Arctic Sea Ice : Forum

Off-topic => The rest => Topic started by: Anne on July 11, 2013, 01:54:56 PM

Title: Wildlife
Post by: Anne on July 11, 2013, 01:54:56 PM
The US government has decided for the second time not grant protection to Arctic ribbon seals (http://www.enewspf.com/latest-news/science/science-a-environmental/44170-obama-administration-denies-protection-to-arctic-seal-threatened-by-global-warming.html).
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These seals depend on sea ice in the Bering and Chukchi seas off Alaska and are mainly threatened by global warming and the consequent loss of its sea-ice habitat, as well as dangerous oil development. The decision comes just two weeks after President Obama’s speech on the importance of addressing the climate crisis.

“President Obama’s stirring words about the impending climate disaster don’t do much for ribbon seals,” said the Center for Biological Diversity’s Alaska director Rebecca Noblin. “Without concrete action to protect these seals and other ice-dependent animals, speeches like that are only sending more hot air into the atmosphere.”

While acknowledging that ribbon seals will be harmed by rapidly melting sea ice, the National Marine Fisheries Service decided the species did not qualify for protection because their ultimate disappearance from large portions of their range would somehow not be significant to the species. This is the second time the Service has declined to protect ribbon seals; today’s decision follows a challenge by the Center after the agency’s first denial in 2008.
Title: Arctic Sea-Ice Loss Has Widespread Effects On Wildlife
Post by: Anne on August 02, 2013, 07:08:20 AM
Penn State University Professor of Biology Eric Post and an international team of scientists looked at the effects of sea ice loss by examining relationships among algae, plankton, whales, and terrestrial animals such as caribou, arctic foxes and walrus; as well as the effects of human exploration of previously inaccessible parts of the region1.
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A domino effect of sea-ice melting on terrestrial animals, Post explained, could happen through a disruption in the food chain. Sea-ice algae and sub-ice plankton, which together account for 57 percent of the total annual biological production in the Arctic Ocean, already are being immediately affected by sea-ice melting because ice loss triggers a significant change in the blooming times of these organisms. Likewise, land adjacent to areas of sea-ice loss will experience significant surface warming inland from the coastline, affecting soil conditions and plant growth. Post and his colleagues hypothesize that, while invertebrate ocean-dwelling animals -- such as zooplankton that feed on algae and phytoplankton in the seas -- already are being affected, larger terrestrial animals such as caribou could find their land-dwelling food sources disrupted, as well, due to temperature changes affecting plant communities inland.
"A change in population mixing could be another, indirect effect of sea-ice melting," Post said. He explained that populations of wolves and arctic foxes that currently are isolated only during the summer could become even more isolated. A longer period of the year without ice, which promotes travel between populations, could lead to a decline in crossbreeding.
However, for other species, the effect of sea-ice loss could be just the opposite: "We know that, for some species, sea ice acts as a barrier to intermixing," Post explained. "So for these species, ice loss and a lengthening of the ice-free season likely will increase population mixing, reducing genetic differentiation." Post explained that, for example, polar and grizzly bears already have been observed to have hybridized because polar bears now are spending more time on land, where they have contact with grizzlies.
From Science Daily (http://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2013/08/130801142317.htm). The paper in Science, linked below, is behind a paywall.

1E. Post, U. S. Bhatt, C. M. Bitz, J. F. Brodie, T. L. Fulton, M. Hebblewhite, J. Kerby, S. J. Kutz, I. Stirling, D. A. Walker. Ecological Consequences of Sea-Ice Decline. Science, 2013 (http://www.sciencemag.org/content/341/6145/519.full); 341 (6145): 519 DOI: 10.1126/science.1235225
Title: Re: Wildlife
Post by: JimD on August 02, 2013, 08:02:50 PM
Huge declines in wildlife populations in the UK.

Headlines For the first time ever, the UK’s wildlife organisations have joined forces to undertake a health check of nature in the UK and its Overseas Territories. The key findings are presented here, and the full report is online: www.rspb.org.uk/stateofnature (http://www.rspb.org.uk/stateofnature)
    60% of the 3,148 UK species we assessed have declined over the last 50 years and 31% have declined strongly.
    Half of the species assessed have shown strong changes in their numbers or range, indicating that recent environmental changes are having a dramatic impact  on nature in the UK. Species with specific habitat requirements seem to be faring worse than generalist species.
    A new Watchlist Indicator, developed  to measure how conservation priority species are faring, shows that their overall numbers have declined by 77%  in the last 40 years, with little sign  of recovery.
    Of more than 6,000 species that have been assessed using modern Red List criteria, more than one in 10 are thought to be under threat of extinction in the UK.
    Our assessment looks back over 50 years at most, yet there were large declines in the UK’s wildlife prior to this, linked to habitat loss.
    The UK’s Overseas Territories hold a wealth of wildlife of huge international importance and over 90 of these species are at high risk of global extinction.
    There is a lack of knowledge on the  trends of most of the UK’s species.  As a result, we can report quantitative trends for only 5% of the 59,000 or so terrestrial and freshwater species in  the UK, and for very few of the 8,500  marine species. Much needs to be done  to improve our knowledge.
    What we do know about the state of  the UK’s nature is often based upon  the efforts of thousands of dedicated volunteer enthusiasts who contribute their time and expertise to monitoring schemes and species recording.
    The threats to the UK’s wildlife are  many and varied, the most severe  acting either to destroy valuable habitat  or degrade the quality and value of  what remains.
    Climate change is having an increasing impact on nature in the UK. Rising average temperatures are known to be driving range expansion in some species, but evidence for harmful impacts is  also mounting. 
The full report is online:  www.rspb.org.uk/stateofnature (http://www.rspb.org.uk/stateofnature)



http://www.rspb.org.uk/ourwork/science/stateofnature/index.aspx (http://www.rspb.org.uk/ourwork/science/stateofnature/index.aspx)
Title: Re: Wildlife
Post by: JimD on September 03, 2013, 07:29:00 PM
Minnesota's moose population has plummeted 52% since 2010.  Scientists indicate that warming conditions may be worsening disease and competition from other species.

http://www.nbcnews.com/video/nightly-news/52908322/#52908322 (http://www.nbcnews.com/video/nightly-news/52908322/#52908322)
Title: Re: Wildlife
Post by: Andreas T on October 07, 2013, 01:48:25 AM
http://alaskafisheries.noaa.gov/newsreleases/2013/walrushaulout093013.htm (http://alaskafisheries.noaa.gov/newsreleases/2013/walrushaulout093013.htm)
seems  somebody forgot to tell these walrus that sea ice is recovering.
Title: Re: Wildlife
Post by: JimD on December 20, 2013, 04:16:31 PM
I'm not getting in there.  It's cold!

http://biglizards.net/Graphics/ForegroundPix/PolarBearClingingToIceberg.jpg (http://biglizards.net/Graphics/ForegroundPix/PolarBearClingingToIceberg.jpg)
Title: Re: Wildlife
Post by: Laurent on December 24, 2013, 07:04:10 PM
Absolutely incredible birds...ouahou

Birds-of-Paradise Project (http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=REP4S0uqEOc#ws)
Title: Re: Wildlife
Post by: Laurent on December 26, 2013, 10:11:00 PM
The wild birds even far from any human is impacted... plastics are everywhere !
Plastics that we through away but it may happened we have a problem with our waching machines...yes most of my clothes are synthetic...a bit of them is wached away each time they are washed...that + that + that... you obtaine a soup of microparticules floating in the oceans...
http://epanews.fr/video/video/show?id=2485226%3AVideo%3A1194110&xgs=1&xg_source=msg_share_video#.UryZA6GsReQ (http://epanews.fr/video/video/show?id=2485226%3AVideo%3A1194110&xgs=1&xg_source=msg_share_video#.UryZA6GsReQ)
Title: Re: Wildlife
Post by: Laurent on December 29, 2013, 06:52:42 PM
Shifting mirrors: adaptive changes in retinal reflections to winter darkness in Arctic reindeer
http://rspb.royalsocietypublishing.org/content/280/1773/20132451.abstract?sid=7c627b92-02d5-4f66-b7fe-802ef5bf2b3b#aff-2 (http://rspb.royalsocietypublishing.org/content/280/1773/20132451.abstract?sid=7c627b92-02d5-4f66-b7fe-802ef5bf2b3b#aff-2)
Title: Re: Wildlife
Post by: JimD on January 02, 2014, 05:56:06 PM
I hope no public money went into this or it will end up on the news.  :o 

Ahhhh..the life of a scientist.

Quote
Abstract (provisional)

Introduction

Several mammalian species spontaneously align their body axis with respect to the Earth's magnetic field (MF) lines in diverse behavioral contexts. Magnetic alignment is a suitable paradigm to scan for the occurrence of magnetosensitivity across animal taxa with the heuristic potential to contribute to the understanding of the mechanism of magnetoreception and identify further functions of magnetosensation apart from navigation. With this in mind we searched for signs of magnetic alignment in dogs. We measured the direction of the body axis in 70 dogs of 37 breeds during defecation (1,893 observations) and urination (5,582 observations) over a two-year period. After complete sampling, we sorted the data according to the geomagnetic conditions prevailing during the respective sampling periods. Relative declination and intensity changes of the MF during the respective dog walks were calculated from daily magnetograms. Directional preferences of dogs under different MF conditions were analyzed and tested by means of circular statistics.

Results

Dogs preferred to excrete with the body being aligned along the North-south axis under calm MF conditions. This directional behavior was abolished under Unstable MF. The best predictor of the behavioral switch was the rate of change in declination, i.e., polar orientation of the MF.
...

http://www.frontiersinzoology.com/content/10/1/80/abstract (http://www.frontiersinzoology.com/content/10/1/80/abstract)
Title: Re: Wildlife
Post by: TerryM on January 02, 2014, 07:08:45 PM
JimD
If this extends to the rest of mammalian species I can see Litter Box Alignment as the latest pet service being offered & the rearrangement of commodes could be the biggest thing since Sheng Feng.


Terry
Title: Re: Wildlife
Post by: Laurent on January 17, 2014, 09:26:03 AM
Underwater timelapse shows secret life of a coral reef
http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/science-environment-25762906 (http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/science-environment-25762906)
Title: Re: Wildlife
Post by: Laurent on January 17, 2014, 09:42:18 AM
11 Jellyfish Facts That Are Just As Mesmerizing As The Creatures Themselves (PHOTOS)
http://www.huffingtonpost.com/2014/01/15/jellyfish-facts_n_4606737.html?utm_hp_ref=green&ir=Green (http://www.huffingtonpost.com/2014/01/15/jellyfish-facts_n_4606737.html?utm_hp_ref=green&ir=Green)
Title: Re: Wildlife
Post by: Laurent on January 18, 2014, 11:31:11 AM
Don't want to be a crow !
Amazing footage of how falcons catch their prey. (http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=BQ5oaNdJKx8#ws)
Title: Re: Wildlife
Post by: Laurent on January 18, 2014, 11:43:05 AM
For those interested by nature !
http://www.bbc.com/future/columns/power-of-nature (http://www.bbc.com/future/columns/power-of-nature)
Title: Re: Wildlife
Post by: Anne on March 08, 2014, 12:37:15 PM
Bear Tracker (http://www.polarbearsinternational.org/about-polar-bears/tracking/bear-tracker), from Polar Bears International, doesn't seem to have been posted before.
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Using this tool, you can watch polar bears as they pad across the sea ice, which they use as a platform for hunting seals. Our Bear Tracker shows current and past sea ice levels on Hudson Bay, along with the rough locations of polar bears.
Title: Re: Wildlife
Post by: JimD on March 08, 2014, 03:28:22 PM
Anne

Thanks, that is cool.  I was all excited about adopting one of the bears as the site said you can do that ... until I got to the point that it cost $7,000 a year.  It will be interesting to watch them during the melt.
Title: Re: Wildlife
Post by: JimD on March 10, 2014, 04:40:02 PM
Awesome video of dolphins and whales

http://www.ritholtz.com/blog/2014/03/dolphin-stampede-and-whales-off-dana-point-and-maui-drone-video/ (http://www.ritholtz.com/blog/2014/03/dolphin-stampede-and-whales-off-dana-point-and-maui-drone-video/)
Title: Re: Wildlife
Post by: JimD on March 13, 2014, 08:00:38 PM
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A rampaging elephant smashed a house to bits in an Indian village, but turned back and rescued a baby trapped in the rubble, a couple have claimed...

Jhalda ranger Samir Bose told ToI the animal has damaged at least 17 houses in Mathadi, Kasidih and Ghoshra village areas.

Sounds like the elephant is trying to send the message to stop building your houses in my yard.  But you know they are going to kill it eventually.

http://www.independent.co.uk/news/weird-news/rampaging-elephant-smashes-up-house-but-then-saves-crying-baby-trapped-under-debris-9186030.html (http://www.independent.co.uk/news/weird-news/rampaging-elephant-smashes-up-house-but-then-saves-crying-baby-trapped-under-debris-9186030.html)
Title: Re: Wildlife
Post by: Laurent on March 18, 2014, 10:34:39 AM
Narwhal’s tusk is super sensitive
http://www.bbc.co.uk/nature/26534619 (http://www.bbc.co.uk/nature/26534619)
Title: Re: Wildlife
Post by: Anne on March 27, 2014, 03:22:12 PM
The Guardian's obituary for the Great Barrier Reef (http://www.theguardian.com/environment/ng-interactive/2014/mar/great-barrier-reef-obituary).
Title: Re: Wildlife
Post by: Laurent on April 09, 2014, 01:19:03 PM
Salamander’s Hefty Role in the Forest
http://www.nytimes.com/2014/04/08/science/salamanders-hefty-role-in-the-forest.html?partner=rss&emc=rss&_r=0 (http://www.nytimes.com/2014/04/08/science/salamanders-hefty-role-in-the-forest.html?partner=rss&emc=rss&_r=0)
Title: Re: Wildlife
Post by: JimD on April 09, 2014, 05:30:27 PM
He was just doing his part to solve AGW.

Officials capture one-ton crocodile that ate 4 people

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A 2,204 pound crocodile suspected of eating four people and injuring several others has been captured by wildlife officials in Uganda.

http://nypost.com/2014/04/06/officials-capture-one-ton-crocodile-that-ate-4-men/ (http://nypost.com/2014/04/06/officials-capture-one-ton-crocodile-that-ate-4-men/)
Title: Re: Wildlife
Post by: JimD on April 11, 2014, 04:06:32 PM
9 blue whales die after getting trapped off Newfoundland's coast

Trapped in the ice

http://www.ctvnews.ca/canada/9-blue-whales-die-after-getting-trapped-off-newfoundland-s-coast-1.1769042#ixzz2yaQi2TlO (http://www.ctvnews.ca/canada/9-blue-whales-die-after-getting-trapped-off-newfoundland-s-coast-1.1769042#ixzz2yaQi2TlO)
Title: Re: Wildlife
Post by: Laurent on April 28, 2014, 10:28:01 PM
Amazing experience. Not so vicious these leopard's seals..
http://siz.io/s/wild-animals/v/face-off-with-a-deadly-predator?srctum (http://siz.io/s/wild-animals/v/face-off-with-a-deadly-predator?srctum)
Title: Re: Wildlife
Post by: JimD on May 19, 2014, 04:52:12 PM
Ok, no crying now.

https://twitter.com/planetepics/status/468136497854828545/photo/1
Title: Re: Wildlife
Post by: Laurent on May 21, 2014, 02:37:46 PM
Purple jellyfish with multiple mouths could be new species
http://www.theguardian.com/environment/2014/may/21/purple-jellyfish-with-multiple-mouths-could-be-new-species (http://www.theguardian.com/environment/2014/may/21/purple-jellyfish-with-multiple-mouths-could-be-new-species)
Title: Re: Wildlife
Post by: Laurent on May 29, 2014, 10:41:05 PM
We are killing species at 1000 times the natural rate
http://www.newscientist.com/article/dn25645-we-are-killing-species-at-1000-times-the-natural-rate.html?cmpid=RSS (http://www.newscientist.com/article/dn25645-we-are-killing-species-at-1000-times-the-natural-rate.html?cmpid=RSS)|NSNS|2012-GLOBAL|environment#.U4eaboZJzlc

What is important for an ecosystem is also the variability inside the species...
Title: Re: Wildlife
Post by: Laurent on June 07, 2014, 10:10:05 AM
Polar bear POV: videocam shows female hunting and finding a mate
http://www.theguardian.com/environment/2014/jun/07/polar-bear-videocam-females-hunting (http://www.theguardian.com/environment/2014/jun/07/polar-bear-videocam-females-hunting)
Title: Re: Wildlife
Post by: Anne on June 07, 2014, 11:10:15 AM
Anchorage Daily News has a nice article on Project ITEX, gathering data on Arctic plants, working out which will survive a warming climate and the surprising effect on albedo of mosses. More besides...

Quote
Imaging the future of Arctic plant life
An overview of ITEX results shows that shrubs and graminoids (grasses) grow well in warmed plots, while lichens and bryophytes (mosses and liverworts) decline. Shrubs, especially deciduous species, thrive at the expense of other species, which lowers diversity. These findings mesh with the observed increase of shrubs in locations elsewhere in the southern Arctic. Along with the increase in shrubs, one can expect to see higher vegetation canopy height (taller plants in general).

”Mosses and lichens tend to disappear so the overall diversity inside these things tends to get lower with warming, so: fewer species. And there’s some changes in species composition.” “The loss of the bryophytes and lichens and increases in shrub height is the dominant effect that we’ve seen.” “The graminoids respond better. Meaning they grow better and flower earlier. One of the things that has happened at some of our sites, the wet sites where we have just a few graminoid species (like carrix – graminoid means grass-like), carrix or grasses have filled up the chambers so much that all of this dead or organic matter leaves things in the Arctic. It’s cold and wet here; things don’t break down very fast. This is why the Arctic has all this stored carbon, all the standing dead gets trapped in there. And so they actually have less light.” ~Steve Oberbauer
Quote
Mysterious moss

Oberbauer is excited about the very fine-scale measurements allowed by the instruments aboard his ITEX AON tram. “Already we have found out something very interesting that we hadn’t expected.” His team learned that their expectations about albedo (surface reflectiveness) were sometimes reversed. Normally, the high albedo of snow or sea ice bounces the Sun’s light back into space. The low albedo of dark-colored vegetated lands in contrast absorbs light, heating up the earth. Yet lowly moss can throw a wrench into the works.

“You would think something with a high albedo should be cooler and something with a low albedo should be warmer because it is absorbing more of that solar energy. But what we find at the small scale is, some places that relationship is reversed. That actually at higher albedo’s we saw higher temperatures and at low albedo’s we saw lower temperatures, which seems completely reversed.”
“Underneath the overstory of these plants, there’s a layer of mosses that is almost completely covering many areas.” “And what we think it is, is that it is areas that are dominated by moss – and moss when it is wet is not as reflective as when it is dry. When moss is wet it is evaporating a lot of water, and water as it evaporates cools (the whole principal of evaporative cooling with air conditioners that work by that process). So we found something not intuitive, completely unexpected and something that you wouldn’t pick up at the scale of a satellite.” ~Steve Oberbauer
Read more here: http://www.adn.com/2014/06/04/3501527/imaging-the-future-of-arctic-plant.html#storylink=cpy (http://www.adn.com/2014/06/04/3501527/imaging-the-future-of-arctic-plant.html#storylink=cpy)
Title: Re: Wildlife
Post by: Laurent on June 17, 2014, 01:04:53 AM
Species Migrating Upslope Due to Climate Change in Tropical Montane Cloud Forests of Peru May Meet a Grass Ceiling
http://www.huffingtonpost.com/keith-peterman/species-migrating-upslope_b_5494509.html?utm_hp_ref=green&ir=Green (http://www.huffingtonpost.com/keith-peterman/species-migrating-upslope_b_5494509.html?utm_hp_ref=green&ir=Green)
Title: Re: Wildlife
Post by: Laurent on June 17, 2014, 02:28:02 PM
Japan kills 30 minke whales in first hunt since UN court order
http://www.theguardian.com/environment/2014/jun/17/japan-kills-minke-whale-hunt-un-court-order-antarctic (http://www.theguardian.com/environment/2014/jun/17/japan-kills-minke-whale-hunt-un-court-order-antarctic)
Title: Re: Wildlife
Post by: Laurent on June 18, 2014, 05:36:03 PM
Fish Just May Be A Lot Smarter Than We Thought
http://www.huffingtonpost.com/2014/06/18/fish-intelligence-study_n_5503895.html?utm_hp_ref=green&ir=Green (http://www.huffingtonpost.com/2014/06/18/fish-intelligence-study_n_5503895.html?utm_hp_ref=green&ir=Green)
Title: Re: Wildlife
Post by: Laurent on June 24, 2014, 12:29:28 PM
Your pictures: Celebrating National Insect Week
http://www.bbc.co.uk/nature/27980820 (http://www.bbc.co.uk/nature/27980820)
Title: Re: Wildlife
Post by: Laurent on June 24, 2014, 12:33:42 PM
Stunning New Video View of Swimming Polar Bears
http://dotearth.blogs.nytimes.com/2014/06/23/stunning-new-video-view-of-swimming-polar-bears/?partner=rss&emc=rss (http://dotearth.blogs.nytimes.com/2014/06/23/stunning-new-video-view-of-swimming-polar-bears/?partner=rss&emc=rss)
Title: Re: Wildlife
Post by: Laurent on June 25, 2014, 12:17:19 PM
War Games Killing Whales
http://www.huffingtonpost.com/brenda-peterson/war-games-kill-whales_b_5524085.html?utm_hp_ref=green&ir=Green (http://www.huffingtonpost.com/brenda-peterson/war-games-kill-whales_b_5524085.html?utm_hp_ref=green&ir=Green)
Title: Re: Wildlife
Post by: Laurent on June 27, 2014, 11:00:15 PM
Some nice pictures...
http://www.theguardian.com/environment/gallery/2014/jun/27/the-week-in-wildlife-in-pictures (http://www.theguardian.com/environment/gallery/2014/jun/27/the-week-in-wildlife-in-pictures)
Title: Re: Wildlife
Post by: Laurent on July 02, 2014, 06:45:48 PM
Interesting this relationship between dogs and bears...
Polar bears and dogs playing (http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=JE-Nyt4Bmi8#ws)
Title: Re: Wildlife
Post by: Laurent on July 18, 2014, 02:50:12 PM
Future bird deaths: It's not the heat, it's the precipitation
http://news.sciencemag.org/biology/2014/07/future-bird-deaths-its-not-heat-its-precipitation (http://news.sciencemag.org/biology/2014/07/future-bird-deaths-its-not-heat-its-precipitation)
Title: Re: Wildlife
Post by: Anne on July 20, 2014, 03:29:44 PM
Polar bears adapt to life on the land. They are spending three weeks longer on land than they did in the 1980s and are discovering new sources of food.

