.com/analysis/models/)
also has
CMC, which looks like a Canadian run of the GEM model?
JMA = a Japanese model

Title: Re: Glossary ... for newbies and others
Post by: slow wing on July 14, 2016, 12:30:46 PM
Their ensembles of the models are not obvious to me from their acronyms:
EPS
GEFS
GEPS

Anyone?
Title: Re: Glossary ... for newbies and others
Post by: JayW on July 14, 2016, 12:54:07 PM
Their ensembles of the models are not obvious to me from their acronyms:
EPS
GEFS
GEPS

Anyone?

EPS is ECMWF ensembles
GEFS is GFS ensembles
GEPS is GGEM ensembles
Title: Re: Glossary ... for newbies and others
Post by: JayW on July 14, 2016, 12:56:04 PM
Their ensembles of the models are not obvious to me from their acronyms:
EPS
GEFS
GEPS

Anyone?

EPS is ECMWF ensembles commonly EURO ENS
GEFS is GFS ensembles
GEPS is GGEM ensembles (Canadian)
Title: Re: Glossary ... for newbies and others
Post by: Cate on July 18, 2016, 11:50:20 PM
Ice Glossary from the Canadian Ice Service of Environment and Climate Change Canada. 

Concise but pretty extensive. My apologies if it's been posted already.

http://www.ec.gc.ca/glaces-ice/default.asp?lang=En&n=501D72C1-1 (http://www.ec.gc.ca/glaces-ice/default.asp?lang=En&n=501D72C1-1)
Title: Re: Glossary ... for newbies and others
Post by: Neven on August 30, 2016, 09:00:53 AM
Neven,

I do not know which thread would be appropriate for this question.

Sourabh, ask perhaps in the <a href="http://forum.arctic-sea-ice.net/index.php/topic,143.msg87274.html#msg87274">Stupid Questions</a> thread, even though this is not a stupid question. Here is the wrong place.

You can also use the Search function, top of the page, below the banner.
Title: Re: Glossary ... for newbies and others
Post by: Flocke on September 07, 2016, 07:18:45 AM
RCP 8.5 Representative Concentration Pathways, predection of greenhouse gas concentrations
AR5 IPCC Fifth Assessment report
ECS equilibrum climate sensitivity

(https://forum.arctic-sea-ice.net/index.php/topic,1493.msg89152.html#msg89152 and following)
Title: Re: Glossary ... for newbies and others
Post by: logicmanPatrick on December 08, 2016, 07:44:04 PM
THC  Thermohaline Circulation

NOW  North Water Polynya

NEW   Northeast Water Polynya

Excellent article -
http://www.issibern.ch/teams/Polynya/ (http://www.issibern.ch/teams/Polynya/)
Title: Re: Glossary ... for newbies and others
Post by: Neven on December 08, 2016, 10:39:39 PM
Added. Thanks, Patrick.
Title: Re: Glossary ... for newbies and others
Post by: hendric on January 02, 2017, 09:19:32 AM
FDD = Freezing Degree Days.  Sum of temps in C below freezing. Provides integrated intensity of cold.
TDD = Thawing Degree Days.  Sum of temps in C above freezing. Provides integrated intensity of warmth.

I found some contradictions on the details, with some sites saying the freezing point of sea water, and others saying above 0*C (maybe useful for rivers or lakes?). I couldn't find anything on the specifics of how the number for a day is calculated, but some sites implied that it was a continuous integration of all temps vs some kind of average.

https://nsidc.org/cryosphere/seaice/processes/thermodynamic_growth.html


 
Title: Re: Glossary ... for newbies and others
Post by: Neven on January 02, 2017, 11:23:29 AM
Thanks and welcome to the forum, hendric. I've added FDD and TDD to the list.
Title: Re: Glossary ... for newbies and others
Post by: logicmanPatrick on January 19, 2017, 10:11:10 PM
MIZ
Marginal Ice Zone

I didn't find that in a search of the ASIF, so here's a useful link to explain it:

http://www.apl.washington.edu/project/project.php?id=miz (http://www.apl.washington.edu/project/project.php?id=miz)
Title: Re: Glossary ... for newbies and others
Post by: Neven on January 19, 2017, 11:33:11 PM
Thanks, Patrick, added now.
Title: Re: Glossary ... for newbies and others
Post by: Ice Shieldz on January 20, 2017, 12:29:14 AM
WACC - Warm Arctic, Cold Continents (also WACCy for adverb/adjective usage)

"The emergence of rapid Arctic warming in recent decades has coincided with unusually cold winters over Northern Hemisphere continents. It has been speculated that this “Warm Arctic, Cold Continents” trend pattern is due to sea ice loss."

Source:  https://www.esrl.noaa.gov/psd/people/lantao.sun/publications/2016_SPH_GRL.pdf (https://www.esrl.noaa.gov/psd/people/lantao.sun/publications/2016_SPH_GRL.pdf)
Title: Re: Glossary ... for newbies and others
Post by: Neven on January 20, 2017, 08:43:29 AM
Added, thanks.
Title: Re: Glossary ... for newbies and others
Post by: logicmanPatrick on January 26, 2017, 12:46:43 AM
NWP North West Passage
Title: Re: Glossary ... for newbies and others
Post by: Tor Bejnar on January 29, 2017, 04:05:20 PM
"FJI" is repeatedly used by at least 3 posters (for example: today's "Just a followup from yesterday on the poleward region poleward of Barents-FJl."  by A-Team).  Pmt111500 suggested it means Franz Josef Islands when I asked.  There is some support for this when I do an internet search (~5 results for "FJI" "Franz Josef Islands" plus "FJI" "Franz Joseph Islands").  Should FJI be added to the glossary?  Or should folks be asked to use the standard "FJL" [Franz Josef(ph) Land](~13,000 internet search hits)?
Title: Re: Glossary ... for newbies and others
Post by: magnamentis on January 29, 2017, 04:22:50 PM
"FJI" is repeatedly used by at least 3 posters (for example: today's "Just a followup from yesterday on the poleward region poleward of Barents-FJl."  by A-Team).  Pmt111500 suggested it means Franz Josef Islands when I asked.  There is some support for this when I do an internet search (~5 results for "FJI" "Franz Josef Islands" plus "FJI" "Franz Joseph Islands").  Should FJI be added to the glossary?  Or should folks be asked to use the standard "FJL" [Franz Josef(ph) Land](~13,000 internet search hits)?

there is the old official name that is "Franz Josef Land" after the emperor "Franz Josef von Habsburg" (K&K Monarchy)

and

the new russian offical name that is: Zemlya Frantsa-Iosifa or Земля́ Фра́нца-Ио́сифа respectively

all other names are translations and i'm not sure if every abbreviation should be added, that would be confusing IMO

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Franz_Josef_Land
Title: Re: Glossary ... for newbies and others
Post by: Neven on January 29, 2017, 06:07:49 PM
NWP North West Passage

Thanks, added now, as well as NSR (Northern Sea Route). Funny we didn't have those on the list yet.  :)

And yes, it's Franz Josef Land, period.
Title: Re: Glossary ... for newbies and others
Post by: A-Team on January 30, 2017, 05:21:09 PM
Sounds good. I will use FJL in the future since that is what Wikipedia has settled on. Also, that is found primarily in the very oldest maps. Note however a google scholar search for "franz josef islands" has 4 pages of journal matches, so they are not on board.
Title: Re: Glossary ... for newbies and others
Post by: Tor Bejnar on January 30, 2017, 08:40:53 PM
I see the 4 pages of google scholar pages when searching for "Franz Josef Islands" (2 more pages for "Franz Joseph Islands (http://scholar.google.com/scholar?q=%22Franz+Joseph+Islands%22+-josef&btnG=&hl=en&as_sdt=0%2C10)"), but only 3 articles (one questionable) use "FJI" to represent these islands.

