Arctic Sea Ice : Forum

Cryosphere => Arctic sea ice => Topic started by: b_lumenkraft on April 15, 2019, 07:04:36 AM

Title: The Rammb Slider Thread
Post by: b_lumenkraft on April 15, 2019, 07:04:36 AM
As requested,

Perhaps you should start a new thread to store them.

, here i will post GIFs made with the Rammb Slider website which provides satellite images of the Arctic in 51-minute steps.

Hope you all enjoy. :)
Title: Re: The Rammb Slider Thread
Post by: b_lumenkraft on April 15, 2019, 07:09:40 AM
This is a GIF showing the Beaufort Sea.

You can see beautifully how the wind moves the ice, causing a spiral pattern.

Edit: The gyre below is also contributing to the movement.

(Click to play)
Title: Re: The Rammb Slider Thread
Post by: b_lumenkraft on April 15, 2019, 07:17:51 AM
This is a GIF showing a perfect storm over Nares Strait on 11. and 12. 04.
Title: Re: The Rammb Slider Thread
Post by: oren on April 15, 2019, 08:48:53 AM
Amazing stuff, thank you B_L. Although the name of the thread may not be clear to some.
Title: Re: The Rammb Slider Thread
Post by: b_lumenkraft on April 15, 2019, 09:16:47 AM
Thanks a lot Oren :)

I thought it's a good nerdy name for nerdy sea ice topic. I'm not married to it though.

Neven, feel free to rename (if possible).
Title: Re: The Rammb Slider Thread
Post by: uniquorn on April 15, 2019, 11:29:23 AM
This is a GIF showing the Beaufort Sea.
You can see beautifully how the wind moves the ice, causing a spiral pattern.
Thanks for the new thread b_l. As you probably know, the gyre below is also contributing to the movement.
Title: Re: The Rammb Slider Thread
Post by: b_lumenkraft on April 15, 2019, 11:36:52 AM
This is a GIF showing the Beaufort Sea.
You can see beautifully how the wind moves the ice, causing a spiral pattern.
Thanks for the new thread b_l. As you probably know, the gyre below is also contributing to the movement.

You are welcome Uniquorn.

Thanks for the correction. I've edited the post accordingly. :)
Title: Re: The Rammb Slider Thread
Post by: b_lumenkraft on April 15, 2019, 11:58:14 AM
This is a GIF showing the Nares Strait downstream of Franklin Island.

There is evaporation going on directly after Franklin. I suspect swirls are causing upwelling here, showing the heat content carried by Nares deep waters.

Timeframe covered: 14.04. 11:16 to 20:35 UTC
Title: Re: The Rammb Slider Thread
Post by: be cause on April 15, 2019, 12:52:23 PM
b-lumencraft .. thanks for allowing the gifs to be played seperately ..I cannot load some pages here because all the gifs are trying to load and play themselves at the same time and my connection is not that good . I only wish all posters could adopt similar tactics .. for folks like me .. and for the environment .. b.c.
Title: Re: The Rammb Slider Thread
Post by: b_lumenkraft on April 15, 2019, 02:16:57 PM
b-lumencraft .. thanks for allowing the gifs to be played seperately ..I cannot load some pages here because all the gifs are trying to load and play themselves at the same time and my connection is not that good . I only wish all posters could adopt similar tactics .. for folks like me .. and for the environment .. b.c.

Thank you B.C.,

but actually, i think it's the forum software doing this when GIF size is very big. I did nothing special.

Neven, can you shed light on this? Is there an 'play inline' option?
Title: Re: The Rammb Slider Thread
Post by: Neven on April 15, 2019, 02:53:01 PM
Yes, from a certain size onwards (700x700px or some such, I'm not sure) gifs only play by clicking on them.
Title: Re: The Rammb Slider Thread
Post by: Sleepy on April 15, 2019, 03:03:36 PM
Click is required above 700 pixels. Or make an MP4 instead of a gif.
Title: Re: The Rammb Slider Thread
Post by: b_lumenkraft on April 15, 2019, 03:05:27 PM
Yes, from a certain size onwards (700x700px or some such, I'm not sure) gifs only play by clicking on them.

Thank you for your answer Neven. :)

So B.C., what do we do with this info? Upload big ones on purpose so they don't autoplay?
Title: Re: The Rammb Slider Thread
Post by: b_lumenkraft on April 15, 2019, 03:10:21 PM
Click is required above 700 pixels. Or make an MP4 instead of a gif.

Thanks Sleepy,

MP4s don't play in the browser for me. I need to download them and play them with separate software. Very inconvenient IMHO.
Title: Re: The Rammb Slider Thread
Post by: Sleepy on April 15, 2019, 03:15:02 PM
Some MP4's do not play well, I made this one with handbrake recently, does it play for you?
https://forum.arctic-sea-ice.net/index.php/topic,1102.msg195011.html#msg195011
Title: Re: The Rammb Slider Thread
Post by: b_lumenkraft on April 15, 2019, 03:39:58 PM
Sorry to report: No. :-[
Title: Re: The Rammb Slider Thread
Post by: Sleepy on April 15, 2019, 03:59:24 PM
Ok, just trying to figure out if it was playing for you, the settings I use in handbrake should work in most browsers, I primarily use Firefox myself.
But since MP4 is just a container it's possible to make it unplayable for everyone. ;)
http://camendesign.com/code/video_for_everybody/test.html (http://camendesign.com/code/video_for_everybody/test.html)

The easy fix is to make your gifs 701 pixels or more.
Title: Re: The Rammb Slider Thread
Post by: uniquorn on April 15, 2019, 08:08:31 PM
I sympathise with be cause's problem not least because I am on satellite broadband and am always managing bandwidth at the end of the month. It should be noted that 700 pixel gifs (or less) often produce the best quality images when viewed directly in the browser.
I think posting larger animations on the less viewed threads is a good compromise, though I thought that neven preferred an upper limit of ~10MB. If be cause really wants to view those threads then there is always the option suggested a long time ago here.
https://forum.arctic-sea-ice.net/index.php/topic,1259.msg165467.html#msg165467
Title: Re: The Rammb Slider Thread
Post by: Neven on April 15, 2019, 10:02:15 PM
Larger files cost more energy. I'm neurotic when it comes to that kind of stuff. In the greater scheme of things, it doesn't matter all that much. But it does matter to some of those people who don't have limitless bandwidth at their disposal, so I try to keep files as small as possible.
Title: Re: The Rammb Slider Thread
Post by: uniquorn on April 15, 2019, 10:38:27 PM
Larger files cost more energy. I'm neurotic when it comes to that kind of stuff. In the greater scheme of things, it doesn't matter all that much. But it does matter to some of those people who don't have limitless bandwidth at their disposal, so I try to keep files as small as possible.
understood
Title: Re: The Rammb Slider Thread
Post by: b_lumenkraft on April 16, 2019, 07:33:39 AM
Larger files cost more energy. I'm neurotic when it comes to that kind of stuff. In the greater scheme of things, it doesn't matter all that much. But it does matter to some of those people who don't have limitless bandwidth at their disposal, so I try to keep files as small as possible.
understood

I don't understand.

Let's imagine 2 threads. The first thread has only small GIFs. A person opening this thread would download all the GIFs just by opening the thread.
Another thread with only big GIFs would not download any GIF, but only the ones they are clicked on.

So the thread with bigger GIFs would need more memory on the server but would cause less traffic because threads are opened way more often than GIFs clicked on.

As unintuitive as it sounds, bigger GIFs would cause less traffic given the behaviour of the forum software.
Title: Re: The Rammb Slider Thread
Post by: Sleepy on April 16, 2019, 10:27:19 AM
People are talking different sizes here, pixel size and file size. Then add animation and canvas size.

If you want a thread primarily using animated images and at the same time optimize loading time for users with low bandwidth you should use a 701 pixel canvas. A 700 pixel image (or lower) with a 701 pixel canvas is exactly as good as an image with an 700 pixel canvas as long as the image itself is the same (original) size, pixelwise...

Your filesizes are also a bit large b_lumenkraft, as an example, NSDust03 above is +14MB, as a comparison I'll attach a modified animation using ScreenToGif and Photoshop with a 701 pixel wide canvas, it's now down to 3,7MB and it doesn't autoplay.

In short; b.c. is happy because loading time and power consumption are improved at his end.
Nevens servers likewise.
You've got more work and increased your own power consumption.
Like I did right now. But I save a lot more by not using a car. ;)

Edit; forgot to add the former standard phrase in here, click to animate.
Title: Re: The Rammb Slider Thread
Post by: b_lumenkraft on April 16, 2019, 11:09:12 AM
I understand now. Thank you Sleepy, that was very helpful.
Title: Re: The Rammb Slider Thread
Post by: b_lumenkraft on April 16, 2019, 06:19:08 PM
In the GIF below i provide visual context to this post from the Nares Strait thread:

Looking at pairs of DMI-Greenland (http://ocean.dmi.dk/arctic/kane.uk.php) Sentinel images that are "1 day" apart (but who knows the exact number hours between any two images?) - March 14 and March 15 - I see large floes coming into the north end of Nares Strait (that I'm 'sure' will break along the way, and not create an ice jam) having moved 30 km, floes moved 65 km in Hall Basin, 35 km in Kane Basin, and 55 km in Smith Sound.  (Named locations can be found in the very first link offered in the [Greenland and Arctic Circle folder] Google Maps with place names thread Reply #1 (https://forum.arctic-sea-ice.net/index.php/topic,277.msg5119.html#msg5119) or more directly here (https://www.google.com/maps/d/viewer?mid=1C6FrX9494kHMX_svvTu7SzmEEDA&ll=80.65188124838661%2C-57.267691032425574&z=4).)  Averaging these rates, ice is currently taking about 10 days to traverse the 500 km length of Nares Strait.

14.04. 01:50 to 15.4. 10:38 (UTC)

Click to play
Title: Re: The Rammb Slider Thread
Post by: b_lumenkraft on April 19, 2019, 07:19:04 PM
This is a GIF showing 'spaghetti clouds' i spotted today.

For orientation, on the right, the Nares Strait.

Five frames, 18.04. 03:14, 04:56, 06:37, 12:33, 13:24 UTC

When someone can explain how they form i would be thankful for input. :)

(click to play)
Title: Re: The Rammb Slider Thread
Post by: uniquorn on April 19, 2019, 07:59:02 PM
flight path?
Title: Re: The Rammb Slider Thread
Post by: b_lumenkraft on April 19, 2019, 08:03:53 PM
Good idea, Uniquorn.

Just googled it and apparently, planes do fly up there.
Title: Re: The Rammb Slider Thread
Post by: uniquorn on April 19, 2019, 10:54:58 PM
Looking for something about Amundsen Gulf tides found this journal from 1986.

International Hydrographie  Review,  Monaco,  LXIII (2),  July  1986CANADIAN  ARCTIC  TIDE  MEASUREMENTTECHNIQUES  AND  RESULTSby  B.J.  TAIT,  S.T.  GRANT,  D.  St.-JACQUES  and  F.  STEPHENSON (*)
https://journals.lib.unb.ca/index.php/ihr/article/viewFile/23426/27201

Quote
The  tide  in  the  southern  Beaufort  Sea  and  in  Amundsen  Gulf  propagates counterclockwise  about  an  amphidromic  point  situated near the  southwest  corner of  Banks  I.  It  propagates  quickly  along  the  coast  from  Alaska  to  a  point approximately midway along the Tuktoyaktuk Peninsula where it slows significantly,  reaching  Sachs  Harbour (site  4,  Figure  2)  on  Banks  I. about  six  hours  later.  In Amundsen  Gulf the  tide  travels  east  into  Dolphin  and  Union  Strait  and  Prince Albert  Sound  and  northwest  into  Prince  of Wales  Strait.The  tidal  propagation  patterns  in  the  waterways  between  the  eastern  end  of Amundsen Gulf and the southern end of M’Clintock Channel are complex and not yet  well  defined.  Further field  surveys  are  planned  for these  areas.

First image is fig2 from the journal.
Original rammb animation 35MB (80 frames) when cropped was 5MB and very small. Enlarged 2x took it to 18MB. Converting to mp4 gets 384kB. (click to play)
ffmpeg -i rb2.gif -pix_fmt yuv420p -vf "scale=trunc(iw/2)*2:trunc(ih/2)*2" rb2.mp4
Worldview terra modis apr18 (or nearest) 2010-2019posted on melting season (deleted here to help save the planet)
Title: Re: The Rammb Slider Thread
Post by: johnm33 on April 19, 2019, 11:19:16 PM
"Amundsen" that's timely I've been thinking the tides there are about to kick off opening up the coastal ice off Banks driving ice across to Alaska and firing up the gyre. Plus that format gives me the opportunity to loop and adjust speed.
Title: Re: The Rammb Slider Thread
Post by: uniquorn on April 19, 2019, 11:29:40 PM
Hoping that the slider might show evidence of the tides. Drift would appear to be largely wind driven once fractured at the moment but if the wind drops the tide may show itself.
edit: unfortunately I don't have the broadband vol to check the slider regularly (or width. gives me an idea for a new thread   ;)  Funny. Possible best format doesn't play for the OP)
Title: Re: The Rammb Slider Thread
Post by: Sleepy on April 20, 2019, 06:40:25 AM
Funny. Possible best format doesn't play for the OP)
Yeah, all major browsers support H.264 in MP4. Everything else is doable with ffmpeg, except coffee. :)
Title: Re: The Rammb Slider Thread
Post by: Sleepy on April 21, 2019, 08:46:27 AM
A final OT-comment since this was brought up here.
b_lumenkraft, I noticed the test bed thread yesterday and used uniquorn's MP4 there, added quicktime and iOS support using ffmpeg:
https://forum.arctic-sea-ice.net/index.php/topic,2558.msg196167.html#msg196167 (https://forum.arctic-sea-ice.net/index.php/topic,2558.msg196167.html#msg196167)

The issue here is that it also makes the file slightly larger. Not too bad in that case but if I take a video (like the one I asked you to view in reply #14, made using handbrake) and provide universal support, it will increase in size from 3,19MB to 8,16MB. And that's a small video.
Title: Re: The Rammb Slider Thread
Post by: b_lumenkraft on April 21, 2019, 09:03:35 AM
I was looking for a tool (for Mac) yesterday that can do screengrab and does support canvas size adjustment and can export as MP4 but didn't find anything suitable.

What are you using Sleeepy.
Title: Re: The Rammb Slider Thread
Post by: Sleepy on April 21, 2019, 09:58:59 AM
PC, the last time I used a MAC was some twenty years ago working as a systems manager, but that's also the reason for using Photoshop. GIMP should do just fine as a replacement but I've never used it myself.
For screengrabs I mainly use ScreenToGif, which is not available for MAC. There are alternatives for MAC there as well but I don't know anything about those.
Title: Re: The Rammb Slider Thread
Post by: b_lumenkraft on April 21, 2019, 12:10:51 PM
Ah ok. Thank you anyway Sleepy.

Need to get familiar with Gimp then i guess.  ;)
Title: Re: The Rammb Slider Thread
Post by: b_lumenkraft on April 22, 2019, 08:53:13 AM
In this GIF you see a closeup of the Nares Strait arch during high(er) tide conditions.

Transport in the strait stalls briefly, at the arch it reverses direction. The GIF showing 19.04. 7:59h to 22.04. 00:17h UTC.

Tidal chart attached. Click to play GIF
Title: Re: The Rammb Slider Thread
Post by: b_lumenkraft on April 22, 2019, 09:15:40 AM
Hoping that the slider might show evidence of the tides.

I don't know Uniquorn, i don't see anything.

Click to play GIF
Title: Re: The Rammb Slider Thread
Post by: uniquorn on April 22, 2019, 02:09:33 PM
Hoping that the slider might show evidence of the tides.
I don't know Uniquorn, i don't see anything.
Thanks for looking b_l. Nothing obvious. The thinner ice with (hopefully) lighter winds may show something later.
Title: Re: The Rammb Slider Thread
Post by: b_lumenkraft on April 22, 2019, 02:30:27 PM
Thanks for looking b_.

You are very welcome.

Though i'm having a lag of GIF tools there is no lag in bandwidth. I will keep it observed. :)
Title: Re: The Rammb Slider Thread
Post by: Phil. on April 22, 2019, 02:36:04 PM
I was looking for a tool (for Mac) yesterday that can do screengrab and does support canvas size adjustment and can export as MP4 but didn't find anything suitable.

What are you using Sleeepy.

I use the Mac utility called 'Grab', I don't know if it will do all you need, works fine whenever I've used it.
Title: Re: The Rammb Slider Thread
Post by: b_lumenkraft on April 22, 2019, 04:20:50 PM
That's weird, i don't have that Phil. It's not pre-installed for me and can't find it in the appstore.  :-\
Title: Re: The Rammb Slider Thread
Post by: JayW on April 23, 2019, 12:50:35 PM
Laptev sea April 18-23. Band M7.
Title: Re: The Rammb Slider Thread
Post by: HapHazard on April 23, 2019, 08:18:32 PM
Looks like it's headed towards the Nares (https://forum.arctic-sea-ice.net/index.php/topic,176.msg196477.html#msg196477) after all! ;) ;D

I'm really enjoying the animations in this thread - great stuff.
Title: Re: The Rammb Slider Thread
Post by: b_lumenkraft on April 23, 2019, 08:26:30 PM
Looks like it's headed towards the Nares (https://forum.arctic-sea-ice.net/index.php/topic,176.msg196477.html#msg196477) after all! ;) ;D

It might melt before it get's there.  ???   ;)
Title: Re: The Rammb Slider Thread
Post by: Susan Anderson on April 23, 2019, 08:39:34 PM
Screengrab for Mac:

Control/Shift/4
Drag to create crop box
Hey presto

Mine stores on my desktop, not sure how I set that up or if it's the default. Looking on Finder recent files should locate it.
Title: Re: The Rammb Slider Thread
Post by: b_lumenkraft on April 23, 2019, 08:50:19 PM
Thank you Susan,

but i was looking for a GIF creating tool. Screenshots are well understood. :)
Title: Re: The Rammb Slider Thread
Post by: gerontocrat on April 24, 2019, 12:34:42 PM
Thank you Susan,

but i was looking for a GIF creating tool. Screenshots are well understood. :)

I did a google for freebies, and found this helped----
 https://www.techsupportalert.com/best-free-animated-gif-maker.htm

I decided not to download a program and instead use an on-line freebie --- http://gifmaker.org/

"So simple even a professional can use it"
(Advertising slogan from IBM in the 1980 late 1970's)
Title: Re: The Rammb Slider Thread
Post by: b_lumenkraft on April 24, 2019, 01:23:49 PM
That's cool Gerontocrat. That first tool seems to be overkill but it has what i need (i think). Downloading it now.