Link (http://www.climatecentral.org/news/as-arctic-ice-melts-polar-bears-find-a-new-menu-17787)
Title: Re: Wildlife
Post by: Laurent on August 13, 2014, 10:08:58 PM
You'll Never Appreciate Honey Until You See Honeybees In Super Slow Motion
http://www.huffingtonpost.com/2014/08/13/honeybee-high-speed-michael-sutton_n_5675309.html?utm_hp_ref=green&ir=Green (http://www.huffingtonpost.com/2014/08/13/honeybee-high-speed-michael-sutton_n_5675309.html?utm_hp_ref=green&ir=Green)
Title: Re: Wildlife
Post by: Laurent on August 22, 2014, 10:37:28 AM
Orangutan experts plead for Australian food manufacturers to reject palm oil
http://www.theguardian.com/environment/2014/aug/22/orangutan-experts-plead-for-australian-food-manufacturers-to-reject-palm-oil (http://www.theguardian.com/environment/2014/aug/22/orangutan-experts-plead-for-australian-food-manufacturers-to-reject-palm-oil)
Title: Re: Wildlife
Post by: Laurent on August 22, 2014, 01:58:17 PM
Coral and fish can 'smell' bad reefs
http://www.bbc.com/news/science-environment-28880216 (http://www.bbc.com/news/science-environment-28880216)
Title: Re: Wildlife
Post by: Laurent on August 22, 2014, 08:35:12 PM
http://www.theecologist.org/blogs_and_comments/commentators/2526670/the_cetacean_brain_and_hominid_perceptions_of_cetacean_intelligence.html (http://www.theecologist.org/blogs_and_comments/commentators/2526670/the_cetacean_brain_and_hominid_perceptions_of_cetacean_intelligence.html)
The cetacean brain and hominid perceptions of cetacean intelligence
Title: Re: Wildlife
Post by: Laurent on August 23, 2014, 07:37:30 PM
This Is Not An Optical Illusion; It's A Huge Cloud Of Jelly Creatures
http://www.huffingtonpost.com/2014/08/23/by-the-wind-sailors-washington_n_5698611.html?utm_hp_ref=green&ir=Green (http://www.huffingtonpost.com/2014/08/23/by-the-wind-sailors-washington_n_5698611.html?utm_hp_ref=green&ir=Green)
Title: Re: Wildlife
Post by: Laurent on August 25, 2014, 05:53:02 PM
The Passenger Pigeon's Everlasting Mark: America's Most Infamous Extinction
http://www.huffingtonpost.com/jamie-rappaport-clark/the-passenger-pigeons-eve_b_5708409.html?utm_hp_ref=green&ir=Green (http://www.huffingtonpost.com/jamie-rappaport-clark/the-passenger-pigeons-eve_b_5708409.html?utm_hp_ref=green&ir=Green)
Title: Re: Wildlife
Post by: Laurent on August 29, 2014, 10:41:19 PM
Insect molting is 'like having your lungs ripped out'
http://news.sciencemag.org/climate/2014/08/insect-molting-having-your-lungs-ripped-out (http://news.sciencemag.org/climate/2014/08/insect-molting-having-your-lungs-ripped-out)

Quote
Now, a study of mayfly larvae has revealed another difficulty: While molting, insects can’t breathe. Alarmingly, the respiratory impairment grows more severe with higher temperatures, suggesting that climate change and other stressors could make molting an even greater challenge.
Title: Re: Wildlife
Post by: Laurent on August 29, 2014, 11:25:05 PM
Video: Swarm of locusts invades Madagascar
http://www.usatoday.com/story/news/world/2014/08/29/locusts-invade-madagascar/14803339/ (http://www.usatoday.com/story/news/world/2014/08/29/locusts-invade-madagascar/14803339/)
Title: Re: Wildlife
Post by: Laurent on September 03, 2014, 08:44:21 PM
Maine lobster and Cape cod under threat from rapidly warming seas
http://www.theguardian.com/environment/2014/sep/03/maine-lobster-and-cape-cod-under-threat-from-rapidly-warming-seas (http://www.theguardian.com/environment/2014/sep/03/maine-lobster-and-cape-cod-under-threat-from-rapidly-warming-seas)
Title: Re: Wildlife
Post by: Laurent on September 08, 2014, 10:16:50 PM
A selfie taken by a Sulawesi Crested Macaque. Deforestation threatens is home, and that of many species still undiscovered there.
http://news.mongabay.com/2014/0826-gfrn-joshi-sulawesi.html (http://news.mongabay.com/2014/0826-gfrn-joshi-sulawesi.html)

(The photographer who own the camera was claiming onwership of the photo but he did lose the trial, the photo belongs to anybody since the owner can't claim...) ;)
Title: Re: Wildlife
Post by: Laurent on September 09, 2014, 08:57:57 AM
Climate Change Will Disrupt Half of North America’s Bird Species, Study Says
http://www.nytimes.com/2014/09/09/us/climate-change-will-disrupt-half-of-north-americas-bird-species-study-says.html?partner=rss&emc=rss (http://www.nytimes.com/2014/09/09/us/climate-change-will-disrupt-half-of-north-americas-bird-species-study-says.html?partner=rss&emc=rss)

North America's key birds facing extinction, study finds
http://www.theguardian.com/environment/2014/sep/09/north-america-birds-extinction-study-climate-change (http://www.theguardian.com/environment/2014/sep/09/north-america-birds-extinction-study-climate-change)

Birds of North America under threat from climate change – in pictures
http://www.theguardian.com/environment/gallery/2014/sep/09/birds-of-north-america-under-threat-from-climate-change-in-pictures (http://www.theguardian.com/environment/gallery/2014/sep/09/birds-of-north-america-under-threat-from-climate-change-in-pictures)
Title: Re: Wildlife
Post by: Laurent on September 09, 2014, 09:40:47 AM
Clues to animal extinctions found on the walls of Egyptian tombs
http://news.sciencemag.org/biology/2014/09/clues-animal-extinctions-found-walls-egyptian-tombs (http://news.sciencemag.org/biology/2014/09/clues-animal-extinctions-found-walls-egyptian-tombs)
Title: Re: Wildlife
Post by: Laurent on September 12, 2014, 08:48:18 AM
Japanese Ocean-Killers Slaughtering Dolphins, Again (WARNING: GRAPHIC PHOTOS)
http://www.huffingtonpost.com/dr-reese-halter/japanese-ocean-killers-sl_b_5799288.html?utm_hp_ref=green&ir=Green (http://www.huffingtonpost.com/dr-reese-halter/japanese-ocean-killers-sl_b_5799288.html?utm_hp_ref=green&ir=Green)

Reminding you to protect our planet.
Title: Re: Wildlife
Post by: Laurent on September 12, 2014, 07:29:49 PM
Giant Manta Ray Tangled In Fishing Line Approaches Divers As If To Ask For Help
https://www.thedodo.com/giant-manta-ray-tangled-in-fis-716792720.html?utm_source=HuffPo (https://www.thedodo.com/giant-manta-ray-tangled-in-fis-716792720.html?utm_source=HuffPo)
Title: Re: Wildlife
Post by: Laurent on September 16, 2014, 07:37:31 PM
Rare colossal squid thawed for examination in New Zealand
http://www.bbc.com/news/science-environment-29222666 (http://www.bbc.com/news/science-environment-29222666)
Title: Re: Wildlife
Post by: Laurent on September 17, 2014, 09:30:40 AM
Tribute to Van Leeuwenhoek, mystery of the invisible.
http://www.nytimes.com/2014/09/16/opinion/animated-life-seeing-the-invisible.html?partner=rss&emc=rss (http://www.nytimes.com/2014/09/16/opinion/animated-life-seeing-the-invisible.html?partner=rss&emc=rss)
Title: Re: Wildlife
Post by: Laurent on September 17, 2014, 07:25:16 PM
As Global Temperatures Rise, Beloved Bird Species Are Leaving for More Suitable Locales
http://www.huffingtonpost.com/david-yarnold/as-global-temperatures-ri_b_5836656.html?utm_hp_ref=green&ir=Green (http://www.huffingtonpost.com/david-yarnold/as-global-temperatures-ri_b_5836656.html?utm_hp_ref=green&ir=Green)
Title: Re: Wildlife
Post by: Laurent on September 29, 2014, 10:32:35 AM
Swimming Through Garbage
http://www.nytimes.com/2014/09/29/opinion/swimming-through-garbage.html?partner=rss&emc=rss (http://www.nytimes.com/2014/09/29/opinion/swimming-through-garbage.html?partner=rss&emc=rss)
Title: Re: Wildlife
Post by: Laurent on September 29, 2014, 06:16:00 PM
Global Warming Might Push Back Fall Foliage Transformations
http://www.weather.com/news/science/environment/global-warming-fall-leaves-20140922 (http://www.weather.com/news/science/environment/global-warming-fall-leaves-20140922)
Title: Re: Wildlife
Post by: Laurent on October 01, 2014, 09:52:19 AM
Walrus mass in vast numbers on Alaska beach as sea ice retreats
http://www.theguardian.com/world/2014/oct/01/walrus-mass-vast-numbers-alaska-beach-sea-ice-retreats (http://www.theguardian.com/world/2014/oct/01/walrus-mass-vast-numbers-alaska-beach-sea-ice-retreats)
Title: Re: Wildlife
Post by: Laurent on October 02, 2014, 06:40:57 PM
Jane Goodall On SeaWorld, Twitter, And The Power Of Viral Animal Videos
https://www.thedodo.com/jane-goodall-animals-746406144.html?utm_source=HuffPo (https://www.thedodo.com/jane-goodall-animals-746406144.html?utm_source=HuffPo)
Title: Re: Wildlife
Post by: viddaloo on October 05, 2014, 12:42:19 AM
Half of world's animals have disappeared since 1970
 (http://www.telegraph.co.uk/earth/wildlife/11129163/Half-of-worlds-animals-have-disappeared-since-1970.html)

Really should be Top Story of the year, everywhere.
Title: Re: Wildlife
Post by: Laurent on October 05, 2014, 01:32:08 PM
In the Age of Extinction, which species can we least afford to lose?
http://www.theguardian.com/environment/2014/oct/05/threatened-species-cannot-afford-to-lose-age-of-extinction (http://www.theguardian.com/environment/2014/oct/05/threatened-species-cannot-afford-to-lose-age-of-extinction)
Title: Re: Wildlife
Post by: Laurent on October 06, 2014, 10:24:15 AM
UN biodiversity report highlights failure to meet conservation targets
http://www.theguardian.com/environment/2014/oct/06/un-biodiversity-report-failure-meet-conservation-targets (http://www.theguardian.com/environment/2014/oct/06/un-biodiversity-report-failure-meet-conservation-targets)

Reality check in race to curb extinction as only five of 56 targets are seeing progress
http://www.independent.co.uk/environment/nature/reality-check-in-race-to-curb-extinction-as-only-five-of-56-targets-are-seeing-progress-9776121.html (http://www.independent.co.uk/environment/nature/reality-check-in-race-to-curb-extinction-as-only-five-of-56-targets-are-seeing-progress-9776121.html)
Title: Re: Wildlife
Post by: Laurent on October 09, 2014, 09:50:35 AM
Wildlife Killing Contests and the Failure of Government
http://www.huffingtonpost.com/travis-bruner/wildlife-killing-contests_b_5943038.html?utm_hp_ref=green&ir=Green (http://www.huffingtonpost.com/travis-bruner/wildlife-killing-contests_b_5943038.html?utm_hp_ref=green&ir=Green)

World not on course to meet 2020 biodiversity targets
http://www.newscientist.com/article/mg22429904.100-world-not-on-course-to-meet-2020-biodiversity-targets.html?cmpid=RSS (http://www.newscientist.com/article/mg22429904.100-world-not-on-course-to-meet-2020-biodiversity-targets.html?cmpid=RSS)|NSNS|2012-GLOBAL|environment#.VDZAp1FJzlc
Title: Re: Wildlife
Post by: Laurent on October 09, 2014, 04:51:10 PM
Earth Warriors Demand End to Ecocide
http://www.huffingtonpost.com/dr-reese-halter/earth-warriors-demand-end_b_5958534.html?utm_hp_ref=green&ir=Green (http://www.huffingtonpost.com/dr-reese-halter/earth-warriors-demand-end_b_5958534.html?utm_hp_ref=green&ir=Green)
Title: Re: Wildlife
Post by: Laurent on October 13, 2014, 05:27:26 PM
Fantastic journey: why animals are driven to migrate
http://www.theguardian.com/environment/2014/oct/13/the-worlds-mass-autumn-animal-migration (http://www.theguardian.com/environment/2014/oct/13/the-worlds-mass-autumn-animal-migration)
Title: Re: Wildlife
Post by: Laurent on October 13, 2014, 05:39:43 PM
Nature doesn't need us...
https://www.youtube.com/watch?feature=player_embedded&v=rM6txLtoaoc (https://www.youtube.com/watch?feature=player_embedded&v=rM6txLtoaoc)
http://natureisspeaking.org/ (http://natureisspeaking.org/)
Title: Re: Wildlife
Post by: Laurent on October 16, 2014, 11:25:46 AM
(Comment)
Quote
Species decline is very evident in birds and amphibians but we have no way of tracking decline in insects, as there's no RSPI (as far as I know). My own hunch -- based on summer car windscreen kill -- is that this decline is even more precipitous. If this is true, then it would clearly also impact insect-eating birds too - many of the species which show the steepest decline in numbers.

Britain's migrating birds are drastically declining, RSPB says
http://www.theguardian.com/environment/2014/oct/16/britains-migrating-birds-are-declining-in-number (http://www.theguardian.com/environment/2014/oct/16/britains-migrating-birds-are-declining-in-number)
Title: Re: Wildlife
Post by: Laurent on October 17, 2014, 07:05:38 PM
UK is breaking EU's conservation laws on porpoises
http://www.theguardian.com/environment/2014/oct/17/uk-is-breaking-eus-conservation-laws-on-porpoise (http://www.theguardian.com/environment/2014/oct/17/uk-is-breaking-eus-conservation-laws-on-porpoise)

Quote
In a flurry of other infringement case announcements, the UK was given two months to reduce nitrogen oxide emissions from the Aberthaw power plant in Wales, while Portugal was given a court referral for inadequate waste water treatment, with a request for a €4.5m (£3.5m) lump sum fine and daily €20,000 penalty until the country complies with EU laws.
Title: Re: Wildlife
Post by: Laurent on October 19, 2014, 11:36:27 PM
How Wolves Change Rivers
https://www.youtube.com/watch?feature=player_embedded&v=ysa5OBhXz-Q (https://www.youtube.com/watch?feature=player_embedded&v=ysa5OBhXz-Q)

2013 TED talk with George Monbiot
https://www.youtube.com/watch?feature=player_embedded&v=8rZzHkpyPkc (https://www.youtube.com/watch?feature=player_embedded&v=8rZzHkpyPkc)

He is speaking of lions, hyena, etc...in London what...10.000 years ago, ouahou. I saw a documentary in Mongolia showing an hypopotamus carved on a stone, I didn't believe but now, it may be true...That does mean that the earth is much much more sensible to carbon and temperature than expected....
Title: Re: Wildlife
Post by: Laurent on October 20, 2014, 06:45:46 PM
Only Six Northern White Rhinos Left In The World After Death At Wildlife Sanctuary
http://www.huffingtonpost.com/2014/10/20/suni-white-rhino_n_6014426.html?utm_hp_ref=green&ir=Green (http://www.huffingtonpost.com/2014/10/20/suni-white-rhino_n_6014426.html?utm_hp_ref=green&ir=Green)
Title: Re: Wildlife
Post by: Laurent on October 23, 2014, 10:31:18 PM
San Francisco declares: every whale and dolphin has the right to be free
http://www.theecologist.org/campaigning/2606308/san_francisco_declares_every_whale_and_dolphin_has_the_right_to_be_free.html (http://www.theecologist.org/campaigning/2606308/san_francisco_declares_every_whale_and_dolphin_has_the_right_to_be_free.html)
Title: Re: Wildlife
Post by: viddaloo on November 11, 2014, 01:51:42 AM
Looking through an old hard drive from my days at the UN, I found this neat illustration of life on and under the ice:
Title: Re: Wildlife
Post by: Laurent on November 14, 2014, 10:03:35 PM
Why are polar bears losing their hair?
http://news.sciencemag.org/plants-animals/2014/11/why-are-polar-bears-losing-their-hair (http://news.sciencemag.org/plants-animals/2014/11/why-are-polar-bears-losing-their-hair)
Title: Re: Wildlife
Post by: icefest on November 14, 2014, 10:58:59 PM
Will that make them polar bares?
Title: Re: Wildlife
Post by: Laurent on November 18, 2014, 10:38:09 AM
Wildlife crime wanted list released
http://www.bbc.com/news/science-environment-30088961 (http://www.bbc.com/news/science-environment-30088961)
Title: Re: Wildlife
Post by: Laurent on November 18, 2014, 02:55:14 PM
Study Shows Polar Bears Disappearing in Region
http://www.nytimes.com/2014/11/18/us/study-shows-polar-bears-disappearing-in-region.html?partner=rss&emc=rss (http://www.nytimes.com/2014/11/18/us/study-shows-polar-bears-disappearing-in-region.html?partner=rss&emc=rss)
Title: Re: Wildlife
Post by: Laurent on November 19, 2014, 10:02:02 AM
Years of marine research sunk – because seals ate the evidence
http://www.independent.co.uk/environment/years-of-marine-research-sunk--because-seals-ate-the-evidence-9868995.html (http://www.independent.co.uk/environment/years-of-marine-research-sunk--because-seals-ate-the-evidence-9868995.html)
Title: Re: Wildlife
Post by: viddaloo on November 20, 2014, 03:18:27 PM
Wildlife suffers as Svalbard melts (http://www.newsinenglish.no/2014/11/20/wildlife-suffers-as-svalbard-melts/)

Norway’s Arctic archipelago of Svalbard has experienced the sharpest rise in average temperatures in all of Europe, according to a new climate study set to be published on Thursday. Now Svalbard’s once-frozen and remote islands can expect more rain even during the middle of winter, and more troubling consequences for its wildlife.
Title: Re: Wildlife
Post by: oceanhub on November 24, 2014, 06:14:12 AM
A new innovation to save sea animals from ghost nets.

http://innovations.oceanhub.com/new-tracker-app-comes-to-marine-animals-rescue/ (http://innovations.oceanhub.com/new-tracker-app-comes-to-marine-animals-rescue/)
Title: Re: Wildlife
Post by: solartim27 on November 26, 2014, 07:00:14 PM
Great show on how Killer Whales are expanding their range to the Arctic.  Very bad for Narwhales and Polar Bears.

http://www.pbs.org/wnet/nature/ (http://www.pbs.org/wnet/nature/)
Title: Re: Wildlife
Post by: Laurent on November 27, 2014, 09:56:40 AM
No more cetacean extinctions! It's our last chance to save the vaquita
http://www.theecologist.org/campaigning/2652351/no_more_cetacean_extinctions_its_our_last_chance_to_save_the_vaquita.html (http://www.theecologist.org/campaigning/2652351/no_more_cetacean_extinctions_its_our_last_chance_to_save_the_vaquita.html)
Title: Re: Wildlife
Post by: Laurent on November 29, 2014, 12:48:52 PM
Museum specimens reveal loss of pollen host plants as key factor driving wild bee decline in The Netherlands
http://www.pnas.org/content/early/2014/11/19/1412973111.abstract?sid=ec0dc06d-bea3-4560-bf42-f0dfa92d34fc (http://www.pnas.org/content/early/2014/11/19/1412973111.abstract?sid=ec0dc06d-bea3-4560-bf42-f0dfa92d34fc)
Title: Re: Wildlife
Post by: Laurent on December 06, 2014, 10:26:24 AM
A dram of Edradour
http://www.theguardian.com/environment/2014/dec/06/counctry-diary-dram-edradour (http://www.theguardian.com/environment/2014/dec/06/counctry-diary-dram-edradour)
Title: Re: Wildlife
Post by: Laurent on December 15, 2014, 10:23:11 AM
Northern white rhino's death leaves just five left in the world
http://www.theguardian.com/environment/2014/dec/15/northern-white-rhinos-death-leaves-just-five-left-in-the-world (http://www.theguardian.com/environment/2014/dec/15/northern-white-rhinos-death-leaves-just-five-left-in-the-world)