"Franz Josef Land" has 99 google scholar pages and "Franz Joseph Land" has 100 additional google scholar pages.  "FJL" is used in about 370 of these articles.

I guess there are no crumbs here for the <1%.   :D
Title: Re: Glossary ... for newbies and others
Post by: Neven on January 30, 2017, 11:22:25 PM
I live in Austria. I have to call it Franz-Josef-Land. They discovered it. 8) ;)
Title: Re: Glossary ... for newbies and others
Post by: Pmt111500 on January 31, 2017, 05:46:47 AM
To spell it out, in my post an hour or so back I used the expletive profanity and foul language acronym (in this scientific context at least) that should not be added to the list. (GDI! - God Did It!) GDI - God Damn It is the more usual explanation.
Title: Re: Glossary ... for newbies and others
Post by: logicmanPatrick on February 01, 2017, 04:25:23 AM
For the sake of leaving no stone unturned: archive.org lists one false positive for texts containing  'Franz Josef Islands', so that name seemingly has no historical authenticity.
Title: Re: Glossary ... for newbies and others
Post by: RikW on February 01, 2017, 08:50:23 AM
Is it an idea to add the difference between Extent and Area in the list?

If I understand correctly Extent is based on a grid where every tile in that grid that has 15% or more ice cover is counted and Area only the ice cover is counted?
Title: Re: Glossary ... for newbies and others
Post by: Neven on February 01, 2017, 01:54:05 PM
Is it an idea to add the difference between Extent and Area in the list?

Nah, it's just a glossary.

Quote
If I understand correctly Extent is based on a grid where every tile in that grid that has 15% or more ice cover is counted and Area only the ice cover is counted?

Yes, everything above 15% in a grid is counted as 100% (and below as 0%). For area it's the ice cover as is, but it is considered 0% below 15% as well.

Extent was created to reduce the influence of melt ponds (which get counted as open water for area).
Title: Re: Glossary ... for newbies and others
Post by: Ice Shieldz on February 11, 2017, 01:57:34 AM
SFW - Stratospheric Final Warming

The final warming of the stratosphere that occurs in early to late spring. The SFW is the final transition of the zonal winds from wintertime westerlies to summertime easterlies as solar heating of the high latitude stratosphere increases.

Sources:
http://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/10.1029/2008GL036624/full (http://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/10.1029/2008GL036624/full)
http://rxb.eas.gatech.edu/papers/black_mcdaniel_2006b.pdf (http://rxb.eas.gatech.edu/papers/black_mcdaniel_2006b.pdf)
http://www.arl.noaa.gov/documents/JournalPDFs/Butler_et_al_2015_bams-d-13-00173.1.pdf (http://www.arl.noaa.gov/documents/JournalPDFs/Butler_et_al_2015_bams-d-13-00173.1.pdf)
Title: Re: Glossary ... for newbies and others
Post by: Neven on February 11, 2017, 09:47:55 AM
Added, thanks.
Title: Re: Glossary ... for newbies and others
Post by: martalunde68 on February 19, 2017, 05:48:31 PM
A couple of pollution terms:
HFO – heavy fuel oil
LFO – light fuel oil
(So much fuss about them lately! Read this  https://thebarentsobserver.com/en/arctic/2017/02/eu-wants-ban-heavy-fuel-arctic
 (https://thebarentsobserver.com/en/arctic/2017/02/eu-wants-ban-heavy-fuel-arctic)
Title: Re: Glossary ... for newbies and others
Post by: Neven on February 19, 2017, 09:55:37 PM
Thanks and welcome, martalunde68. I've added the terms and released your profile.
Title: Re: Glossary ... for newbies and others
Post by: shmengie on February 24, 2017, 05:30:57 PM
https://earth.nullschool.net

Is an awesome viewer of weather & winds around the Earth

Best viewed via:  Google's chrome web browser -- due to javascript optimization.

(this is why; I'm creating this off topic post here)
Key codes:
i-reduce hPa (higher view of atmosphere)
I-top (10 hPa) view
m-increase hPa (lower view of atmosphere)
M-bottom (surface) view
j-3 hours earlier
J-1 day earlier
k-3 hours later
K-1 day later
a-rotate earth clockwise 1°
A-rotate earth clockwise 5°
s-rotate earth counter clockwise 1°
S-rotate earth counter clockwise 5°
d-zoom in 1%
D-zoom in 5%
x-zoom out 1%
X-zoom out 5%
z-tilt earth up 1°
Z-tilt earth up 5°
w-tilt earth down 1°
W-tilt earth down 5°
z-tilt earth up 1°
g-show/hide grid
e-show/hide earth menu
p-pause/play

Nice to know... IMO :-)
Title: Re: Glossary ... for newbies and others
Post by: slow wing on February 24, 2017, 09:43:09 PM
Thanks shmengie! I didn't know that and it really works!
Title: Re: Glossary ... for newbies and others
Post by: Neven on March 11, 2017, 09:26:53 AM
From Global Cryosphere Watch (http://globalcryospherewatch.org/news/gcw_news.php#glossaryupdate1000):

Quote
[2017-03-10] 1000+ terms added to the cryosphere glossary!. We"ve just added over 1000 entries to the cryosphere glossary! There are now 4141 entries from 26 sources; over 2200 are unique. http://globalcryospherewatch.org/reference/glossary.php. (http://globalcryospherewatch.org/reference/glossary.php.)
Title: Re: Glossary ... for newbies and others
Post by: Sarat on April 18, 2017, 04:24:02 PM
Hi can can anyone define "torching", from what i can tell its when ice changes albedo and starts looking darker on filtered satellite images?  What are the implications of this for the melt?
Title: Re: Glossary ... for newbies and others
Post by: oren on April 18, 2017, 08:42:36 PM
Hi can can anyone define "torching", from what i can tell its when ice changes albedo and starts looking darker on filtered satellite images?  What are the implications of this for the melt?
I will try though I'm no expert:
Torching - slang for when a significant amount of heat, typically anomalous temps and/or clear sunny sky, is applied to the ice. Terminology to keep the spirits going as we watch the melting season.
"Torching" as Wipneus uses it in his AMSR2 thread - when the ice loses 100% concentration over large areas of the AMSR2 animation. Remember it's a radar "image" so it's not albedo and actual darkening - but possibly concentration drops due to surface wetness, actual meltwater or even rain, or cloud interference. "Torching" is not necessarily the result of actual torching. The implications are that the ice is not in a perfect condition, and might melt sooner than 100% concentration ice.
Title: Re: Glossary ... for newbies and others
Post by: Sarat on April 18, 2017, 10:56:11 PM
Thank you Oren!
Title: Re: Glossary ... for newbies and others
Post by: Tor Bejnar on May 14, 2017, 05:12:08 AM
Should "SSTA" be in the page 1 glossary?  SSTA = Sea Surface Temperature Anomalies in the 2017 ENSO thread. It was just used (undefined) in the 2017 Melting Season thread.
Title: Re: Glossary ... for newbies and others
Post by: Neven on May 14, 2017, 10:28:50 AM
Should "SSTA" be in the page 1 glossary?  SSTA = Sea Surface Temperature Anomalies in the 2017 ENSO thread. It was just used (undefined) in the 2017 Melting Season thread.