Edit: Woopsie... 45 bucks for the pro version which is needed to create GIFs. Also has no screen grap feature. Deleted again.  ;D
Title: Re: The Rammb Slider Thread
Post by: b_lumenkraft on April 25, 2019, 07:38:53 AM
This is a GIF showing two days of ice movement at the coast of Alaska.

Day/Night Band

(Click GIF to play GIF)
Title: Re: The Rammb Slider Thread
Post by: Phil. on April 25, 2019, 01:32:31 PM
That's weird, i don't have that Phil. It's not pre-installed for me and can't find it in the appstore.  :-\

Are you using the Mojave operating system, it might not be on that?

https://appletoolbox.com/2013/01/how-to-use-mac-os-x-grab-utility-to-take-screenshots/#Grab_Utility_in_macOS_Mojave_and_Above
Title: Re: The Rammb Slider Thread
Post by: b_lumenkraft on April 25, 2019, 01:51:11 PM
That's weird, i don't have that Phil. It's not pre-installed for me and can't find it in the appstore.  :-\

Are you using the Mojave operating system, it might not be on that?

https://appletoolbox.com/2013/01/how-to-use-mac-os-x-grab-utility-to-take-screenshots/#Grab_Utility_in_macOS_Mojave_and_Above

OMG cmd+shift+5 !!

No wonder i didn't find it as an app in the utility folder. Because it's a system-wide feature. Thank you so much, Phil.
Title: Re: The Rammb Slider Thread
Post by: magnamentis on April 25, 2019, 03:43:08 PM
some info, easist is to get "Grab" back from a backup, time machine or from any pre-mojave running machine via "copy > paste" "drag and drop etc. etc.

https://www.makeuseof.com/tag/best-gif-apps-mac/

https://itunes.apple.com/us/app/gifgrabber/id668208984?mt=12

https://itunes.apple.com/us/app/gif-brewery-by-gfycat/id1081413713?mt=12

Restore Grab from a previous macOS Time Machine backup, if available
Open Time Machine or open your backup drive’s backups.backupdb folder
If using Time Machine, go to a past snapshot from a previous macOS version like High Sierra or Sierra
If opening your backup folder, select a backup date before you updated to macOS Mojave
Locate Grab in the Utilities folder inside the Applications folder of your backup
If using Time Machine, command-click on Grab and select Restore “Grab” to… and choose your Applications > Utilities folder as the folder for the restored item
Enter your admin password, if asked
If searching your backup drive without Time Machine, locate Grab and paste it in your Mac > Applications > Utilities folder
Once complete, verify that Grab is on your Mac running macOS Mojave in the Applications > Utilities folder, open it, and conduct a test screenshot using Grab
You can also copy it from another person’s Mac running macOS Sierra or High Sierra or from their Time Machine or another backup macOS Sierra or High Sierra.

if someone wants/needs that we find ways how you can get one from me, i have 1 of 4 macs running on high sierra and can post a dropbox link here:

Via the link below you should be able to download "Grab" from my dropbox
https://www.dropbox.com/sh/chdlu6q3o0rizz8/AACExYdgybIKSJVSQyRPqYbWa?dl=0

Title: Re: The Rammb Slider Thread
Post by: b_lumenkraft on April 25, 2019, 03:53:32 PM
That's awesome Magnamentis. Thank you!
Title: Re: The Rammb Slider Thread
Post by: magnamentis on April 25, 2019, 04:07:43 PM
That's awesome Magnamentis. Thank you!

glad to see that one of the methods worked for you ;) :D

BTW as a little side note:

"Grab" is 64bit hence chances are high that it will work for many years to come

Generally one can find a lot of "hidden" stuff under shortcuts and accessibility in system prefs
and last but not least one can easily create own shortcuts for often used functions.
Title: Re: The Rammb Slider Thread
Post by: JayW on April 29, 2019, 12:19:06 PM
Effects of southerly winds over the Bering and Chukchi are evident.
Last 3 days.
Title: Re: The Rammb Slider Thread
Post by: b_lumenkraft on April 29, 2019, 12:44:48 PM
Hey JayW,

thanks for posting in this thread. I'm having a favour to ask though.

Could you make the GIFs 1 pixel wider please (701px)? Since this thread is dedicated for GIFs it's a burden to even open for users with bandwidth cap or slow internet if GIFs would all autoplay and therefore auto-download. Also, the forums servers will have to work less when this thread does not force a download of multiple GIFs just by opening it.

Hope this makes sense to you. It took me some time to wrap my head around it. ;)
Title: Re: The Rammb Slider Thread
Post by: b_lumenkraft on May 01, 2019, 02:31:08 PM
This is a GIF showing cracks on the north of Ellesmere Island evolving.

(Click GIF to animate)
Title: Re: The Rammb Slider Thread
Post by: b_lumenkraft on May 11, 2019, 07:37:38 PM
This is a GIF showing the extreme crackification at the most northern Greenland coast (north is left).

11.05. 06:06h to 15:25h UTC.

(Click GIF to animate)
Title: Re: The Rammb Slider Thread
Post by: uniquorn on May 11, 2019, 08:04:18 PM
Nice animation. If the ice is thick it doesn't have a lot of integrity. That must be warm water upwelling along the coast. Probably been bottom melting for a while.
maybe rotate 90deg and post on melting thread?
Title: Re: The Rammb Slider Thread
Post by: b_lumenkraft on May 11, 2019, 08:12:21 PM
Nice animation.

Thank you! :)

Quote
If the ice is thick it doesn't have a lot of integrity. That must be warm water upwelling along the coast. Probably been bottom melting for a while.

My thought exactly! I had this suspicion back in March April too when the first NS east side cracking occurred.

Quote
maybe rotate 90deg and post on melting thread?[/size]

No probs! :)

Edit!
Title: Re: The Rammb Slider Thread
Post by: b_lumenkraft on May 12, 2019, 03:19:35 PM
This is followup GIF showing the extreme crackification at the most northern Greenland coast, rotated.

Note that this crack is now reaching west all the way to the Beaufort Sea cutting through all the supposed thick ice. The sea ice has completely lost its anchor. It's drifting and cracking all over the place.

11.05. 14:34h to 12.05. 10:02h UTC.

(Click GIF to animate)
Title: Re: The Rammb Slider Thread
Post by: b_lumenkraft on May 12, 2019, 04:59:13 PM
This GIF is showing an interesting S-curvy pattern the floes take in hight of Hall Basin in Nares Strait.

In the upper part of the GIF, you can see an up and down movement caused by a tidal wave. The S-curve stays persistent.

Sentinel also clearly shows this 'track'.

(Click GIF to animate)
Title: Re: The Rammb Slider Thread
Post by: JayW on May 15, 2019, 12:14:10 PM
49 hour loop - Kara Sea - ending at 722Z, May 15, 2019 - contrast enhanced
(Requires a click)

Title: Re: The Rammb Slider Thread
Post by: FishOutofWater on May 15, 2019, 08:47:43 PM
The whole Arctic pack is rotating clockwise now. The ice has transform faults all around the CAA and Greenland. Faults are continuous in ice on the north of Ellesmere island on today's Aqua image.
Title: Re: The Rammb Slider Thread
Post by: b_lumenkraft on May 21, 2019, 03:13:20 PM
Ice follows wind.

This is a GIF showing the Laptev Sea, 20.05. 18:29h to 21.05 08:00h UTC.

(requires a click)
Title: Re: The Rammb Slider Thread
Post by: oren on May 22, 2019, 02:23:44 AM
b_l, thank you for this. I sometimes wish there was a way to Like a certain post more than once.
Title: Re: The Rammb Slider Thread
Post by: b_lumenkraft on May 22, 2019, 08:34:42 AM
Pleasing you is worth more than a thousand likes. ;)
You are welcome Oren.
Title: Re: The Rammb Slider Thread
Post by: JayW on May 27, 2019, 11:48:57 PM
Okay, instead of clogging up the melting thread with my speculative post, this fits well here.  I was perusing the arctic using band M8 ("snow/cloud"), and was struck by some features on the Pacific side, these also show up in the two "snow/ice" bands. As an aside, the "I" bands are 375m resulting, "M" bands are 750m.  They are clearly features of the ice, not atmospheric, but I'm not willing to go as far as saying it is wetness, as much as I'm tempted.  The satellite definitely "sees" something, but I can't discern if it's a roughness thing, a temperature thing, or a wetness thing, or even a combination.  I've reattached the NPP satellites a bit, but haven't gained clarity.  Incidentally, the area that uniquorn referenced at 85.3N, 96.5E shows as a dark spot. (Third attachment, still image)

First attachment is north of the Chukchi. (Click it)
Link to are area http://rammb-slider.cira.colostate.edu/?sat=jpss&z=5&im=42&ts=1&st=0&et=0&speed=130&motion=loop&map=1&lat=1&opacity%5B0%5D=1&hidden%5B0%5D=0&pause=0&slider=-1&hide_controls=1&mouse_draw=0&follow_feature=0&follow_hide=0&s=rammb-slider&sec=northern_hemisphere&p%5B0%5D=band_m08&x=14903.9169921875&y=19530.083984375

Second is further north. (Click it)
Link http://rammb-slider.cira.colostate.edu/?sat=jpss&z=5&im=42&ts=1&st=0&et=0&speed=130&motion=loop&map=1&lat=1&opacity%5B0%5D=1&hidden%5B0%5D=0&pause=0&slider=-1&hide_controls=1&mouse_draw=0&follow_feature=0&follow_hide=0&s=rammb-slider&sec=northern_hemisphere&p%5B0%5D=band_m08&x=14903.9169921875&y=19530.083984375
Title: Re: The Rammb Slider Thread
Post by: b_lumenkraft on May 28, 2019, 04:39:26 AM
Great catch Jay!
Title: Re: The Rammb Slider Thread
Post by: JayW on May 28, 2019, 12:36:44 PM
Great catch Jay!
Thanks b_l, I'd like to quantify it more, but I'm very unsure on what it's picking up.

Today, I noticed a dark area emerging from beneath the clouds along the north Russian coast near the Laptev/ESS boundary.

http://rammb-slider.cira.colostate.edu/?sat=jpss&z=4&im=24&ts=1&st=0&et=0&speed=130&motion=loop&map=1&lat=0&opacity%5B0%5D=1&hidden%5B0%5D=0&pause=20190528054741&slider=-1&hide_controls=0&mouse_draw=0&follow_feature=0&follow_hide=0&s=rammb-slider&sec=northern_hemisphere&p%5B0%5D=band_m08&x=12307.0283203125&y=17794.083984375

Band M8
(Click to animate)
Title: Re: The Rammb Slider Thread
Post by: b_lumenkraft on May 28, 2019, 12:52:22 PM
emerging from beneath the clouds

I noticed the same with the other dark spots too.

Could it caused by rain?
Title: Re: The Rammb Slider Thread
Post by: uniquorn on May 28, 2019, 04:56:15 PM
worldview terra modis corrective reflectance 367 picks up the same striations on may26-28. I'm thinking peak sunlight through different layers of cloud combined with warm air temperature for a shortish time period. (click to run)
Title: Re: The Rammb Slider Thread
Post by: jdallen on May 29, 2019, 01:32:07 AM
worldview terra modis corrective reflectance 367 picks up the same striations on may26-28. I'm thinking peak sunlight through different layers of cloud combined with warm air temperature for a shortish time period. (click to run)
Melt ponds between pressure ridges, my 2 cents worth.
Title: Re: The Rammb Slider Thread
Post by: JayW on May 30, 2019, 10:32:51 AM
worldview terra modis corrective reflectance 367 picks up the same striations on may26-28. I'm thinking peak sunlight through different layers of cloud combined with warm air temperature for a shortish time period. (click to run)
Melt ponds between pressure ridges, my 2 cents worth.
That's kinda my thinking as well, although I think that the dark is wet snow, not quite liquid water. 

The pressure from the Beaufort ice getting shoved westward by the winds must've piled the ice up somewhere.  As the pressure ridges rose up, the extra weight then lowered the troughs between ridges, allowing see water to saturate the snow.



I noticed the same with the other dark spots too.

Could it caused by rain?

I'm coming around to the idea that the dark areas in band M8 are representing wet snow, and whiter areas are drier/colder snow.  I think in many of these cases, we are seeing the snowpack "ripen", meaning that it has softened to the piont it's melting so that it's surface is wet, but it's still very white, as the water can't pool on the surface yet.  That's why everything looks white in the visible bands, but picked up by the near infrared bands and displays as darker.

Today's interesting area of darkening is SE of Wrangel Island.  Here we see a storm passing through, but offering is a window through the dry slot.  A close look reveals some white bands that follow the cyclonic curvature of the storm. My interpretation is that the majority of precipitation that fell was a mixture of rain and snow, this wet down the snow (dark patches).  The whiter arcs are areas where the the precipitation came down hard enough that it was able to stay snow.  This is very common for storms where the temperatures are neat 0°C, the heavier stuff creates more cooling in the column and can drag down enough cold to keep it snow.

There's some similar patterns emerging in the Kara Sea this morning, but waiting for a few more images to load for that area.

http://rammb-slider.cira.colostate.edu/?sat=jpss&z=4&im=18&ts=1&st=0&et=0&speed=130&motion=loop&map=1&lat=1&opacity%5B0%5D=1&hidden%5B0%5D=0&pause=0&slider=-1&hide_controls=1&mouse_draw=0&follow_feature=0&follow_hide=0&s=rammb-slider&sec=northern_hemisphere&p%5B0%5D=band_m08&x=13818.2783203125&y=21136.111328125

Edit: added the Bremen cause color, as it picked up on the "torching" in the Chukchi where I feel the rain/snow mixture fell.

Requires a click
Title: Re: The Rammb Slider Thread
Post by: b_lumenkraft on May 30, 2019, 10:37:22 AM
Absolutely makes sense to me, Jay.
Title: Re: The Rammb Slider Thread
Post by: JayW on May 30, 2019, 01:23:24 PM
Here's the area in the Kara Sea where more darkening in band M8 is evident.  I hypothesize that the thin, low clouds produced drizzle (liquid), wetting the snow, where the thicker clouds were able to generate higher precipitation rates, and thus snow, leaving behind the white streaks.

http://rammb-slider.cira.colostate.edu/?sat=jpss&z=4&im=18&ts=1&st=0&et=0&speed=130&motion=loop&map=1&lat=1&opacity%5B0%5D=1&hidden%5B0%5D=0&pause=20190530074202&slider=-1&hide_controls=0&mouse_draw=0&follow_feature=0&follow_hide=0&s=rammb-slider&sec=northern_hemisphere&p%5B0%5D=band_m08&x=13081.361328125&y=13241.1669921875

Click to run
Title: Re: The Rammb Slider Thread
Post by: bluice on May 30, 2019, 01:31:37 PM
It looks like the white streaks are also slowly disappearing which would suggest fresh new snow from the passing storm is also starting to melt/darken/get wet. Do we have surface temperatures from the area?

New snow kills the old, as the saying goes.
Title: Re: The Rammb Slider Thread
Post by: b_lumenkraft on May 30, 2019, 01:36:18 PM
According to Windy, ~0˚C

Title: Re: The Rammb Slider Thread
Post by: bluice on May 30, 2019, 01:39:01 PM
Thanks b_l. I don't know how accurate Windy is in such a remote location, but 0 degrees should be enough to darken new snow on top of wet snow.
Title: Re: The Rammb Slider Thread
Post by: b_lumenkraft on May 30, 2019, 01:42:37 PM
Welcome, Idk how accurate it is either...
Title: Re: The Rammb Slider Thread
Post by: b_lumenkraft on May 31, 2019, 02:12:37 PM
Caught in the act i guess.  8)

This is in the north of the Nares Strait arch.

(Click to play)
Title: Re: The Rammb Slider Thread
Post by: b_lumenkraft on May 31, 2019, 03:03:28 PM
Zoomed out, it looks like this.

Arctic Ocean, north of Prinz Georg Land.

M8 Band

27.05. 03:34h to 31.05. 09:55h (UTC)
Title: Re: The Rammb Slider Thread
Post by: b_lumenkraft on May 31, 2019, 07:39:25 PM
Same occurrence, M10 Band, close up.

(Click to play)
Title: Re: The Rammb Slider Thread
Post by: JayW on June 01, 2019, 12:03:45 AM
Plenty of streaks showing NE of Utqiagvik.
Band 8, needs click.
Title: Re: The Rammb Slider Thread
Post by: b_lumenkraft on June 01, 2019, 06:29:58 AM
I'm having the impression the rotation picked up speed.
Title: Re: The Rammb Slider Thread
Post by: JayW on June 01, 2019, 01:44:01 PM
ESS showing some dark as the clouds pass in band M8.  A curious little low level circulation riding along 75°N, likely along some low level boundary also seen.

http://rammb-slider.cira.colostate.edu/?sat=jpss&z=4&im=28&ts=1&st=0&et=0&speed=130&motion=loop&map=1&lat=1&opacity%5B0%5D=1&hidden%5B0%5D=0&pause=0&slider=-1&hide_controls=0&mouse_draw=0&follow_feature=0&follow_hide=0&s=rammb-slider&sec=northern_hemisphere&p%5B0%5D=band_m08&x=13580.72265625&y=19252

Click
Title: Re: The Rammb Slider Thread
Post by: jdallen on June 01, 2019, 07:01:10 PM
ESS showing some dark as the clouds pass in band M8.  A curious little low level circulation riding along 75°N, likely along some low level boundary also seen.
I remember seeing little cyclonic features like that in 2013...14?