Earth Faces Sixth 'Great Extinction' With 41 Percent Of Amphibians Set To Go The Way Of The Dodo
http://www.huffingtonpost.com/2014/12/14/earth-faces-sixth-great-e_n_6322920.html?utm_hp_ref=green&ir=Green (http://www.huffingtonpost.com/2014/12/14/earth-faces-sixth-great-e_n_6322920.html?utm_hp_ref=green&ir=Green)
Title: Re: Wildlife
Post by: Laurent on December 17, 2014, 09:40:30 AM
Arctic ground squirrels unlock permafrost carbon
http://www.bbc.com/news/science-environment-30456869 (http://www.bbc.com/news/science-environment-30456869)

These stupid squirrels...pfff
Title: Re: Wildlife
Post by: Laurent on December 19, 2014, 10:44:34 AM
Birds 'heard tornadoes coming' and fled the day before
http://www.bbc.com/news/science-environment-30531060 (http://www.bbc.com/news/science-environment-30531060)
Title: Re: Wildlife
Post by: Laurent on January 04, 2015, 02:52:32 PM
Pacific Coast Sea Bird Die-Off Puzzles Scientists
http://www.huffingtonpost.com/2015/01/03/pacific-coast-sea-bird-dead_n_6411188.html?utm_hp_ref=green&ir=Green (http://www.huffingtonpost.com/2015/01/03/pacific-coast-sea-bird-dead_n_6411188.html?utm_hp_ref=green&ir=Green)
Title: Re: Wildlife
Post by: Laurent on January 10, 2015, 10:56:07 AM
Unusual number of UK flowers bloom
http://www.bbc.com/news/science-environment-30754443 (http://www.bbc.com/news/science-environment-30754443)

Quote
They say according to textbooks there should be between 20 and 30 species in flower. This year there were 368 in bloom.
Title: Re: Wildlife
Post by: Laurent on January 12, 2015, 05:43:26 PM
The First Secure Platform for Wildlife Crime Whistleblowers
https://wildleaks.org/ (https://wildleaks.org/)

Same for fishes :
http://globalfishingwatch.org/ (http://globalfishingwatch.org/)
Title: Re: Wildlife
Post by: Laurent on January 14, 2015, 09:56:51 AM
A Wild Answer to Climate Change
http://www.huffingtonpost.com/vance-g-martin/a-wild-answer-to-climate-_b_6459012.html?utm_hp_ref=green&ir=Green (http://www.huffingtonpost.com/vance-g-martin/a-wild-answer-to-climate-_b_6459012.html?utm_hp_ref=green&ir=Green)

Quote
The message is simple: wilderness is necessary -- the more the better
Title: Re: Wildlife
Post by: Laurent on January 14, 2015, 09:14:23 PM
Poisoning Tibet's rabbit relatives may be a bad move
http://www.newscientist.com/article/dn26797-poisoning-tibets-rabbit-relatives-may-be-a-bad-move.html?cmpid=RSS (http://www.newscientist.com/article/dn26797-poisoning-tibets-rabbit-relatives-may-be-a-bad-move.html?cmpid=RSS)|NSNS|2012-GLOBAL|environment#.VLbNhvl3_tQ
Title: Re: Wildlife
Post by: Laurent on January 15, 2015, 05:22:45 PM
Zebra Stripes May Be More For Cooling Than Camouflage
http://www.huffingtonpost.com/2015/01/15/zebra-stripes-cool-climates_n_6470654.html?utm_hp_ref=green&ir=Green (http://www.huffingtonpost.com/2015/01/15/zebra-stripes-cool-climates_n_6470654.html?utm_hp_ref=green&ir=Green)
Title: Re: Wildlife
Post by: Sigmetnow on January 15, 2015, 09:44:30 PM
Arctic waters could hold secret to creating life-saving drugs.
Quote
"In the past, bacteria and fungi have been the main sources for new antibiotics," Jaspars explained. "In fact, about 70% of our antibiotics still come from nature, normally from sediment samples and soil samples from land. But now, by looking at the ocean, we hope to find new life forms which give us new chemistry that might be able to treat bacterial infections."
http://us.cnn.com/2015/01/15/health/antibiotic-arctic-bacteria-pharmasea/index.html (http://us.cnn.com/2015/01/15/health/antibiotic-arctic-bacteria-pharmasea/index.html)
Title: Re: Wildlife
Post by: Laurent on January 20, 2015, 10:19:11 AM
Climate Change Messing with Mother Nature’s Timetable
http://www.climatecentral.org/news/climate-change-nature-schedule-18525 (http://www.climatecentral.org/news/climate-change-nature-schedule-18525)
Title: Re: Wildlife
Post by: Laurent on January 21, 2015, 06:48:48 PM
Should we try to halt extinction?
http://www.bbc.com/news/science-environment-30916690 (http://www.bbc.com/news/science-environment-30916690)
Title: Re: Wildlife
Post by: wili on January 21, 2015, 07:28:02 PM
The article, of course, gets it exactly upside-down.

We are massively and furiously driving most of the rest of complex life over the brink of extinction at a rate conservatively 1000 times the background extinction rate.

Try to halt an extinction?

That puts us in some kind of 'reluctant hero' position as the savior who maybe just couldn't manage to save this one species.

But really we are the ones hording life off of the planet for good.
Title: Re: Wildlife
Post by: Laurent on January 22, 2015, 10:14:16 PM
Super-Rare 'Living Fossil' Shark Caught Off Australian Coast
http://www.huffingtonpost.com/2015/01/22/living-fossil-shark-australia_n_6524232.html?utm_hp_ref=green&ir=Green (http://www.huffingtonpost.com/2015/01/22/living-fossil-shark-australia_n_6524232.html?utm_hp_ref=green&ir=Green)
Title: Re: Wildlife
Post by: solartim27 on January 26, 2015, 03:26:47 AM
Auk birds adapting to the loss of glaciers.  I first saw this re-posted on the Earth Sky website.
http://glacierhub.org/2015/01/22/little-auk-upends-arctic-climate-change-models/ (http://glacierhub.org/2015/01/22/little-auk-upends-arctic-climate-change-models/)
Title: Re: Wildlife
Post by: solartim27 on January 26, 2015, 07:36:27 PM
Cross post from Policy and Solutions
The ANWR is a big issue for the 2016 election in the US.

http://www.nytimes.com/2015/01/26/us/politics/obama-to-seek-to-protect-millions-of-acres-of-arctic-habitat.html?_r=0 (http://www.nytimes.com/2015/01/26/us/politics/obama-to-seek-to-protect-millions-of-acres-of-arctic-habitat.html?_r=0)
Title: Re: Wildlife
Post by: solartim27 on January 26, 2015, 08:03:45 PM
Great story on Snowy Owls moving south again this year:
http://hereandnow.wbur.org/2015/01/26/snowy-owl-migration (http://hereandnow.wbur.org/2015/01/26/snowy-owl-migration)
Title: Re: Wildlife
Post by: Laurent on January 27, 2015, 04:55:58 PM
This fish lived in peace for 70 million years. Then it met the Army Corps of Engineers
http://www.washingtonpost.com/news/energy-environment/wp/2015/01/26/after-70-million-years-a-prehistoric-fish-is-vanishing-in-montana-heres-why/ (http://www.washingtonpost.com/news/energy-environment/wp/2015/01/26/after-70-million-years-a-prehistoric-fish-is-vanishing-in-montana-heres-why/)
Title: Re: Wildlife
Post by: Laurent on January 27, 2015, 04:58:27 PM
Polar bear penis bone may be weakened by pollution
http://www.newscientist.com/article/dn26855-polar-bear-penis-bone-may-be-weakened-by-pollution.html?cmpid=RSS (http://www.newscientist.com/article/dn26855-polar-bear-penis-bone-may-be-weakened-by-pollution.html?cmpid=RSS)|NSNS|2012-GLOBAL|environment#.VMetc8XHKLU
Title: Re: Wildlife
Post by: Laurent on January 27, 2015, 11:26:29 PM
Beetle vs. Bird: Expert Panel Weighs in on Biocontrol of Invasive Tamarisk Trees
http://www.huffingtonpost.com/anna-sher-simon/beetle-vs-bird-expert-pan_b_6535708.html?utm_hp_ref=green&ir=Green (http://www.huffingtonpost.com/anna-sher-simon/beetle-vs-bird-expert-pan_b_6535708.html?utm_hp_ref=green&ir=Green)

Quote
To this point, one problem we all agreed on was that increasing human demand for water has both facilitated tamarisk invasion and threatens birds. Declining surface and groundwater in the arid Southwestern U.S. has made many regions inhospitable to any tree species other than tamarisk.
Title: Re: Wildlife
Post by: Laurent on January 30, 2015, 03:29:51 PM
California: Ominous explosion of sea slugs 'could signal forthcoming mass extinction'
http://www.ibtimes.co.uk/california-ominous-explosion-sea-slugs-could-signal-forthcoming-mass-extinction-1485925 (http://www.ibtimes.co.uk/california-ominous-explosion-sea-slugs-could-signal-forthcoming-mass-extinction-1485925)
Title: Re: Wildlife
Post by: Laurent on February 12, 2015, 11:23:08 PM
Sperm whales target fishing boats for an easy meal
http://www.bbc.com/earth/story/20150204-sperm-whales-target-fishing-boats-for-an-easy-meal (http://www.bbc.com/earth/story/20150204-sperm-whales-target-fishing-boats-for-an-easy-meal)
Title: Re: Wildlife
Post by: Laurent on February 13, 2015, 10:13:44 AM
Sea lions desperate for nourishment dying off in alarming numbers on California coast
http://www.mercurynews.com/science/ci_27517032/sea-lions-desperate-nourishment-dying-off-alarming-numbers (http://www.mercurynews.com/science/ci_27517032/sea-lions-desperate-nourishment-dying-off-alarming-numbers)
Title: Re: Wildlife
Post by: Sigmetnow on March 13, 2015, 06:59:01 PM
Another article on the California sea lions.  The number of rescues is up to 1,450.
Quote
This year is the third in five years that scientists have seen such large numbers of strandings. Researchers say they worry about the long-term consequences of climate change and rising ocean temperatures on a sea lion population that has evolved over thousands of years to breed almost exclusively on the Channel Islands, relying on circulating flows of Pacific upwellings to bring anchovies, sardines and other prey.

“The environment is changing too rapidly,” said Sharon Melin, a wildlife biologist with the National Marine Fisheries Service who found that pups on the Channel Islands were 44 percent underweight. “Their life history is so much slower that it’s not keeping up.”
http://www.nytimes.com/2015/03/13/us/starving-sea-lions-washing-ashore-by-the-hundreds-in-california.html (http://www.nytimes.com/2015/03/13/us/starving-sea-lions-washing-ashore-by-the-hundreds-in-california.html)
Title: Re: Wildlife
Post by: Laurent on March 16, 2015, 05:42:12 PM
Our humble hedgehog is disappearing fast
http://www.telegraph.co.uk/news/earth/wildlife/11449901/Our-humble-hedgehog-is-disappearing-fast.html (http://www.telegraph.co.uk/news/earth/wildlife/11449901/Our-humble-hedgehog-is-disappearing-fast.html)

So plant trees !
Title: Re: Wildlife
Post by: Laurent on April 04, 2015, 09:15:22 AM
Whales, Dolphins Get a Life-Saving Break From Navy's War Games
http://www.huffingtonpost.com/miyoko-sakashita/whales-dolphins-get-a-life-saving-break_b_6995028.html?utm_hp_ref=green&ir=Green (http://www.huffingtonpost.com/miyoko-sakashita/whales-dolphins-get-a-life-saving-break_b_6995028.html?utm_hp_ref=green&ir=Green)
Title: Re: Wildlife
Post by: Anne on April 05, 2015, 07:41:37 AM
Mild weather is making bears awake early from hibernation, according to The Siberian Times (http://siberiantimes.com/ecology/others/news/n0173-mild-weather-is-making-bears-awake-early-from-hibernation/) on 2 April.
Quote
<snip>Unusually warm weather is prompting bears to awake from hibernation early with warnings that they could attack people as they forage for food. A number of sightings of the animals has been made in parts of Siberia and the Far East in recent days, much earlier than normal.
Title: Re: Wildlife
Post by: Laurent on April 11, 2015, 10:45:58 AM
Clam Cancer Spreads Along Eastern Seaboard
http://www.npr.org/blogs/health/2015/04/10/398817089/clam-cancer-spreads-along-eastern-seaboard (http://www.npr.org/blogs/health/2015/04/10/398817089/clam-cancer-spreads-along-eastern-seaboard)
Title: Re: Wildlife
Post by: Sigmetnow on April 14, 2015, 09:10:51 PM
The bad news for Rio de Janeiro ahead of the 2016 Olympics keeps coming after scores of dead fish appeared in the Rodrigo de Freitas lagoon.
http://www.cnn.com/2015/04/14/sport/rio-2016-olympics-dead-fish/index.html (http://www.cnn.com/2015/04/14/sport/rio-2016-olympics-dead-fish/index.html)
Title: Re: Wildlife
Post by: foolhardycougar on April 24, 2015, 04:42:41 PM

U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service abandons plan to give ESA protection to bi-state sage grouse, Agency also ignoring scientific recommendations for reversing the birds for more details visit the article
http://www.thewildlifenews.com/2015/04/21/u-s-fish-and-wildlife-service-abandons-plan-to-give-esa-protection-to-bi-state-sage-grouse/ (http://www.thewildlifenews.com/2015/04/21/u-s-fish-and-wildlife-service-abandons-plan-to-give-esa-protection-to-bi-state-sage-grouse/)
Title: Re: Wildlife
Post by: skanky on May 08, 2015, 01:03:39 PM
A new look at extinction events:

http://arstechnica.co.uk/science/2015/05/biologists-devise-new-way-of-comparing-past-present-extinction-events/ (http://arstechnica.co.uk/science/2015/05/biologists-devise-new-way-of-comparing-past-present-extinction-events/)
Title: Re: Wildlife
Post by: wili on May 08, 2015, 03:56:07 PM
Good catch, skanky. This seems to be the takeaway:

“…there's no naturally occurring equivalent for the loss or endangerment of older species, which we're currently seeing in human-caused extinctions…

humans are affecting the loss of evolutionary history in a distinctive and marked way”
Title: Re: Wildlife
Post by: Laurent on May 15, 2015, 01:43:10 PM
Warm-blooded fish' traps its own heat in the deep
http://www.bbc.com/news/science-environment-32742620 (http://www.bbc.com/news/science-environment-32742620)
Title: Re: Wildlife
Post by: Laurent on May 16, 2015, 06:41:10 PM
Why are so many whales dying on California's shores?
http://www.theguardian.com/environment/2015/may/16/california-whale-deaths-human-role-ocean-changes (http://www.theguardian.com/environment/2015/may/16/california-whale-deaths-human-role-ocean-changes)

Quote
It is a sign of changing ocean conditions, which are resulting in whales and other marine life having their traditional migratory patterns disrupted by the need to find food sources in fresh locations.
Title: Re: Wildlife
Post by: Sigmetnow on June 03, 2015, 09:58:22 PM
Gotta wonder if this is due to abnormally high temperatures....    Short video.

Quote
@CNN: A third of the world's Saiga antelope population has died in recent days. What's behind this? http://t.co/oJcgAmh4Er (http://t.co/oJcgAmh4Er) (Some images graphic)
Title: Re: Wildlife
Post by: Sigmetnow on June 12, 2015, 01:40:35 PM
Polar bears are now eating dolphins thanks to climate change
http://grist.org/science/polar-bears-are-now-eating-dolphins-thanks-to-climate-change/ (http://grist.org/science/polar-bears-are-now-eating-dolphins-thanks-to-climate-change/)
Title: Re: Wildlife
Post by: Sigmetnow on June 14, 2015, 12:27:53 PM
Lions, Tigers on the Loose in Tbilisi, Georgia, After Flooding Destroys Zoo Enclosures
http://www.nbcnews.com/news/world/lions-tigers-loose-tbilisi-georgia-after-flooding-destroys-zoo-enclosures-n375066 (http://www.nbcnews.com/news/world/lions-tigers-loose-tbilisi-georgia-after-flooding-destroys-zoo-enclosures-n375066)
Title: Re: Wildlife
Post by: Sigmetnow on June 17, 2015, 02:48:24 AM
Why these bright, tiny crabs are blanketing Southern California beaches
http://www.washingtonpost.com/news/speaking-of-science/wp/2015/06/16/why-these-bright-tiny-crabs-are-blanketing-southern-california-beaches/ (http://www.washingtonpost.com/news/speaking-of-science/wp/2015/06/16/why-these-bright-tiny-crabs-are-blanketing-southern-california-beaches/)
Title: Re: Wildlife
Post by: Sigmetnow on July 06, 2015, 01:57:23 AM
'The situation is desperate' for monarch butterflies, but here's the plan to save them
http://www.pri.org/stories/2015-05-21/situation-desperate-monarch-butterflies-heres-plan-save-them (http://www.pri.org/stories/2015-05-21/situation-desperate-monarch-butterflies-heres-plan-save-them)
Title: Re: Wildlife
Post by: Laurent on July 10, 2015, 03:38:22 PM
Bees 'at risk from climate change'
http://www.bbc.com/news/science-environment-33473963 (http://www.bbc.com/news/science-environment-33473963)

Sea bass stocks on brink of collapsing, warn conservationists
http://www.theguardian.com/environment/2015/jul/10/sea-bass-stocks-on-brink-of-collapsing-warn-conservationists (http://www.theguardian.com/environment/2015/jul/10/sea-bass-stocks-on-brink-of-collapsing-warn-conservationists)
Title: Re: Wildlife
Post by: Sigmetnow on July 19, 2015, 08:05:00 PM
Thirsty birds are dying all over California — thanks, climate change.
http://grist.org/news/thirsty-birds-are-dying-all-over-california-thanks-climate-change/ (http://grist.org/news/thirsty-birds-are-dying-all-over-california-thanks-climate-change/)
Title: Re: Wildlife
Post by: ivica on August 03, 2015, 03:40:37 PM
I see no mention of Captain Paul Watson (http://www.facebook.com/captpaulwatson/photos/a.478707120931.287883.155430570931/10150932453375932/?type=1&source=11) on ASIF, so here we start:
https://www.facebook.com/captpaulwatson/posts/10153392887605932:0 (https://www.facebook.com/captpaulwatson/posts/10153392887605932:0)

Ask yourself: Are You Smarter Than A Cetacean? (http://all-that-is-interesting.com/cetacean-intelligence)

They talk in 'pictures' (http://www.theecologist.org/blogs_and_comments/commentators/2526670/the_cetacean_brain_and_hominid_perceptions_of_cetacean_intelligence.html) 8)

How long cetaceans on this planet, 10 m years ? :P and no damage done to life on this planet ?  :o . (https://youtu.be/rf_dQk9iaSY)
Title: Re: Wildlife
Post by: Sigmetnow on August 20, 2015, 09:22:52 PM
Quote
NOAA is declaring the recent deaths of 30 large whales in the western Gulf of Alaska an "unusual mortality event," triggering a focused, expert investigation into the cause. An unusual mortality event is a stranding event that is unexpected, involves a significant die-off of a marine mammal population, and demands immediate response.

Since May 2015, 11 fin whales, 14 humpback whales, one gray whale, and four unidentified cetaceans have stranded around the islands of the western Gulf of Alaska and the southern shoreline of the Alaska Peninsula. To date, this brings the large whale strandings for this region to almost three times the historical average.

http://alaskafisheries.noaa.gov/newsreleases/2015/whales-ume082015.htm (http://alaskafisheries.noaa.gov/newsreleases/2015/whales-ume082015.htm)
Title: Re: Wildlife
Post by: ivica on August 22, 2015, 12:50:11 AM
"Scottish town cuts twinned link to Faroe Islands over whale killings" (http://www.theguardian.com/environment/2015/aug/21/scottish-town-cuts-twinned-link-to-faroe-islands-over-whale-killings?CMP=share_btn_fb) at Guardian, today.

Want more information (https://forum.arctic-sea-ice.net/index.php/topic,179.msg61485.html#msg61485)?
Title: Re: Wildlife
Post by: Sigmetnow on August 28, 2015, 09:59:48 PM
Walruses Once Again Taking to Alaskan Beaches En Masse as Sea Ice Dwindles
http://www.slate.com/blogs/the_slatest/2015/08/28/alaska_walrus_haul_out_sea_ice_melts_animals_collect_on_beach_in_possible.html (http://www.slate.com/blogs/the_slatest/2015/08/28/alaska_walrus_haul_out_sea_ice_melts_animals_collect_on_beach_in_possible.html)
Title: Re: Wildlife
Post by: Sigmetnow on August 31, 2015, 03:22:58 AM
Baby Tortoises Found On Galapagos Island For First Time In Over 100 Years
https://www.thedodo.com/galapagos-tortoises-945526940.html (https://www.thedodo.com/galapagos-tortoises-945526940.html)
Title: Re: Wildlife
Post by: Sigmetnow on September 02, 2015, 08:55:58 PM
Polar bears lay siege to researchers in the Arctic Sea
Quote
The bears sleep near the station and have been seen fighting with one another outside the building in recent days, one of the researchers at the station told Viktor Nikiforov, the head of the WWF Polar Bear Patrol project.