Yes! As well as SST itself, SAT and SLP. I can't believe those weren't in there yet. I've added them all, including SSTa (I like it better with a small 'a' at the end), and SIV and SIT as well.

Thanks, Tor.
Title: Re: Glossary ... for newbies and others
Post by: Hyperion on May 14, 2017, 08:50:58 PM
Quote
For more terms you can refer to NSIDC's Glossary. Or peruse the Global Croysphere ???
::)
Title: Re: Glossary ... for newbies and others
Post by: Jontenoy on July 14, 2017, 09:56:02 AM
Can someone explain '  GARLIC PRESS '
Title: Re: Glossary ... for newbies and others
Post by: Andreas T on July 14, 2017, 10:48:03 AM
garlic press is another casual term which refers to the Canadian Arctic Archipelago (CAA) and the fact that when ice in its passages has become mobile in August there is movement of ice which has compacted against the islands into those passages and from those passages into the Parry channel with its connection out into Baffin bay.
The narrowness of the passages into Parry channel (red arrows) compared to those from the open arctic ocean into the CAA shows how obstructed this flow is. Because of that the flow happens in stages. Ice which moves into the larger passages in late August freezes in in early October. In the following year it will partly melt, partly make its way into the Parry channel. If it survives there until freeze up, it may make it much reduced by melt into Baffin bay in the following year.
What matters of course is not how much ice arrives in Baffin bay but how much ice moves out of the Central Arctic Basin by this route.
I have not seen any attempt to quantify this but is claimed at times (including quite early in the melt season) by various people (I just picked the first I found)

The image is from 30. Aug 2015 https://go.nasa.gov/2ugn3xC (https://go.nasa.gov/2ugn3xC) just to give an example of a clear view

I think the opening of the CAA may be more important than it initially appears to be. It's kind of like opening a pressure relief valve of sorts. It seems to me, with my limited experience, to change the dynamics within the CAB.
                                                                                                                             
pauldry600
Quote
The Canadian Arpegio (or however you spell it) is notoriously difficult to break down so it may not all go but this will surely test it to the limit
It don't have to all go, as in melt. If enough gets weakened and broken up, the rest will eventually just flush out. Remember that at the end of last melt season, smaller floes were moving through until the end and got frozen together. I don't suspect the bonds between these to be any stronger than elsewhere. Also, wave activity has been infiltrating some of the channels, despite the dampening effect of the ice.
Title: Re: Glossary ... for newbies and others
Post by: Pmt111500 on July 14, 2017, 10:53:03 AM
Can someone explain '  GARLIC PRESS '
Not the correct place for the question, but "garlic press" of the canadian arctic archipelago is just an euphemism for the structure  and currents of it. Sufficiently weak ice north of the archipelago gets broken by the combined effect of dominant currents from north, the assisting winds and the narrow channels in there providing grinding effect. The resulting mush of rather thick pieces of ice gets spread along the center of Northwest passage, and is still a hazard for weaker ships travelling there... Much easirr to say "garlic press" ;-).
Title: Re: Glossary ... for newbies and others
Post by: Jontenoy on July 14, 2017, 02:52:09 PM
Thanks to you both
Title: Re: Glossary ... for newbies and others
Post by: Tor Bejnar on July 18, 2017, 04:06:56 PM
GAC - Great Arctic Cyclone and other "xAC" terms don't appear to be found in this Glossary.
Title: Re: Glossary ... for newbies and others
Post by: Neven on July 18, 2017, 04:17:44 PM
Well, I'll be. Don't know how we managed to forget about those. Thanks, Tor. GAC and PAC added now.
Title: Re: Glossary ... for newbies and others
Post by: Tor Bejnar on July 21, 2017, 06:07:33 PM
GMSTA means something to some people, but to me its something about 'global' and 'temperature' and probably 'anomaly', 'mean' and 'surface', but I'm taking an educated guess here.  There are some 30 posts that reference GMSTA, starting with: 
...
The second attached image shows Gavin Schmidt's pre-industrial GMSTA projection for the end of 2016 (based on data through the end of September 2016) indicate a mean value of 1.25C by the end of Dec 2016.  However, Gavin's projection is based on historical data and thus ESLD in a world with acceleration global warming.  This is indicated by the third attached image of daily NCEP/NCAR GMSTA values through Oct 16 2016; indicating that the world continues to be running hot.
Searching for "Global Mean Surface Temperature Anom" in the  relevant thread has four 'hits', so I'm guessing I guessed right.
Title: Re: Glossary ... for newbies and others
Post by: Ajpope85 on February 28, 2018, 05:43:46 PM
ECS - equilibrium climate sensitivity would be nice to have in here.
Title: Re: Glossary ... for newbies and others
Post by: HapHazard on March 21, 2018, 07:58:04 PM
SWE - Snow Water Equivalent

Side note: It appears that all you lovely people are now on the brink of developing a totally new & unique language, which is based entirely on acronyms. Extremely interesting from an ethnolinguistics perspective, I must say! (but one helluva bugger to learn! The dev team at Rosetta Stone have their work cut out for them!)
Title: Re: Glossary ... for newbies and others
Post by: Neven on March 21, 2018, 08:56:32 PM
Good one! I'll add it to the glossary right away. MTABGTY!
Title: Re: Glossary ... for newbies and others
Post by: Iceismylife on March 21, 2018, 09:08:15 PM
ICE= internal combustion engine  Also cold stuff in the Arctic
Title: Re: Glossary ... for newbies and others
Post by: gerontocrat on March 21, 2018, 10:13:31 PM
SWE - Snow Water Equivalent

Side note: It appears that all you lovely people are now on the brink of developing a totally new & unique language, which is based entirely on acronyms. Extremely interesting from an ethnolinguistics perspective, I must say! (but one helluva bugger to learn! The dev team at Rosetta Stone have their work cut out for them!)
But SWE can mean....

SWE - Wikipedia
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/SWE
SWE may refer to: Samberigi Airport in Papua New Guinea by IATA airport code; Sensor Web Enablement, an Open Geospatial Consortium framework for defining a Sensor Web; Shallow water equations, a set of hyperbolic partial differential equations; Snow water equivalent · Society of Women Engineers, a non-profit ...