There was some discussion but no conclusions.
Title: Re: The Rammb Slider Thread
Post by: JayW on June 01, 2019, 10:27:48 PM

I remember seeing little cyclonic features like that in 2013...14?

There was some discussion but no conclusions.

I suspect they are fairly common, but exist in the lowest part of the atmosphere along frontal boundaries.  Since they are so low, higher clouds likely obscure them normally.

Speaking of swirls, some neat, fractal-like ones in the Greenland sea today.

http://rammb-slider.cira.colostate.edu/?sat=jpss&z=5&im=18&ts=1&st=0&et=0&speed=130&motion=loop&map=1&lat=1&opacity%5B0%5D=1&hidden%5B0%5D=0&pause=0&slider=-1&hide_controls=0&mouse_draw=0&follow_feature=0&follow_hide=0&s=rammb-slider&sec=northern_hemisphere&p%5B0%5D=band_i01&x=17694.875&y=13175.0419921875

Needs click, band I2, because it's the highest resolution.
Title: Re: The Rammb Slider Thread
Post by: b_lumenkraft on June 02, 2019, 07:01:12 AM
Beautiful Kelvin-Helmholtz waves. :)
Title: Re: The Rammb Slider Thread
Post by: b_lumenkraft on June 02, 2019, 10:11:24 AM
Zoomed out, it looks like this.

Arctic Ocean, north of Prinz Georg Land.

M8 Band

27.05. 03:34h to 31.05. 09:55h (UTC)

Looking at NASA Worldview (Brightness Temperature for Sea Ice (89V Ghz) GCOM-W1 / AMSR2) for this day and area, it shows warmth. Another piece in the puzzle i think.
Title: Re: The Rammb Slider Thread
Post by: b_lumenkraft on June 03, 2019, 07:51:32 AM
This GIF is showing Lincoln sea where the ice is driven towards the Nares Strait.

M8 band.

So is this precipitation (snowfall here?) or not? I can't explain it another way.

(Click to play)
Title: Re: The Rammb Slider Thread
Post by: JayW on June 05, 2019, 08:17:32 AM
80 hour loop of the Lena delta, ending June 5, 0Z

http://rammb-slider.cira.colostate.edu/?sat=jpss&z=5&im=60&ts=1&st=0&et=0&speed=130&motion=loop&map=1&lat=1&opacity%5B0%5D=1&hidden%5B0%5D=0&pause=0&slider=-1&hide_controls=1&mouse_draw=0&follow_feature=0&follow_hide=0&s=rammb-slider&sec=northern_hemisphere&p%5B0%5D=band_i01&x=11351.2783203125&y=16546.0283203125

Requires a click
Title: Re: The Rammb Slider Thread
Post by: binntho on June 05, 2019, 08:22:12 AM
Wow
Title: Re: The Rammb Slider Thread
Post by: b_lumenkraft on June 05, 2019, 01:09:12 PM
80 hour loop of the Lena delta, ending June 5, 0Z

Looks like this in Geo vs Natural
Title: Re: The Rammb Slider Thread
Post by: b_lumenkraft on June 05, 2019, 09:10:49 PM
Rammb Slider not updating.  :-[
Title: Re: The Rammb Slider Thread
Post by: JayW on June 12, 2019, 03:04:41 AM
Neat cluster of mesolows moving south over the Barents, cool to see the whole thing rotating clockwise.  I flipped the image to put north, up.

http://rammb-slider.cira.colostate.edu/?sat=jpss&z=4&im=24&ts=1&st=0&et=0&speed=140&motion=loop&map=1&lat=1&opacity%5B0%5D=1&hidden%5B0%5D=0&pause=0&slider=-1&hide_controls=1&mouse_draw=0&follow_feature=0&follow_hide=0&s=rammb-slider&sec=northern_hemisphere&p%5B0%5D=band_m08&x=16124&y=12146.0556640625
Contrast enhanced for detail, click to run.
Title: Re: The Rammb Slider Thread
Post by: Neven on June 12, 2019, 12:15:05 PM
Megalow may be on the way...
Title: Re: The Rammb Slider Thread
Post by: JayW on June 13, 2019, 03:52:09 AM
Greenland, band M8.
Needs click
Title: Re: The Rammb Slider Thread
Post by: oren on June 13, 2019, 04:00:42 AM
Amazing animation.
So does the dark color represent wet surface or warmed surface?
Title: Re: The Rammb Slider Thread
Post by: JayW on June 13, 2019, 04:14:49 AM
Amazing animation.
So does the dark color represent wet surface or warmed surface?

I believe band M8 is considered to be in the near infrared spectrum, so it's possible that's is sensitive to surface temperatures, but as it is called the "cloud/snow" band, it's also possible is picking up on some property of wet snow.  Maybe some of both.  My hunch is that it's the snowpack "ripening", right at the threshold of melting.  So perhaps it's sensitive to temps near 0°C, or dampness, but I can't say for certain.  Only thing that I'm sure of, is that's is picking up on something.   :)  sorry I can't be more informative..
Title: Re: The Rammb Slider Thread
Post by: b_lumenkraft on June 13, 2019, 08:32:03 AM
Amazing animation.
So does the dark color represent wet surface or warmed surface?

I don't know if it's surface temperature or snow wetness or a combination of both.

I did saw the ESS darkening in M8 and M10 band like 2 days before melt ponds became visible in Sentinel.

Also the Greenland darkening Jay posted, corresponds directly to rising temperatures.

I made GIFs showing this in detail. First GIF is yesterdays temperatures on the east coast with time stamps. If you compare the Greenland darkening (in M10 band) GIF 2 (Click to play), it corresponds directly to the rising temperatures.

So i guess the question is, would ice and snow melt that fast or is it temperature we are seeing?
Title: Re: The Rammb Slider Thread
Post by: JayW on June 13, 2019, 11:34:24 AM

I don't know if it's surface temperature or snow wetness or a combination of both.

I did saw the ESS darkening in M8 and M10 band like 2 days before melt ponds became visible in Sentinel.

Also the Greenland darkening Jay posted, corresponds directly to rising temperatures.


I did a bit of poking around, trying to read stuff well above my pay grade.  This one paper explains a lot I think.  Ultimately, it appears we are likely looking at grain size.  Fresh snow generally falls as dendrites, the pretty, six sided geometric shapes we see portrayed in Christmas movies that's highly reflective.  Over time, the snow metamorphosizes due to factors such as temperature, humidity, compaction, etc.  It turns out that the 1240nm wavelength is sensitive to the grain size (larger grains better absorb this part of the spectrum).  Anyone who has watched a lot of snow melt will have likely noticed that as snow warms to the point of melting, it turns into "corn snow", large grainy snow that loosely resembles ball bearings (at least it reminds me of them). 

I believe that this must be what we are seeing, the metamorphosis from a more flake-like structure, to larger, coarser grains that occurs as a snowpack begins going through thaw-freeze cycles.  So while the sensor is picking up on the increased absorption of the 1240nm wavelength by larger grains, it coincides with the temperature rising above freezing, or any other process that would increase grain size like rain or even compaction.

https://www.google.com/url?sa=t&source=web&rct=j&url=https://www.the-cryosphere.net/5/831/2011/tc-5-831-2011.pdf&ved=2ahUKEwiRoeeohebiAhXQqFkKHRy6Bw0QFjAMegQIBhAB&usg=AOvVaw39ewk-rkiK8uXp5-YsUAkD
Title: Re: The Rammb Slider Thread
Post by: b_lumenkraft on June 13, 2019, 11:50:19 AM
OMG, this makes so much sense. What we see is the structure of the snow.

Thanks so much Jay!
Title: Re: The Rammb Slider Thread
Post by: b_lumenkraft on June 13, 2019, 01:03:21 PM
VIIRS potential for snow retrievals

Several VIIRS bands have good sensitivity to snow structure, especially SWIR bands M8,10,11
Overlaid curves show model snow albedo for various grain sizes

Link >> https://collaboration.cmc.ec.gc.ca/science/rpn/SEM/dossiers/2012/seminaires/2012-11-23/Seminar_2012-11-23_Alexander_Trishchenko.pdf
Title: Re: The Rammb Slider Thread
Post by: oren on June 13, 2019, 02:21:46 PM
Thanks for the detailed explanation!
Title: Re: The Rammb Slider Thread
Post by: JayW on June 13, 2019, 10:13:17 PM
VIIRS potential for snow retrievals

Several VIIRS bands have good sensitivity to snow structure, especially SWIR bands M8,10,11
Overlaid curves show model snow albedo for various grain sizes

Link >> https://collaboration.cmc.ec.gc.ca/science/rpn/SEM/dossiers/2012/seminaires/2012-11-23/Seminar_2012-11-23_Alexander_Trishchenko.pdf

Thanks for this awesome find!

An impressively dark, nearly black splotch is emerging in the northern Laptev above 80°N.  Anxiously awaiting the next frames, and how the sensors used for area and extent interpret it.

Still shot, edited to put north up.
Title: Re: The Rammb Slider Thread
Post by: JayW on June 16, 2019, 04:00:48 PM
Megalow may be on the way...
24 hour wide shot shows the impressive real estate occupied by the storm.

http://rammb-slider.cira.colostate.edu/?sat=jpss&z=0&im=30&ts=1&st=0&et=0&speed=130&motion=loop&map=1&lat=0&opacity%5B0%5D=1&opacity%5B1%5D=0.21&hidden%5B0%5D=0&hidden%5B1%5D=0&pause=0&slider=-1&hide_controls=1&mouse_draw=0&follow_feature=0&follow_hide=0&s=rammb-slider&sec=northern_hemisphere&p%5B0%5D=band_i01&p%5B1%5D=band_i03&x=15384.1484375&y=13919.25927734375
Title: Re: The Rammb Slider Thread
Post by: b_lumenkraft on June 16, 2019, 04:04:11 PM
@B_lumenkraft: Shit, a can't see anything. Damn clouds.

@JayW: Wow, these clouds, look what's there to see.

I have so much to learn still...
Title: Re: The Rammb Slider Thread
Post by: JayW on June 20, 2019, 12:55:46 PM
The shortwave IR bands M12 and I4 are sensitive to sea surface temperatures.  I had to boost the contrast and "lightness" in ezgif for better detail, I lack the processing skills others her have.  Sorry the shot land masses are a bit distracting.  Lighter is warmer.  Some frames weren't available, so there's a bit of a jump in there.

Bering Strait, needs a click.
Title: Re: The Rammb Slider Thread
Post by: be cause on June 20, 2019, 12:59:18 PM
Hi Jay .. this would suit the met thread .. b.c.
Title: Re: The Rammb Slider Thread
Post by: JayW on June 21, 2019, 12:39:42 PM
The current east of Wrangel Island eating it's way into the pack.
60 hours.
Click to run
Title: Re: The Rammb Slider Thread
Post by: JayW on July 03, 2019, 02:06:21 AM
Just watching the openings in the CAA ice slowly expand.

34 hours
http://rammb-slider.cira.colostate.edu/?sat=jpss&z=5&im=42&ts=1&st=0&et=0&speed=130&motion=loop&map=1&lat=1&opacity%5B0%5D=1&hidden%5B0%5D=0&pause=0&slider=-1&hide_controls=1&mouse_draw=0&follow_feature=0&follow_hide=0&s=rammb-slider&sec=northern_hemisphere&p%5B0%5D=band_m08&x=19151&y=17950.09765625
Click to run
Title: Re: The Rammb Slider Thread
Post by: johnm33 on July 04, 2019, 10:33:03 AM
If anyone cares to do it I would be grateful to see animations of the circular features in the Norwegian sea, which should have been happening the last couple of days. Rammb gives my desktop siezures, and polarview seem to be on holiday.
Title: Re: The Rammb Slider Thread
Post by: b_lumenkraft on July 04, 2019, 11:03:53 AM
Here you go, John. Click to play.
Title: Re: The Rammb Slider Thread
Post by: johnm33 on July 04, 2019, 02:56:28 PM
Thanks b_l, needs to be fully zoomed in on though, perhaps where it's cloudless? john
Title: Re: The Rammb Slider Thread
Post by: b_lumenkraft on July 04, 2019, 03:13:58 PM
Well, for a zoom in, the Norwegian sea is kinda too big to know what area you mean. What circular feature do you mean exactly? That storm on the left?
Title: Re: The Rammb Slider Thread
Post by: JayW on July 04, 2019, 04:30:04 PM
Glad to see the high resolution I bands updating again.   I don't have the skills, nor the patience and time to create my own RGB composites.  So I emailed feedback to RAMMB about the possibility of plugging in bands to RGB channels.   I didn't get a response,  :( , but if more folks makes that suggestion, maybe they'll add it.   I think it could be useful.   :)
Title: Re: The Rammb Slider Thread
Post by: uniquorn on July 04, 2019, 04:56:00 PM
create my own RGB composites
If you can provide 3gifs of the same size of exactly the same area with matching timestamps I would be interested to put them together for a test. I'm on metered broadband so I don't play with rammb much.

btw this area east of svalbard looks interesting and quite clear recently. https://go.nasa.gov/325M64G
Worldview with bathymetry inlay
edit: aqua modis is better https://go.nasa.gov/32bUzmK
Title: Re: The Rammb Slider Thread
Post by: johnm33 on July 04, 2019, 06:58:12 PM
b_l , Norwegian sea, polarview (https://www.polarview.aq/images/106_S1jpgsmall/201907/S1A_IW_GRDH_1SDV_20190703T160816_58C4_N_1.jpg) rebooted and is showing some signs se of 20e 72n but even there I think it's too cloudy/there's too much evaporation.
Title: Re: The Rammb Slider Thread
Post by: b_lumenkraft on July 04, 2019, 07:06:41 PM
Yes, John, i don't see a thing. Sorry. :(
Title: Re: The Rammb Slider Thread
Post by: b_lumenkraft on July 04, 2019, 07:08:22 PM
create my own RGB composites
If you can provide 3gifs of the same size of exactly the same area with matching timestamps I would be interested to put them together for a test.

How would one do that, Jay?

I don't see that setting.
Title: Re: The Rammb Slider Thread
Post by: JayW on July 04, 2019, 08:13:08 PM
create my own RGB composites
If you can provide 3gifs of the same size of exactly the same area with matching timestamps I would be interested to put them together for a test.

How would one do that, Jay?

I don't see that setting.
It doesn't exist.  I just gave feedback and suggested it, but never got a response, and was trying to recruit others to suggest it.  The overlay feature is nice, but the ability to create RGB composites seems like it could be useful.

I'm busy now, but I'll try to get a few synchronized gifs together soon, to take uniquorn up on the kind offer.
Title: Re: The Rammb Slider Thread
Post by: b_lumenkraft on July 04, 2019, 08:25:25 PM
Thanks, Jay, for clarification.

Title: Re: The Rammb Slider Thread
Post by: b_lumenkraft on July 04, 2019, 08:29:24 PM
If you can provide 3gifs of the same size of exactly the same area with matching timestamps I would be interested to put them together for a test. I'm on metered broadband so I don't play with rammb much.

What do you need? 3 different bands? Which ones?

That could be tricky because often times the times don't match. For example, you get more 'day/night' shots per day than 'geo-colours'.
Title: Re: The Rammb Slider Thread
Post by: JayW on July 04, 2019, 08:57:50 PM
If you can provide 3gifs of the same size of exactly the same area with matching timestamps I would be interested to put them together for a test. I'm on metered broadband so I don't play with rammb much.

What do you need? 3 different bands? Which ones?

That could be tricky because often times the times don't match. For example, you get more 'day/night' shots per day than 'geo-colours'.
I believe the geo color and natural color are already composites, that's why they take so long to load.

The two combinations I want to try are I2 - M13 - I4. Hoping for a pretty sea surface temp image.
And I1 - M8  - I3 for snow/ice.  My plan was to make a bunch and let uniquorn play with them.
Title: Re: The Rammb Slider Thread
Post by: b_lumenkraft on July 04, 2019, 09:09:21 PM
I'm looking forward to them, Jay! :)
Title: Re: The Rammb Slider Thread
Post by: JayW on July 04, 2019, 10:17:08 PM
create my own RGB composites
If you can provide 3gifs of the same size of exactly the same area with matching timestamps I would be interested to put them together for a test. I'm on metered broadband so I don't play with rammb much.

btw this area east of svalbard looks interesting and quite clear recently. https://go.nasa.gov/325M64G
Worldview with bathymetry inlay
edit: aqua modis is better https://go.nasa.gov/32bUzmK

Here are three. Appreciate your efforts!  ;D
I2 then M12  and M13,  I4 was missing too many frames so I had to use M12.  Depending on the output, I'll provide 3 of the Chukchi, as the arts in that area are interesting, and the skies might be clear for a bit.  I'll do some nearer the pole for snow/ice cover later.  All require a click, and I didn't optimize to preserve as much detail as possible.