The presence of the bears means that the researchers have been unable to make their twice daily trip, several hundred meters from the weather station, to measure water temperatures in the sea.
http://www.cnn.com/2015/09/02/europe/russia-polar-bears/index.html (http://www.cnn.com/2015/09/02/europe/russia-polar-bears/index.html)
Title: Re: Wildlife
Post by: Sigmetnow on September 16, 2015, 06:39:06 PM
World wildlife populations halved in 40 years - report
http://www.bbc.com/news/science-environment-29418983 (http://www.bbc.com/news/science-environment-29418983)
Title: Re: Wildlife
Post by: Sigmetnow on September 16, 2015, 06:49:39 PM
ANCHORAGE, ALASKA
The U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service has declined for now to create artificial floating platforms for Pacific walrus that come ashore in Alaska because they lack summer sea ice.

http://www.bellinghamherald.com/news/state/article35429358.html (http://www.bellinghamherald.com/news/state/article35429358.html)
Title: Re: Wildlife
Post by: Sigmetnow on September 18, 2015, 08:23:24 PM
Why the Arctic's Big Mosquito Problem Is Getting a Lot Worse
http://news.nationalgeographic.com/2015/09/150915-Arctic-mosquito-warming-caribou-Greenland-climate-CO2/# (http://news.nationalgeographic.com/2015/09/150915-Arctic-mosquito-warming-caribou-Greenland-climate-CO2/#)
Title: Re: Wildlife
Post by: skanky on September 25, 2015, 11:43:15 AM
Life in winter: http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/science-environment-34334801 (http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/science-environment-34334801)
Title: Re: Wildlife
Post by: Sigmetnow on October 18, 2015, 12:43:01 AM
Surprise appearance on California beach thought to be due to El Niño.

Incredibly Venomous’ Yellow-Bellied Sea Snake Seen in California for 1st Time in 30 Years
http://ktla.com/2015/10/16/incredibly-venomous-yellow-bellied-sea-snake-seen-in-california-for-1st-time-in-30-years/ (http://ktla.com/2015/10/16/incredibly-venomous-yellow-bellied-sea-snake-seen-in-california-for-1st-time-in-30-years/)
Title: Re: Wildlife
Post by: Laurent on October 27, 2015, 04:37:40 PM
Lions Heading Quickly Towards Extinction
http://www.huffingtonpost.com/entry/lions-africa-extinction_562eaf7ae4b00aa54a4aef64?utm_hp_ref=green&ir=Green&section=green (http://www.huffingtonpost.com/entry/lions-africa-extinction_562eaf7ae4b00aa54a4aef64?utm_hp_ref=green&ir=Green&section=green)
Quote
There is nothing as awe-inspiring as watching the brutal power of a lion capturing its prey. At close range, their throaty roars thump through your body, raising a cold sweat triggered by the fear of what these animals are capable of doing now, and what they once did to our ancestors. They are the most majestic animals left on our planet, and yet we are currently faced with the very real possibility that they will be functionally extinct within our lifetime.
Title: Re: Wildlife
Post by: Sigmetnow on December 02, 2015, 09:03:35 PM
Quote
It’s the TV premiere of the documentary Racing Extinction by Oscar-winning director Louie Psihoyos tonight (December 2) at 9PM ET/PT on Discovery. For the occasion, the channel released a video of the modified Tesla Model S they used in the film.
http://electrek.co/2015/12/02/tesla-model-s-with-mobile-projector-and-electroluminescent-paint-for-racing-extinction-video/ (http://electrek.co/2015/12/02/tesla-model-s-with-mobile-projector-and-electroluminescent-paint-for-racing-extinction-video/)
Title: Re: Wildlife
Post by: ivica on December 02, 2015, 09:41:13 PM
thanks, sig,
but mixing wildlife with a motor made by humans ... is ... aargh (i resisted (https://youtu.be/VkHEUEOiksY)).

(https://forum.arctic-sea-ice.net/proxy.php?request=http%3A%2F%2Fb.vimeocdn.com%2Fps%2F324%2F398%2F3243989_300.jpg&hash=1344c970cb27c425130ee0f167460b17)

For minimal-force approach (http://forum.arctic-sea-ice.net/index.php/topic,179.msg66603.html#msg66603) one should have functional prefrontal cortex what birds surely have:
"Five species that show why ‘bird brain’ is a stupid phrase" (https://www.sciencenews.org/blog/wild-things/five-species-show-why-%E2%80%98bird-brain%E2%80%99-stupid-phrase)
Pigeon (http://journals.plos.org/plosone/article?id=10.1371/journal.pone.0141357), New Caledonian crow (https://www.sciencenews.org/article/different-kind-smart), African gray parrot (http://www.lifewithalexmovie.com/), Bowerbird (http://www.cell.com/current-biology/abstract/S0960-9822%2810%2901036-5), Chick (http://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/10.1111/j.1467-7687.2009.00936.x/abstract).
Nice article albeit with some Ref behind subscription...

My observation on animal/feathery friends: They also have emotions. They return good with good, bad with spite.
Like a human child . (https://youtu.be/3gzqsmx1KGU)     
Title: Re: Wildlife
Post by: Sigmetnow on January 18, 2016, 02:23:55 PM
thanks, sig,
but mixing wildlife with a motor made by humans ... is ... aargh (i resisted (https://youtu.be/VkHEUEOiksY)).

I get it.  But a zero-emissions car, helping lots of humans to see wildlife in a "new light," as it were -- perhaps it's worth the discontinuity.
Title: Re: Wildlife
Post by: Sigmetnow on January 18, 2016, 02:25:32 PM
Thousands Of Starved Dead Birds Wash Up On Alaska’s Coasts, And Climate Change Could Be The Culprit
Quote
Seabird die-offs in Alaska are natural events, but the massive rate of starved dead birds washing ashore this month is as puzzling as it is unprecedented.

Two weeks ago an estimated 8,000 murres were found laying dead by David Irons, a retired seabird biologist from the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service. “I never thought I would see that many dead birds on one beach,” Irons told ThinkProgress.

But it was this week when the story got national attention, as some Alaska researchers have publicly said the number of dead birds found in a beach 60 miles southeast of Anchorage is beyond anything experienced in the last few decades.
http://thinkprogress.org/climate/2016/01/15/3739760/alaska-murre-die-off/ (http://thinkprogress.org/climate/2016/01/15/3739760/alaska-murre-die-off/)
Title: Re: Wildlife
Post by: Sigmetnow on February 13, 2016, 11:49:49 PM
150,000 penguins perish after giant iceberg traps colony
Quote
About 150,000 penguins have died since being stranded by a vast iceberg that became lodged off the coast of Antarctica six years ago, according to the journal Antarctic Science.

Combined with expanding ice, the B09B iceberg, which at 1,120 square miles is almost the size of Rhode Island, has cut off the Adelie penguins' food supply and changed the landscape of their home, according to a February report in the peer-reviewed journal published by Cambridge University Press.

The towering mass of water ice first ran aground into the penguins' habitat of Cape Denison in Commonwealth Bay in 2010. Before that it was floating along the coast for nearly 20 years before colliding into the bay. The iceberg essentially has landlocked the penguins, forcing the animals to trek across a desolate stretch of nearly 40 miles to find food.
http://www.cnn.com/2016/02/13/world/penguins-die-giant-iceberg-irpt/index.html (http://www.cnn.com/2016/02/13/world/penguins-die-giant-iceberg-irpt/index.html)
Title: Re: Wildlife
Post by: Sigmetnow on March 12, 2016, 06:37:28 PM
Warning to visitors, Yellowstone grizzly bears emerge weeks early due to warm weather
Quote
Wildlife biologists were surprised to spot a large grizzly bear lumbering through Yellowstone on Feb. 22; grizzlies typically stay in their winter dens until mid-March and sometimes April. The bears are responding to unusually warm weather in the northern Rockies. At Lake Yellowstone, Wy., at an elevation of 7,795 feet, February temperatures averaged 19.4 degrees, a whopping 4.6 degrees above normal. January temperatures averaged 15.1 degrees, 2.4 degrees above normal.
https://www.washingtonpost.com/news/capital-weather-gang/wp/2016/03/10/warning-to-visitors-yellowstone-bears-emerge-weeks-early-due-to-warm-weather/ (https://www.washingtonpost.com/news/capital-weather-gang/wp/2016/03/10/warning-to-visitors-yellowstone-bears-emerge-weeks-early-due-to-warm-weather/)
Title: Re: Wildlife
Post by: Clare on March 26, 2016, 03:41:11 AM
I watch this live webcam feed of a young albatross chick when I need cheering up- after reading too much of the grim climate news!
It's in NZ but they do have an infrared camera at night. The chick is now old enough to be left alone while the parents are away for a few days getting food. & sometimes other birds from the colony call for a 'visit'
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Gwy2IjA7z-I (https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Gwy2IjA7z-I)
Here's a screen grab from 8 March. Weight last Tuesday was already over 4kg.
(https://forum.arctic-sea-ice.net/proxy.php?request=http%3A%2F%2F&hash=35d7d5d7526c9897dfb55501e320295a)
Title: Re: Wildlife
Post by: Clare on March 26, 2016, 03:50:25 AM
& here's a Dutch site with camera feeds from a number of different birds nests:
http://www.beleefdelente.nl/ (http://www.beleefdelente.nl/)

These 2 x 19 March clips was funny, the owls caught 6 ?mice & stack them up in the corner of the nest box:
http://www.beleefdelente.nl/vogel/steenuil/weblog/111 (http://www.beleefdelente.nl/vogel/steenuil/weblog/111)

Clare
Title: Re: Wildlife
Post by: sesyf on March 29, 2016, 07:08:49 PM
An osprey nest on top of a seamark http://saaristomeri.utu.fi/osprey/ (http://saaristomeri.utu.fi/osprey/) in Finnish archipelago. Live feed and seemingly rather slow static picture. Also other sites in link 'MUITA KAMEROITA' (= other cameras). There used to be english version but I could not see it now...

Title: Re: Wildlife
Post by: Laurent on April 14, 2016, 03:01:37 PM
More moose on the loose in a warmer Alaska
http://www.bbc.com/news/science-environment-36038237 (http://www.bbc.com/news/science-environment-36038237)
Title: Re: Wildlife
Post by: Laurent on April 19, 2016, 06:02:43 PM
Old wild life ;)
Dinosaurs 'in decline' 50 million years before asteroid strike
http://www.bbc.com/news/science-environment-36073592 (http://www.bbc.com/news/science-environment-36073592)

Quote
The dinosaurs were already in decline 50 million years before the asteroid strike that finally wiped them out, a study suggests.

The new assessment adds further fuel to a debate on how dinosaurs were doing when a 10km-wide space rock slammed into Earth 66 million years ago.

A team suggests the creatures were in long-term decline because they could not cope with the ways Earth was changing.

The study appears in PNAS journal.

Researchers analysed the fossil remains of dinosaurs from the point they emerged 231 million years ago up to the point they went extinct.

To begin with, new species evolved at an explosive rate. But things started to slow about 160 million years ago, leading to a decline in the number of species which commences at about 120 million years ago.

    "Dinosaurs were already on their way out around 50 million years before the asteroid hit
    Dr Manabu Sakamoto, University of Reading

Dr Manabu Sakamoto, a palaeontologist from the University of Reading, who led the research, said: "We were not expecting this result."

"Even though they were wiped out ultimately by the impact of the asteroid, they were actually already on their way out around 50 million years before the asteroid hit."
Mixed pattern

Dr Sakamoto's analysis shows that the long-necked giant sauropod dinosaurs were declining the fastest, whereas theropods, the group of dinosaurs that included the iconic Tyrannosaurus rex, were in a more gradual decline.

Co-author Dr Chris Venditti, an evolutionary biologist from the University of Reading, told BBC News:

"The current widespread view is that dinosaurs were reigning strong right up to the impact that hit the Earth - and it's the impact that drove their final extinction," he said.

"And while that's certainly true, what we found was that they were on the decline long before that."

Dr Venditti believes that the dinosaurs' 50 million year decline rendered them even more susceptible to the environmental catastrophe that followed the asteroid impact.

"If they were reigning strong perhaps they would have fared much better than they did," he said.

A study two years ago also indicated that some species were in decline, but only for the last few million years before the asteroid impact. The new research suggests that the problem began tens of millions of years earlier and affected a wider range of species.

So why were the dinosaurs in decline? No one knows but one possibility is an inability to cope with the way the environment was changing.
Evolutionary pressures

Conditions 230 million years ago were perfect for the dinosaurs when they first emerged, warm and lush from pole to equator.

But as the climate cooled and sea levels shifted, the dinosaurs may have been subjected to new evolutionary pressures.

Dinosaurs and mammals evolved at about the same time, but the former dominated the land surface for more than 100 million years.

The asteroid impact is commonly thought to have paved the way for mammals to take over. But the new study suggests that mammalian supremacy might have occurred eventually, without a space impact.

Co-author Prof Mike Benton of Bristol University, told BBC News: "World climates were getting cooler all the time. Dinosaurs rely on quite warm climates and mammals are better adapted to the cold.

"So there might have been a switch over in any case without the asteroid impact."
Title: Re: Wildlife
Post by: solartim27 on May 13, 2016, 08:01:19 PM
I saw video of a pod of orcas creating waves to break up an ice floe to get at a seal on the PBS show Nature.  Starts at 39:50 in the episode.
http://www.pbs.org/wnet/nature/natures-perfect-partners-full-episode/14261/ (http://www.pbs.org/wnet/nature/natures-perfect-partners-full-episode/14261/)
Title: Re: Wildlife
Post by: Sigmetnow on May 27, 2016, 12:36:00 AM
Scientists say unseasonal rains could have caused the mass deaths of Kazakhstan's endangered saiga antelope.
Quote
Nearly half of the world's population of the saiga - a species of antelope older than the mammoth - were wiped out by a freak pathogen last year, in an event scientists are blaming on rapid temperature fluctuations caused by climate change.

More than 200,000 of the saiga, a small antelope native to central Asia, died over the course of two weeks in Kazakhstan's Betpak-Dala region in May, pushing the critically endangered species to the brink of extinction.

In the run-up to this year's breeding season, scientists say that toxins - produced by an otherwise common bacteria that lives harmlessly in the respiratory tract of the saiga - may have been responsible for the sudden deaths.
http://www.aljazeera.com/news/2016/05/kazakhstan-antelopes-saiga-160525181510378.html (http://www.aljazeera.com/news/2016/05/kazakhstan-antelopes-saiga-160525181510378.html)
Title: Re: Wildlife
Post by: Sigmetnow on June 16, 2016, 12:19:36 AM
Revealed: first mammal species wiped out by human-induced climate change
Exclusive: scientists find no trace of the Bramble Cay melomys, a small rodent that was the only mammal endemic to Great Barrier Reef
Quote
Human-caused climate change appears to have driven the Great Barrier Reef’s only endemic mammal species into the history books, with the Bramble Cay melomys, a small rodent that lives on a tiny island in the eastern Torres Strait, being completely wiped-out from its only known location.

It is also the first recorded extinction of a mammal anywhere in the world thought to be primarily due to human-caused climate change.
https://www.theguardian.com/environment/2016/jun/14/first-case-emerges-of-mammal-species-wiped-out-by-human-induced-climate-change (https://www.theguardian.com/environment/2016/jun/14/first-case-emerges-of-mammal-species-wiped-out-by-human-induced-climate-change)
Title: Re: Wildlife
Post by: Clare on July 03, 2016, 02:57:23 AM
 Mouse eradication project on remote Antipodes Islands SE of NZ:
http://milliondollarmouse.org.nz/ (http://milliondollarmouse.org.nz/)

(https://forum.arctic-sea-ice.net/proxy.php?request=http%3A%2F%2F&hash=35d7d5d7526c9897dfb55501e320295a)

A really good video here, sorry I've forgotten how to embed the link!
https://youtu.be/C_P4kzIk390 (https://youtu.be/C_P4kzIk390)
Title: Re: Wildlife
Post by: Sigmetnow on July 27, 2016, 12:56:43 PM
Good news, for a change!

Seahorse population reflects improved health of Chesapeake Bay
http://www.stardem.com/news/environment/article_77db7afc-9943-5993-992d-f27e513b2306.html (http://www.stardem.com/news/environment/article_77db7afc-9943-5993-992d-f27e513b2306.html)
Title: Re: Wildlife
Post by: OrganicSu on August 28, 2016, 03:48:37 PM
Wasps - where have they gone?
Today, for 5 hours we crushed grapes for wine making, outdoors. Not a single wasp (or hornet) came during the whole time. The mulch of skins and pips is still outside and still nothing. Normally it's a ferocious feasting time.
Similarly have seen almost no mosquitoes or horseflies and only a few hornets and bees all summer, but at least I did see some of these.
Title: Re: Wildlife
Post by: budmantis on August 28, 2016, 04:07:52 PM
Wasps - where have they gone?
Today, for 5 hours we crushed grapes for wine making, outdoors. Not a single wasp (or hornet) came during the whole time. The mulch of skins and pips is still outside and still nothing. Normally it's a ferocious feasting time.
Similarly have seen almost no mosquitoes or horseflies and only a few hornets and bees all summer, but at least I did see some of these.

That cant be good OrganicSu. We live in Florida, about half way down the peninsula. We have an abundance of paper wasps here, building nests in the eaves and in our carport, as well as in our shed.
Title: Re: Wildlife
Post by: OrganicSu on September 23, 2016, 04:34:23 PM
Sea cucumbers - where have they gone?
I live near a large, shallow, inland bay (circa 20km long by 10 km wide). Everywhere I used to swim had huge amounts of sea cucumbers. They are not a part of the Greek diet. There was maybe an average of 1 per sq meter. Some places had 3 or 4 per sqm. Potentially one of the most densely populated regions in the world for sea cucumbers.
One person eventually got the paperwork together to export to China. He employed many people to pick them up between December 2015 and March 2016. The bay is emptied of 'almost' all sea cucumbers. I have seen none. I say 'almost' because it is surely impossible they got every single one.

1 part of the food pyramid here was eliminated in 1 winter.

The fisherman have complained hugely of the lack of sardines and octopus in the bay this year but at least they have been at the elimination of those 2 species for much longer.
Title: Re: Wildlife
Post by: Sigmetnow on September 25, 2016, 02:46:27 PM
Caspian Terns follow record warm temperatures in 'shock' migration to north of Alaska
Researchers on north-west coast of Alaska startled to discover Caspian terns 1,000 miles farther north than species had been previously recorded
Quote
Eyebrows would be raised if American crocodiles, found on the southern tip of Florida, decided to relocate to New York’s Fifth Avenue or Moroccan camels suddenly joined the tourist throng outside Buckingham Palace in London. Yet this is the scale of species shift that appears to be under way in Alaska.

In July, researchers in Cape Krusenstern national monument on the north-west coast of Alaska were startled to discover a nest containing Caspian terns on the gravelly beach of a lagoon. The birds were an incredible 1,000 miles further north than the species had been previously recorded.
https://www.theguardian.com/environment/2016/sep/23/terns-migration-alaska (https://www.theguardian.com/environment/2016/sep/23/terns-migration-alaska)
Title: Re: Wildlife
Post by: Sigmetnow on October 27, 2016, 07:26:34 PM
World on track to lose two-thirds of wild animals by 2020, major report warns
Living Planet Index shows vertebrate populations are set to decline by 67% on 1970 levels unless urgent action is taken to reduce humanity’s impact
https://www.theguardian.com/environment/2016/oct/27/world-on-track-to-lose-two-thirds-of-wild-animals-by-2020-major-report-warns (https://www.theguardian.com/environment/2016/oct/27/world-on-track-to-lose-two-thirds-of-wild-animals-by-2020-major-report-warns)
Title: Re: Wildlife
Post by: Clare on November 15, 2016, 10:18:12 PM
These crayfish & paua (the bumps of side of rocks =abalone) have suffered a climate change of a different sort: uplift from Sunday's 7.5 earthquake in NZ caused up to 2m of uplift on the shoreline of Kaikoura:

(https://forum.arctic-sea-ice.net/proxy.php?request=http%3A%2F%2F&hash=35d7d5d7526c9897dfb55501e320295a)
Title: Re: Wildlife
Post by: Sigmetnow on December 07, 2016, 09:39:56 PM
Thousands of snow geese die in Montana after landing on contaminated water
Huge flock of migratory birds landed on acidic waters of an open pit mine where employees attempted to scare them off
https://www.theguardian.com/us-news/2016/dec/07/thousands-of-snow-geese-die-in-montana-after-landing-on-contaminated-water (https://www.theguardian.com/us-news/2016/dec/07/thousands-of-snow-geese-die-in-montana-after-landing-on-contaminated-water)
Title: Re: Wildlife
Post by: Sigmetnow on February 04, 2017, 06:39:56 PM
"Piles of dead turtle hatchlings are lining Queensland's famous Mon Repos beach amid a heatwave which has pushed the sand's temperature to a record 75 degrees Celsius."

Turtle hatchlings dying in extreme heat at Mon Repos
Quote
...
The rangers, scientists and volunteers at Mon Repos have been working around the clock to save as many clutches of hatchlings as they can from the heat.