So one needs context - will AI be able to cope ?
Title: Re: Glossary ... for newbies and others
Post by: Tor Bejnar on June 10, 2018, 11:16:10 PM
SMB - surface mass balance
Doesn't appear in glossary. Abbreviation is used 'all the time' in Greenland Melt (https://forum.arctic-sea-ice.net/index.php/topic,2227.100.html) thread, and seldom defined there, but is here (https://forum.arctic-sea-ice.net/index.php/topic,31.msg136756.html#msg136756).
Title: Re: Glossary ... for newbies and others
Post by: Neven on June 10, 2018, 11:38:50 PM
Added, thanks.  :)
Title: Re: Glossary ... for newbies and others
Post by: Nlhope on August 03, 2018, 04:05:39 PM
Thank you very much for this! it is a great help.   :) :-*
Title: Re: Glossary ... for newbies and others
Post by: karl dubhe2 on August 15, 2018, 03:40:53 AM
Sorry to be a bother, I think this is a better place to ask than the stupid question thread. 

I was reading the end of the 2018 ENSO thread and there's an acronym that I don't understand. 

SOI, I'm thinking it's surface ocean index?  Maybe...  Probably not.  :)
Title: Re: Glossary ... for newbies and others
Post by: Neven on August 15, 2018, 12:42:55 PM
Southern Oscillation Index (http://www.bom.gov.au/climate/glossary/soi.shtml).
Title: Re: Glossary ... for newbies and others
Post by: Tor Bejnar on August 17, 2018, 08:08:05 PM
MSLP - mean sea level pressure
WIPD - whole ice pack detachment

A-Team just used these terms (and defined the second)
Title: Re: Glossary ... for newbies and others
Post by: Neven on August 20, 2018, 09:41:49 PM
Added. Thanks, Tor.
Title: Re: Glossary ... for newbies and others
Post by: josh-j on September 21, 2018, 06:21:20 PM
SOI - Southern Oscillation Index  ;D
Title: Re: Glossary ... for newbies and others
Post by: Pmt111500 on September 23, 2018, 06:01:16 PM
SOI - Southern Oscillation Index  ;D
Oh, was that one missing??? What a bunch of amateurs we are!?!? Just one of the main ENSO components. Well, thank you for the addition.
Title: Re: Glossary ... for newbies and others
Post by: Neven on September 23, 2018, 06:10:43 PM
The glossary contains mostly Arctic sea ice and cryosphere-related terms, but what the heck, I've added it.  :)
Title: Re: Glossary ... for newbies and others
Post by: oren on September 23, 2018, 11:07:10 PM
SOI - Southern Oscillation Index  ;D
Oh, was that one missing?
Actually it was already added back in August, as can be seen directly upthread.
Title: Re: Glossary ... for newbies and others
Post by: josh-j on October 23, 2018, 09:07:51 PM
It wasn't added, it was just given as a response to a question (hence my  ;D emoticon)  :D
Title: Re: Glossary ... for newbies and others
Post by: oren on October 23, 2018, 09:37:31 PM
 :) :-X
Title: Re: Glossary ... for newbies and others
Post by: crandles on November 02, 2018, 07:48:41 PM
Since someone said they didn't know what GISS was:

GISS / GISTEMP Goddard Institute for Space Studies. Does a global temperature record including LOTI (Land Ocean Temperature Index)

LOTI Land Ocean Temperature Index (Combined Land-Surface Air and Sea-Surface Water Temperature Anomalies) see GISS / GISTEMP

GHCN-v3 NASA's global meteorological station Temperature Index data (version 3)

ERSST-v5 NASA's Sea Surface Temperature Index data (version 5)

NOAA National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration. National Climatic Data Center (NCDC) division does a global temperature record.

NCDC National Climatic Data Center. Division of NOAA that does a global temperature record.

HadCRU UK Met office Hadley Centre Climate Research Unit. Does a global temperature record, HadCRU4.
Title: Re: Glossary ... for newbies and others
Post by: Juan C. García on December 01, 2018, 04:23:02 PM
 ESAS - East Siberian Arctic Shelf

Image from:
Hi OLN,
Title: Re: Glossary ... for newbies and others
Post by: Neven on December 01, 2018, 05:00:12 PM
Added, thanks.
Title: Re: Glossary ... for newbies and others
Post by: Pmt111500 on April 08, 2019, 11:20:30 AM
Had to use the modelling acronym EMIC - Earth Model of Intermediate Complexity in the paleo modelling thread https://forum.arctic-sea-ice.net/index.php/topic,2619.0.html
and thought I put it up here,
Title: Re: Glossary ... for newbies and others
Post by: Tom_Mazanec on April 15, 2019, 10:39:27 PM
What is a "saddle collapse"?
Title: Re: Glossary ... for newbies and others
Post by: mhampton on April 15, 2019, 11:29:46 PM
What is a "saddle collapse"?
I think its when you have a glacial mountain-pass (saddle) of ice, which as it melts changes water and ice flow to cause a positive feedback on melting.
Title: Re: Glossary ... for newbies and others
Post by: Sebastian Jones on April 16, 2019, 01:05:20 AM
What is a "saddle collapse"?
I think its when you have a glacial mountain-pass (saddle) of ice, which as it melts changes water and ice flow to cause a positive feedback on melting.
Or, the description of when an ice sheet reaches a tipping point as it melts. The Laurentide Ice Sheet experienced a saddle collapse over Hudson Bay as it disintegrated into the Keewatin and Labrador sub sheets.
Title: Re: Glossary ... for newbies and others
Post by: Tor Bejnar on April 16, 2019, 04:27:40 AM
Just to substantiate what Sebastian wrote, see Collapse of the North American ice saddle 14,500 years ago caused widespread cooling and reduced ocean overturning circulation (https://www.researchgate.net/publication/311843240_Collapse_of_the_North_American_ice_saddle_14500_years_ago_caused_widespread_cooling_and_reduced_ocean_overturning_circulation) - Geophysical Research Letters 44(1) · December 2016 
Title: Re: Glossary ... for newbies and others
Post by: gerontocrat on April 16, 2019, 09:03:37 AM
What is a "saddle collapse"?
The term "saddle" comes from geography and refers to the landscape shape of a pass between two hills, i.e. like the saddle on a horse.
Title: Re: Glossary ... for newbies and others
Post by: sidd on April 16, 2019, 09:58:23 AM
Re: saddle collapse

I have posted on this b4:

https://forum.arctic-sea-ice.net/index.php/topic,1327.msg107538.html#msg107538

there is an earlier paper from 2012, doi:10.1038/nature11257 of which i again attach fig 3, since it has value on this thread also.