Added the link just in case I want to revise the same exact view.
http://rammb-slider.cira.colostate.edu/?sat=jpss&z=5&im=24&ts=1&st=0&et=0&speed=130&motion=loop&map=1&lat=0&opacity%5B0%5D=1&hidden%5B0%5D=0&pause=20190704105857&slider=-1&hide_controls=0&mouse_draw=0&follow_feature=0&follow_hide=0&s=rammb-slider&sec=northern_hemisphere&p%5B0%5D=band_m13&x=15392&y=13145
Title: Re: The Rammb Slider Thread
Post by: uniquorn on July 05, 2019, 12:03:08 AM
Jayw, thanks for looking at the area suggested, maybe best not to clog up this thread with too many images for now. The gifs were turned into a montage(film strip) and contrast adjusted, hopefully sensitively, then combined composed with imagej default rgb settings.
If the result is anything like you expected and you want to continue I'll write a how to in the dev thread. I'll be happy to do one more test. It will take up less space on this thread if you concatenate the three gifs.
Apologies if the result is a bit large at 4MB, similar to the sum of the three parts, also not optimised. rgb=bca abc, I think, in the order you posted, I preferred ice in red rather than green or blue.
edit:decided overnight that contrast adjustment is a bad idea if reanalysis is planned. I've replaced the gif. Also added noaa bathymetry top right (which dithers :( )
Title: Re: The Rammb Slider Thread
Post by: JayW on July 05, 2019, 12:36:30 PM
Jayw, thanks for looking at the area suggested, maybe best not to clog up this thread with too many images for now.

My hope was to see something in the oceans, so the result wasn't what I had hoped.  Maybe just not enough gradient. Or, I wonder if the way I constructed the gifs from screenshots, was not the best decision.  I'll give it another shot later today with a different approach and area of ice/snow using different bands, probably I1 - M8 - M11.
 My instinct is that only three bands that display in greyscale have any chance at working (< 4µm), but maybe I'm wrong.  Here's a list of what's available, unfortunately the "atmospheric correction" band seems useless.

Thanks again for humoring me.
Title: Re: The Rammb Slider Thread
Post by: uniquorn on July 05, 2019, 12:46:43 PM
Small dispersed floes show a combination of wind and current. That's why I chose that ice edge over shallower bathy area. I don't have a clue about bands, that's A-Team stuff.
The how to is posted here https://forum.arctic-sea-ice.net/index.php/topic,1259.msg211015.html#msg211015
Let's continue there so as not to disrupt this thread. Looking forward to the next test.
Title: Re: The Rammb Slider Thread
Post by: b_lumenkraft on July 08, 2019, 06:16:52 PM
Mesmerizing...
Title: Re: The Rammb Slider Thread
Post by: Darvince on July 10, 2019, 07:19:57 AM
What feature is making those waves in the clouds?
Title: Re: The Rammb Slider Thread
Post by: b_lumenkraft on July 10, 2019, 08:17:41 AM
A mountain, Darvince.  :)

This is Svalbard (east part). Clouds going north to south.
Title: Re: The Rammb Slider Thread
Post by: b_lumenkraft on July 10, 2019, 01:52:45 PM
This is M8 band showing the Lincoln Sea at Nares Strait.

This darkening coexistent with the wind pattern on this day.

Doesn't look like ice condition change to me.

Jay, can you comment on what you are seeing here?
Title: Re: The Rammb Slider Thread
Post by: JayW on July 11, 2019, 01:42:08 AM
This is M8 band showing the Lincoln Sea at Nares Strait.

This darkening coexistent with the wind pattern on this day.

Doesn't look like ice condition change to me.

Jay, can you comment on what you are seeing here?

I think it's very low clouds and/or fog hugging the ice, and we are seeing warmer and/or drier winds trying to scour it out. 
Title: Re: The Rammb Slider Thread
Post by: b_lumenkraft on July 11, 2019, 10:02:10 PM
I think it's very low clouds and/or fog hugging the ice, and we are seeing warmer and/or drier winds trying to scour it out.

Amazing!

You can even see it in the radar images >> https://forum.arctic-sea-ice.net/index.php/topic,176.msg212564.html#msg212564

Thanks for your answer, Jay.
Title: Re: The Rammb Slider Thread
Post by: b_lumenkraft on July 13, 2019, 10:01:48 AM
This pretty swirl.

Lincoln Sea, M8 band, enhanced contrast.
Title: Re: The Rammb Slider Thread
Post by: b_lumenkraft on July 13, 2019, 10:28:38 AM
Another one.

Ellesmere on the right, M8 band, enhanced contrast.
Title: Re: The Rammb Slider Thread
Post by: JayW on July 13, 2019, 04:41:43 PM
Some eddies have formed in the crack of insignificance north of the CAA, and now that the high resolution I bands are updating regularly, we can see them in better detail.  Some flows can also be seen breaking up a bit as well.
Click to play.
Title: Re: The Rammb Slider Thread
Post by: b_lumenkraft on July 13, 2019, 05:04:20 PM
... and the thick floes getting ground in the process.
Title: Re: The Rammb Slider Thread
Post by: Tor Bejnar on July 13, 2019, 07:08:15 PM
Title: Re: The Rammb Slider Thread
Post by: b_lumenkraft on July 13, 2019, 08:20:16 PM
Barry!

GeoColor (CIRA) & Band 11: 8.4 µm ("Cloud-Top Phase")

(Click to play)
Title: Re: The Rammb Slider Thread
Post by: JayW on July 13, 2019, 08:56:02 PM
This shot is centered at roughly 84°N,110°W.  ~18 hours.  Contrast gently enhanced for detail.
A shear line can be seen bisecting the image horizontally.  There's also interesting patches of dark peppered on the left side.  This is band I2.  A general motion towards the Atlantic is also evident.

Click to run
Title: Re: The Rammb Slider Thread
Post by: Tor Bejnar on July 13, 2019, 09:52:47 PM
Quote
A shear line can be seen bisecting the image horizontally.
I see two shear lines, actually.  First a shear line in the lower/center part of the GIF, then it stops and a shear line further up (still center) immediately takes over.

I've watched this sort of team-tag movement in Lincoln Sea ice (mostly on the Greenland side of the Sea) many times.
Title: Re: The Rammb Slider Thread
Post by: binntho on July 14, 2019, 08:49:23 AM
Some eddies have formed in the crack of insignificance north of the CAA, and now that the high resolution I bands are updating regularly, we can see them in better detail.  Some flows can also be seen breaking up a bit as well.

That looks amazing to me. There most be very strong currents rising along the coast there? Does any one know what they might be / where they come from?
Title: Re: The Rammb Slider Thread
Post by: b_lumenkraft on July 14, 2019, 09:26:24 AM
Does any one know what they might be / where they come from?

I know there are multiple variables at work here. I don't know how to weight them though.

Variables i can think off are momentum due to the pack movement, tides, gyres, upwelling, wind, and of course, currents.

The general direction of the floes is mainly caused by the pack momentum i would say.

Currents become the main driver for floe movement once floes are separated from the pack.

Surface currents are oftentimes rather narrow. They only influence a small part of the pack while winds often times drag on big portions of it.

Also, the Beauford gyre is a variable to consider here. It also puts a drag onto the pack to make it rotate clockwise.

Mercator barely sees current here btw.
Title: Re: The Rammb Slider Thread
Post by: binntho on July 14, 2019, 09:55:03 AM
Does any one know what they might be / where they come from?

I know there are multiple variables at work here. I don't know how to weight them though.
...
Mercator barely sees current here btw.

Yes that's the thing - if there are currents there, they must be new or previously undocumentet.

To my untrained eye the two "twirls" seen in the gif in JayW's post (https://forum.arctic-sea-ice.net/index.php/topic,2649.msg213135.html#msg213135) look like mini-cyclones, with considerable vortexicity (if that is a word ...), each having a diameter of appr. 20 km. and a circular movement of perhaps 10 km per day along the perifery.

Very mysterious ...
Title: Re: The Rammb Slider Thread
Post by: b_lumenkraft on July 14, 2019, 11:22:51 AM
Those twirls, they should be caused by currents, no? But tides may have something to do with this also.

Why is there never an expert on hydrodynamics when you need one??
Title: Re: The Rammb Slider Thread
Post by: JayW on July 14, 2019, 11:37:48 AM
 Appreciate your interest binntho, as b_lumenkraft mentioned there are likely several/many factors at play.  I'm certainly no expert, but the the counter clockwise motion to me suggests there is some upwelling.  I'm basing this on how the atmosphere works, low pressure is associated with rising air. 
  With so little open water, wind stresses seem to be minimal, but perhaps a southerly flow over the land masses of the CAA *could* result in modest coastal upwelling.
  The most mysterious question to me, is whether these exist under the ice, or do they form only due to the opening.  I haven't a clue.  It'll be interesting to see how they behave going forward.
   I think features like this emphasize the value of these sub daily images available from RAMMB, and am grateful that others, especially b_lumenkraft, have also taken an interest.
Title: Re: The Rammb Slider Thread
Post by: johnm33 on July 14, 2019, 12:21:05 PM
Those twirls, they should be caused by currents, no? But tides may have something to do with this also.

I more or less agree, there's Atlantic water moving along off the shelf at depth, mercator shows this as higher salinity stretching back to Greenland, and there must be tides running in/out of channel so maybe this movement disturbs that deeper water which organises itself into vortices as it flows, an analogy would be electric current>magnetism. Just guessing.
added
Maybe any movement here https://go.nasa.gov/2JGdiyF could shed some light?
Title: Re: The Rammb Slider Thread
Post by: JayW on July 26, 2019, 11:33:26 PM
High resolution bands are finally updating.

14 hour loop of a channel in the CAA, I don't know its name so left the lat, lon in there. Rotated so that North is up.
http://rammb-slider.cira.colostate.edu/?sat=jpss&z=5&im=36&ts=1&st=0&et=0&speed=130&motion=loop&map=0&lat=0&opacity%5B0%5D=1&hidden%5B0%5D=0&pause=20190727084517&slider=-1&hide_controls=1&mouse_draw=0&follow_feature=0&follow_hide=0&s=rammb-slider&sec=northern_hemisphere&p%5B0%5D=cira_geocolor&x=18549.013671875&y=16970.083984375
Click to run.
Title: Re: The Rammb Slider Thread
Post by: Alphabet Hotel on July 26, 2019, 11:47:28 PM

14 hour loop of a channel in the CAA, I don't know its name so left the lat, lon in there. Rotated so that North is up.


Nansen Sound upper left, Greely Fjord to the center and right. Eureka is just to the left of the lower left '80'.

I didn't realize this stuff was moving around like that. It looks to me like melt runoff is driving it, but what do I know? :-)
Title: Re: The Rammb Slider Thread
Post by: uniquorn on July 27, 2019, 12:49:09 AM
Thanks both. Really been missing rammb.
Title: Re: The Rammb Slider Thread
Post by: binntho on July 27, 2019, 07:35:37 AM

14 hour loop of a channel in the CAA, I don't know its name so left the lat, lon in there. Rotated so that North is up.


Nansen Sound upper left, Greely Fjord to the center and right. Eureka is just to the left of the lower left '80'.

I didn't realize this stuff was moving around like that. It looks to me like melt runoff is driving it, but what do I know? :-)
I was also very surprised at the movement - I'd have thought ice in those narrow inlets and straits would mostly stay put. But I don't think melt runoff can be the culprit. To me it looks like a strong wind is pushing ice out towards the left in that long central east-west fjord, while currents are pulling ice generally southwards in the other fjords and straits.

If you look closely at the top fjord that stretches to the right, the ice is floating in along the southern side and ends in a turbulent swirl towards the bottom of the fjord. This is entirely in accordance with how fjord currents work in Iceland, flowing in along one side and out the other, with turbulence somewhere towards the end (where the fjords tend to be deepest).

The strong wind in that one fjord is also something we see in Iceland and other narrow fjord/narrow valley environments. If the alignment of the valley/fjord is just right, the wind starts to funnel along and can get increadibly strong, while another fjord a few kilometers away that is slighlty differently orientated could be experiencing a wind-free day.
Title: Re: The Rammb Slider Thread
Post by: JayW on July 27, 2019, 05:41:23 PM
I think it might be both winds and melt water pushing in. To me, it looks like you can see sediment rich water moving west through the channel. 

Here is an interesting feature at about 80°N, 5°W.  Since the I bands have only been updating a few days, I didn't go back that far, plus it was cloudy, but the feature reappears about the same time the last 4 days and propagates east., making me think it's tide driven.  I'm not sure of the bathymetry.

26ish hour loop, contrast enhanced for detail.
Link to location
http://rammb-slider.cira.colostate.edu/?sat=jpss&z=5&im=36&ts=1&st=0&et=0&speed=130&motion=loop&map=1&lat=1&opacity%5B0%5D=1&hidden%5B0%5D=0&pause=0&slider=-1&hide_controls=1&mouse_draw=0&follow_feature=0&follow_hide=0&s=rammb-slider&sec=northern_hemisphere&p%5B0%5D=band_i01&x=16590.013671875&y=13820.0830078125

Requires click
Title: Re: The Rammb Slider Thread
Post by: petm on July 27, 2019, 06:08:12 PM
Here is an interesting feature

What on earth?!
Title: Re: The Rammb Slider Thread
Post by: kassy on July 27, 2019, 06:19:43 PM
My guess is kraken and i am just hoping that someone comes up with a more sensible explanation.  :)
Title: Re: The Rammb Slider Thread
Post by: binntho on July 27, 2019, 06:21:27 PM
I think it might be both winds and melt water pushing in. To me, it looks like you can see sediment rich water moving west through the channel. 
Well the problem with meltwater is that I'm not at all sure that there could be enough of it to cause such a strong movement in a (presumably) deep fjord. But you are right, there is discoloration that follows the ice retreat, possibly just reflecting a change in temperature?

Meltwater would be brown, but the discoloration seems more bluish. Perhaps an extremly rapid spread of algae? I don't know.
Quote
Here is an interesting feature at about 80°N, 5°W.
Very interesting, with those circular movements. Is it the wind doing that, or ocean currents? This Rammb slider thing is really showing us details that I for one didn't know existed.
Title: Re: The Rammb Slider Thread
Post by: JayW on July 27, 2019, 06:49:46 PM
I think it might be both winds and melt water pushing in. To me, it looks like you can see sediment rich water moving west through the channel. 
Well the problem with meltwater is that I'm not at all sure that there could be enough of it to cause such a strong movement in a (presumably) deep fjord. But you are right, there is discoloration that follows the ice retreat, possibly just reflecting a change in temperature?

Meltwater would be brown, but the discoloration seems more bluish. Perhaps an extremly rapid spread of algae? I don't know.
Quote
Here is an interesting feature at about 80°N, 5°W.
Very interesting, with those circular movements. Is it the wind doing that, or ocean currents? This Rammb slider thing is really showing us details that I for one didn't know existed.

I don't believe high resolution hourly imagery has been available until they added it to the slider.

I thought of Peyto lake in Canada, and just thought it was fine sediment similar to that.

The swirl at 80°N,5°W looks oceanic to me, as it has appeared the last week or so in the same location at thr same time.  I can't tell how long is been there, as it was too cloudy to see before the 21st.
Title: Re: The Rammb Slider Thread
Post by: SteveMDFP on July 27, 2019, 06:52:20 PM

Quote
Here is an interesting feature at about 80°N, 5°W.
Very interesting, with those circular movements. Is it the wind doing that, or ocean currents? This Rammb slider thing is really showing us details that I for one didn't know existed.


I suspect a moving ocean vortex, possibly initiated by tidal flows somewhere.  Initially I assumed a small atmospheric low, but the ice is moving in the opposite circular motion for that to be so.  Plus, lows tend to have clouds.

In water, vortices can be surprisingly long-lived, and travel long distances.  For a swimming pool demonstration:
Crazy pool vortex
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=pnbJEg9r1o8 (https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=pnbJEg9r1o8)
Title: Re: The Rammb Slider Thread
Post by: uniquorn on July 27, 2019, 07:20:29 PM
Here is an interesting feature at about 80°N, 5°W.
Nice find. Never seen it like that before. Please see
https://forum.arctic-sea-ice.net/index.php/topic,2417.msg205327.html#msg205327

and  https://forum.arctic-sea-ice.net/index.php/topic,2417.msg185312.html#msg185312
Title: Re: The Rammb Slider Thread
Post by: petm on July 27, 2019, 07:44:12 PM
Crazy pool vortex

So cool!  :D
Almost restores some hope for the future.

Please see

Well, well. So this may be recurrent or persistent. Any idea how new it is, or not?
Title: Re: The Rammb Slider Thread
Post by: uniquorn on July 27, 2019, 08:36:51 PM
I didn't look back too far but here is amsr2-uhh north of svalbard 2017 (high contrast, small, uncorrected). It's still there at times but I think the ice drifting over has been thicker in previous years so the lower concentration doesn't show.
I assume that it's warmer water forced to the surface over the shallower plateau
Title: Re: The Rammb Slider Thread
Post by: JayW on July 28, 2019, 02:04:11 AM
Continuation from the gif in post #150.

I believe the resolution is about 375m /pixel.  I'd say the front moved about 70 pixels, equaling roughly 26km, over the 13.5 hour animation, so about 2km/hour is my guess.  Does it plow straight through? Make a hard left? Or stop in its tracks?. Won't know till tomorrow, and even then, who knows if it'll be clear.

Click it.
Title: Re: The Rammb Slider Thread
Post by: petm on July 28, 2019, 05:06:12 AM
Rammb slider does a great job of showing the extensive damage that export into the Beaufort Blender has done to the central basin, up to and even beyond 80N. There's a lot of ice here that might melt out this season.

https://col.st/ZIcGT
Title: Re: The Rammb Slider Thread
Post by: Alphabet Hotel on July 28, 2019, 07:03:59 AM
Continuation from the gif in post #150.

I believe the resolution is about 375m /pixel.  I'd say the front moved about 70 pixels, equaling roughly 26km, over the 13.5 hour animation, so about 2km/hour is my guess.  Does it plow straight through? Make a hard left? Or stop in its tracks?. Won't know till tomorrow, and even then, who knows if it'll be clear.