Deceased turtles in the dunes lead them to the nests where some hatchlings may still be alive beneath the surface and they work quickly to dig them up, separating the dead from the living.

They are also relocating any new nests to hatchery areas underneath shade cloths, with sand surface temperatures under the shades up to 30 degrees cooler. ...
http://www.abc.net.au/news/2017-02-04/mon-repos-turtles-hurting-in-heatwave-qld/8230036 (http://www.abc.net.au/news/2017-02-04/mon-repos-turtles-hurting-in-heatwave-qld/8230036)
Title: Re: Wildlife
Post by: Sigmetnow on February 10, 2017, 07:34:30 PM
'It's the worst whale stranding we have ever seen'

Rescuers Fight to Save Hundreds of Pilot Whales Beached in New Zealand
Quote
Hundreds of volunteers formed a human chain in the shallows of a remote beach in New Zealand as they tried desperately to save hundreds of pilot whales that have beached themselves there.
...
Volunteer rescue group Project Jonah said 416 whales were stranded, and 75 percent of them had died by the time they were discovered. The Department of Conservation put the number of dead whales at 250 to 300. ...
http://www.nbcnews.com/news/world/rescuers-fight-save-hundreds-pilot-whales-beached-new-zealand-n719206 (http://www.nbcnews.com/news/world/rescuers-fight-save-hundreds-pilot-whales-beached-new-zealand-n719206)
Title: Re: Wildlife
Post by: sidd on May 26, 2017, 09:40:28 PM
This made me feel very bad: poachers are using scientific research to find, capture or kill endangered species

https://phys.org/news/2017-05-scientists-accidentally-poachers-rare-species.html

paper at doi:10.1126/science.aan1362

"Poaching has been documented in species within months of their taxonomic description in journals (4). For example, more than 20 newly described reptile species have been targeted in this way, potentially leading to extinction in the wild."

Must we humans eat all the world ?

sidd
Title: Re: Wildlife
Post by: ivica on October 16, 2017, 10:53:25 PM
Sea Shepherd Celebrating 40th Anniversary with Paul Watson, Pamela Anderson and more... (https://youtu.be/5CvS_A29xCU)
(in English from 1:25:00)
Title: Re: Wildlife
Post by: sidd on November 23, 2017, 12:31:17 AM
This is obscene: Bluefin tuna catch limits raised:

http://www.france24.com/en/20171121-expansion-tuna-quotas-step-backward-conservation

We are eating the world. I eat no tuna now for many years.

sidd
Title: Re: Wildlife
Post by: gerontocrat on January 26, 2018, 06:10:30 PM
Going, going, gone. Posting this to avoid a rant about how any species that gets in the way of human demand, the species loses.

http://www.sciencemag.org/news/2017/11/north-atlantic-right-whale-faces-extinction

The North Atlantic right whale faces extinction
By Elizabeth PennisiNov. 7, 2017 , 5:40 PM


Quote
HALIFAX, CANADA—In a sad reversal of fortune, the North Atlantic right whale is in deep trouble again after rebounding in recent decades from centuries of hunting. Recent population trends are so dire that experts predict the whale could vanish within 20 years, making it the first great whale to go extinct in modern times.

At a meeting of the Society for Marine Mammalogy here last month, whale experts reported that roughly 100 reproductively mature females remain, but they are not living long enough or reproducing quickly enough for the species to survive. Ship strikes have long been a threat, and fatal entanglements in commercial fishing gear are taking an increasing toll. And researchers have found that even when an entangled female doesn’t die, dragging ropes, buoys, or traps can exhaust her, making her less likely to reproduce.

“It’s going to take a bold effort on the part of everyone involved” to save the species, says Ann Pabst, a functional morphologist at the University of North Carolina in Wilmington. “We have to redouble our efforts.”
Title: Re: Wildlife
Post by: ivica on March 03, 2018, 02:27:07 PM
https://www.mnn.com/earth-matters/animals/photos/11-of-the-smallest-mammals-in-the-world/itty-bitty-fur-balls

(https://media.mnn.com/assets/images/2016/09/Baby-marmoset-monkey--human-finger.jpg.1000x0_q80_crop-smart.jpg)

"A baby marmoset monkey rests on a human hand. (Photo: bluedog studio/Shutterstock)"

< embracing nonviolence means minimizing trail of destruction left behind you >

Title: Re: Wildlife
Post by: gerontocrat on March 14, 2018, 05:13:43 PM
https://www.theguardian.com/environment/2018/mar/14/worlds-great-forests-could-lose-half-of-all-wildlife-as-planet-warms-report

World’s great forests could lose half of all wildlife as planet warms – report
From the Amazon to Africa, WWF report predicts catastrophic losses of as much as 60% of plants and 50% of animals by the end of the century


Quote
The world’s greatest forests could lose more than half of their plant species by the end of the century unless nations ramp up efforts to tackle climate change, according to a new report on the impacts of global warming on biodiversity hotspots.

Mammals, amphibians, reptiles and birds are also likely to disappear on a catastrophic scale in the Amazon and other naturally rich ecosysterms in Africa, Asia, North America and Australia if temperatures rise by more than 1.5C, concludes the study by WWF, the University of East Anglia and the James Cook University.

The research in the journal Climate Change examined the impact of three different levels of warming – 2C (the upper target in the 2015 Paris agreement), 3.2C (the likely rise given existing national commitments) and 4.5C (the forecast outcome if emissions trends remain unchanged) on nearly 80,000 plant and animal species in 35 of the world’s most biodiverse regions.
Title: Re: Wildlife
Post by: Sigmetnow on March 20, 2018, 02:36:11 PM
Sudan, World's Last Male Northern White Rhino, Dies
Quote
Sudan, the world's last male northern white rhinoceros, died in Kenya Monday, leaving his species one step closer to complete extinction, even as a group of scientists undertake an unprecedented effort to try to keep this animal from vanishing entirely. ...
https://www.npr.org/sections/parallels/2018/03/20/591075801/sudan-worlds-last-male-northern-white-rhino-dies
Title: Re: Wildlife
Post by: gerontocrat on March 23, 2018, 07:15:56 PM
If climate change don't get you, destroying the biosphere will.

https://www.theguardian.com/environment/2018/mar/23/destruction-of-nature-as-dangerous-as-climate-change-scientists-warn

Destruction of nature as dangerous as climate change, scientists warn
Unsustainable exploitation of the natural world threatens food and water security of billions of people, major UN-backed biodiversity study reveals


Quote
Human destruction of nature is rapidly eroding the world’s capacity to provide food, water and security to billions of people, according to the most comprehensive biodiversity study in more than a decade.

Such is the rate of decline that the risks posed by biodiversity loss should be considered on the same scale as those of climate change, noted the authors of the UN-backed report, which was released in Medellin, Colombia on Friday.

Among the standout findings are that exploitable fisheries in the world’s most populous region – the Asia-Pacific – are on course to decline to zero by 2048; that freshwater availability in the Americas has halved since the 1950s and that 42% of land species in Europe have declined in the past decade....................

....“The time for action was yesterday or the day before,” said Robert Watson, the chair of the Intergovernmental Science-Policy Platform on Biodiversity and Ecosystem Services (IPBES) which compiled the research. “Governments recognise we have a problem. Now we need action, but unfortunately the action we have now is not at the level we need.”......

....In the Americas, more than 95% of high-grass prairies have been transformed into farms, along with 72% of dry forests and 88% of the Atlantic forests, notes the report. The Amazon rainforest is still mostly intact, but it is rapidly diminishing and degrading along with an even faster disappearing cerrado (tropical savannah). Between 2003 to 2013, the area under cultivation in Brazil’s northeast agricultural frontier more than doubled to 2.5m hectares, according to the report.....

....The authors stressed the close connection between climate change and biodiversity loss, which are adversely affecting each other. By 2050, they believe climate change could replace land-conversion as the main driver of extinction.

Qu: Surely something will have to break before 2050?
Title: Re: Wildlife
Post by: TerryM on March 23, 2018, 08:49:14 PM
If nothing has broken by 2050, I'll be spinning in my grave for having so misread the situation. :-X


Glaciers who have provided reliable water supplies for millennia are retreating and many already lack clean water. Insects, and the animals that rely on them for sustenance are moving north, or into extinction. Nuclear armed nations think nothing of insulting and vilifying the leaders of other nuclear armed nations, as though Mutually Assured Destruction was somehow a disproven relic of bygone times.


Exciting times we live in.
Terry


Does anyone know when or how insects determine when to hatch? Is it the heat, a simple timed cycle from when they were laid, or could the daily hours of sunlight be involved?


Anecdotally I witnessed what I perceived as a huge downswing in insect populations here in Southern Ontario Canada last year. This was possibly accompanied by a die off, or fly off, of a number of bird species.
It seems possible that if the insects were hatching when another cold snap was due, or when no fresh plants were available for their dining pleasure, that we could lose whole species of insects, at least regionally, and in turn lose generations of insectivores.
Title: Re: Wildlife
Post by: Sigmetnow on March 24, 2018, 08:14:28 PM
Not due to poisoning.  Due to lack of insects for food.

'Catastrophe' as France's bird population collapses due to pesticides
Dozens of species have seen their numbers decline, in some cases by two-thirds, because insects they feed on have disappeared
Quote
Bird populations across the French countryside have fallen by a third over the last decade and a half, researchers have said.

Dozens of species have seen their numbers decline, in some cases by two-thirds, the scientists said in a pair of studies – one national in scope and the other covering a large agricultural region in central France.

“The situation is catastrophic,” said Benoit Fontaine, a conservation biologist at France’s National Museum of Natural History and co-author of one of the studies.

“Our countryside is in the process of becoming a veritable desert,” he said in a communique released by the National Centre for Scientific Research (CNRS), which also contributed to the findings.

The common white throat, the ortolan bunting, the Eurasian skylark and other once-ubiquitous species have all fallen off by at least a third, according a detailed, annual census initiated at the start of the century.

A migratory song bird, the meadow pipit, has declined by nearly 70%.

The museum described the pace and extent of the wipe-out as “a level approaching an ecological catastrophe”.

The primary culprit, researchers speculate, is the intensive use of pesticides on vast tracts of monoculture crops, especially wheat and corn.

The problem is not that birds are being poisoned, but that the insects on which they depend for food have disappeared. ...
https://www.theguardian.com/world/2018/mar/21/catastrophe-as-frances-bird-population-collapses-due-to-pesticides
Title: Re: Wildlife
Post by: Sigmetnow on March 24, 2018, 08:26:05 PM
I am reminded of China’s “War on Sparrows,” which led to uncontrolled swarms of insects which destroyed food crops, resulting in widespread human famine.

China’s Worst Self-Inflicted Environmental Disaster: The Campaign to Wipe Out the Common Sparrow
https://io9.gizmodo.com/5927112/chinas-worst-self-inflicted-disaster-the-campaign-to-wipe-out-the-common-sparrow
Title: Re: Wildlife
Post by: Sigmetnow on March 24, 2018, 08:28:08 PM
“There are times when I hear people complain about possums eating their roses, birds calling too loud and fruit bats pooing on their houses. I just smile, nod, and think you don't know how lucky we are to still have wildlife sharing our suburbs. We need cherish and protect them.“
https://twitter.com/JWhiteWildlife/status/977130281701224449
Image below.
Title: Re: Wildlife
Post by: Sigmetnow on April 07, 2018, 05:20:55 PM
A reminder that other species see the world differently than humans do.
(And that puffin sunglasses are now a thing.)

Puffin beaks are fluorescent and we had no idea
https://www.cbc.ca/amp/1.4607386
Title: Re: Wildlife
Post by: gerontocrat on April 23, 2018, 02:15:16 PM
We are now looking at extinction big-time.

https://www.theguardian.com/environment/2018/apr/23/one-in-eight-birds-is-threatened-with-extinction-global-study-finds

Extracts below:-

One in eight bird species is threatened with extinction, global study finds

Report on the state of the world’s birds reveals a biodiversity crisis driven by intensive farming, with once-common species such as puffins and snowy owls now at risk


Quote
In all, 74% of 1,469 globally threatened birds are affected primarily by farming. Logging, invasive species and hunting are the other main threats.

“Each time we undertake this assessment we see slightly more species at risk of extinction – the situation is deteriorating and the trends are intensifying,” said Tris Allinson, senior global science officer for BirdLife International, which produced the report. “The species at risk of extinction were once on mountaintops or remote islands, such as the pink pigeon in Mauritius. Now we’re seeing once widespread and familiar species – European turtle doves, Atlantic puffins and kittiwakes – under threat of global extinction.”.....

.....According to the report, at least 40% of bird species worldwide are in decline, with researchers blaming human activity for the losses. After farming, logging is a key factor in declines of 50% of the most globally endangered species, followed by invasive species (39%), hunting and trapping (35%), climate change (33%) and residential and commercial development (28%). The illegal killing of birds – usually because of traditional hunting – results in an estimated 12 to 38 million individual birds dying or being taken each year in the Mediterranean region alone.
Title: Re: Wildlife
Post by: ivica on April 27, 2018, 01:10:56 AM
My observation on animal/feathery friends:

   They also have emotions. They return good with good, bad with a spite.

   Like a human child

. (https://youtu.be/3gzqsmx1KGU)     


How often do you kill a child?



Title: Re: Wildlife
Post by: sidd on April 27, 2018, 01:22:19 AM
It's spring in the midwest now, and i have been whistling at birds, as is my wont. i have become convinced over my life that avian language is far more sophisticated language there than we suspect. Not just intra, but inter species.

This year, as often happens, there is a pair of red finches nesting in a colorado blue spruce variant by a window. They speak to eache other in one tongue, to the sparrows in another, to the robins in yet another. They speak not to the cats, but the robins and bluejays do ...

sidd
Title: Re: Wildlife
Post by: sidd on May 05, 2018, 07:46:05 PM
There are more things on heaven and earth: sea slugs use photosynthesizers sucked out of algae and lives off photosynthesis.

Amazing.

https://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2018/05/180503085550.htm

sidd
Title: Re: Wildlife
Post by: gerontocrat on May 18, 2018, 09:38:33 AM
The somewhat disturbing data on threats to life on earth is now coming thick and fast.

https://www.theguardian.com/environment/2018/may/17/climate-change-on-track-to-cause-major-insect-wipeout-scientists-warn

Quote
Climate change on track to cause major insect wipeout, scientists warn
Insects are vital to ecosystems but will lose almost half their habitat under current climate projections

The new research is the most comprehensive to date, analysing the impact of different levels of climate change on the ranges of 115,000 species. It found plants are also heavily affected but that mammals and birds, which can more easily migrate as climate changes, suffered less.

“We showed insects are the most sensitive group,” said Prof Rachel Warren, at the University of East Anglia, who led the new work. “They are important because ecosystems cannot function without insects. They play an absolutely critical role in the food chain.”

“The disruption to our ecosystems if we were to lose that high proportion of our insects would be extremely far-reaching and widespread,” she said. “People should be concerned - humans depend on ecosystems functioning.” Pollination, fertile soils, clean water and more all depend on healthy ecosystems, Warren said........

......Another study published in Science on Thursday found that one third of the world’s protected areas, which cover 15% of all land, are now highly degraded by intense human pressure including road building, grazing, and urbanisation.

Kendall Jones, at the University of Queensland, Australia, who led the work, said: “A well-run protected area network is essential in saving species. If we allow our protected area network to be degraded there is a no doubt biodiversity losses will be exacerbated.”
Title: Re: Wildlife
Post by: Forest Dweller on June 02, 2018, 01:20:35 PM
Reindeer crisis in Siberia:
http://siberiantimes.com/ecology/casestudy/news/reindeer-crisis-in-yamalo-nenets-as-number-of-deaths-rise/

This whole Siberian wildlife & anthrax affair is pretty darn crazy.
When the first outbreak took place the Russians thought they could just incinerate the heck out of the tundra and failed.
Another outbreak took place.
Now it seems they have the illusion of being able to vaccinate every animal and the herders say it's killing them.
Interestingly, the previous anthrax problems 70 years ago took place during an exceptionally warm period and warming/thawing of permafrost is associated with increased chances of such diseases popping up, even long forgotten ones.
Meanwhile the ambitious work to clone and bring back prehistoric species and establish Pleistocene Park goes on...in the 6th mass extinction of extant species...bonkers!
Title: Re: Wildlife
Post by: SteveMDFP on June 02, 2018, 07:40:00 PM
Reindeer crisis in Siberia:
http://siberiantimes.com/ecology/casestudy/news/reindeer-crisis-in-yamalo-nenets-as-number-of-deaths-rise/

This whole Siberian wildlife & anthrax affair is pretty darn crazy.
When the first outbreak took place the Russians thought they could just incinerate the heck out of the tundra and failed.
Another outbreak took place.
Now it seems they have the illusion of being able to vaccinate every animal and the herders say it's killing them.
Interestingly, the previous anthrax problems 70 years ago took place during an exceptionally warm period and warming/thawing of permafrost is associated with increased chances of such diseases popping up, even long forgotten ones.
Meanwhile the ambitious work to clone and bring back prehistoric species and establish Pleistocene Park goes on...in the 6th mass extinction of extant species...bonkers!

It's an interesting article and a fascinating subject.
Anthrax spores can persist in the soil in temperate regions for years.
In frozen permafrost, I wouldn't be surprised if they could remain viable for decades, maybe centuries.  Melting permafrost therefore presents bona fide biological hazards.

The current Russian vaccines for anthrax use live attenuated spores, both human and veterinary versions.  Live-attenuated vaccines, in general, tend to produce strong, lost-lasting immunity, sometimes with a risk of higher side effect rates.

The herders' claim that the vaccine is causing widespread deaths among stressed animals strikes me as plausible.  More biology detail here:
Russian vaccines against especially dangerous bacterial pathogens
https://www.nature.com/articles/emi201482 (https://www.nature.com/articles/emi201482)
Title: Re: Wildlife
Post by: Sigmetnow on June 02, 2018, 08:48:52 PM
 :'(

Whale that died off Thailand had eaten 80 plastic bags
https://www.bbc.com/news/world-asia-44344468


Australia alert after ship loses 83 containers
Quote
Sanitary products, surgical masks and nappies have begun washing up on beaches north of Sydney.

There are concerns the items could prove dangerous to whales and other animals if they swallow them.
https://www.bbc.com/news/world-australia-44343423
Title: Re: Wildlife
Post by: Sigmetnow on June 03, 2018, 12:57:07 AM
“Feels like” temperatures in the upper 60’s (~19°C) in Anchorage, Alaska.

“It was noticeably warm to just about everyone today...even the bull moose in our yard. The big boy found a shady spot to pant it out this afternoon. Maybe he’ll be back tomorrow and Sunday with more sunny weather expected. Check out your local forecast. #AKwx ”
https://twitter.com/NWSAnchorage/status/1002738394928205824
Short video of very large moose at the link.
Title: Re: Wildlife
Post by: Forest Dweller on June 03, 2018, 03:19:38 PM
Reindeer crisis in Siberia:
http://siberiantimes.com/ecology/casestudy/news/reindeer-crisis-in-yamalo-nenets-as-number-of-deaths-rise/

This whole Siberian wildlife & anthrax affair is pretty darn crazy.
When the first outbreak took place the Russians thought they could just incinerate the heck out of the tundra and failed.
Another outbreak took place.
Now it seems they have the illusion of being able to vaccinate every animal and the herders say it's killing them.
Interestingly, the previous anthrax problems 70 years ago took place during an exceptionally warm period and warming/thawing of permafrost is associated with increased chances of such diseases popping up, even long forgotten ones.
Meanwhile the ambitious work to clone and bring back prehistoric species and establish Pleistocene Park goes on...in the 6th mass extinction of extant species...bonkers!

It's an interesting article and a fascinating subject.
Anthrax spores can persist in the soil in temperate regions for years.
In frozen permafrost, I wouldn't be surprised if they could remain viable for decades, maybe centuries.  Melting permafrost therefore presents bona fide biological hazards.

The current Russian vaccines for anthrax use live attenuated spores, both human and veterinary versions.  Live-attenuated vaccines, in general, tend to produce strong, lost-lasting immunity, sometimes with a risk of higher side effect rates.

The herders' claim that the vaccine is causing widespread deaths among stressed animals strikes me as plausible.  More biology detail here:
Russian vaccines against especially dangerous bacterial pathogens
https://www.nature.com/articles/emi201482 (https://www.nature.com/articles/emi201482)

Thanks for the link Steve, it's a bit over my head i'm afraid.
The number of years anthrax spores can lay dormant was just about 70 years i think, possibly longer in frozen permafrost?
The ST reports the last cases as 70 years ago in earlier articles anyway.
Seems plausible some reindeer died from it in 1946 or thereabouts and thawed out recently therefore...in which case others could pop up as well in several places.

The Native American knowledge in southern US was pretty interesting to see i might add.
It seems they had related the outbreaks to the cyclical population explosions of mice due to an abundance of food sources.
Next the deer are affected, the humans hunting those and so on.
Perhaps voles and mice in Siberia under warming climate should be considered as well...who knows?
Title: Re: Wildlife
Post by: Forest Dweller on June 03, 2018, 04:00:37 PM
:'(

Whale that died off Thailand had eaten 80 plastic bags
https://www.bbc.com/news/world-asia-44344468


Australia alert after ship loses 83 containers
Quote
Sanitary products, surgical masks and nappies have begun washing up on beaches north of Sydney.