I note this is mainly a toplogical effect, the area available to melt skyrockets as equilibrium line altitude (ELA) rises toward the saddle.

sidd
Title: Re: Glossary ... for newbies and others
Post by: Neven on April 16, 2019, 10:17:42 AM
I think there are more than one glacier threads to discuss this. This thread is for proposing new acronyms for the glossary (mostly focused on Arctic sea ice).
Title: Re: Glossary ... for newbies and others
Post by: Tor Bejnar on May 07, 2019, 06:59:39 PM
Terms frequently used by AbruptSLR in discussions about Antarctica ice shelf melt (and not explained elsewhere in the Glossary).

AABW - Antarctic bottom water
ABW - Arctic bottom water
ASE - Amundsen Sea Embayment - is roughly the size of the state of Texas and the area is known as the Amundsen Sea Embayment (ASE); it forms one of the three major ice drainage basins of the West Antarctic Ice Sheet, the others being the Ross Sea Embayment and the Weddell Sea Embayment (from Wikipedia (https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Amundsen_Sea))  - the ASE includes Pine Island Glacier (PIG) and Thwaites Glacier (at the base and to the west of the Antarctic Peninsula)
CDW - Circumpolar Deep Water
GIS - Greenland Ice Sheet [or course, this is in the Arctic!]
MICI - marine ice cliff instability
MISI - marine ice-sheet instability
PIIS - Pine Island Ice Shelf
SAM - Southern Hemisphere Annular Mode (Wikipedia (https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Antarctic_oscillation))
Title: Re: Glossary ... for newbies and others
Post by: Glen Koehler on May 24, 2019, 08:12:55 PM
to add DMI - Danish Meteorloglical Institute, usually referring to their chart of average temperature north of 80N.  My understanding is that those temperatures are not area-weighted.  So small circle at 89N gets as much weight as much larger area at 80N.
Title: Re: Glossary ... for newbies and others
Post by: Neven on May 24, 2019, 09:59:28 PM
There's an Antarctic glossary (https://forum.arctic-sea-ice.net/index.php/topic,251.msg4400.html#msg4400) as well. I've added the Antarctic acronyms there. The rest here.
Title: Re: Glossary ... for newbies and others
Post by: Glen Koehler on May 27, 2019, 06:20:52 AM
AMOC - Atlantic Meridional Overturning Circulation 
- Atlantic Ocean component of the global thermohaline circulation.  The "Gulf Stream" is a subcomponent of the AMOC.
Title: Re: Glossary ... for newbies and others
Post by: Davidsf on June 14, 2019, 03:26:27 PM
Hi I'm seeing the acronym SMOS in the melt season stream, and I don't know what it stands for. I looked but didn't see it here in the glossary. Probably missed it, but could someone help? Thanks
Title: Re: Glossary ... for newbies and others
Post by: b_lumenkraft on June 14, 2019, 03:28:48 PM
Here you go David >> https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Soil_Moisture_and_Ocean_Salinity

Quote
Soil Moisture and Ocean Salinity, or SMOS, is a satellite which forms part of ESA's Living Planet Programme. It is intended to provide new insights into Earth's water cycle and climate. In addition, it is intended to provide improved weather forecasting and monitoring of snow and ice accumulation
Title: Re: Glossary ... for newbies and others
Post by: oren on June 14, 2019, 03:34:16 PM
SMOS is known in these parts for the Uni Bremen sea ice thinness product (with some caveats, mostly reliable during winter, but showing surface wetness in summer).

https://seaice.uni-bremen.de/thin-ice-thickness/ (https://seaice.uni-bremen.de/thin-ice-thickness/)
Title: Re: Glossary ... for newbies and others
Post by: Davidsf on June 14, 2019, 03:39:27 PM
Thank you b_lumen and Oren.
Title: Re: Glossary ... for newbies and others
Post by: Neven on June 14, 2019, 04:06:56 PM
SMOS added to the list.
Title: Re: Glossary ... for newbies and others
Post by: gerontocrat on June 14, 2019, 05:46:28 PM
to add DMI - Danish Meteorloglical Institute, usually referring to their chart of average temperature north of 80N.  My understanding is that those temperatures are not area-weighted.  So small circle at 89N gets as much weight as much larger area at 80N.

I also look at lots of other stuff from the Danish Meteorological Institute:-

http://polarportal.dk/en/greenland/surface-conditions/
http://ocean.dmi.dk/arctic/kennedy.uk.php Satellie images for all around Greenland and links to images elsewhere,
http://ocean.dmi.dk/satellite/index.uk.php Sea Surface temps and anomalies.

I am sure there is loads of other stuff there as well.
Title: Re: Glossary ... for newbies and others
Post by: dnem on July 06, 2019, 09:42:39 PM
"The ECMWF has got ridiculously warmer than 00Z, but at least confirms the WAA over ESS (now getting really deep by day 5) and then stuff that may flop in next run"

WAA?
Title: Re: Glossary ... for newbies and others
Post by: Neven on July 06, 2019, 09:52:30 PM
Warm Air Advection (a more scientific sounding term than 'balmy winds'  ;) ). Added now.
Title: Re: Glossary ... for newbies and others
Post by: Sterks on July 06, 2019, 09:53:03 PM
Warm Air Advection. I use it when the isobars are really tight in the direction from the continent toward the ice, and lasts a few days, but is used everywhere apart from the Arctic
Title: Re: Glossary ... for newbies and others
Post by: Sterks on July 06, 2019, 09:54:16 PM
Warm Air Advection (a more scientific sounding term than 'balmy winds'  ;) ). Added now.
Right. Basically :-) thanks for better explanation
Title: Re: Glossary ... for newbies and others
Post by: Neven on July 06, 2019, 09:59:52 PM
BTW, I prefer WAA over balmy winds.  ;)

Now this pops up in the MST:

Quote
the model run is NOT breaking down the effect from the FSW (earlier post wrt Judah Cohens tweet)

Does anyone know what FSW stands for?
Title: Re: Glossary ... for newbies and others
Post by: Sterks on July 06, 2019, 10:15:13 PM
WAA is short
FSW, no idea. Freaking Sudden Warming? It is a hell of a heat wave
Final Stratospheric Warming?
Title: Re: Glossary ... for newbies and others
Post by: Rod on July 06, 2019, 10:35:45 PM
Below is the tweet from Judah Cohen. It was quoted in post 3284 in the melting thread.

I was also trying to figure out what FSW means.  I think Lord Vader will need to tell us.  But, Sterks’ second guess seems reasonable. 
Title: Re: Glossary ... for newbies and others
Post by: Sterks on July 06, 2019, 10:44:33 PM
Yeah, the Final Stratospheric Warming started before the summer, and it seems polar Stratospheric temps should be normal by now, but remained high during the summer. This apparently helps to maintain high geopotential levels over the Arctic keeping polar vortex away (and lows away). Now it may end, expect more storms entering the pack. That's how I(half) understand it
Title: Re: Glossary ... for newbies and others
Post by: Tor Bejnar on July 07, 2019, 04:16:25 AM
FSW from here (http://www.atmos.albany.edu/facstaff/brose/classes/ATM623_Spring2015/Notes/Lectures/Lecture11%20--%20Insolation.html)
Fsw = Daily average solar radiation in W/m^2.