It should all make the turn and go down the channel that leads off to the lower right, which leads eventually to the southern part of the CAA.

I looked closer, and can see what looks like large amounts of melt water and sediment pouring into the fjords. There are brown plumes everywhere.
Title: Re: The Rammb Slider Thread
Post by: johnm33 on July 28, 2019, 06:43:51 PM
Interesting feature.
I think whats happening there is that Atl. waters which are pressed in to the area by NAD/Gulf stream + tides, some, the fastest, climb the shelf tight to the Norwegian coast, some climb the shelf south of Svarlbad, some get caught up against the shelf tight against Svarlbad, others forming deep vortices get caught up in the deep channels that run north. The last two+ meet at the anomoly hotspot, then move north and depending on the momentary situation may be drawn across the north of Svarlbad or Greenland, these waters may be energetically comfortable at 60N but here they are moving against there 'natural' inertia and rapidly approaching the axis of rotation so once moving will organise into vortices to refine and disperse that excess.
(https://forum.arctic-sea-ice.net/proxy.php?request=http%3A%2F%2Fpuu.sh%2FDYqnE%2Fd40c1977fd.jpg&hash=115a3e48558216b3c16474138999a381)
welcome back B-l
Title: Re: The Rammb Slider Thread
Post by: wdmn on July 29, 2019, 01:52:48 AM
Contrast between the CAB ice and the CAA ice, separated by the open water of the CAA/CAB crack.
Title: Re: The Rammb Slider Thread
Post by: blumenkraft on July 29, 2019, 08:41:36 PM
The famous ESS Wobble
Title: Re: The Rammb Slider Thread
Post by: JayW on August 01, 2019, 12:48:06 PM
Another interesting feature, this one on the NW coast of Greenland.  Gotta be tide related.
Contrast enhanced for detail.
http://rammb-slider.cira.colostate.edu/?sat=jpss&z=5&im=14&ts=1&st=0&et=0&speed=130&motion=loop&map=0&lat=0&opacity%5B0%5D=1&hidden%5B0%5D=0&pause=0&slider=-1&hide_controls=1&mouse_draw=0&follow_feature=0&follow_hide=0&s=rammb-slider&sec=northern_hemisphere&p%5B0%5D=band_i02&x=17735.583984375&y=15176.638671875
Title: Re: The Rammb Slider Thread
Post by: binntho on August 01, 2019, 02:22:48 PM
Look at the very confused floes along the crack, going in all sorts of different directions. Quite a lot of confusing water movement there.

The "slo-mo bomb" under the ice is, I would think, some sort of rising body of water and I can't really see how the tides could produce this? Maybe as a partial influence.
Title: Re: The Rammb Slider Thread
Post by: johnm33 on August 01, 2019, 03:02:57 PM
I think the tides force Atl.Wat. through Fram some fraction moves along the Greenland shelf, some surges into the basins which causes internal waves to slew back and forth causing upwelling vortices both here and at the Laptev end.
Title: Re: The Rammb Slider Thread
Post by: blumenkraft on August 01, 2019, 04:26:02 PM
I think the tides force Atl.Wat. through Fram

I think these tides are coming from the Nares, John.

Thanks for sharing Jay, you beat me to it. :P
Title: Re: The Rammb Slider Thread
Post by: binntho on August 01, 2019, 04:50:51 PM
Well, how big are the tides up there? I found this image from https://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0078323415000883).

The deep read in the Nares strait shows that there is quite a tidal surge there but not so much once it enters the Lincoln sea.

But the movement in the "crack" in the video above can hardly be explained by tidal movement, look in the lower right corner where the ice closest to shore is moving rapidly in one directon but the floes further out in the opposite direction.
Title: Re: The Rammb Slider Thread
Post by: blumenkraft on August 01, 2019, 04:58:18 PM
High tides in this area are a meterish. >> https://www.tide-forecast.com/locations/Alert-Nunavut/tides/latest

What we see in the satellite pictures though is not water going up and down. What we see are waves caused by the water body moving as a whole.
Title: Re: The Rammb Slider Thread
Post by: binntho on August 01, 2019, 05:26:51 PM
What we see in the satellite pictures though is not water going up and down. What we see are waves caused by the water body moving as a whole vertically.
Well quite. Or what, wait. The water body moves as a whole vertically? Is that a typo?

Anyway, the Rammb images keep showing very rapid and mysterious movements of water (as implied by movement of ice) in all sorts of fun and strange directions. It makes me curious, that's all. Would we see the same off the coast of Norway if there were bits if ice floating around there?
Title: Re: The Rammb Slider Thread
Post by: blumenkraft on August 01, 2019, 05:30:21 PM
Is that a typo?

Whoops. Fixed it. Thanks!

Quote
Would we see the same off the coast of Norway if there were bits if ice floating around there?

I would think so, yes.
Title: Re: The Rammb Slider Thread
Post by: blumenkraft on August 01, 2019, 06:15:08 PM
The same feature as provided by Jay above zoomed out with upper NS included.

The slider doesn't like me today. Getting 404s...  :'(
Title: Re: The Rammb Slider Thread
Post by: uniquorn on August 01, 2019, 10:16:44 PM
Another interesting feature
Thanks. Here it is overlaid onto bathymetry. Rotation and scaling is not perfect.
Blue deeper than brown.
Title: Re: The Rammb Slider Thread
Post by: Tor Bejnar on August 02, 2019, 02:52:26 AM
uniquorn,
Interesting dark arc that moves to the right off the coast near the center of that movie.  A drifting contrail shadow? (plane having made a U-turn)??  Better interpretation out there?
Title: Re: The Rammb Slider Thread
Post by: DrTskoul on August 02, 2019, 02:53:13 AM
Wind/ cloud effects..
Title: Re: The Rammb Slider Thread
Post by: petm on August 02, 2019, 03:41:41 AM
Similar to the one discussed earlier off Svalbard.
Title: Re: The Rammb Slider Thread
Post by: JayW on August 02, 2019, 03:42:49 AM
 
Wind/ cloud effects..

It's a 78 hour loop I posted, and the feature recurs at the same spot, at almost the same time 4 days in a row. That's why I believe it to be related to the tides, the one north of Svalbard also shows a daily rhythm.  I don't see how the clouds and winds would be exactly the same 4 days in a row.  It actually was there the day before that loop as well. 

It was also there in mid July, I think the higher tides surrounding the full/new moons enhances it.
Title: Re: The Rammb Slider Thread
Post by: DrTskoul on August 02, 2019, 03:55:21 AM
That would be awesome if those where waves under the ice, or the tide disturbing the ice. Is there a ocean floor topographic map of that region ?
Title: Re: The Rammb Slider Thread
Post by: JayW on August 02, 2019, 04:03:43 AM
Similar to the one discussed earlier off Svalbard.
Yep, that one is still making it's daily appearance as well.  I misspoke when I initially posted that one and said it was at 80°N , 5°E, I had the latitude line confused on the slider, it's actually 82.5°N, 5°E.


Title: Re: The Rammb Slider Thread
Post by: binntho on August 02, 2019, 06:30:17 AM
Great work! Some sort of tidal effect seems the best explanation. But the circular movement indicates (to me at least) something rising from below. How can that be caused by tides?
Title: Re: The Rammb Slider Thread
Post by: oren on August 02, 2019, 08:53:58 AM
Friggin' amazing. This Rammb thing, wow. I can imagine A-Team having a field day with it.
These features do look like something upwelling to the layman's eye, but I'm hardly the expert on currents and tides.
Title: Re: The Rammb Slider Thread
Post by: uniquorn on August 02, 2019, 11:06:26 AM
It's a 78 hour loop I posted, and the feature recurs at the same spot, at almost the same time 4 days in a row. That's why I believe it to be related to the tides, the one north of Svalbard also shows a daily rhythm.  I don't see how the clouds and winds would be exactly the same 4 days in a row.  It actually was there the day before that loop as well. 
It was also there in mid July, I think the higher tides surrounding the full/new moons enhances it.
Yes, mine is shorter. rammb eats up my broadband volume. Thanks for the links. I definitely couldn't go searching for these.
@Tor I don't know what this streak is, though it looks too big for an aircraft. Possibly cloud related. JayW does a better interpretation of rammb bands.

Is there a ocean floor topographic map of that region ?
Here is the noaa bathymetric map used for the overlay with rough location of the anomaly. I think it's upwelling of deeper water from the north, though I expected to see it further west.
Full arctic map is here https://forum.arctic-sea-ice.net/index.php/topic,417.msg215159.html#msg215159
Title: Re: The Rammb Slider Thread
Post by: binntho on August 02, 2019, 12:01:09 PM
After staring myself silly I think I've made a better estimate of the location (see first picture).

The most detailed bathymetry map I could find was at https://journals.plos.org/plosone/article/figure?id=10.1371/journal.pone.0122418.g001, again I've marked the location as far as I can make it out.

There are some interesting features, what with the bump rising up to 100m depth, I'd have loved if the Rammb circles had been exactly on top of that!
Title: Re: The Rammb Slider Thread
Post by: blumenkraft on August 02, 2019, 04:05:47 PM
Friggin' amazing. This Rammb thing, wow.

Totally agree!

Now imagine JPSS tould have a 10-minute interval as the GEOS satellites have. Or imagine a geostationary satellite with the resolution of Sentinel.  :o

Title: Re: The Rammb Slider Thread
Post by: JayW on August 03, 2019, 01:02:41 AM
A glimpse through the clouds gave a peak at the Prince Gustav Adolph Sea today.
Click
Title: Re: The Rammb Slider Thread
Post by: blumenkraft on August 03, 2019, 08:02:25 PM
Similar to the one discussed earlier off Svalbard.
Yep, that one is still making it's daily appearance as well.  I misspoke when I initially posted that one and said it was at 80°N , 5°E, I had the latitude line confused on the slider, it's actually 82.5°N, 5°E.

Apparently, that underwater mountain below that feature is called Yermak Plateau.
Title: Re: The Rammb Slider Thread
Post by: DrTskoul on August 03, 2019, 08:23:54 PM
Upwelling due to the mountain ??
Title: Re: The Rammb Slider Thread
Post by: blumenkraft on August 03, 2019, 08:27:11 PM
Upwelling due to the mountain ??

Until someone presents evidence showing otherwise, this is what i think, yes. :)
Title: Re: The Rammb Slider Thread
Post by: Stephan on August 03, 2019, 09:23:19 PM
A glimpse through the clouds gave a peak at the Prince Gustav Adolph Sea today.

Just a silly question: Why does the coastline appear twice? Is this ebb/flood change area or the borders of usually fast ice?
Title: Re: The Rammb Slider Thread
Post by: blumenkraft on August 03, 2019, 09:26:56 PM
Just a silly question: Why does the coastline appear twice? Is this ebb/flood change area or the borders of usually fast ice?

I asked myself the same question and thought it might be just an error. But now that you mention tides, that actually makes sense. If Jay doesn't know i'll ask them.
Title: Re: The Rammb Slider Thread
Post by: philopek on August 03, 2019, 09:30:35 PM
A glimpse through the clouds gave a peak at the Prince Gustav Adolph Sea today.

Just a silly question: Why does the coastline appear twice? Is this ebb/flood change area or the borders of usually fast ice?

This is why i prefer other sat-img-services, depending on the zoom level this can at time cover too many pixels and zooming in is not always an option if one wants to see the big picture.

This is personal preference whatever.
Title: Re: The Rammb Slider Thread
Post by: JayW on August 03, 2019, 10:00:39 PM
A glimpse through the clouds gave a peak at the Prince Gustav Adolph Sea today.

Just a silly question: Why does the coastline appear twice? Is this ebb/flood change area or the borders of usually fast ice?
I think it's simply imperfect overlay of coastlines, why there are two, I haven't a clue.  I just know the lines don't exactly match the coasts.  I often toggle then off, but when clouds are present it helps.   I'd also note that the rammb is still in beta I believe.   As blumenkraft mentioned, one can always send feedback and suggestions.
Title: Re: The Rammb Slider Thread
Post by: JayW on August 03, 2019, 10:02:15 PM
A glimpse through the clouds gave a peak at the Prince Gustav Adolph Sea today.

Just a silly question: Why does the coastline appear twice? Is this ebb/flood change area or the borders of usually fast ice?

This is why i prefer other sat-img-services, depending on the zoom level this can at time cover too many pixels and zooming in is not always an option if one wants to see the big picture.

This is personal preference whatever.

Have you got a better resource for hourly arctic imagery?  I've looked long and hard, and find the rammb slider to offer a unique look.
Title: Re: The Rammb Slider Thread
Post by: philopek on August 03, 2019, 10:15:14 PM
A glimpse through the clouds gave a peak at the Prince Gustav Adolph Sea today.

Just a silly question: Why does the coastline appear twice? Is this ebb/flood change area or the borders of usually fast ice?

This is why i prefer other sat-img-services, depending on the zoom level this can at time cover too many pixels and zooming in is not always an option if one wants to see the big picture.

This is personal preference whatever.

Have you got a better resource for hourly arctic imagery?  I've looked long and hard, and find the rammb slider to offer a unique look.

If that's the preference (frequency, i.e hourly) no, i did not come across any better while I would have to verify if the entire surface is really pictured hourly. I'm not that savvy in satellite imagery hence can't tell, perhaps I have to dig a bit deeper into the matter.

Until now i was believing that they pass once per day max but things change permanently.

Thanks for pointing at it.
Title: Re: The Rammb Slider Thread
Post by: gerontocrat on August 03, 2019, 10:53:09 PM
The RAMMB slider is awesome. The public access is total.
I wish all science was like this.


I can't see you finding anything like slider anywhere else. Three satelliites in geostationary orbit giving you everything all the time.

From NASA articles
On 12 March, GOES-17 joined GOES-16 (launched in 2016) in geosynchronous orbit at 22,200 mi (35,700 km) above Earth. Himawari 8 occurred at 05:16 UTC on 7 October 2014 and reached its operational geostationary orbit in October 2014, at 140.7 degrees East.

https://journals.ametsoc.org/doi/full/10.1175/BAMS-D-17-0272.1
SLIDER provides access to every pixel from the imagers aboard the GOES-16, GOES-17, and Himawari-8 satellites in real time.

The experimental version of SLIDER was unveiled for public use in June 2017 by the Cooperative Institute for Research in the Atmosphere (CIRA) in partnership with NOAA’s Regional and Mesoscale Meteorology Branch, collocated at Colorado State University.

SLIDER provides full-resolution imagery from all spectral bands, for all sectors, from GOES-16’s and GOES-17’s Advanced Baseline Imagers (ABI) and Himawari-8’s Advanced Himawari Imager (AHI). Compared to the previous generation of GOES satellites, the data volume coming from the ABI instruments has increased dramatically. In addition to three times the number of the spectral bands and four times the spatial resolution, the increased temporal resolution means that new imagery is available every 15 min for the full disk sector, every 5 min for the contiguous U.S. sector, and every minute for each of the two mesoscale domain sectors.


If that's the preference (frequency, i.e hourly) no, i did not come across any better while I would have to verify if the entire surface is really pictured hourly. I'm not that savvy in satellite imagery hence can't tell, perhaps I have to dig a bit deeper into the matter.

Until now i was believing that they pass once per day max but things change permanently.

Thanks for pointing at it.
Title: Re: The Rammb Slider Thread
Post by: philopek on August 03, 2019, 11:02:04 PM
Three satelliites in geostationary orbit giving you everything all the time.

Great, that's the part that evaded me, that's impressing and of course that sheds a new (for me) light on the matter, will re-add it to my bookmarks of course.

Thank YOU  8)
Title: Re: The Rammb Slider Thread
Post by: petm on August 03, 2019, 11:46:55 PM
RAMMB Slider is indeed fantastic. I might have to get a faster connection for this alone!

Here's a gif of 3 recent images of the Beaufort: before, during, and after the recent cyclone. They're not evenly spaced, but chosen for less cloud cover. I've used an overlay ("Flight Level Based Cloud Layers", opacity almost minimum) to emphasize where the clouds are.

Click.
Title: Re: The Rammb Slider Thread
Post by: petm on August 04, 2019, 12:08:03 AM
Before-after cross-fade of middle part of the melt edge. Very substantial damage already apparent. Click.
Title: Re: The Rammb Slider Thread
Post by: petm on August 04, 2019, 12:22:48 AM
Before-after cross-fade (improved cross-fade settings) of Eastern corner of Beaufort. Impressive damage. Click.
Title: Re: The Rammb Slider Thread
Post by: Killian on August 04, 2019, 02:45:53 PM
Here's a gif of 3 recent images of the Beaufort: before, during, and after the recent cyclone.

What strikes me most about this, and I've been noticing this phenomenon during this period of low-to-average extent changes, is how with all the loss of area/volume, the ice edge barely moves.

This is why we will, much like 2012, get a big drop in extent, whether suddenly or over some extended period as enough of that much melts out for the extent to fall.

Sept. minimum still possible, though I'm pretty strongly in the camp of my July poll response: 2nd all-time, less than 4M ASIE (Jaxa), but if *all* the weak ice goes, all bets are off.
Title: Re: The Rammb Slider Thread
Post by: JayW on August 04, 2019, 03:12:01 PM
The RAMMB slider is awesome. The public access is total.
I wish all science was like this.


I can't see you finding anything like slider anywhere else. Three satelliites in geostationary orbit giving you everything all the time.