There are concerns the items could prove dangerous to whales and other animals if they swallow them.
https://www.bbc.com/news/world-australia-44343423

This is a crime, and we are dealing with it as criminals do by committing more.
California is banning plastic straws....big deal.
They will use many more new plastic products.

A Dutch 14 year old kid(now almost 30) had a bright idea of the "Ocean Cleanup".
He will use more plastic, create a new fossil fuel based industry on top of the old and has not done anything!
But the capturing device will have a solar panel, made of plastic and other pollutants.
Close the damn factory i say, if you don't want plastic!
Don't want pesticides wiping out biodiversity and poisoning your kids?
Close the whole damn industrial sector!

It seems we are too stupid to understand we are stabbing the Earth to death.
We merely try to use a different knife for it.
Title: Re: Wildlife
Post by: mitch on June 03, 2018, 07:22:25 PM
Lots of shipping containers lost at sea every year. Here is a blog on them:
https://www.tjocargo.com/how-many-containers-are-lost-at-sea-and-what-happens-to-them

He estimates in the several thousand container range. This is on top of the huge amount of plastics that washes down rivers every year, especially in Asia.
Title: Re: Wildlife
Post by: gerontocrat on June 04, 2018, 02:01:17 PM
A dreadfully sad story - climate change and plastic again.

https://www.theguardian.com/environment/2018/jun/03/shetland-seabirds-climate-change-catastrophe-terns-kittiwakes-puffins

Eerie silence falls on Shetland cliffs that once echoed to seabirds’ cries
Climate change has caused a catastrophic drop in the numbers of terns, kittiwakes and puffins


Quote
Sumburgh Head lies at the southern tip of mainland Shetland. This dramatic 100-metre-high rocky spur, crowned with a lighthouse built by Robert Louis Stevenson’s grandfather, has a reputation for being one of the biggest and most accessible seabird colonies in Britain.

Thousands of puffins, guillemots, razorbills, kittiwakes and fulmars gather there every spring to breed, covering almost every square inch of rock or grass with teeming, screeching birds and their young.

Or at least they used to – for this year Sumburgh Head is a quiet and largely deserted place. Where seabirds once swooped and cried in their thousands, only a handful of birds wheel round the cliffs. The silence is uncanny – the result of a crash in seabird numbers that has been in progress for several years but which has now reached an unprecedented, catastrophic low.

One of the nation’s most important conservation centres has been denuded of its wildlife, a victim – according to scientists – of climate change, which has disrupted food chains in the North Sea and North Atlantic and left many seabirds without a source of sustenance. The result has been an apocalyptic drop in numbers of Arctic terns, kittiwakes and many other birds.
.....figures that reveal the staggering decreases in seabird numbers in Shetland, the most northerly part of the British Isles. In 2000, there were more than 33,000 puffins on the island in early spring. That figure dropped to 570 last year and there are no signs of any recovery this year, although it is still early in the season.

Similarly, Shetland’s kittiwake population plummeted from over 55,000 in 1981 to 5,000 in 2011, and observers believe those numbers have declined even further in the past few years. Only the lack of a properly funded census has prevented ornithologists from putting precise numbers on the devastation that is occurring.

"I went to check our sites at Dalsetter and Troswick last week to compare numbers of Arctic terns with those we counted during Seabird 2000, the last national seabird census carried out across Britain and Ireland,” added Moncrieff. “I found there were around 110 Arctic terns there last week compared with around 9,000 that were counted in the same area in 2000. That is the kind of loss we have sustained here.”

This point is backed by Euan Dunn, principal policy officer for the RSPB. “These are apocalyptic numbers,” he told the Observer. “We are seeing something very dramatic happening, something that has never occurred in the history of ornithology up there.”

........Yet as these crises have unfolded, the government has declined to fund a new national census, along the lines of those organised in 1970, 1985 and 2000, even though it is supposed to instigate one every 15 years. “Fortunately, it has now agreed to proceed with one, which we hope should be completed by the end of next year,” said Dunn. “Then we should have a better overall picture of what is happening and why these striking declines are happening in particular places.”
Title: Re: Wildlife
Post by: gerontocrat on July 20, 2018, 02:52:35 PM
Trumpistan continues its relentless attacks on the environment. Seems they want to turn the USA into a garbage filled desert.

https://www.nytimes.com/2018/07/19/climate/endangered-species-act-changes.html?rref=collection%2Fsectioncollection%2Fscience&action=click&contentCollection=science&region=stream&module=stream_unit&version=latest&contentPlacement=4&pgtype=sectionfront

Interior Department Proposes a Vast Reworking of the Endangered Species Act
Quote
The Interior Department on Thursday proposed the most sweeping set of changes in decades to the Endangered Species Act, the law that brought the bald eagle and the Yellowstone grizzly bear back from the edge of extinction but which Republicans say is cumbersome and restricts economic development.

The proposed revisions have far-reaching implications, potentially making it easier for roads, pipelines and other construction projects to gain approvals than under current rules. One change, for instance, would eliminate longstanding language that prohibits considering economic factors when deciding whether or not a species should be protected.

The agency also intends to make it more difficult to shield species like the Atlantic sturgeon that are considered “threatened,” which is the category one level beneath the most serious one, “endangered.”

Battles over endangered species have consumed vast swaths of the West for decades, and confrontations over protections for the spotted owl, the sage grouse and the gray wolf have shaped politics and public debate. While the changes proposed Thursday by the Fish and Wildlife Service and the National Marine Fisheries Service wouldn’t be retroactive, they could set the stage for new clashes over offshore drilling and also could help smooth the path for  projects like oil and gas drilling in the Arctic National Wildlife Refuge.
Title: Re: Wildlife
Post by: Sigmetnow on July 23, 2018, 06:06:53 PM
Aquariums have all tried — and failed — to keep a great white shark on display. Here's why:
https://twitter.com/voxdotcom/status/1021201982562824192/video/1
Title: Re: Wildlife
Post by: gerontocrat on July 27, 2018, 11:49:08 AM
Once upon a time I lived in Lydbrook in the Forest of Dean

https://www.theguardian.com/environment/2018/jul/24/beavers-forest-dean-possible-flooding-solution

Beavers released in Forest of Dean as solution to flooding

Hope is that dams built by pair of beavers will hold back water and improve biodiversity

Quote
Four hundred years after the beaver was hunted to extinction in the UK, two of the mammals have been reintroduced on government land in an English forest as part of a scheme to assess whether they could be a solution to flooding.

Two Eurasian beavers were released on Tuesday into their new lodge within a large penned-off section of the Forest of Dean in Gloucestershire. The hope is that the animals will build dams and create ponds on Greathough Brook, which feeds into the River Wye, and slow the flow of water through the steep-sided, wooded valley at times of torrential rainfall.

In 2012 the villages of Lydbrook and Upper Lydbrook were badly flooded. Hundreds of thousands of pounds  on conventional schemes such as replacing drains to try to keep the communities dry and safe.

The government hopes that introducing the beavers into a 6.5-hectare (16-acre) enclosure on Forestry Commission land will help hold back the waters in a more natural way and improve biodiversity.

Should the three-year scheme prove successful, beavers could be introduced in other areas susceptible to flooding.
Title: Re: Wildlife
Post by: gerontocrat on July 31, 2018, 01:07:08 PM
An illustration of how climate change may be making a bad situation worse.

https://www.bbc.co.uk/news/science-environment-45014746

Largest king penguin colony shrinks 90% in 30 years
Quote
The world's largest king penguin colony has shrunk nearly 90% since the 1980s, research suggests.

Aerial and satellite images show breeding pair numbers have fallen 88% in the last three decades, an article in the journal Antarctic Science says.

The colony lies on the France's uninhabited Île aux Cochons between Africa and Antarctica in the Indian Ocean.

Researchers say there is no clear reason for the decline. The paper says that only 60,000 penguin pairs remain in photos taken in 2015 and 2017, down from half a million pairs recorded on a previous conducted in the 1980s. Second only to the emperor penguin in size, the king penguin breeds on the more temperate islands north of the Antarctic coast.

Research published in February says some of the birds populations could be at risk from climate change.

Study is at:-
https://www.cambridge.org/core/journals/antarctic-science/article/massive-decline-of-the-worlds-largest-king-penguin-colony-at-ile-aux-cochons-crozet/E254E3E24DE3BDC523B25FA3A3261584

and includes as just one of the hypotheses for the decline the 1997-8 El Nino.
Title: Re: Wildlife
Post by: Sigmetnow on August 03, 2018, 08:14:26 PM
An orca named J35 has been carrying her dead calf, pushing it with her head, for more than a week off the Pacific Northwest coast. The sad spectacle is a prime example, and confirmation, of the complex emotional lives of these sophisticated cetaceans, experts say.

Orca’s Death Vigil Shows Complexity of Killer Whale Emotions
A Pacific Northwest orca likely bonded closely with her calf before it died, which could help explain her record-breaking emotional sojourn.
Quote
Balcomb points to a lack of food as the culprit. “We have long demonstrated that these fish-eating whales are getting skinnier and skinnier, and the death rate is increasing,” he writes on the center’s website.

“Whales in this endangered population are dependent upon Chinook salmon for their primary food source. Unfortunately, Chinook salmon are also endangered,” he adds.
https://relay.nationalgeographic.com/proxy/distribution/public/amp/animals/2018/08/orca-mourning-calf-killer-whale-northwest-news
Title: Re: Wildlife
Post by: Sebastian Jones on August 04, 2018, 07:26:03 AM

Beavers released in Forest of Dean as solution to flooding

Hope is that dams built by pair of beavers will hold back water and improve biodiversity

Quote
Four hundred years after the beaver was hunted to extinction in the UK, two of the mammals have been reintroduced on government land in an English forest as part of a scheme to assess whether they could be a solution to flooding.........
.....Should the three-year scheme prove successful, beavers could be introduced in other areas susceptible to flooding.
Well, while I am sure that given half a chance the beavers will be fruitful and multiply, and that they will alter the hydrology of their habitat, I'm not so sure about preventing flash type flooding. I have seen many beaver dams washed out by floods, and to the extent that the dams hold back a reservoir of water, the dams, when they fail, can exacerbate flooding.
Title: Re: Wildlife
Post by: Forest Dweller on August 04, 2018, 05:53:44 PM
Once upon a time I lived in Lydbrook in the Forest of Dean

https://www.theguardian.com/environment/2018/jul/24/beavers-forest-dean-possible-flooding-solution

Beavers released in Forest of Dean as solution to flooding

Hope is that dams built by pair of beavers will hold back water and improve biodiversity

Quote
Four hundred years after the beaver was hunted to extinction in the UK, two of the mammals have been reintroduced on government land in an English forest as part of a scheme to assess whether they could be a solution to flooding.

Two Eurasian beavers were released on Tuesday into their new lodge within a large penned-off section of the Forest of Dean in Gloucestershire. The hope is that the animals will build dams and create ponds on Greathough Brook, which feeds into the River Wye, and slow the flow of water through the steep-sided, wooded valley at times of torrential rainfall.

In 2012 the villages of Lydbrook and Upper Lydbrook were badly flooded. Hundreds of thousands of pounds  on conventional schemes such as replacing drains to try to keep the communities dry and safe.

The government hopes that introducing the beavers into a 6.5-hectare (16-acre) enclosure on Forestry Commission land will help hold back the waters in a more natural way and improve biodiversity.

Should the three-year scheme prove successful, beavers could be introduced in other areas susceptible to flooding.

I wouldn't get my hopes up.
Europeans and their so called "rewilding" projects are basically industrial scams with no chance at all.
A form of denial imho.
Beavers were brought back to Netherlands as well, much pride and hullabaloo involved.
How useful they are...
Problem was they didn't stay in the places we wanted them to be for wildlife photographers to make pretty pictures alone.
The cheeky buggers actually sabotaged a road somewhat and so of course the hunters were the first to say "Ah we must shoot beavers!".
The politicians holding their hand.

It is the same with any species really, industrial society leaves no room but symbolic presence of wildlife to serve denial.
Otters, eagles, insects or whatever...wolves are walking around now.
They have no chance at all but for a miserable existence at best.
Sounds harsh but i speak from experience.
Even the badgers here are hailed as a wonderful story of success.
I pick up their bodies and find only ruined den sites.
When they are forced to move elsewhere again and get noticed people say:
"See! they are spreading in numbers thanks to our great work!"
They are actually being wiped out just as anything else is.

Bit different from the beaver situation over there you describe but fundamentally the same.
People are already expecting those guys to serve some sort of hydrological goal?
Pardon my French but that sounds like bullshit to me.
Leave it alone we say here and nothing else...i hope those beavers do well.
Title: Re: Wildlife
Post by: gerontocrat on August 04, 2018, 10:35:48 PM
Once upon a time I lived in Lydbrook in the Forest of Dean

https://www.theguardian.com/environment/2018/jul/24/beavers-forest-dean-possible-flooding-solution

Beavers released in Forest of Dean as solution to flooding

Hope is that dams built by pair of beavers will hold back water and improve biodiversity

Quote
Four hundred years after the beaver was hunted to extinction in the UK, two of the mammals have been reintroduced on government land in an English forest as part of a scheme to assess whether they could be a solution to flooding.

Two Eurasian beavers were released on Tuesday into their new lodge within a large penned-off section of the Forest of Dean in Gloucestershire. The hope is that the animals will build dams and create ponds on Greathough Brook, which feeds into the River Wye, and slow the flow of water through the steep-sided, wooded valley at times of torrential rainfall.



I wouldn't get my hopes up.
Europeans and their so called "rewilding" projects are basically industrial scams with no chance at all.
A form of denial imho.
Beavers were brought back to Netherlands as well, much pride and hullabaloo involved.
How useful they are...
Problem was they didn't stay in the places we wanted them to be for wildlife photographers to make pretty pictures alone.
The cheeky buggers actually sabotaged a road somewhat and so of course the hunters were the first to say "Ah we must shoot beavers!".
The politicians holding their hand.

Leave it alone we say here and nothing else...i hope those beavers do well.

And then we have unintentional rewilding. In the Forest of Dean (again) - some pig farmers switched to wild boar (higher prices), another species hunted to extinction in the UK many moons ago.. Of course, it was guaranteed that none would escape, and,of course, they did, and have been spectacularly successful ( no wolves = no predators), and do the forest a lot of damage (and scare the tourists).

Culling of boar is now an annual event.
Title: Re: Wildlife
Post by: Bruce Steele on August 04, 2018, 11:40:53 PM
Beavers were reintroduced to the Santa Ynez river about seventy years ago . They are IMO the best mammal carbon engineers on the planet. With a strong work ethic, fast growing teeth, and softwood trees,  they can engineer green riparian habitats from flat sunburned gravel riverbed. Once the beaver dams have been established cattail ( bullrush ) fill in the pond perimeter. Cattail are much better carbon sinks than sunburnt gravel. Anyway I am a fan ! Viva la beaver ! 
Title: Re: Wildlife
Post by: sidd on August 07, 2018, 10:49:34 PM
Killing the soil:

This is something i have many times seen up close and personal. There is no life in the soil with conventional agriculture in the USA. Last year I went thru Indiana, Illinois, Iowa southern Minnesota, some of the richest soil of the midwest. I frequently found myself pausing by fields (almost exclusively corn/soy rotations) and a more than a  few times I reached down and picked up a handful  of earth. Dead, dead, dead. Solitudinem faciunt, agrum appelant.

"Thus is it concluded that cascading soil fauna depletion occurs when woodland is cleared for pasture, when pasture is cultivated for crops, when synthetic fertilizers replaced organics, especially after WW1, and when excessive toxic and systemic biocides are introduced, especially after WW2, followed by the onslaught of alien/invasive species and diseases. Continued catastrophic trajectory for earthworms—the builders of fertile topsoils and humic SOM, upon which most life on Earth ultimately depends—seems as serious as for insects and most other organisms. Demonstrated solutions to restore biotic abundance and curtail loss of biodiversity are to readopt or to re-invest in more natural farming by recycling organic fertilizers and avoiding both waste and chemical poisons. Concomitant with a shift by farmers and consumers, governments may need to reallocate funding from agri-chemistry that continues to seek stop-gap solutions to problems often caused by chemical toxins themselves, and to raise support for practical, applied agro-ecology and sustainable Permaculture for efficient and flexible natural designs."

Open access.Read the whole thing.

http://www.mdpi.com/2571-8789/2/2/33

sidd
Title: Re: Wildlife
Post by: sidd on September 10, 2018, 05:30:09 AM
These guys live in some of the most rugged and impassable country on earth. And wild and beautiful, to boot.

"As a result of the campaign by some people in the tribe, the village council decided to cordon off about 20 sq km, where they would not allow hunting. In 1998 this area became the Khonoma Nature Conservation and Tragopan Sanctuary.

In the years since the council has banned al forms of hunting, logging, jungle burning as well as any kind of commercial operation that exploits natural resources and the forests that surround the village."

https://www.bbc.co.uk/news/world-asia-india-45328322

sidd

Title: Re: Wildlife
Post by: sidd on September 25, 2018, 10:32:09 PM
N. American amphibian decline not primarily driven by climate change, but more directly by land use changes going back a century or more.

" these declines are a continuation of losses of amphibian populations that have been occurring since the 19th century when human land-use began destroying their habitats."

"The researchers determined that, while climate change likely has been and will be a factor in the decline of some local populations such as in the Rocky Mountain West—where the effect of a warming climate seems to be more severe for amphibians—it is not responsible for the current declines that are occurring."

https://phys.org/news/2018-09-climate-main-driver-amphibian-decline.html

The paper is open access. The patterns it describes are quite complex:

"While we demonstrate that amphibian communities are sensitive to changes in climate, our results suggest that changing climate is not the proximate cause for ongoing assemblage-wide declines that have been observed in North American amphibians. Instead, we find that recent change in climate is a strong predictor of why local species richness is declining more quickly in some regions and that positive effects of climate may be buffering declines in other regions. For 37% of studied locations, we predicted that local species richness would have increased if climate was the primary factor determining changes in amphibian communities. We cannot eliminate factors we have not tested here. However, it would be surprising to find so many climate “winners” in our analysis if climate was a primary driver of the severe declines  being  observed  in  North  American  amphibian populations."

Read all about it:

doi: 10.1038/s41467-018-06157-6

sidd
Title: Re: Wildlife
Post by: sidd on September 25, 2018, 10:37:55 PM
Glyphosphate hurts bees: Stop using roundup so indiscriminately:

"As in many animals, honey bees rely on their gut microbial community for a variety of functions, including food processing (25, 26), regulation of immune system (33, 34), and defense against pathogens (17, 27). Perturbations of this system have the potential to lead to negative consequences for host fitness. We found that glyphosate affects the bee gut microbiota composition and that bacterial species and strains within this community vary in susceptibility to glyphosate. Recent experimental and observational studies have provided evidence that dysbiosis affecting the bee gut can increase susceptibility to pathogen invasion (23, 41, 42). Our results also suggest that establishment of a normal microbial community is crucial for protection against opportunistic pathogens of honey bees."

The numbers in parentheses are reference numbers. The article is

doi: 10.1073/pnas.1803880115

coverage at

https://phys.org/news/2018-09-common-weed-killer-linked-bee.html

sidd
Title: Re: Wildlife
Post by: gerontocrat on September 28, 2018, 12:13:39 PM
Who needs climate change to kill wildlife when we have all these other means? For the Orca, something that just can't be fixed.

Orca 'apocalypse': half of killer whales doomed to die from pollution
Quote
Banned PCB chemicals are still severely harming the animals – but Arctic could be a refuge

At least half of the world’s killer whale populations are doomed to extinction due to toxic and persistent pollution of the oceans, according to a major new study.

Although the poisonous chemicals, PCBs, have been banned for decades, they are still leaking into the seas. They become concentrated up the food chain; as a result, killer whales, the top predators, are the most contaminated animals on the planet. Worse, their fat-rich milk passes on very high doses to their newborn calves.

PCB concentrations found in killer whales can be 100 times safe levels and severely damage reproductive organs, cause cancer and damage the immune system. The new research analysed the prospects for killer whale populations over the next century and found those offshore from industrialised nations could vanish as soon as 30-50 years.

Among those most at risk are the UK’s last pod, where a recent death revealed one of the highest PCB levels ever recorded. Others off Gibraltar, Japan and Brazil and in the north-east Pacific are also in great danger. Killer whales are one of the most widespread mammals on earth but have already been lost in the North Sea, around Spain and many other places.

The new research, published in the journal Science, examined PCB contamination in 351 killer whales, the largest analysis yet. The scientists then took existing data on how PCBs affect calf survival and immune systems in whales and used this to model how populations will fare in the future. “Populations of Japan, Brazil, Northeast Pacific, Strait of Gibraltar, and the United Kingdom are all tending toward complete collapse,” they concluded.

http://science.sciencemag.org/content/361/6409/1373
Quote
PCB—still a problem
Until they were recognized as highly toxic and carcinogenic, polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs) were once used widely. Their production was banned in the United States in 1978, though they are still produced globally and persist in the environment. Persistent organic compounds, like PCBs, magnify across trophic levels, and thus apex predators are particularly susceptible to their ill effects. Desforges et al. looked at the continuing impact of PCBs on one of the largest marine predators, the killer whale. Using globally available data, the authors found high concentrations of PCBs within killer whale tissues. These are likely to precipitate declines across killer whale populations, particularly those that feed at high trophic levels and are the closest to industrialized areas.