FSW = the solar insolation at the top of the atmosphere  [note:  it is "F" sub "SW" ]
from here (https://journals.ametsoc.org/doi/pdf/10.1175/JCLI-D-12-00085.1) - used 17 times in that paper  (This paper referenced in 2017 by rboyd (https://forum.arctic-sea-ice.net/index.ph/topic,1834.msg111338.html#msg111338))

and in context: 
Quote
The annual-mean incident solar radiation at the top of the atmosphere (FSW) varies significantly over the Arctic Ocean latitudes ranging from about 210 W m-2 at 65oN (roughly the latitude of Bering Strait) to less than 175 W m-2 at the North Pole.
Title: Re: Glossary ... for newbies and others
Post by: Glen Koehler on July 14, 2019, 04:02:22 AM
NP North Pole
Title: Re: Glossary ... for newbies and others
Post by: Neven on July 14, 2019, 10:37:56 AM
Added, thanks.
Title: Re: Glossary ... for newbies and others
Post by: Archimid on August 05, 2019, 10:28:39 AM
WAA... I love it.

Milankovitch cycles... M. cycles?
Title: Re: Glossary ... for newbies and others
Post by: sja45uk on August 09, 2019, 09:27:30 AM
FSW from here (http://www.atmos.albany.edu/facstaff/brose/classes/ATM623_Spring2015/Notes/Lectures/Lecture11%20--%20Insolation.html)
Fsw = Daily average solar radiation in W/m^2.
[Edited]
It would help me to remember the abbreviation for a constant (?), to have the glossary entry include the words solar Flux (F) and the radiative flux subscript short-wave (sw).
Title: Re: Glossary ... for newbies and others
Post by: Pmt111500 on August 11, 2019, 10:17:16 AM
Since I used it without explanation

IOD - Indian Ocean Dipole index, somewhat irregular large scale oscillation in the state of Indian Ocean regions (forgot what areas are used to calculate this one, some cross-equator And east-west variation is included in this.)
Title: Re: Glossary ... for newbies and others
Post by: Lewis on August 19, 2019, 05:13:58 AM
Just saw this being used but not in your glossary.

AGW - Anthropogenic Global Warming
Title: Re: Glossary ... for newbies and others
Post by: Neven on August 19, 2019, 01:07:43 PM
Just saw this being used but not in your glossary.

AGW - Anthropogenic Global Warming

I believe every adult should know this one, and children after they reach age 6.  ;)
Title: Re: Glossary ... for newbies and others
Post by: Glen Koehler on February 21, 2020, 08:20:50 PM
AMSR = Advanced Microwave Scanning Radiometer    
     AMSR-E is the AMSR instrument on board AQUA satellite (NASA), and AMSR-2 the one on board GCOM-W1 satellite (JAXA)

JAXA = Japan Aerospace eXploration Agency

OSISAF = Ocean and Sea Ice Satellite Application Facility
    Satellite Application Facility = Utilising specialist expertise from the EUMETSAT Member States, Satellite Application Facilities (SAFs) are dedicated centres of excellence for processing satellite data. They form an integral part of the distributed EUMETSAT Application Ground Segment.
Title: Re: Glossary ... for newbies and others
Post by: Neven on February 22, 2020, 03:05:06 PM
Added, thanks!
Title: Re: Glossary ... for newbies and others
Post by: Glen Koehler on February 24, 2020, 10:09:58 PM
ASCAT = Advanced Scatterometer instruments on multiple satellites that use radar to measure speed and direction of winds over the surface of the oceans.
Title: Re: Glossary ... for newbies and others
Post by: Glen Koehler on March 17, 2020, 03:21:54 PM
The acronym definition for CAPIE includes an undefined acronym: IJIS

IJIS = IARC-JAXA Information System run by the International Arctic Research Center at the University of Alaska (IARC), and the Japan Aerospace Exploration Agency (JAXA).


Title: Re: Glossary ... for newbies and others
Post by: Neven on March 18, 2020, 12:02:31 AM
Added, thanks.
Title: Re: Glossary ... for newbies and others
Post by: Glen Koehler on May 24, 2020, 08:26:02 PM
CR = Climate Reanalyzer
Title: Re: Glossary ... for newbies and others
Post by: KenB on June 30, 2020, 06:56:27 PM
hpa (hPa) = hectopascal, a unit of pressure
Title: Re: Glossary ... for newbies and others
Post by: oren on June 30, 2020, 07:53:39 PM
Added both CR and hPa.
Title: Re: Glossary ... for newbies and others
Post by: KenB on July 03, 2020, 03:40:42 AM
IMB = Ice Mass Balance
SIMB = Seasonal IMB
DTC = Digital Temperature Chain (in the context of SIMB)

(see https://ui.adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2017AGUFM.C21B1120W/abstract)
Title: Re: Glossary ... for newbies and others
Post by: oren on July 03, 2020, 04:40:55 AM
Added.
Title: Re: Glossary ... for newbies and others
Post by: Let It Go on July 15, 2020, 08:25:28 PM
Im missing GAAC i see it used everywhere on the forum but no one explains what it is :'(
Title: Re: Glossary ... for newbies and others
Post by: HapHazard on July 15, 2020, 08:32:51 PM
Great Arctic Anti-Cyclone

new term this season
Title: Re: Glossary ... for newbies and others
Post by: Ice Shieldz on July 15, 2020, 08:35:27 PM
Hi LIG! The Great Arctic Anti-Cyclone is in contrast to 2012’s GAC Great Arctic Cyclone. While the GAC destroyed the ice with a persistent low pressure system the GAAC is doing it with a high pressure system - hence an anticyclone. There is ongoing debate about just how great the GAAC is in terms of what will be its net effect on the ice.
Title: Re: Glossary ... for newbies and others
Post by: blumenkraft on July 15, 2020, 08:38:36 PM
... which is caused by a persistent high-pressure zone centered over the arctic.

Edit: Oops, Ice Shieldz beat me to it! ;)
Title: Re: Glossary ... for newbies and others
Post by: Let It Go on July 15, 2020, 08:50:11 PM
Wow thanks for all the quick replies :D
Title: Re: Glossary ... for newbies and others
Post by: HapHazard on July 15, 2020, 09:29:27 PM
No prob, our primary functions are to educate others & learn ourselves, regarding what the heck is going on in the cryosphere. And the more folks who come here (posting or lurking, doesn't matter) the better. We're all stuck in the same ol' leaky lifeboat, after all. :)
Title: Re: Glossary ... for newbies and others
Post by: oren on July 16, 2020, 06:41:01 AM
GAAC added, thanks.
Title: Re: Glossary ... for newbies and others
Post by: pearscot on July 16, 2020, 06:50:40 AM
I understand GAAC, but to myself I call the current arctic high: Great Arctic High (GAH)