  I agree with everything you said, and appreciate it.  I just wanted to clarify that the orbits are actually sun-synchronous. Each satellite makes 14 passes a day, taking roughly 102 minutes to complete an orbit.  The ~3,000km wide field of view allows each pass to image from roughly 68° to 5° on the far side of the pole, spanning 28°.  So above 85° is imaged every pass.
  I believe that the slider actually only incorporates two of them, SUOMI and JPSS-1, which orbit opposite each other, giving us 51 minute intervals.  SUOMI is actually beyond its planned 5 year expected lifespan, but more of these satellites are planned over the next decade.
Title: Re: The Rammb Slider Thread
Post by: blumenkraft on August 04, 2019, 03:20:37 PM
next decade

Hmmm, i want it now!  :P
Title: Re: The Rammb Slider Thread
Post by: JayW on August 04, 2019, 04:44:56 PM

Yes, mine is shorter. rammb eats up my broadband volume. Thanks for the links. I definitely couldn't go searching for these.


Here's my effort to make RAMMB a bit more user friendly for those who have internet struggles with the demands of the slider.  I can add more upon request (including gifs if needed and as time allows), note that the "geocolor" and "natural color" appear the most resource intensive. 

I'm providing a list of links to locations around the arctic using band I2 (my favorite), with the minimum number of frames (6), and as a still image.  My hope is that this'll be gentler on this with metered/throttled/slower connections.

These are not the maximum zoom, but can be zoomed in once more.

North Pole lower left, 60°W-30°E
http://rammb-slider.cira.colostate.edu/?sat=jpss&z=4&im=6&ts=1&st=0&et=0&speed=130&motion=loop&map=1&lat=1&opacity%5B0%5D=1&hidden%5B0%5D=0&pause=20190804102542&slider=-1&hide_controls=0&mouse_draw=0&follow_feature=0&follow_hide=0&s=rammb-slider&sec=northern_hemisphere&p%5B0%5D=band_i02&x=16692.4169921875&y=15199.47265625 (http://rammb-slider.cira.colostate.edu/?sat=jpss&z=4&im=6&ts=1&st=0&et=0&speed=130&motion=loop&map=1&lat=1&opacity%5B0%5D=1&hidden%5B0%5D=0&pause=20190804102542&slider=-1&hide_controls=0&mouse_draw=0&follow_feature=0&follow_hide=0&s=rammb-slider&sec=northern_hemisphere&p%5B0%5D=band_i02&x=16692.4169921875&y=15199.47265625)

North Pole upper left, 150°W-60°W
http://rammb-slider.cira.colostate.edu/?sat=jpss&z=4&im=6&ts=1&st=0&et=0&speed=130&motion=loop&map=1&lat=1&opacity%5B0%5D=1&hidden%5B0%5D=0&pause=20190804102542&slider=-1&hide_controls=0&mouse_draw=0&follow_feature=0&follow_hide=0&s=rammb-slider&sec=northern_hemisphere&p%5B0%5D=band_i02&x=16698.4169921875&y=16801.47265625 (http://rammb-slider.cira.colostate.edu/?sat=jpss&z=4&im=6&ts=1&st=0&et=0&speed=130&motion=loop&map=1&lat=1&opacity%5B0%5D=1&hidden%5B0%5D=0&pause=20190804102542&slider=-1&hide_controls=0&mouse_draw=0&follow_feature=0&follow_hide=0&s=rammb-slider&sec=northern_hemisphere&p%5B0%5D=band_i02&x=16698.4169921875&y=16801.47265625)

North Pole upper right, 120°E-150°W
http://rammb-slider.cira.colostate.edu/?sat=jpss&z=4&im=6&ts=1&st=0&et=0&speed=130&motion=loop&map=1&lat=1&opacity%5B0%5D=1&hidden%5B0%5D=0&pause=20190804102542&slider=-1&hide_controls=0&mouse_draw=0&follow_feature=0&follow_hide=0&s=rammb-slider&sec=northern_hemisphere&p%5B0%5D=band_i02&x=15316.4169921875&y=16791.47265625 (http://rammb-slider.cira.colostate.edu/?sat=jpss&z=4&im=6&ts=1&st=0&et=0&speed=130&motion=loop&map=1&lat=1&opacity%5B0%5D=1&hidden%5B0%5D=0&pause=20190804102542&slider=-1&hide_controls=0&mouse_draw=0&follow_feature=0&follow_hide=0&s=rammb-slider&sec=northern_hemisphere&p%5B0%5D=band_i02&x=15316.4169921875&y=16791.47265625)

North Pole lower right, 120°E-30°E
http://rammb-slider.cira.colostate.edu/?sat=jpss&z=4&im=6&ts=1&st=0&et=0&speed=130&motion=loop&map=1&lat=1&opacity%5B0%5D=1&hidden%5B0%5D=0&pause=20190804102542&slider=-1&hide_controls=0&mouse_draw=0&follow_feature=0&follow_hide=0&s=rammb-slider&sec=northern_hemisphere&p%5B0%5D=band_i02&x=15314.4169921875&y=15193.47265625 (http://rammb-slider.cira.colostate.edu/?sat=jpss&z=4&im=6&ts=1&st=0&et=0&speed=130&motion=loop&map=1&lat=1&opacity%5B0%5D=1&hidden%5B0%5D=0&pause=20190804102542&slider=-1&hide_controls=0&mouse_draw=0&follow_feature=0&follow_hide=0&s=rammb-slider&sec=northern_hemisphere&p%5B0%5D=band_i02&x=15314.4169921875&y=15193.47265625)

Kara Sea south
http://rammb-slider.cira.colostate.edu/?sat=jpss&z=4&im=6&ts=1&st=0&et=0&speed=130&motion=loop&map=1&lat=1&opacity%5B0%5D=1&hidden%5B0%5D=0&pause=20190804102542&slider=-1&hide_controls=1&mouse_draw=0&follow_feature=0&follow_hide=0&s=rammb-slider&sec=northern_hemisphere&p%5B0%5D=band_i02&x=13424.388671875&y=12085.361328125 (http://rammb-slider.cira.colostate.edu/?sat=jpss&z=4&im=6&ts=1&st=0&et=0&speed=130&motion=loop&map=1&lat=1&opacity%5B0%5D=1&hidden%5B0%5D=0&pause=20190804102542&slider=-1&hide_controls=1&mouse_draw=0&follow_feature=0&follow_hide=0&s=rammb-slider&sec=northern_hemisphere&p%5B0%5D=band_i02&x=13424.388671875&y=12085.361328125)

Kara Sea north
http://rammb-slider.cira.colostate.edu/?sat=jpss&z=4&im=6&ts=1&st=0&et=0&speed=130&motion=loop&map=1&lat=1&opacity%5B0%5D=1&hidden%5B0%5D=0&pause=20190804102542&slider=-1&hide_controls=1&mouse_draw=0&follow_feature=0&follow_hide=0&s=rammb-slider&sec=northern_hemisphere&p%5B0%5D=band_i02&x=13230.388671875&y=13707.361328125 (http://rammb-slider.cira.colostate.edu/?sat=jpss&z=4&im=6&ts=1&st=0&et=0&speed=130&motion=loop&map=1&lat=1&opacity%5B0%5D=1&hidden%5B0%5D=0&pause=20190804102542&slider=-1&hide_controls=1&mouse_draw=0&follow_feature=0&follow_hide=0&s=rammb-slider&sec=northern_hemisphere&p%5B0%5D=band_i02&x=13230.388671875&y=13707.361328125)

Laptev Sea/Lena River delta
http://rammb-slider.cira.colostate.edu/?sat=jpss&z=4&im=6&ts=1&st=0&et=0&speed=130&motion=loop&map=1&lat=1&opacity%5B0%5D=1&hidden%5B0%5D=0&pause=20190804102542&slider=-1&hide_controls=1&mouse_draw=0&follow_feature=0&follow_hide=0&s=rammb-slider&sec=northern_hemisphere&p%5B0%5D=band_i02&x=11990.388671875&y=16609.361328125 (http://rammb-slider.cira.colostate.edu/?sat=jpss&z=4&im=6&ts=1&st=0&et=0&speed=130&motion=loop&map=1&lat=1&opacity%5B0%5D=1&hidden%5B0%5D=0&pause=20190804102542&slider=-1&hide_controls=1&mouse_draw=0&follow_feature=0&follow_hide=0&s=rammb-slider&sec=northern_hemisphere&p%5B0%5D=band_i02&x=11990.388671875&y=16609.361328125)

Laptev Sea North
http://rammb-slider.cira.colostate.edu/?sat=jpss&z=4&im=6&ts=1&st=0&et=0&speed=130&motion=loop&map=1&lat=1&opacity%5B0%5D=1&hidden%5B0%5D=0&pause=20190804102542&slider=-1&hide_controls=1&mouse_draw=0&follow_feature=0&follow_hide=0&s=rammb-slider&sec=northern_hemisphere&p%5B0%5D=band_i02&x=13690.388671875&y=16701.361328125 (http://rammb-slider.cira.colostate.edu/?sat=jpss&z=4&im=6&ts=1&st=0&et=0&speed=130&motion=loop&map=1&lat=1&opacity%5B0%5D=1&hidden%5B0%5D=0&pause=20190804102542&slider=-1&hide_controls=1&mouse_draw=0&follow_feature=0&follow_hide=0&s=rammb-slider&sec=northern_hemisphere&p%5B0%5D=band_i02&x=13690.388671875&y=16701.361328125)

East Siberian Sea west
http://rammb-slider.cira.colostate.edu/?sat=jpss&z=4&im=6&ts=1&st=0&et=0&speed=130&motion=loop&map=1&lat=1&opacity%5B0%5D=1&hidden%5B0%5D=0&pause=20190804102542&slider=-1&hide_controls=1&mouse_draw=0&follow_feature=0&follow_hide=0&s=rammb-slider&sec=northern_hemisphere&p%5B0%5D=band_i02&x=12332.388671875&y=18799.361328125 (http://rammb-slider.cira.colostate.edu/?sat=jpss&z=4&im=6&ts=1&st=0&et=0&speed=130&motion=loop&map=1&lat=1&opacity%5B0%5D=1&hidden%5B0%5D=0&pause=20190804102542&slider=-1&hide_controls=1&mouse_draw=0&follow_feature=0&follow_hide=0&s=rammb-slider&sec=northern_hemisphere&p%5B0%5D=band_i02&x=12332.388671875&y=18799.361328125)

East Siberian Sea east
http://rammb-slider.cira.colostate.edu/?sat=jpss&z=4&im=6&ts=1&st=0&et=0&speed=130&motion=loop&map=1&lat=1&opacity%5B0%5D=1&hidden%5B0%5D=0&pause=20190804102542&slider=-1&hide_controls=1&mouse_draw=0&follow_feature=0&follow_hide=0&s=rammb-slider&sec=northern_hemisphere&p%5B0%5D=band_i02&x=13088.388671875&y=19889.361328125 (http://rammb-slider.cira.colostate.edu/?sat=jpss&z=4&im=6&ts=1&st=0&et=0&speed=130&motion=loop&map=1&lat=1&opacity%5B0%5D=1&hidden%5B0%5D=0&pause=20190804102542&slider=-1&hide_controls=1&mouse_draw=0&follow_feature=0&follow_hide=0&s=rammb-slider&sec=northern_hemisphere&p%5B0%5D=band_i02&x=13088.388671875&y=19889.361328125)

East Siberian Sea north
http://rammb-slider.cira.colostate.edu/?sat=jpss&z=4&im=6&ts=1&st=0&et=0&speed=130&motion=loop&map=1&lat=1&opacity%5B0%5D=1&hidden%5B0%5D=0&pause=20190804102542&slider=-1&hide_controls=1&mouse_draw=0&follow_feature=0&follow_hide=0&s=rammb-slider&sec=northern_hemisphere&p%5B0%5D=band_i02&x=13510.388671875&y=18583.361328125 (http://rammb-slider.cira.colostate.edu/?sat=jpss&z=4&im=6&ts=1&st=0&et=0&speed=130&motion=loop&map=1&lat=1&opacity%5B0%5D=1&hidden%5B0%5D=0&pause=20190804102542&slider=-1&hide_controls=1&mouse_draw=0&follow_feature=0&follow_hide=0&s=rammb-slider&sec=northern_hemisphere&p%5B0%5D=band_i02&x=13510.388671875&y=18583.361328125)

Bering Sea
http://rammb-slider.cira.colostate.edu/?sat=jpss&z=4&im=6&ts=1&st=0&et=0&speed=130&motion=loop&map=1&lat=1&opacity%5B0%5D=1&hidden%5B0%5D=0&pause=20190804102542&slider=-1&hide_controls=1&mouse_draw=0&follow_feature=0&follow_hide=0&s=rammb-slider&sec=northern_hemisphere&p%5B0%5D=band_i02&x=13516.388671875&y=22929.361328125 (http://rammb-slider.cira.colostate.edu/?sat=jpss&z=4&im=6&ts=1&st=0&et=0&speed=130&motion=loop&map=1&lat=1&opacity%5B0%5D=1&hidden%5B0%5D=0&pause=20190804102542&slider=-1&hide_controls=1&mouse_draw=0&follow_feature=0&follow_hide=0&s=rammb-slider&sec=northern_hemisphere&p%5B0%5D=band_i02&x=13516.388671875&y=22929.361328125)

Chukchi Sea south
http://rammb-slider.cira.colostate.edu/?sat=jpss&z=4&im=6&ts=1&st=0&et=0&speed=130&motion=loop&map=1&lat=1&opacity%5B0%5D=1&hidden%5B0%5D=0&pause=20190804102542&slider=-1&hide_controls=1&mouse_draw=0&follow_feature=0&follow_hide=0&s=rammb-slider&sec=northern_hemisphere&p%5B0%5D=band_i02&x=14346.388671875&y=21249.361328125 (http://rammb-slider.cira.colostate.edu/?sat=jpss&z=4&im=6&ts=1&st=0&et=0&speed=130&motion=loop&map=1&lat=1&opacity%5B0%5D=1&hidden%5B0%5D=0&pause=20190804102542&slider=-1&hide_controls=1&mouse_draw=0&follow_feature=0&follow_hide=0&s=rammb-slider&sec=northern_hemisphere&p%5B0%5D=band_i02&x=14346.388671875&y=21249.361328125)

Chukchi Sea north
http://rammb-slider.cira.colostate.edu/?sat=jpss&z=4&im=6&ts=1&st=0&et=0&speed=130&motion=loop&map=1&lat=1&opacity%5B0%5D=1&hidden%5B0%5D=0&pause=20190804102542&slider=-1&hide_controls=1&mouse_draw=0&follow_feature=0&follow_hide=0&s=rammb-slider&sec=northern_hemisphere&p%5B0%5D=band_i02&x=13516.388671875&y=22929.361328125 (http://rammb-slider.cira.colostate.edu/?sat=jpss&z=4&im=6&ts=1&st=0&et=0&speed=130&motion=loop&map=1&lat=1&opacity%5B0%5D=1&hidden%5B0%5D=0&pause=20190804102542&slider=-1&hide_controls=1&mouse_draw=0&follow_feature=0&follow_hide=0&s=rammb-slider&sec=northern_hemisphere&p%5B0%5D=band_i02&x=13516.388671875&y=22929.361328125)

Beaufort Sea west
http://rammb-slider.cira.colostate.edu/?sat=jpss&z=4&im=6&ts=1&st=0&et=0&speed=130&motion=loop&map=1&lat=1&opacity%5B0%5D=1&hidden%5B0%5D=0&pause=20190804102542&slider=-1&hide_controls=1&mouse_draw=0&follow_feature=0&follow_hide=0&s=rammb-slider&sec=northern_hemisphere&p%5B0%5D=band_i02&x=16126.388671875&y=20643.361328125 (http://rammb-slider.cira.colostate.edu/?sat=jpss&z=4&im=6&ts=1&st=0&et=0&speed=130&motion=loop&map=1&lat=1&opacity%5B0%5D=1&hidden%5B0%5D=0&pause=20190804102542&slider=-1&hide_controls=1&mouse_draw=0&follow_feature=0&follow_hide=0&s=rammb-slider&sec=northern_hemisphere&p%5B0%5D=band_i02&x=16126.388671875&y=20643.361328125)

Beaufort Sea east
http://rammb-slider.cira.colostate.edu/?sat=jpss&z=4&im=6&ts=1&st=0&et=0&speed=130&motion=loop&map=1&lat=1&opacity%5B0%5D=1&hidden%5B0%5D=0&pause=20190804102542&slider=-1&hide_controls=1&mouse_draw=0&follow_feature=0&follow_hide=0&s=rammb-slider&sec=northern_hemisphere&p%5B0%5D=band_i02&x=16126.388671875&y=20643.361328125 (http://rammb-slider.cira.colostate.edu/?sat=jpss&z=4&im=6&ts=1&st=0&et=0&speed=130&motion=loop&map=1&lat=1&opacity%5B0%5D=1&hidden%5B0%5D=0&pause=20190804102542&slider=-1&hide_controls=1&mouse_draw=0&follow_feature=0&follow_hide=0&s=rammb-slider&sec=northern_hemisphere&p%5B0%5D=band_i02&x=16126.388671875&y=20643.361328125)

Beaufort Sea north
http://rammb-slider.cira.colostate.edu/?sat=jpss&z=4&im=6&ts=1&st=0&et=0&speed=130&motion=loop&map=1&lat=1&opacity%5B0%5D=1&hidden%5B0%5D=0&pause=20190804102542&slider=-1&hide_controls=1&mouse_draw=0&follow_feature=0&follow_hide=0&s=rammb-slider&sec=northern_hemisphere&p%5B0%5D=band_i02&x=16344.388671875&y=19117.361328125 (http://rammb-slider.cira.colostate.edu/?sat=jpss&z=4&im=6&ts=1&st=0&et=0&speed=130&motion=loop&map=1&lat=1&opacity%5B0%5D=1&hidden%5B0%5D=0&pause=20190804102542&slider=-1&hide_controls=1&mouse_draw=0&follow_feature=0&follow_hide=0&s=rammb-slider&sec=northern_hemisphere&p%5B0%5D=band_i02&x=16344.388671875&y=19117.361328125)