Science, this issue p. 1373
Title: Re: Wildlife
Post by: ivica on October 22, 2018, 08:41:17 AM
"Natural History Museum unveils the top Wildlife Photographer of the Year images."
https://www.mnn.com/earth-matters/wilderness-resources/blogs/natural-history-museum-wildlife-photographer-year-capture-diversity-beauty-nature

"Taken by 16-year-old Skye Meaker of South Africa, the photograph is of Mathoja, a calm 8-year-old leopard."

(https://media.mnn.com/assets/images/2018/10/LoungingLeopardInNyalaTree.jpg.990x0_q80_crop-smart.jpg)
[ I exist. Do i think? ]

< Raising Human Consciousness (https://youtu.be/q3XcPKUj3l8) > :)


Title: Re: Wildlife
Post by: sidd on October 22, 2018, 09:02:27 AM
Nice picture.

"  I exist. Do i think?  "

Very apposite.

Thanx.

I cannot resist straying from the thread topic to contrast an inset from another image, a famous one. This is the one from Cleveland.

sidd
Title: Re: Wildlife
Post by: ivica on October 23, 2018, 01:12:58 AM
sidd wrote: "I cannot resist straying from the thread topic to contrast an inset from another image, a famous one. This is the one from Cleveland."

Thank you, it links us & them :)
Title: Re: Wildlife
Post by: Sigmetnow on October 30, 2018, 03:05:54 PM
Wildlife populations fell by 60% from 1970, WWF says
- Population of more than 4,000 species found to have fallen since 1970
- 90% of seabirds now have plastics in their stomachs
- "Global deal" similar to Paris climate agreement is needed, WWF says
Quote
Global wildlife populations have fallen by 60% in just over four decades, as accelerating pollution, deforestation, climate change and other manmade factors have created a "mindblowing" crisis, the World Wildlife Fund has warned in a damning new report.

The total numbers of more than 4,000 mammal, bird, fish, reptile and amphibian species declined rapidly between 1970 and 2014, the Living Planet Report 2018 says.

Current rates of species extinction are now up to 1,000 times higher than before human involvement in animal ecosystems became a factor.

The proportion of the planet's land that is free from human impact is projected to drop from a quarter to a tenth by 2050, as habitat removal, hunting, pollution, disease and climate change continue to spread, the organization added.

The group has called for an international treaty, modeled on the Paris climate agreement, to be drafted to protect wildlife and reverse human impacts on nature.

It warned that current efforts to protect the natural world are not keeping up with the speed of manmade destruction. ...
https://www.cnn.com/2018/10/29/health/wwf-wildlife-population-report-intl/index.html
Title: Re: Wildlife
Post by: solartim27 on November 07, 2018, 05:10:39 PM
Article has a short video clip of Sperm Whales off of Nunavut, apparently only the second sighting so far north.
https://www.ecowatch.com/sperm-whales-sighting-arctic-2618298807.amp.html
Title: Re: Wildlife
Post by: gerontocrat on November 13, 2018, 06:45:26 PM
A UK supermarket made an advert saying they were no longer using palm oil in their own label products because of the effect on orangutan habitat.
The advert is a cartoon made by Greenpeace

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=HTZ6sFW7kCg

It was banned from TV for being political. So far around 35 million views on social media. Banning it made the difference.

https://www.bbc.co.uk/news/newsbeat-46187070
Iceland Christmas ad: Petition to show it on TV hits 670k
Quote
9 hours ago
A petition to get Iceland's Christmas advert shown on TV has reached more than 670,000 signatures. The advert, which highlights the impact of palm oil on rainforests and orangutan, has gone viral.

TV presenter James Corden shared the ad on Twitter where it's had 15 million views.

Clearcast, the body which approves ads for TV, said it wasn't approved because it breached political advertising rules.

It comes down to the law - political advertising isn't allowed on TV.
Title: Re: Wildlife
Post by: sidd on November 17, 2018, 06:13:00 AM
Industry funded study exonerates industry: 

"The company-funded animal test was performed to ascertain how neural development is affected by the pesticide chlorpyrifos ..."

" ...  concluded that there was no such effect, even at high doses."

" ... we observed a clear effect on the height of the cerebellum ... was reported neither in the study's summary nor in its conclusion."

" ... independent research has also previously indicated that chlorpyrifos adversely affects brain development, including childhood IQ ..."

https://medicalxpress.com/news/2018-11-flaws-industry-funded-pesticide.html

The reason i post this is "Wildlife" thread is because we are not just poisoning ourselves. We are killing myriads of creatures great and small, and we are too lazy to look and see the blights that follow our footsteps. Perhaps, as a species, we deserve to poison our own young. We do it to every other lifeform, don't we ?

sidd
Title: Re: Wildlife
Post by: sidd on November 18, 2018, 11:27:44 PM
As Yeats may have said, "The world is full of magic things, patiently waiting for our senses to grow sharper."

https://www.cbc.ca/news/technology/hemimastigotes-supra-kingdom-1.4715823

paper at doi: 10.1038/s41586-018-0708-8

sidd

Title: Re: Wildlife
Post by: Sleepy on November 19, 2018, 08:21:05 AM
Curiosity and Control, a nice Swedish documentary about our dented relation to nature.
https://www.svtplay.se/video/19863562/curiosity-and-control (https://www.svtplay.se/video/19863562/curiosity-and-control)

Hardcoded Swedish subtitles but mostly in English with some French commentary. Hopefully viewable elsewhere. Adding a small snippet below.
Title: Re: Wildlife
Post by: Sebastian Jones on November 22, 2018, 06:55:19 AM
Climate change makes strange bedfellows, grizzlies show up in Wapusk National park, joining black bears and polar bears for a world first.
https://news.usask.ca/articles/research/2018/usask-researchers-find-changing-environment-bringing-bear-species-together----.php (https://news.usask.ca/articles/research/2018/usask-researchers-find-changing-environment-bringing-bear-species-together----.php)
Title: Re: Wildlife
Post by: longwalks1 on November 22, 2018, 06:09:27 PM

The above post looked interesting so I sleuthed.

Here is the site for preview article the 3 bear species co-habiting in space (land), but not so much in time (seasons).
The doi is part of the url  10.1139/AS-2018-0013

http://www.nrcresearchpress.com/doi/pdf/10.1139/AS-2018-0013

Quote
Range  overlap  of  these  three  species  in  this  dynamic  ecotonal  region  should  not  be
viewed as a threat to any of them but as an ecological response to environmental change that needs
to be better understood.
Keywords:
Ursus americanus  ,  Ursus arctos,  Ursus maritimus, Wapusk National Park

Quote
1Novel range overlap of three ursids in the Canadian subarctic  Douglas Andrew Clark 11*
, Ryan Brook
2 , Chelsea Oliphant-Reskanski
3 , Michel P. Laforge
4 , Kiva Olson
5 , Danielle Rivet
6 * Corresponding Author: Douglas Clark, email: d.clark@usask.c
Title: Re: Wildlife
Post by: gerontocrat on November 24, 2018, 08:25:33 PM
It seems the slow late freeze in the vicinity of Svalbard is a real threat to the population of bears that are based there. So, once gain, it is not the sea ice maximum and minimum that is the problem it is the length of time without ice that may be the killer. And one thing is sure, that 2018 extent now may be only the 13th lowest, but in many seas the ice-free or low-ice season was longer than usual.

https://www.theguardian.com/environment/2018/nov/23/slow-arctic-freeze-raises-risk-of-polar-bear-extinction-say-scientists

Slow Arctic freeze raises risk of polar bear extinction, say scientists
Record absence of ice after freak warm spells denies pregnant bears birthing dens and triggers ‘extirpation event’ warning

Quote
A record slow freeze of many regions of the Arctic this winter is making it harder for pregnant polar bears to find birthing dens.

The delayed formation of sea ice during autumn has worried biologists, who fear a first “extirpation event” – the local extinction of a species – may be approaching faster than forecast for the most affected populations.

The waters around Svalbard, an archipelago between Norway and the North Pole, have a little over half the average area of ice for this time of year. According to the Norwegian Ice Service, the 172,291 sq km (66,522 sq m) of ice on 14 November was the lowest for this time of year since records began in 1967.

October also saw a huge departure from previous trends, particularly in the Barents Sea, which had freakishly warm weather in February and August. Scientists say these shifts, which are caused by the manmade heating of the globe, are disrupting the behaviour of species that depend on thick winter ice, such as narwhals, seals, belugas and polar bears.
Title: Re: Wildlife
Post by: sidd on November 29, 2018, 08:01:00 AM
Beaverage in Alaska: Tundra be Dammed

(I kid you not, that second phrase is part of the title of the paper)

" ... beavers are rapidly expanding their range via major rivers and streams ..."

" ... range expansion in the northwest arctic of Alaska has occurred at an average rate of 8 km/year ... "

" ... beaver dams on the Seward Peninsula (even further from treeline than in the primary study region in Figure 2) and a dozen potential beaver dams in the tundra regions of north-central Brooks Range of Alaska. The location of these dams indicates that beavers likely are colonizing the north-central Brooks Range ... "

"Thermokarst landforms have developed adjacent to new ponds and new stream channels made by beavers, as well as downstream of failed beaver dams ... "

"permafrost that constitutes arctic tundra soils thus makes the tundra uniquely vulnerable to beavers."

doi:10.1111/gcb.14332

coverage at

https://www.sciencenews.org/article/beavers-are-engineering-new-alaskan-tundra

sidd
Title: Re: Wildlife
Post by: magnamentis on November 29, 2018, 04:41:41 PM

"permafrost that constitutes arctic tundra soils thus makes the tundra uniquely vulnerable to beavers."


considering you kind of posts i think i don't get the point here, probably a language barrier ;)
so please elaborate for me the following:

"vulnarable to beavers" how can nature be vulnarable to one of it's native inhabitants? well suited or something along this line is what i would choose as a term, in my translation "vulnarable" sound like
if the tundra would be at risk through the migration of beavers ?

sorry i'm quite sure i just miss something but would like to know what that is ;) T.I.A for your help ;)
Title: Re: Wildlife
Post by: oren on November 29, 2018, 05:11:16 PM
Magna, the beavers are natives but they are expanding rapidly into new (tundra?) territories.
Title: Re: Wildlife
Post by: Tor Bejnar on November 29, 2018, 05:27:41 PM
Magnamentis,
I'm quite sure your interpretation that 'the survival of tundra is at risk due to invading beavers' is correct.  included in Sidd's post is "Thermokarst landforms have developed adjacent to new [beaver] ponds ..."  From Wikipedi (https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Thermokarst)a and the National Geographic (https://www.nationalgeographic.com/environment/habitats/tundra-threats/), I learn that developing thermokarst is strongly associated with melting of permafrost and the release of carbon into the atmosphere.  Tundra ecosystems are considered to be "among the most sensitive habitats in the world".
Title: Re: Wildlife
Post by: magnamentis on November 29, 2018, 07:10:55 PM
thx for various replies, so the beaver is indicating that tundra becomes something else than turndra due to global warming, hope i got that right now, beaver is not the cause but a result with indicative property.
Title: Re: Wildlife
Post by: Tor Bejnar on November 29, 2018, 08:11:58 PM
My interpretation from what I've read (today) is that beavers can move into tundra areas because of climate change (warmer? more to eat? I don't know - obviously, something to eat is part of it), and that they speed up certain processes (thermokarst) by building dams.  I appreciate your "tundra becomes something else than tundra", Magnamentis, as what I read didn't say, other than 'shallow ponds and lakes'.
Title: Re: Wildlife
Post by: Red on November 30, 2018, 11:24:21 AM
The past year is bad enough.

Significant whale strandings in NZ since 2010
November 26, 2018

145 pilot whales died after stranding in Mason Bay on Stewart Island.

November 25, 2018
12 whales, understood to be pygmy killer whales, stranded south of Te Paki Stream in Northland. 10 survived.


November 23, 2018
A 15-metre sperm whale died after being stranded at Tokeroa Beach in Doubtful Bay in Northland.

August 5, 2018
2 whales stranded on Baylys Beach near Dargaville. 1 died.

July 9, 2018
2 rare pygmy right whales died at Taupo Bay in Northland.

May 23, 2018
8 sperm whales died after becoming stranded on a South Taranaki beach.

April 5, 2018
32 pilot whales stranded at the mouth of the Okuru River. At least 21 died.

https://www.nzherald.co.nz/index.cfm?objectid=12166302&ref=twitter

https://www.tvnz.co.nz/one-news/new-zealand/more-than-50-whales-dead-after-another-mass-stranding?fbclid=IwAR0kKanjsxHSLpTMj984P0dvYeZrDfsi6pNa5PtCsDlH5qEE6FD4SCpBwpQ
Title: Re: Wildlife
Post by: sidd on March 04, 2019, 12:54:33 AM
terrorist parrots hooked on opiods:

"  Often the birds wait until the farmers cut the poppy pods to help them ripen, according to Earth.com, exposing latex that is rich in morphine and opium milk, while in other cases they simply cut the stalks of the plant themselves and make off with the whole pod in their clutches."

https://www.vice.com/en_au/article/8xydp5/opium-addicted-parrots-keep-raiding-poppy-farms-in-india

sidd
Title: Re: Wildlife
Post by: vox_mundi on April 12, 2019, 06:23:55 PM
From the ethically questionable pile ...

Chinese Scientists Added Human Brain Genes to Monkeys—and Yes, They May Be Smarter
https://www.technologyreview.com/s/613277/chinese-scientists-have-put-human-brain-genes-in-monkeysand-yes-they-may-be-smarter/

(https://adampadillablog.files.wordpress.com/2017/07/planet-of-the-apes-statue-of-liberty-caesar.jpg)

Scientists in southern China report that they’ve tried to narrow the evolutionary gap, creating several transgenic macaque monkeys with extra copies of a human gene suspected of playing a role in shaping human intelligence.

In a study published last month in Beijing’s National Science Review journal, researchers took human copies of the MCPH1 gene, which is believed to play an important role in our brain development, and introduced it into monkey embryos by means of a virus that carried the gene.

Of the 11 transgenic macaque monkeys they generated, six died. The five survivors went through a series of tests, including MRI brain scans and memory tests. It turned out they didn’t have bigger brains than a control group of macaques, but they did perform better on short-term memory tasks. Their brains also developed over a longer period of time, which is typical of human brains.

The Chinese researchers suspect the MCPH1 gene is part of the answer. But they’re not stopping there. One of them, Bing Su, a geneticist at the Kunming Institute of Zoology, told MIT Technology Review that he’s already testing other genes involved in brain evolution:

One that he has his eye on is SRGAP2C, a DNA variant that arose about two million years ago, just when Australopithecus was ceding the African savannah to early humans. That gene has been dubbed the “humanity switch” and the “missing genetic link” for its likely role in the emergence of human intelligence. Su says he’s been adding it to monkeys, but that it’s too soon to say what the results are.

Su has also had his eye on another human gene, FOXP2, which is believed to have graced us with our language abilities. Pondering the possibility of adding that gene to monkeys, Su told Nature in 2016, “I don’t think the monkey will all of a sudden start speaking, but will have some behavioral change.”

(https://i.pinimg.com/236x/d5/8d/1e/d58d1e12a2730998b7cb39d00b723fd0--recommended-books-fiction-books.jpg)

... Regarding the five survivors, what kind of lives will they have going forward, altered as they are and confined to an experimental laboratory?” ... “The use of transgenic monkeys to study human genes linked to brain evolution is a very risky road to take,”  ... After how many eliminated differences does a monkey shade into a human being? There’s no clear answer to that question.

Open Access: Lei Shi, et.al., Transgenic rhesus monkeys carrying the human MCPH1 gene copies show human-like neoteny of brain development (https://academic.oup.com/nsr/advance-article/doi/10.1093/nsr/nwz043/5420749), National Science Review, 27 March 2019

(https://forum.arctic-sea-ice.net/proxy.php?request=http%3A%2F%2Fwww.realclear.com%2Fcomics%2Fnon_sequitur%2Fimages%2F2016%2F10%2Fnon_sequitur_october_13_2016_6_.gif&hash=a2d24221c17228516f7d95532fe1fb77)
Title: Re: Wildlife
Post by: Sebastian Jones on April 12, 2019, 08:44:28 PM
From the ethically questionable pile ...

Chinese Scientists Added Human Brain Genes to Monkeys—and Yes, They May Be Smarter
https://www.technologyreview.com/s/613277/chinese-scientists-have-put-human-brain-genes-in-monkeysand-yes-they-may-be-smarter/


It is hard to imagine what the ethical review for this project entailed, not to mention the rhetorical skills of the proponents who succeeded.
Title: Re: Wildlife
Post by: Mozi on April 12, 2019, 09:28:57 PM
It is hard to imagine what the ethical review for this project entailed, not to mention the rhetorical skills of the proponents who succeeded.

"Come on... what's the worst thing that could happen, anyways?"
Title: Re: Wildlife
Post by: Sleepy on May 06, 2019, 08:17:25 AM
Curiosity and Control, a nice Swedish documentary about our dented relation to nature.
https://www.svtplay.se/video/19863562/curiosity-and-control (https://www.svtplay.se/video/19863562/curiosity-and-control)

Hardcoded Swedish subtitles but mostly in English with some French commentary. Hopefully viewable elsewhere. Adding a small snippet below.

The above documentary only has two days left on svtplay, apart from the snippet I posted above, here's the trailer:

https://vimeo.com/292695747
Title: Re: Wildlife
Post by: Archimid on May 06, 2019, 03:53:31 PM
The beavers find themselves in an environment more favorable to them, thus they grow. You could say that in the beaver world the dam industry is flourishing. As the dam economy grows so does the standard of living of the beavers. That makes them grow to the point where they change the environment around them. They could reach a point when their growth overwhelms the environment and causes a collapse of the dam economy and of the beaver population.

Stupid beavers. Don't they know what they are doing to themselves?
Title: Re: Wildlife
Post by: Pmt111500 on May 10, 2019, 05:05:03 AM
New family of small lepidoptera (butterflies and moths) discovered, two previously unknown species found in Kazakhstan proved not to belong to Urodidae but to a linking group. The placement of Urodidae in the systematic order has been in dispute. The newly formed family of 2 species, Ustyurtiidae, fly during the day, in the early summer, and the caterpillars live above ground during the summer of the desert. Kazakh desert temperatures may rise well above 40°C (105°F).

https://www.helsinki.fi/en/news/life-science-news/finnish-researchers-discover-a-new-moth-family

The image of the habitat and the hostplant (© Lauri Kaila)
Title: Re: Wildlife
Post by: gerontocrat on May 30, 2019, 11:41:00 AM
A small event but there are similar and recent stories from puffin colonies in the North Atlantic - the shape of things to come.

https://www.bbc.co.uk/news/science-environment-48447394
Climate change link to puffin deaths

Quote
Climate change played a role in the deaths of thousands of puffins in Alaska, according to a study.

Scientists believe the birds starved to death when the fish they eat migrated north with rising sea temperatures.

The bodies of dead, emaciated puffins began washing up on beaches on Saint Paul Island in autumn 2016. Up to 9,000 puffins and other seabirds died over the course of a few months, US scientists say.

And climate-driven shifts in fish populations, combined with the onset of moulting, may have caused this mass die-off. "Mass mortality events are increasing in frequency and magnitude, potentially linked with ongoing climate change," researchers led by Timothy Jones of the University of Washington, Seattle, wrote in the journal Plos One.

The findings add to fears that rising temperatures are having unpredictable effects on birds, bats and other wildlife. A recent study found birds nesting in the Arctic faced a bigger risk of having their nests raided by predators due to changes linked to climate change. And over two days last November, record-breaking heat in Australia's north wiped out almost one-third of the nation's spectacled flying foxes, according to researchers.

The latest study looked at tufted puffins breeding in the Bering Sea, off the coast of Alaska. The birds feed on fish and marine invertebrates, which in turn feed on ocean plankton. Scientists fear that unusually warm waters can shift the ocean food web, spelling trouble for marine life, including puffins.
Title: Re: Wildlife
Post by: be cause on May 30, 2019, 12:03:29 PM
Here my fears of Ash tree dieback are being realised. Almost all the large trees on the farm are ash as are 90% in the area . #########As they die we will lose much of our species diversity .. so much is dependent on the ivy that the ash trees support . I have campaigned for years for ivy to be protected . Now much of it is doomed with the trees .
 I had hoped we may have some resistance locally , but young trees I have let grow over the last decade have failed to produce leaves other than on a few lonely twigs ..

 The Norse said the end of the Ash was the end of the world .. b.c.
Title: Re: Wildlife
Post by: sidd on May 30, 2019, 08:43:54 PM
Re: ash dieback

Ash borer ? i been burning a lot of ash for firewood over the last few years as a great many ash trees had to be felled. Tapering off now, looks like the ash borer ran outta trees ...

sidd
Title: Re: Wildlife
Post by: Tom_Mazanec on June 03, 2019, 01:07:46 PM
MPs to debate rewilding:
https://www.independent.co.uk/environment/climate-change-breakdown-rewilding-petition-carbon-nature-recovery-a8940701.html
Title: Re: Wildlife
Post by: Tom_Mazanec on June 05, 2019, 03:58:22 PM
Climate change threatens Cerrado's biodiversity:
https://www.dw.com/en/germany-pushes-climate-change-as-security-risk/a-49056370
Title: Re: Wildlife
Post by: b_lumenkraft on June 05, 2019, 04:01:52 PM
I think a copy&paste mistake just happened Tom.
Title: Re: Wildlife
Post by: vox_mundi on June 05, 2019, 04:19:40 PM
Moved: Chimpanzees In the Wild Reduced To 'Forest Ghettos'
https://phys.org/news/2019-06-chimpanzees-wild-forest-ghettos.html

All four sub-species of the African primate are threatened with extinction, with at least one—the western chimpanzee—declining in number by more than 80 percent over three generations.