I only refer to it insofar as we often refer to the GAC - I feel like it's descriptive
Title: Re: Glossary ... for newbies and others
Post by: Glen Koehler on July 19, 2020, 04:03:05 AM
CONUS - Continental U.S.  Frequently used acronym in meteorology.
Title: Re: Glossary ... for newbies and others
Post by: Tor Bejnar on July 19, 2020, 06:39:52 AM
probably "contiguous" or "conterminous", as Alaska is on the continent but not part of CONUS.
Title: Re: Glossary ... for newbies and others
Post by: Glen Koehler on July 19, 2020, 04:30:42 PM
Thanks for the correction - Conterminous United States (the lower 48)

National Weather Service - Table of Commonly Used Acronyms and Abbreviations
https://www.weather.gov/mdl/about_acronyms
Title: Re: Glossary ... for newbies and others
Post by: oren on July 19, 2020, 04:45:27 PM
Added.
Title: Re: Glossary ... for newbies and others
Post by: Tor Bejnar on July 21, 2020, 05:13:36 AM
"gice" is getting used again.  Can the term be put into the glossary and defined, please.  I really don't remember...
Title: Re: Glossary ... for newbies and others
Post by: oren on July 21, 2020, 05:15:49 AM
It's just the name of an internal PIOMAS file (gridded ice thickness?). Not fit for a glossary entry I think.
Title: Re: Glossary ... for newbies and others
Post by: oren on July 21, 2020, 06:21:59 PM
Convinced via PM, added...
Title: Re: Glossary ... for newbies and others
Post by: oren on July 23, 2020, 06:14:52 PM
Added AWI - Alfred Wegener Institute.
Title: Re: Glossary ... for newbies and others
Post by: KenB on August 02, 2020, 06:10:53 PM
CIS - Canadian Ice Service (https://www.canada.ca/en/environment-climate-change/services/ice-forecasts-observations.html)
Title: Re: Glossary ... for newbies and others
Post by: oren on August 02, 2020, 06:42:59 PM
CIS Added.
Title: Re: Glossary ... for newbies and others
Post by: KenB on August 02, 2020, 06:59:44 PM
CIS Added.

Lost link though?  I thought those were desired.
Title: Re: Glossary ... for newbies and others
Post by: oren on August 02, 2020, 08:02:47 PM
Fixed.
Don't forget, I'm new to this moderation thing...
Title: Re: Glossary ... for newbies and others
Post by: Juan C. García on September 09, 2020, 04:51:03 PM
EEI: Earth energy imbalance.

Earth's energy imbalance is the difference between the amount of solar energy absorbed by Earth and the amount of energy the planet radiates to space as heat. If the imbalance is positive, more energy coming in than going out, we can expect Earth to become warmer in the future — but cooler if the imbalance is negative. Earth's energy imbalance is thus the single most crucial measure of the status of Earth's climate and it defines expectations for future climate change.

https://www.giss.nasa.gov/research/briefs/hansen_16/#:~:text=Earth%27s%20energy%20imbalance%20is%20the,if%20the%20imbalance%20is%20negative. (https://www.giss.nasa.gov/research/briefs/hansen_16/#:~:text=Earth%27s%20energy%20imbalance%20is%20the,if%20the%20imbalance%20is%20negative.)
Title: Re: Glossary ... for newbies and others
Post by: interstitial on September 09, 2020, 10:24:13 PM
The title should just be "Glossary". New names and acronyms are created all the time.
Title: Re: Glossary ... for newbies and others
Post by: oren on September 09, 2020, 10:58:15 PM
EEI: Earth energy imbalance.
Added.
Title: Re: Glossary ... for newbies and others
Post by: Positive retroaction on September 14, 2020, 03:20:21 PM
Hello everybody
Juste a question : what is BoE ?
Thank's
Title: Re: Glossary ... for newbies and others
Post by: oren on September 15, 2020, 04:43:30 AM
Hello P.r. and welcome. BOE is "Blue Ocean Event", meaning the Arctic Ocean has become virtually ice-free on some date. I can't believe this was missing from the glossary...
Edit: It was there already. Phew.
Title: Re: Glossary ... for newbies and others
Post by: kassy on September 15, 2020, 01:04:09 PM
Although it is missing the actual technical definition of ice area under 1 million square kilometers.
Title: Re: Glossary ... for newbies and others
Post by: Tom_Mazanec on September 15, 2020, 01:06:43 PM
Although it is missing the actual technical definition of ice area under 1 million square miles.
I thought it was one million square kilometers.
Title: Re: Glossary ... for newbies and others
Post by: kassy on September 15, 2020, 01:09:39 PM
Oops fixed... (background song singing about miles lol).
Title: Re: Glossary ... for newbies and others
Post by: Positive retroaction on September 15, 2020, 02:30:42 PM
Thank's for all your answers!
Title: Re: Glossary ... for newbies and others
Post by: Tor Bejnar on September 15, 2020, 04:07:03 PM
I though BOE was a distinctly different concept from 'virtually ice-free'.  Because of several scientific publications, 'virtually ice-free Arctic' or 'ice-free Arctic' got defined as 'less than 1 million km2 of Arctic sea ice extent'.

An internet search shows BOE having the same definition, but some on these threads have suggested different definitions, something like, 'when the DMI 80N summer temperature really spikes' or 'when sea ice area is under 50K km2' or something.

Maybe we should have a poll!  [What is the best definition of "BOE - Blue Ocean Event - given that "ice-free" uses "less than 1 million km2 of ice extent"?  Should it be the same?]  A little discussion somewhere should be had before a poll goes up (if at all), I think...  Moderators ...?  [This is called, 'passing the buck.']
Title: Re: Glossary ... for newbies and others
Post by: be cause on September 15, 2020, 04:13:43 PM
I'm happy with the < 1 million sq km measure . 50k might just about equal the coastal false ice . b.c.
Title: Re: Glossary ... for newbies and others
Post by: Neven on September 15, 2020, 05:14:50 PM
My impression is that BOE is a relatively recent term, but I can't remember who came up with it (Beckwith?). My opinion is that if there still is ice left, the ocean isn't blue. BOE to me means completely ice-free.
Title: Re: Glossary ... for newbies and others
Post by: binntho on September 16, 2020, 07:28:56 AM
BOE stands for "Blue Ocean Event", and the inclusion of the word "Event" indicates something that can neither be fractional nor partial nor continuous with previous or later states, nor can it really be defined as when some specific measure drops below some arbitrary line.

A proper use of the term BOE would indicated the first time all ice disappears. It cannot really be used to describe the first time ice goes under 1Mkm2 simply because the day that happens will be no different from the day before or the day after. Going under 1Mkm2 is an arbitrary point on a continuum, not an event in real-world terms.

Same goes for this strange use of the term "partial" or "fractional" BOE. There is no such thing as a partial event.

I'm not sure about the history of BOE as a concept, but I remember a few years back when a lot of people become excited about a hypothetical future BOE with several of them claiming that following BOE, ice would not regenerate and the Arctic would flip into a new regime, a tipping point of epic proportion. This line of argument is obviously using BOE to mean "when all ice disappears".

Further to the earlier discussions on BOE were claims that the world as we know it would end shortly afterwards - not only the Arctic but the entire planet would have reached a catastrophic tipping point. Again this line of discussion does not allow for a definition of BOE as meaning "going under 1Mkm2".