CAA - Amundsen Gulf/M'Clure Strait/Viscount Melville Sound
http://rammb-slider.cira.colostate.edu/?sat=jpss&z=4&im=6&ts=1&st=0&et=0&speed=130&motion=loop&map=1&lat=1&opacity%5B0%5D=1&hidden%5B0%5D=0&pause=20190804102542&slider=-1&hide_controls=1&mouse_draw=0&follow_feature=0&follow_hide=0&s=rammb-slider&sec=northern_hemisphere&p%5B0%5D=band_i02&x=18660.388671875&y=20035.361328125 (http://rammb-slider.cira.colostate.edu/?sat=jpss&z=4&im=6&ts=1&st=0&et=0&speed=130&motion=loop&map=1&lat=1&opacity%5B0%5D=1&hidden%5B0%5D=0&pause=20190804102542&slider=-1&hide_controls=1&mouse_draw=0&follow_feature=0&follow_hide=0&s=rammb-slider&sec=northern_hemisphere&p%5B0%5D=band_i02&x=18660.388671875&y=20035.361328125)

CAA - Prince of Wales Island/Resolute
http://rammb-slider.cira.colostate.edu/?sat=jpss&z=4&im=6&ts=1&st=0&et=0&speed=130&motion=loop&map=1&lat=1&opacity%5B0%5D=1&hidden%5B0%5D=0&pause=20190804102542&slider=-1&hide_controls=1&mouse_draw=0&follow_feature=0&follow_hide=0&s=rammb-slider&sec=northern_hemisphere&p%5B0%5D=band_i02&x=19704.388671875&y=18613.361328125 (http://rammb-slider.cira.colostate.edu/?sat=jpss&z=4&im=6&ts=1&st=0&et=0&speed=130&motion=loop&map=1&lat=1&opacity%5B0%5D=1&hidden%5B0%5D=0&pause=20190804102542&slider=-1&hide_controls=1&mouse_draw=0&follow_feature=0&follow_hide=0&s=rammb-slider&sec=northern_hemisphere&p%5B0%5D=band_i02&x=19704.388671875&y=18613.361328125)

CAA - Prince Gustav Adolph Sea/Byam Martin Channel/Peary Channel
http://rammb-slider.cira.colostate.edu/?sat=jpss&z=4&im=6&ts=1&st=0&et=0&speed=130&motion=loop&map=1&lat=1&opacity%5B0%5D=1&hidden%5B0%5D=0&pause=20190804102542&slider=-1&hide_controls=1&mouse_draw=0&follow_feature=0&follow_hide=0&s=rammb-slider&sec=northern_hemisphere&p%5B0%5D=band_i02&x=18614.388671875&y=18465.361328125 (http://rammb-slider.cira.colostate.edu/?sat=jpss&z=4&im=6&ts=1&st=0&et=0&speed=130&motion=loop&map=1&lat=1&opacity%5B0%5D=1&hidden%5B0%5D=0&pause=20190804102542&slider=-1&hide_controls=1&mouse_draw=0&follow_feature=0&follow_hide=0&s=rammb-slider&sec=northern_hemisphere&p%5B0%5D=band_i02&x=18614.388671875&y=18465.361328125)

Parry Channel east/Prince Regent inlet/Admiralty
http://rammb-slider.cira.colostate.edu/?sat=jpss&z=4&im=6&ts=1&st=0&et=0&speed=130&motion=loop&map=1&lat=1&opacity%5B0%5D=1&hidden%5B0%5D=0&pause=20190804102542&slider=-1&hide_controls=1&mouse_draw=0&follow_feature=0&follow_hide=0&s=rammb-slider&sec=northern_hemisphere&p%5B0%5D=band_i02&x=20114.388671875&y=18195.361328125 (http://rammb-slider.cira.colostate.edu/?sat=jpss&z=4&im=6&ts=1&st=0&et=0&speed=130&motion=loop&map=1&lat=1&opacity%5B0%5D=1&hidden%5B0%5D=0&pause=20190804102542&slider=-1&hide_controls=1&mouse_draw=0&follow_feature=0&follow_hide=0&s=rammb-slider&sec=northern_hemisphere&p%5B0%5D=band_i02&x=20114.388671875&y=18195.361328125)

Baffin Bay north
http://rammb-slider.cira.colostate.edu/?sat=jpss&z=4&im=6&ts=1&st=0&et=0&speed=130&motion=loop&map=1&lat=1&opacity%5B0%5D=1&hidden%5B0%5D=0&pause=20190804102542&slider=-1&hide_controls=1&mouse_draw=0&follow_feature=0&follow_hide=0&s=rammb-slider&sec=northern_hemisphere&p%5B0%5D=band_i02&x=20272.388671875&y=16699.361328125 (http://rammb-slider.cira.colostate.edu/?sat=jpss&z=4&im=6&ts=1&st=0&et=0&speed=130&motion=loop&map=1&lat=1&opacity%5B0%5D=1&hidden%5B0%5D=0&pause=20190804102542&slider=-1&hide_controls=1&mouse_draw=0&follow_feature=0&follow_hide=0&s=rammb-slider&sec=northern_hemisphere&p%5B0%5D=band_i02&x=20272.388671875&y=16699.361328125)

Baffin Bay south
http://rammb-slider.cira.colostate.edu/?sat=jpss&z=4&im=6&ts=1&st=0&et=0&speed=130&motion=loop&map=1&lat=1&opacity%5B0%5D=1&hidden%5B0%5D=0&pause=20190804102542&slider=-1&hide_controls=1&mouse_draw=0&follow_feature=0&follow_hide=0&s=rammb-slider&sec=northern_hemisphere&p%5B0%5D=band_i02&x=21592.388671875&y=15855.361328125 (http://rammb-slider.cira.colostate.edu/?sat=jpss&z=4&im=6&ts=1&st=0&et=0&speed=130&motion=loop&map=1&lat=1&opacity%5B0%5D=1&hidden%5B0%5D=0&pause=20190804102542&slider=-1&hide_controls=1&mouse_draw=0&follow_feature=0&follow_hide=0&s=rammb-slider&sec=northern_hemisphere&p%5B0%5D=band_i02&x=21592.388671875&y=15855.361328125)

Nares Strait/Lincoln Sea
http://rammb-slider.cira.colostate.edu/?sat=jpss&z=4&im=6&ts=1&st=0&et=0&speed=130&motion=loop&map=1&lat=1&opacity%5B0%5D=1&hidden%5B0%5D=0&pause=20190804102542&slider=-1&hide_controls=1&mouse_draw=0&follow_feature=0&follow_hide=0&s=rammb-slider&sec=northern_hemisphere&p%5B0%5D=band_i02&x=18364.4453125&y=15877.3056640625 (http://rammb-slider.cira.colostate.edu/?sat=jpss&z=4&im=6&ts=1&st=0&et=0&speed=130&motion=loop&map=1&lat=1&opacity%5B0%5D=1&hidden%5B0%5D=0&pause=20190804102542&slider=-1&hide_controls=1&mouse_draw=0&follow_feature=0&follow_hide=0&s=rammb-slider&sec=northern_hemisphere&p%5B0%5D=band_i02&x=18364.4453125&y=15877.3056640625)

Fram Strait/Greenland Sea
http://rammb-slider.cira.colostate.edu/?sat=jpss&z=4&im=6&ts=1&st=0&et=0&speed=130&motion=loop&map=1&lat=1&opacity%5B0%5D=1&hidden%5B0%5D=0&pause=20190804102542&slider=-1&hide_controls=1&mouse_draw=0&follow_feature=0&follow_hide=0&s=rammb-slider&sec=northern_hemisphere&p%5B0%5D=band_i02&x=17686.4453125&y=13599.3056640625 (http://rammb-slider.cira.colostate.edu/?sat=jpss&z=4&im=6&ts=1&st=0&et=0&speed=130&motion=loop&map=1&lat=1&opacity%5B0%5D=1&hidden%5B0%5D=0&pause=20190804102542&slider=-1&hide_controls=1&mouse_draw=0&follow_feature=0&follow_hide=0&s=rammb-slider&sec=northern_hemisphere&p%5B0%5D=band_i02&x=17686.4453125&y=13599.3056640625)

Svalbard
http://rammb-slider.cira.colostate.edu/?sat=jpss&z=4&im=6&ts=1&st=0&et=0&speed=130&motion=loop&map=1&lat=1&opacity%5B0%5D=1&hidden%5B0%5D=0&pause=20190804102542&slider=-1&hide_controls=1&mouse_draw=0&follow_feature=0&follow_hide=0&s=rammb-slider&sec=northern_hemisphere&p%5B0%5D=band_i02&x=16480.4443359375&y=13325.3056640625 (http://rammb-slider.cira.colostate.edu/?sat=jpss&z=4&im=6&ts=1&st=0&et=0&speed=130&motion=loop&map=1&lat=1&opacity%5B0%5D=1&hidden%5B0%5D=0&pause=20190804102542&slider=-1&hide_controls=1&mouse_draw=0&follow_feature=0&follow_hide=0&s=rammb-slider&sec=northern_hemisphere&p%5B0%5D=band_i02&x=16480.4443359375&y=13325.3056640625)

Franz Josef Land/Barents Sea
http://rammb-slider.cira.colostate.edu/?sat=jpss&z=4&im=6&ts=1&st=0&et=0&speed=130&motion=loop&map=1&lat=1&opacity%5B0%5D=1&hidden%5B0%5D=0&pause=20190804102542&slider=-1&hide_controls=1&mouse_draw=0&follow_feature=0&follow_hide=0&s=rammb-slider&sec=northern_hemisphere&p%5B0%5D=band_i02&x=14846.4443359375&y=13313.3056640625 (http://rammb-slider.cira.colostate.edu/?sat=jpss&z=4&im=6&ts=1&st=0&et=0&speed=130&motion=loop&map=1&lat=1&opacity%5B0%5D=1&hidden%5B0%5D=0&pause=20190804102542&slider=-1&hide_controls=1&mouse_draw=0&follow_feature=0&follow_hide=0&s=rammb-slider&sec=northern_hemisphere&p%5B0%5D=band_i02&x=14846.4443359375&y=13313.3056640625)

Greenland wide shot - band M8
http://rammb-slider.cira.colostate.edu/?sat=jpss&z=2&im=6&ts=1&st=0&et=0&speed=130&motion=loop&map=1&lat=1&opacity%5B0%5D=1&hidden%5B0%5D=0&pause=20190804102542&slider=-1&hide_controls=0&mouse_draw=0&follow_feature=0&follow_hide=0&s=rammb-slider&sec=northern_hemisphere&p%5B0%5D=band_m08&x=20862.4453125&y=13657.22265625 (http://rammb-slider.cira.colostate.edu/?sat=jpss&z=2&im=6&ts=1&st=0&et=0&speed=130&motion=loop&map=1&lat=1&opacity%5B0%5D=1&hidden%5B0%5D=0&pause=20190804102542&slider=-1&hide_controls=0&mouse_draw=0&follow_feature=0&follow_hide=0&s=rammb-slider&sec=northern_hemisphere&p%5B0%5D=band_m08&x=20862.4453125&y=13657.22265625)

Title: Re: The Rammb Slider Thread
Post by: petm on August 04, 2019, 06:20:26 PM
Bravo JayW!
Title: Re: The Rammb Slider Thread
Post by: be cause on August 04, 2019, 06:30:04 PM
   ^^^ Indeed .. many thumbs up .. b.c.
Title: Re: The Rammb Slider Thread
Post by: DrTskoul on August 04, 2019, 06:37:27 PM
Bravi
Title: Re: The Rammb Slider Thread
Post by: JayW on August 11, 2019, 01:51:03 AM
Glad that it was well received.

Clear skies around the pole today.
Needs click, contrast slightly enhanced for detail.

Title: Re: The Rammb Slider Thread
Post by: DrTskoul on August 11, 2019, 02:02:05 AM
Mobile, isn't it?
Title: Re: The Rammb Slider Thread
Post by: JayW on August 13, 2019, 11:43:35 AM
Mobile, isn't it?
Sure seems like it reacts quickly to winds, and it's marching towards the Atlantic, as it has for the most part.

Speaking of winds, they have turned southerly over the Laptev and points north, and should persist for some time.

Contrast boosted.
Title: Re: The Rammb Slider Thread
Post by: philopek on August 13, 2019, 03:13:29 PM
Eumetsat Natural Colors are working again
Title: Re: The Rammb Slider Thread
Post by: uniquorn on August 23, 2019, 03:41:54 PM
pgas, aug22-23.       https://tinyurl.com/yyklsavm
Title: Re: The Rammb Slider Thread
Post by: JayW on August 24, 2019, 11:43:15 PM
Greenland sea 149 hours.
Title: Re: The Rammb Slider Thread
Post by: JayW on August 25, 2019, 03:27:07 PM
 30.5 hour loop, NE Greenland.  375M approximately per pixel.
Click for animation.
Title: Re: The Rammb Slider Thread
Post by: JayW on August 27, 2019, 02:53:20 AM
PGAS/Peary Channel area. August 24-26.
Title: Re: The Rammb Slider Thread
Post by: uniquorn on August 31, 2019, 01:46:27 PM
might make an interesting long rammb. wind driven surface movement close to shoal ess-s3
72.1N 166.7, aug8-24
Title: Re: The Rammb Slider Thread
Post by: blumenkraft on September 04, 2019, 08:11:08 PM
This cute cloud in Kane Basin yesterday. <3
Title: Re: The Rammb Slider Thread
Post by: blumenkraft on September 04, 2019, 08:29:17 PM
might make an interesting long rammb. wind driven surface movement close to shoal ess-s3
72.1N 166.7, aug8-24

Uniquorn, i forgot to mention i looked that date, but it was too cloudy to make a nice GIF.  :-\
Title: Re: The Rammb Slider Thread
Post by: blumenkraft on September 16, 2019, 10:56:42 PM
Very pretty tidal wave today in Lincoln at Nares entrance.

Note how it spreads out east and west.
Title: Re: The Rammb Slider Thread
Post by: blumenkraft on September 17, 2019, 01:05:02 PM
North/West Greenland current?
Title: Re: The Rammb Slider Thread
Post by: blumenkraft on September 17, 2019, 08:21:37 PM
Quote
It's not just you! rammb-slider.cira.colostate.edu is down.

:(
Title: Re: The Rammb Slider Thread
Post by: blumenkraft on September 18, 2019, 07:38:49 AM
It's back online! YEY! \o/

This is a GIF showing tidal action in Nares Strait.

Night&Day Band, skipped stills, contrast-enhanced.

Click to play!
Title: Re: The Rammb Slider Thread
Post by: blumenkraft on September 18, 2019, 08:45:29 PM
It's online, but not updating.  :-\

Anyway, here is a GIF of a steaming lake NE Ellesmere.
Title: Re: The Rammb Slider Thread
Post by: JayW on October 10, 2019, 11:49:24 AM
Now that polar night is descending on the arctic, it's time to switch to band I04, shortwave IR discerns temperature.  I inverted the colors and enhanced the contrast, I think it will make for a good substitute for visible bands.  I find the low light band has issues with some form of "glare".

This is the area north of Svalbard at roughly 82.5°N,10°E, that has been discussed before, that "swirl" still evident.   The gif is short, fighting the clouds

Click to run, link to location.
https://rammb-slider.cira.colostate.edu/?sat=jpss&z=5&im=24&ts=1&st=0&et=0&speed=130&motion=loop&map=1&lat=0&opacity%5B0%5D=1&hidden%5B0%5D=0&pause=20191009094722&slider=-1&hide_controls=0&mouse_draw=0&follow_feature=0&follow_hide=0&s=rammb-slider&sec=northern_hemisphere&p%5B0%5D=band_i04&x=16598&y=13956
Title: Re: The Rammb Slider Thread
Post by: blumenkraft on October 10, 2019, 05:09:52 PM
Nice to see you posting, missed you, Jay! :)
Title: Re: The Rammb Slider Thread
Post by: blumenkraft on November 03, 2019, 07:42:51 AM
Convectively-generated gravity waves off the coast of Western Australia

Link >> https://cimss.ssec.wisc.edu/goes/blog/archives/34859
Title: Re: The Rammb Slider Thread
Post by: blumenkraft on November 05, 2019, 04:39:42 PM
Day/Night band updating again. \o/
Title: Re: The Rammb Slider Thread
Post by: blumenkraft on November 09, 2019, 07:06:26 AM
Very fast winds over the Northpole towards the Barents Sea.

60 frames, 51-minute increments, Band: M16.

Click to play. Big file!
Title: Re: The Rammb Slider Thread
Post by: blumenkraft on November 10, 2019, 09:46:29 AM
The north pole in the middle.

60 frames, 51-minute increments, Band: M16

Click to play, big file.
Title: Re: The Rammb Slider Thread
Post by: blumenkraft on November 10, 2019, 06:34:38 PM
Wildfires in south-west Australia via Himawari.

Geo-colors, 10-minute increments.
Title: Re: The Rammb Slider Thread
Post by: blumenkraft on November 10, 2019, 06:51:49 PM
And here to the east, 30-minute increments.
Title: Re: The Rammb Slider Thread
Post by: blumenkraft on December 23, 2019, 09:45:52 AM
The Lincoln Sea right now.

60 frames, 51-minute increments, I5 infrared band.

(Click to play)
Title: Re: The Rammb Slider Thread
Post by: blumenkraft on January 15, 2020, 01:41:18 PM
The cooking ocean north of Svalbard.

Click to play
Title: Re: The Rammb Slider Thread
Post by: blumenkraft on January 15, 2020, 02:48:15 PM
The swirl between Svalbard and Greenland.