I remember reading for the first time some years ago the suggestion that BOE be re-defined as "virtually ice free", and to use the apparently widespread definition of under 1Mkm2 as the arbitry limit.  I didn't think much of it at the time.

Buit this confusion of terms is becoming increasingly unfortunate in my mind. People are really talking about VIF (virtually ice free) which is not an event. Thus using terms such as "partial VIF" is reasonable, while "partial BOE" is nonsense. This confusion of BOE with VIF also makes impossible all speculation and discussion of tipping points or sudden and epic systemic changes following BOE - which I don't really believe in, but other people do, and it would be silly for them to try and come up with new terms because some lazy scientists have stolen BOE - are we to start talking about TIFE (totally ice free event) instead?

BOE is an event, something that happens clearly and is easily definable and discernible, and defendable as well. Nobody is going to claim any major changes to the Arctic just because at some hypothetical point in the future, ice extent drops to the 990.000km2s for a few days. That would be laughable, and totally negate the whole idea behind the term BOE.

So i would suggest to stop using BOE as a tag for "virtually ice free". and start using VIF instead. And that the rest of us start to think about how to actually discern when this Event takes place, I personally like the idea of FMI 80N lift-off being the unmistakable sign of a BOE.

<Don't make it personal. O>
Title: Re: Glossary ... for newbies and others
Post by: P-maker on September 16, 2020, 09:41:35 AM
Binntho & Neven,

To some extent, I do agree that the use of "BOE" ought to become less popular as time goes by.

However, I would like to describe a few scenarios, which may come under a proposed new heading: Virtually Ice-free Arctic (VIA).

Oct All remaining ice (<1 Mkm2) has been blown to the Beaufort Sea due to incoming heat advection from active hurricanes in the Atlantic Sector.

Dec All new ice (< 1 Mkm2) has formed along the Siberian and North American coastlines due to astronomical cooling of the two continents - spilling over into the nearby freshwater bays/ shelf areas.

Feb All FYI (<1 Mkm2) has accumulated on the windward side of all Arctic Islands, including Svalbard, FJL, NZ, SZ, NSI, Wrangel, CAA & Greenland.

Apr All SYI (< 1 Mkm2) has been blown out of the Arctic Basin and remains in the Greenland Sea as an extension of the Greenland cold pole.

Jun All remaining ice (< 1 Mkm2) is stuck between the islands of the CAA - refusing to let go of tradtional strongholds in the narrow sounds & straits and permanently frozen islands.

Aug Any remaining ice (< 1 Mkm2) will be floating around in the Arctic Basin proper as a coherent clump of detached iceberg fragments, shelf ice left-overs, MYI remnants and FYI slush - openly exposed to the vagaries of wind and currents.

No responsibility for what happens in between the months listed above.
Title: Re: Glossary ... for newbies and others
Post by: NigelC on September 16, 2020, 11:23:54 AM
Long time lurker. First time posting.

We have two phrases. 'Virtually ice free' and 'Blue ocean event'. It seems to me that to be of use they should mean different things.

'Virtually ice free' means less than 1,000,000 square kilometres of ice at minimum.

So f we want to use BOE it should mean something different. The word 'event' means something that happens at a specific time and place. I think it should mean the occasion when someone takes a non satellite  photo of the north pole with no ice in sight. Literally a blue ocean.  Ideally the photo would feature a ship at the north pole under a sunny sky with no ice in sight to the horizon. Such a photo would, I believe, be widely reproduced in the mainstream media and would be instrumental in raising public awareness about arctic ice loss.
Title: Re: Glossary ... for newbies and others
Post by: oren on September 16, 2020, 11:27:13 AM
Welcome, NigelC.
Can someone suggest where to move this interesting but OT conversation?
Title: Re: Glossary ... for newbies and others
Post by: binntho on September 16, 2020, 11:31:22 AM
Perhaps here Freeform season chatter and light commentary (https://forum.arctic-sea-ice.net/index.php/topic,2709.msg284183.html#new)
Title: Re: Glossary ... for newbies and others
Post by: Glen Koehler on October 03, 2020, 07:24:47 PM
CAS = Central Arctic Sea.  Used by NSIDC.  Which gerontocrat tells us is 3.2 km2 less than the CAB.  JAXA uses CAB right?
Title: Re: Glossary ... for newbies and others
Post by: gerontocrat on October 03, 2020, 09:21:15 PM
CAS = Central Arctic Sea.  Used by NSIDC.  Which gerontocrat tells us is 3.2 km2 less than the CAB.  JAXA uses CAB right?
Whoops - we are talking about the division of the High Arctic into the 7 central seas
- see attached table & maps.

Title: Re: Glossary ... for newbies and others
Post by: Steven on October 03, 2020, 09:46:19 PM
CAS = Central Arctic Sea.  Used by NSIDC.

Where does NSIDC call it "Central Arctic Sea"?  On their website they call it Central Arctic Basin (or briefly Central Arctic), just like everyone else. 

There are different ways to define the CAB (Wipneus uses a different definition than the NSIDC).  But I see no reason to add some non-existent "CAS" terminology that was made up by gerontocrat.  By that logic, you may as well rename Hudson Bay to Hudson Sea...
Title: Re: Glossary ... for newbies and others
Post by: Glen Koehler on October 03, 2020, 11:35:49 PM
   I hear you.  I was just responding to gerontocrat's CAS graphs and trying to clarify "CAS" vs CAB.  But apparently there is no such CAS label, just different definitions for CAB.  So I change that suggestion to a new one -- the glossary should note that CAB has different definitions between NSIDC and others.
Title: Re: Glossary ... for newbies and others
Post by: oren on October 04, 2020, 12:04:08 AM
Gero maybe you can replace CAS with CAB Central Arctic Basin (and Baffin Sea to Baffin Bay) in your publications? This will help clarify things by sticking to the common names.
I will add a clarification to CAB in the glossary regarding its contentious borders.
Title: Re: Glossary ... for newbies and others
Post by: Glen Koehler on October 09, 2020, 08:25:56 PM
   If the ASIF glossary is not limited to acronyms, even though gerontocrat restates the list in his updates, glossary definitions for
Central Arctic Seas (= Chukchi, Beaufort, CAA, East Siberian Sea, Central Arctic Basin, Laptev Sea, Kara Sea)
vs.
Peripheral Arctic Seas (=Okhotsk, Bering, Hudson Bay Baffin  Bay, Gulf of St. Lawernce, Greenland Sea, Barents Sea)
  would be useful to have in the glossary because that is where people are likely to go first when they encounter those terms and are looking for clarification.

    Also worth noting in definition of the CAB that even though the Lincoln Sea is labeled as a separate entity (e.g. NSIDC map), for Extent/Area/Volume stats it is counted as part of the CAB.
Title: Re: Glossary ... for newbies and others
Post by: oren on October 10, 2020, 10:03:51 AM
Added entries for Peripheral Seas and for High Arctic. Edited CAA entry to include list of main waterways. Edited CAB to include mention of the Lincoln Sea - and the Wandel Sea...