102-minute increments via I5 band

Click to play
Title: Re: The Rammb Slider Thread
Post by: johnm33 on January 15, 2020, 03:02:31 PM
"Swirl" Thats interesting, got a lat/long for it?
Title: Re: The Rammb Slider Thread
Post by: blumenkraft on January 15, 2020, 03:08:04 PM
Check this post, John >> https://forum.arctic-sea-ice.net/index.php/topic,2649.msg218841.html#msg218841
Title: Re: The Rammb Slider Thread
Post by: uniquorn on January 19, 2020, 07:27:56 PM
Export between FJL(left) and Svalbard(right)
Title: Re: The Rammb Slider Thread
Post by: blumenkraft on February 03, 2020, 07:01:03 AM
Stratospheric smoke from Australian bushfires

Quote
GOES-16 (GOES-East) Near-Infrared “Cirrus” (1.37 µm) images during the 19-24 January 2019 period (above) showed a semi-circular pall of smoke that originated from Australian bushfires  — outbreaks of pyrocumulonimbus clouds that occurred in late December 2019 and early January 2020 injected large amounts of smoke into the lower stratosphere, and this smoke drifted eastward across the South Pacific Ocean. The 1.37 µm spectral band does a good job at detecting light scattered by airborne particles such as ice crystals, smoke, volcanic ash, dust, etc.; the areal extent of the smoke was most apparent approaching sunset on each day, due to enhanced forward scattering.

Here is the 300MB GIF directly. It takes a while to load but worth it!
>> https://cimss.ssec.wisc.edu/satellite-blog/images/2020/01/200119_200124_goes16_nearInfraredCirrus_Australian_fire_smoke_South_Pacific_anim.gif
Title: Re: The Rammb Slider Thread
Post by: blumenkraft on February 18, 2020, 05:34:19 PM
A storm causing a lot of ice cracking. Lincoln sea and in the north of Greenland. Greenland on the right for orientation. This is M15 band.

Click to play
Title: Re: The Rammb Slider Thread
Post by: blumenkraft on April 03, 2020, 11:35:18 AM
This is a GIF showing the North Pole region with the pole in the middle.

I5 band, Click to play.
Title: Re: The Rammb Slider Thread
Post by: Glen Koehler on April 03, 2020, 12:28:28 PM
     How weird is it for the ice at the North Pole to be cracking up this early?  That plus apparently strong Fram Export looks ominous.
Title: Re: The Rammb Slider Thread
Post by: blumenkraft on April 03, 2020, 01:00:04 PM
Cracks per se are not too weird, but i think those leads developing are rather big.

On the other hand, when there are big leads, a lot of heat from the ocean water is transferred into the air, cooling down the upper water layer. I don't know if this is a net good or bad.
Title: Re: The Rammb Slider Thread
Post by: JayW on April 21, 2020, 01:28:01 AM
Band M8 showing a change in snow consistency over the Laptev.  This is either rain or wet snow in my humble opinion.
Click to run. Roughly 36 hours.
Title: Re: The Rammb Slider Thread
Post by: uniquorn on April 21, 2020, 12:36:03 PM
Thanks, I was wondering what it could be
Title: Re: The Rammb Slider Thread
Post by: blumenkraft on April 27, 2020, 03:40:35 PM
A beautiful example of how you can spot fresh snow via M10 Band.

The location is between Greenland and Svalbard. 20 frames. Click to play.
Title: Re: The Rammb Slider Thread
Post by: JayW on April 29, 2020, 12:17:34 PM
A beautiful example of how you can spot fresh snow via M10 Band.

The location is between Greenland and Svalbard. 20 frames. Click to play.
It also tells us something about the existing snowpack not being being fresh, and having potentially seen *some* above freezing temps. 
Title: Re: The Rammb Slider Thread
Post by: JayW on May 01, 2020, 12:13:36 PM
Lots of clouds over the ESS, but glimpses show a little fresh snow in areas, but it appears to me that much of the existing snowcover isn't all that impressive.

Band M8. Needs click
Title: Re: The Rammb Slider Thread
Post by: JayW on May 06, 2020, 12:19:40 PM
VIIRS band M8 indicating a change in snow characteristics stretching from just north of Wrangel Island to Banks island.  It occurs just south of a storm track so my feeling is that's it's due to precipitation.  It coincides with the AMSR2 concentration data from Bremen. Second attachment.
Click to run. Contrast boosted for detail.

Title: Re: The Rammb Slider Thread
Post by: blumenkraft on May 12, 2020, 09:04:20 AM
Surface melt over ESS. (M8 band)

Siberia on the left, Alaska bottom right.

Click to play.
Title: Re: The Rammb Slider Thread
Post by: JayW on May 16, 2020, 01:34:57 PM
Southern Chukchi, 100 hours. Band I1.
Title: Re: The Rammb Slider Thread
Post by: blumenkraft on May 16, 2020, 04:39:16 PM
This is a GIF of a giant lead developing north of Ellesmere Ø (ooops) CAA, Band I1 (Red/Visible)

Click to play
Title: Re: The Rammb Slider Thread
Post by: uniquorn on May 16, 2020, 11:52:26 PM
eddies south of the FJL- Svalbard gap, https://col.st/tvlWA  click to play
Title: Re: The Rammb Slider Thread
Post by: JayW on May 17, 2020, 12:24:03 PM
Shot centered a roughly 68°N, 154°E.   4 day change.  Kolyma river in the lower left can be seen thawing, might start spilling out the delta and onto the fast ice soon.  One can also see several "kettle ponds?" melting out, as well as some reduction in snowcover.
Link to location.
https://rammb-slider.cira.colostate.edu/?sat=jpss&z=5&im=14&ts=1&st=0&et=0&speed=130&motion=loop&map=0&lat=1&opacity%5B0%5D=1&hidden%5B0%5D=0&pause=20200517030756&slider=-1&hide_controls=1&mouse_draw=0&follow_feature=0&follow_hide=0&s=rammb-slider&sec=northern_hemisphere&p%5B0%5D=eumetsat_natural_color&x=11169.013671875&y=19222.083984375

Requires a click.
Title: Re: The Rammb Slider Thread
Post by: JayW on May 23, 2020, 01:31:17 PM
Just noticing now that the RAMMB added a bunch of awesome RGB composites after seeing some of blumenkraft's posts.

Beaufort is responding to easterly winds.  Should open up nicely over the next 3 days.
Band M8 showing quite varied snow quality, mostly not very fresh.  You can also see the warm surging up north, in the last frames.  Floes look pretty small, except maybe the ones near Banks island, and even those look a bit dodgy.
A short 10 loop, contrast boosted. Click to run.
Title: Re: The Rammb Slider Thread
Post by: blumenkraft on May 31, 2020, 10:24:51 AM
This is near the north pole.

One cloud, snow in the north, rain in the south.

Click to play.
Title: Re: The Rammb Slider Thread
Post by: JayW on June 10, 2020, 11:57:16 AM
Lots of rain falling on the ice.
24 hour loop. Snowmelt RGB composite.
https://rammb-slider.cira.colostate.edu/?sat=jpss&z=1&im=28&ts=1&st=0&et=0&speed=130&motion=loop&map=1&lat=0&opacity%5B0%5D=1&hidden%5B0%5D=0&pause=20200610063225&slider=-1&hide_controls=1&mouse_draw=0&follow_feature=0&follow_hide=0&s=rammb-slider&sec=northern_hemisphere&p%5B0%5D=cira_snowmelt&x=16283.111328125&y=16096
Title: Re: The Rammb Slider Thread
Post by: JayW on June 12, 2020, 12:52:50 AM
Near shore ice in the Laptev has turned quite the shade of blue on snowmelt RGB.   
Title: Re: The Rammb Slider Thread
Post by: JayW on June 15, 2020, 02:51:21 AM
Lena river outlet in the upper right.  These look like thunderstorms bubbling up and moving towards the arctic shores.  Three also a line of likely thunderstorms in my opinion, associated with a front moving across the Lena.  Hopefully we get some clearing afterward, and are able to see the discharge.
Click to run.
Title: Re: The Rammb Slider Thread
Post by: blumenkraft on June 15, 2020, 01:18:02 PM
Lots of rain all over the place. Click to play.
Title: Re: The Rammb Slider Thread
Post by: JayW on June 23, 2020, 11:37:57 AM
I sent an email to the RAMMB webmaster about imagery not updating the last 2-3 days, hopefully there's a response, or things start updating again.

I did find a neat blog post about the new RGB bands which gives some information about them.  The importance of band M8, which we figured out last season is discussed.

http://rammb.cira.colostate.edu/projects/npp/blog/
Title: Re: The Rammb Slider Thread
Post by: blumenkraft on June 24, 2020, 08:40:34 AM
Thanks, Jay! :)

It's working again!
Title: Re: The Rammb Slider Thread
Post by: blumenkraft on June 24, 2020, 09:23:16 AM
Holy smokes...  :-\

Click to play.
Title: Re: The Rammb Slider Thread
Post by: JayW on June 25, 2020, 05:29:17 AM
Thanks, Jay! :)

It's working again!
Correlation may not be causation.   :)  but maybe my reminder helped, I didn't get a response, so who knows.

A look at the current around Utqiagvik.
Title: Re: The Rammb Slider Thread
Post by: JayW on June 25, 2020, 12:36:16 PM
24 hour loop.  The big storm dropped little snow, some just to the North American side of the pole, and the Beaufort might have received a dusting.  Mostly rain however in my humble opinion.  One can see the cyclonic curvature of the rain bands in the latest AMSR2 microwave shot. 2nd attachment

Title: Re: The Rammb Slider Thread
Post by: JayW on June 29, 2020, 03:20:25 AM
Interesting little swirl in the northern Chukchi.  Roughly 76°N,167.5°W, edit: I'm sorry, it's 74°N, 167.5°W
https://rammb-slider.cira.colostate.edu/?sat=jpss&z=5&im=18&ts=1&st=0&et=0&speed=130&motion=loop&map=1&lat=1&opacity%5B0%5D=1&hidden%5B0%5D=0&pause=0&slider=-1&hide_controls=1&mouse_draw=0&follow_feature=0&follow_hide=0&s=rammb-slider&sec=northern_hemisphere&p%5B0%5D=band_i02&x=14793.4580078125&y=20019.638671875
Need a click
Title: Re: The Rammb Slider Thread
Post by: blumenkraft on June 29, 2020, 06:03:17 PM
Breathtaking! This low cloud creeping over Lincoln like an alien life form. Click to be amazed.

Ah, and as far as the Snow/Ice band is concerned, this is all bloody water down there.
Title: Re: The Rammb Slider Thread
Post by: uniquorn on June 30, 2020, 11:57:02 PM
jay, bl, If you have time, I'm struggling to get a good quality rammb of the eddies around the yermak plateau.
Title: Re: The Rammb Slider Thread
Post by: JayW on July 01, 2020, 01:38:59 AM
jay, bl, If you have time, I'm struggling to get a good quality rammb of the eddies around the yermak plateau.

Today was the only day it was really clear enough, I'll make another tomorrow if it is clear again. I used band I2. Let me know if you want anything adjusted.
Title: Re: The Rammb Slider Thread
Post by: blumenkraft on July 01, 2020, 10:57:24 AM
RAMMB-SLIDER not updating. This is the last snapshot.

It looks like a software problem that caused something to crashed to me.

IIRC it was the same last time it stopped updating but not 100% sure about that. Let's observe this. It could be useful information for the RAMMB developers.

Edit: The I bands are going until 22:11:10 UTC. Geo-Color goes until 17:06:46 UTC. hmmmm
Title: Re: The Rammb Slider Thread
Post by: uniquorn on July 01, 2020, 11:33:16 AM
thanks. Yes please for tomorrow if it's not cloudy. 5deg in shot is good for alignment.
Title: Re: The Rammb Slider Thread
Post by: JayW on July 03, 2020, 01:40:50 PM
Still not updating and my emails haven't been responded to.   Frustrating that it seems like like care is paid to the polar orbiting satellites.  Perhaps some other members could email the webmaster. Preferably someone with an email from a university orvthe like, as that might elicit a response.   
Thanks
Title: Re: The Rammb Slider Thread
Post by: blumenkraft on July 04, 2020, 04:31:20 PM
Day&Night band (nothing else) updating again but has issues.
Title: Re: The Rammb Slider Thread
Post by: blumenkraft on July 06, 2020, 11:32:03 AM
Ok, looks like everything is updating again. Nice!
Title: Re: The Rammb Slider Thread
Post by: JayW on July 10, 2020, 01:16:56 AM
Hopefully we get some reliable imagery, been frustrating.
M'Clure Strait/Parry channel, click to run.

Title: Re: The Rammb Slider Thread
Post by: JayW on July 10, 2020, 12:24:57 PM
Fjords and sounds south of Nansen sound appear to be breaking up.
Most recent image.
Title: Re: The Rammb Slider Thread
Post by: JayW on July 11, 2020, 03:26:28 AM
More CAA, lots of areas starting to break up. Tides doing some work.
Click it
Title: Re: The Rammb Slider Thread
Post by: oren on July 11, 2020, 06:00:42 PM
Amazing animation!
Title: Re: The Rammb Slider Thread
Post by: HapHazard on July 11, 2020, 06:50:44 PM
Amazing animation!

Agreed! Thanks, Jay.
Title: Re: The Rammb Slider Thread
Post by: JayW on July 13, 2020, 12:11:15 AM
Whole site is down, bummer, guess it's not manned on weekends.  My guess it comes back on around 5z tomorrow.
Title: Re: The Rammb Slider Thread
Post by: blumenkraft on July 13, 2020, 10:42:53 AM
For Uniquorn: Bottomfast sea ice.
Title: Re: The Rammb Slider Thread
Post by: JayW on July 14, 2020, 12:19:01 PM
Well, I give up.  I sent the last email I will to the RAMMB webmaster.  Is been two weeks of either none, or basically unusable imagery.  I'll make one last plea to anyone in the academic community to please reach out, and see if there's any plan to continue offering polar satellite imagery.  It's experimental, so there was never a guarantee that it would be maintained.  Shitty day night imagery is of little value to me.
Title: Re: The Rammb Slider Thread
Post by: blumenkraft on July 14, 2020, 12:24:20 PM
I tried that too.

It would be awful losing this tool.

 :'(
Title: Re: The Rammb Slider Thread
Post by: JayW on July 14, 2020, 09:01:34 PM
I tried that too.

It would be awful losing this tool.

 :'(

Good and bad news.  The bad is, there still issues, but it's being worked on.  But some is updating.
   
The response.
Quote
Regarding the JPSS imagery, we have multiple issues that have been causing the sporadic data lately. There seems to be a new bottleneck somewhere upstream from CIRA that we haven't yet been able to getto the bottom of, which is leading to us not getting all the imagery we normally do. Then, this past weekend, there was a power outage in one of our server rooms that took everything down. While the power outage issues have been resolved, one of my colleagues is hard at work trying to get the upstream data feed working as well as it had been before.
Title: Re: The Rammb Slider Thread
Post by: blumenkraft on July 14, 2020, 09:40:45 PM
Well, i for one take that for an answer and am very glad! Thanks, Jay for letting us know.
Title: Re: The Rammb Slider Thread
Post by: JayW on July 15, 2020, 04:58:15 AM
Belcher channel/penny Strait area.  I boosted contrast to help see the rifting in the lower left.
Click
Title: Re: The Rammb Slider Thread
Post by: JayW on July 18, 2020, 08:14:17 AM
50 hour loop day night band (only one updating currently...) Laptev nibbling.

Title: Re: The Rammb Slider Thread
Post by: JayW on July 20, 2020, 09:33:30 AM
Northern ESS/Chukchi. 84 hours. Needs click
Title: Re: The Rammb Slider Thread
Post by: JayW on July 22, 2020, 01:38:07 AM
Beaufort doing what the Beaufort does, pulverizes.
Title: Re: The Rammb Slider Thread
Post by: blumenkraft on July 25, 2020, 06:55:21 PM
Just another GIF of the Nares tides. I know, i've posted them a lot already, but i can't help but being fascinated by them.

A tiny bit of export happened!

Stills not skipped, BIG FILE, click to play.
Title: Re: The Rammb Slider Thread
Post by: JayW on July 27, 2020, 05:57:33 AM
A little snow still seen north of the storm, but a lot of dark red elsewhere. 
Click
Title: Re: The Rammb Slider Thread
Post by: blumenkraft on July 29, 2020, 10:08:48 AM
Some tidal action in the north of Svalbard. Click.
Title: Re: The Rammb Slider Thread
Post by: JayW on July 31, 2020, 02:00:52 AM
Center of the Beaufort storm really cleared out today.
Click it.
Title: Re: The Rammb Slider Thread
Post by: JayW on August 01, 2020, 07:48:50 PM
Fun little low level mesolow cruise by the north pole.  Use the follow feature, feature.
https://rammb-slider.cira.colostate.edu/?sat=jpss&z=5&im=28&ts=1&st=0&et=0&speed=130&motion=rev&map=1&lat=0&opacity%5B0%5D=1&hidden%5B0%5D=0&pause=20200801134224&slider=-1&hide_controls=1&mouse_draw=0&follow_feature=1&follow_x%5B0%5D=16224.2861328125&follow_x%5B27%5D=15436.286149978638&follow_y%5B0%5D=15456.83984375&follow_y%5B27%5D=16690.83984565735&follow_hide=0&s=rammb-slider&sec=northern_hemisphere&p%5B0%5D=band_i02&x=15458.169921875&y=16505.7861328125
Click it.
Title: Re: The Rammb Slider Thread
Post by: JayW on October 21, 2020, 07:41:47 AM
Longwave IR shows neat clouds streaming off the open leads north of the CAA.
Large gif click to run
Title: Re: The Rammb Slider Thread
Post by: uniquorn on October 21, 2020, 11:23:10 AM
Nice. Makes me wonder if heat loss would have been visible like that in previous years with a drier atmosphere.
Title: Re: The Rammb Slider Thread
Post by: uniquorn on November 29, 2020, 11:47:43 AM
tidal movement in the nares Band I4  https://col.st/x9U76