Forty chimp experts from around the world—with a combined 300 years of field experience—issued a collective appeal to save the only animal whose DNA overlaps with humans by 98 percent.

"Over the decades that we have been working with wild chimpanzee communities, we have all seen our study groups become isolated," they said in a statement.

"Chimpanzees are being reduced into living in forest ghettos."

Quote
... "When we first arrived in the Ndoki forest, the chimpanzees would often approach us with curiosity, ... Now they hide."

... The famed anthropologist Irven DeVore once marvelled at humanity's indifference to our closest primate cousins.

"If we, in our travels in space, should encounter a creature that shared 98 percent of our genetic makeup, think of the money we would spend to study this species," he said.

"Such creatures exist on Earth and we are allowing them to become extinct."
Title: Re: Wildlife
Post by: Tom_Mazanec on June 05, 2019, 05:55:33 PM
I think a copy&paste mistake just happened Tom.


Sigh...yup  :(

https://news.mongabay.com/2019/06/climate-change-threatens-to-water-down-cerrados-rich-biodiversity-study/

Title: Re: Wildlife
Post by: Ardeus on June 10, 2019, 01:30:08 PM
I just finished a doc series about Lake Tanganyika. Here's the trailer of the 7th chapter:

https://youtu.be/eqrBWp7U-qk

Peter Wadhams and Guy McPherson were a bit surprised that I wanted their input for a Lake Tanganyika doc, but they went along :)
Title: Re: Wildlife
Post by: ivica on June 12, 2019, 09:50:47 AM
Punjab and Haryana High Court (https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Punjab_and_Haryana_High_Court) Declares:
All animals are ‘legal persons’, all citizens are the guardians of the animal kingdom with a duty to ensure their welfare and protection.
https://www.thebetterindia.com/185543/animal-rights-india-court-judgement-cruelty-prevention/

(https://akm-img-a-in.tosshub.com/indiatoday/images/story/201807/man-eater_650_032414055556.jpeg)
"I'm gonna sue you!"   Source (https://www.indiatoday.in/india/story/animals-are-legal-persons-all-citizens-their-parents-orders-uttarakhand-hc-1277559-2018-07-04).

Title: Re: Wildlife
Post by: vox_mundi on June 14, 2019, 08:19:40 PM
NOAA: 260 Dolphins Dead on Gulf Coast, Triple Usual Number
https://phys.org/news/2019-06-noaa-dolphins-dead-gulf-coast.html

National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration scientists say it's too early to know the cause. But they're investigating whether lingering effects from the 2010 oil spill and salinity changes from high rivers and a Louisiana spillway opening contributed.

NOAA says on its website that a number of the dolphins stranded from Louisiana to the Florida Panhandle had sores consistent with freshwater exposure, but those are common in the spring.

A Mississippi scientist says the spillway opening is at least partly to blame for 126 deaths across Mississippi's coastline. Moby Solangi calls it worse than the BP spill. He says 91 dead dolphins were found in Mississippi during all of 2010.
Title: Re: Wildlife
Post by: wdmn on June 17, 2019, 06:55:57 PM
So Many Dead Whales Are Washing Up On The West Coast That NOAA Is Pleading For Help

https://www.huffingtonpost.ca/entry/dead-gray-whales-decompose-noaa_n_5d06c71ce4b0304a1211ab62

Local organizations have struggled to dispose of 70 dead gray whales that have washed up along America’s West Coast. Now, a federal agency is turning to private property owners for help.

The tragic die-off is the highest in 20 years. Scientists believe most of the massive animals are starving to death and speculate that it’s because food sources are vanishing in the dramatically warmer waters triggered by climate change.

....

The whales that have washed up so far are considered to be just a fraction of the death toll, as many of the animals decompose at sea or end up on remote rock outcroppings or small islands.

Gray whales spend the summer in the northern Bering and Chukchi Seas, where they consume nearly a year’s worth of nourishment so they can migrate south to Mexico for the winter. Sea ice has been at or near record lows off Alaska, with rising temperatures likely impacting the population of amphipods crustaceans that are the whales’ primary source of food, according to NOAA.

The emaciated whales, now migrating north, are likely showing the impact of poor feeding last summer, according to officials.
______________________________


If this truly is causally linked to diminishing ice in the Bering and Chukchi, Gray whales are not going to have a good year next year...
Title: Re: Wildlife
Post by: wdmn on June 21, 2019, 05:00:30 AM
More on the dead gray whales:

3 more gray whale carcasses found in Alaska amid spike in deaths along West Coast

https://www.adn.com/alaska-news/wildlife/2019/06/20/3-more-gray-whale-carcasses-found-in-alaska-amid-spike-in-deaths-along-west-coast/

Three more gray whales were found dead along the coasts of Alaska this week as scientists continue to investigate why so many of the marine mammals are dying as they migrate up the West Coast.

So far this year, 167 dead gray whales have been found dead from Mexico to Alaska, according to the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration. The number of the carcasses found on U.S. shores, 81, is the most since 2000.

Many of the dead whales were skinny, NOAA said. Some scientists think it’s likely the whales didn’t get enough to eat last summer in the Bering and Chukchi seas.

By Thursday, the tally of dead gray whales in Alaska had climbed to 10. Normally by this time of year, just three or four carcasses are reported, according to NOAA data from 2016 to 2018.


Title: Re: Wildlife
Post by: wdmn on June 25, 2019, 03:57:00 PM
Dying walruses

https://youtu.be/qVJzQc9ELTE
Title: Re: Wildlife
Post by: forkyfork on June 29, 2019, 01:18:11 AM
being a conservationist in the united states comes with a heavy emotional price

https://www.audubon.org/news/proposed-pipeline-would-cut-through-golden-cheeked-warbler-habitat
Title: Re: Wildlife
Post by: sidd on June 29, 2019, 01:28:13 AM
As Leopold said, we live in a world of wounds.

sidd
Title: Re: Wildlife
Post by: nanning on June 29, 2019, 10:24:00 AM
Dying walruses
That was indeed heartbreaking.
Title: Re: Wildlife
Post by: Tom_Mazanec on June 29, 2019, 07:22:38 PM
What kind of species will we have in Century 22? Will deer be left? Mongooses? Rats? Roaches? Nothing?
Title: Re: Wildlife
Post by: kassy on June 29, 2019, 07:39:17 PM
These guys will be around:
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Tardigrade
Title: Re: Wildlife
Post by: Rod on June 29, 2019, 07:52:56 PM
These guys will be around:
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Tardigrade

Those things are incredible! 👍🏻

https://www.americanscientist.org/article/tardigrades

Title: Re: Wildlife
Post by: Sebastian Jones on June 30, 2019, 07:01:18 AM
Under the category of amazing animal feats, a radio collared  arctic fox left Svalbard on March 26th, heading for Ellesmere, and arrived on June 10. It  detoured north around open water, crossed the Greenland sea, then took a look at the Greenland ice cap in winter, because, you know, bored, picked its way across the Nares- after the arch had collapsed and arrived at Ellesmere on June 10th!
https://thebarentsobserver.com/en/ecology/2019/06/arctic-fox-across-polar-ice-makes-record-run-svalbard-canada-25-month?fbclid=IwAR3KYMP5E63StCMbV2YpJYRlpzQHNy42-1DgsxC_V7C9SP1lWFmMqk6R0Oc (https://thebarentsobserver.com/en/ecology/2019/06/arctic-fox-across-polar-ice-makes-record-run-svalbard-canada-25-month?fbclid=IwAR3KYMP5E63StCMbV2YpJYRlpzQHNy42-1DgsxC_V7C9SP1lWFmMqk6R0Oc)
Title: Re: Wildlife
Post by: sidd on June 30, 2019, 09:31:54 AM
Thanks for that article on Arctic foxes. There are so many things in this world that are not dreamed of by my understanding. The world is full of marvellous things waiting for our senses to get sharper.

sidd
Title: Re: Wildlife
Post by: ArcticMelt2 on July 03, 2019, 07:31:54 PM
Everywhere warming kills the biosphere - from the Amazon River to the Arctic Circle.

https://twitter.com/m_parrington/status/1146084205727801344

Quote
Unprecedented #wildfire activity in the #Arctic Circle in June 2019, with notable widespread fires in Sakha Republic, Russia for much of the last 3 weeks, as estimated with #Copernicus Atmosphere Monitoring Service GFAS data based on MODIS 🛰️obs

(https://pbs.twimg.com/media/D-e0CzJXYAUMxAK.png)

(https://pbs.twimg.com/media/D-e0B-2WkAMHTUi.png)

(https://pbs.twimg.com/media/D-e0BGQXsAEzK7J.jpg)

(https://pbs.twimg.com/media/D-jkfmCX4AATfBe.png)
Title: Re: Wildlife
Post by: ArcticMelt2 on July 03, 2019, 07:33:26 PM
The total energy of forest fires in the Arctic in the past month is equal to a 200-gigawatt coal-fired power station, which emitted 50 million tons of carbon dioxide per month.
Title: Re: Wildlife
Post by: Niall Dollard on July 04, 2019, 09:38:10 AM
Under the category of amazing animal feats, a radio collared  arctic fox left Svalbard on March 26th, heading for Ellesmere, and arrived on June 10. It  detoured north around open water, crossed the Greenland sea, then took a look at the Greenland ice cap in winter, because, you know, bored, picked its way across the Nares- after the arch had collapsed and arrived at Ellesmere on June 10th!


What an amazing journey !

You say after the arch collapsed Sebastian, however the arch was still intact up to the very end of June last year. The same route could hardly have been chosen this year because we had no arch in the Kane Basin and would have been very tricky !

Here's the timelapse:

https://giphy.com/gifs/Q67UV1IkG36cGlz1dd
Title: Re: Wildlife
Post by: vox_mundi on July 05, 2019, 06:40:48 PM
Surge in Sick, Hungry Sea Lions Off California Coast
https://phys.org/news/2019-07-surge-sick-hungry-sea-lions.html

A rise in the number of ailing and malnourished sea lions along the California coastline has marine experts somewhat puzzled, KNTV reports.

Some of the adult California sea lions may be suffering from domoic acid poisoning, related to toxic algae blooms in the ocean, according to the station. But experts aren't sure why they're also seeing more malnourished pups.

"Whether there is some underlying condition, we haven't been able to determine," Frankfurter said, KNTV reported. It may be related to the domoic acid poisoning cases in adults.

The upswing follows a similar surge in sea lion strandings in spring 2018 as well as a rise in California gray whale deaths in early 2019, KRON reported.

"We're seeing a lot of different animals being impacted from the gray whales that are coming in thin to the issues that we are seeing with Guadalupe animals and the sea lions up and down the coast," Frankfurter said, according to the station. "It's definitely a sign of the ocean overall. All of it might (connect) to climate change, relating to warming oceans."
Title: Re: Wildlife
Post by: wdmn on July 10, 2019, 07:23:54 AM
More on the dead gray whales:

3 more gray whale carcasses found in Alaska amid spike in deaths along West Coast

https://www.adn.com/alaska-news/wildlife/2019/06/20/3-more-gray-whale-carcasses-found-in-alaska-amid-spike-in-deaths-along-west-coast/

Three more gray whales were found dead along the coasts of Alaska this week as scientists continue to investigate why so many of the marine mammals are dying as they migrate up the West Coast.

So far this year, 167 dead gray whales have been found dead from Mexico to Alaska, according to the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration. The number of the carcasses found on U.S. shores, 81, is the most since 2000.

Many of the dead whales were skinny, NOAA said. Some scientists think it’s likely the whales didn’t get enough to eat last summer in the Bering and Chukchi seas.

By Thursday, the tally of dead gray whales in Alaska had climbed to 10. Normally by this time of year, just three or four carcasses are reported, according to NOAA data from 2016 to 2018.

And more...

Alaska up to 22 dead gray whales this season with 7 reported over holiday weekend

https://www.ktuu.com/content/news/Alaska-up-to-22-dead-gray-whales-7-reported-holiday-weekend-512502861.html

The state of Alaska is up to 22 confirmed gray whale deaths this season, according to NOAA spokesperson Julie Speegle. Seven additional sightings were confirmed over the long holiday weekend, Speegle said, with one necropsy having been completed.

As of June 27, the site reported 14 Alaska whales, and 85 total for the U.S. The total for the U.S., Canada and Mexico this season was reported at 171 by that date.

*****

If my math is correct, then these additional dead whales would bring the total to at least 179, not counting any whales that may have been found in Mexico, contiguous U.S. or Canada since June 27th.
Title: Re: Wildlife
Post by: kassy on July 10, 2019, 05:53:03 PM
The total population is estimated 26k?
Title: Re: Wildlife
Post by: wdmn on July 10, 2019, 06:14:38 PM
The total population is estimated 26k?

Yes, so not a crisis at this point (though of course the number of confirmed dead are only a fraction of the total deaths, since not all whales end up on shore).

But if this is related to lack of ice and warming of the Bering and Chukchi seas last year, then we will likely see an even higher number of mortalities next year...
Title: Re: Wildlife
Post by: kassy on July 10, 2019, 06:59:14 PM
The 179 are 0,69% of the population.

Are those all returning or do they include reports from the start of the season migrating south?

I will dig through this thread a bit to see if i can find some more numbers for the other areas.
Title: Re: Wildlife
Post by: ArcticMelt2 on July 10, 2019, 07:09:19 PM
Also note that the indigenous peoples of the Arctic (the Chukchi and the Eskimos) are allowed to kill several hundred gray whales every year.

Whales, like elephants, are prime candidates for extinction because of their size. Like once dinosaurs that could not compete with smaller mammals.

And they say that with warming a tropical paradise will come on the entire planet - a repeat of the era of dinosaurs. And in fact, the planet turns into a lifeless wasteland.
Title: Re: Wildlife
Post by: wdmn on July 10, 2019, 08:19:44 PM
The 179 are 0,69% of the population.

Are those all returning or do they include reports from the start of the season migrating south?

I will dig through this thread a bit to see if i can find some more numbers for the other areas.

Taken from reply 240:

"Gray whales spend the summer in the northern Bering and Chukchi Seas, where they consume nearly a year’s worth of nourishment so they can migrate south to Mexico for the winter. Sea ice has been at or near record lows off Alaska, with rising temperatures likely impacting the population of amphipods crustaceans that are the whales’ primary source of food, according to NOAA.

The emaciated whales, now migrating north, are likely showing the impact of poor feeding last summer, according to officials."

The data just says mortalities from 2019. Most of them would be from the migration northwards.

If there are a number of whales already weak now arriving in the Bering and Chukchi, and if warming waters effecting availability of food really is the main factor, then I am guessing there will be moralities on the trip south this year as well as the trip north next year.
Title: Re: Wildlife
Post by: kassy on July 10, 2019, 09:21:23 PM
https://www.fisheries.noaa.gov/national/marine-life-distress/2019-gray-whale-unusual-mortality-event-along-west-coast

Gray Whale Strandings (as of June 27, 2019)

U.S. State       2019
Alaska       14
Washington    29
Oregon       5
California       37
Total               85
 
Country   2019
Canada     8
U.S.           85
Mexico   78
Total         171

I think this is the breakdown? So that would include the whole route.

 
Title: Re: Wildlife
Post by: vox_mundi on July 18, 2019, 05:28:41 PM
Tiger, Rhinos Flee to Higher Ground in India's Flood-Hit Assam
https://phys.org/news/2019-07-tiger-rhinos-higher-ground-india.html

(https://img.youm7.com/ArticleImgs/2019/7/18/40495-%D9%88%D8%AD%D9%8A%D8%AF-%D8%A7%D9%84%D9%82%D8%B1%D9%86-%D9%81%D9%89-%D8%A7%D9%84%D9%87%D9%86%D8%AF.jpg)

... Wild buffalos running in floodwaters, exhausted rhinos resting on patches of land and elephants crossing a road were some of the unusual sights as World Heritage-listed Kaziranga National Park rangers raced to reach animals struggling in the waters.

The UNESCO-recognised Kaziranga is home to two-thirds of the world's remaining one-horned rhinos and several have been spotted basking in the sun on a patches of high ground surrounded by water.

More than 50 wild animals have died so far, including some in traffic accidents, as they tried to cross a busy highway outside the park and reach the nearby Karbi hills, local media reported.

... The floods, which are in their second week, have so far killed at least 27 people in Assam, sweeping away houses and boats. Across South Asia, including Nepal, Bangladesh and Pakistan, the death toll has risen above 300 with millions of residents affected and hundreds of thousands displaced.
Title: Re: Wildlife
Post by: vox_mundi on July 22, 2019, 05:00:34 PM
Animals' Body Sizes Shrinking from Climate Change
https://phys.org/news/2019-07-animals-body-sizes-climate.html

University of Cape Town (UCT) researchers have collected clear evidence—over a 23 year period between 1976 and 1999—that climate change is shrinking animals' body sizes.

From the fossil record, it is known that during past periods of global warming, both marine and land-based animals have become smaller. And scientists have proposed that contemporary warming could lead to smaller animals, but so far, evidence supporting this has been scarce.

To investigate this idea and whether it could be true, the research team looked at a group of wagtails living along the Palmiet River. What they found supports the idea that climate change can shrink Earth's animals.

"All else being equal, larger animals can tolerate cold conditions better than smaller animals, so one could expect that a warming climate is relatively more advantageous for smaller animals," said Professor Altwegg.

"A lot of other factors also affect body size, though, so we weren't expecting to find clear temperature effects over a quarter of a century. Yet, the results clearly supported the idea that climate change was the reason why these birds became smaller over time," he added.

... The ramifications of this potential impact would extend beyond the organisms themselves, though. This effect of climate change could result in changes across ecosystems. Body size is an important indicator of an animal's fertility, lifespan and ability to survive times of stress, such as food shortages or drought. Body size also affects how much food an animal needs, how vulnerable it is to predators and what type of food it can eat.

Jorinde Prokosch et al. Are animals shrinking due to climate change? Temperature-mediated selection on body mass in mountain wagtails (https://link.springer.com/article/10.1007%2Fs00442-019-04368-2), Oecologia (2019)
Title: Re: Wildlife
Post by: Tor Bejnar on July 22, 2019, 08:45:13 PM
Study shows saving elephants helps us fight climate change (https://theprint.in/environment/study-shows-saving-elephants-helps-us-fight-climate-change/265029/)
Quote
What elephants eat and how they eat contribute significantly to forest biomass, research has shown.

The key novelty of the new study, by the ecologist Fabio Berzaghi and colleagues, is they include, for the first time, the effect of elephant feeding disturbances in a computer model that simulates demographic processes in forest ecosystems. They found that “elephant disturbance” – all that messy eating – results in forests having fewer, larger trees. Elephants filter out small early-succession (i.e. low wood density) trees, promoting the dominance of late-succession (high wood density) trees, which ultimately leads to long-term increases in the total biomass. Berzaghi and colleagues were able to validate their model predictions with data from real forest plots in the Congo Basin.

By promoting these larger, woodier trees, elephant feeding disturbances therefore mean the forest stores more carbon. ...
Title: Re: Wildlife
Post by: blumenkraft on August 27, 2019, 09:11:57 PM
North Slope Alaska Mosquitoes – Humans Versus Trillions

https://www.thealaskalife.com/blog/north-slope-alaska-mosquitoes-trillions/
Title: Re: Wildlife
Post by: DrTskoul on August 28, 2019, 01:10:52 AM
Have you seen northern boreal mosquitoes?? Giant !!!
Title: Re: Wildlife
Post by: sidd on September 06, 2019, 07:31:38 AM
Nice paper on whales and song sharing. Guess they dont respect copyright ... more power to them.

https://royalsocietypublishing.org/doi/10.1098/rsos.190337

open access. audio in the supplementary. beautiful.

sidd
Title: Re: Wildlife
Post by: Sigmetnow on September 17, 2019, 05:59:49 PM
Sea World is stepping back from captive animal exhibits and is now emphasizing amusement rides and food (let’s hope it’s vegan).

CEOs Are Also Endangered at SeaWorld Entertainment
https://www.fool.com/investing/2019/09/17/ceos-are-also-endangered-at-seaworld-entertainment.aspx
Title: Re: Wildlife
Post by: Sigmetnow on November 08, 2019, 01:50:05 PM
Quote
Steve Stewart-Williams (@SteveStuWill)11/7/19, 6:51 PM
No big deal; just a guy playing fetch with a beluga whale...  :o
https://twitter.com/stevestuwill/status/1192590475909140481
Image below; video at the link.
Title: Re: Wildlife
Post by: vox_mundi on November 08, 2019, 05:43:57 PM
Emperor Penguins Could March to Extinction If Nations Fail to Halt Climate Change
https://phys.org/news/2019-11-emperor-penguins-extinction-nations-halt.html

(https://scx1.b-cdn.net/csz/news/800/2019/3-emperorpengu.jpg)

(https://scx1.b-cdn.net/csz/news/800/2019/4-emperorpengu.jpg)

(https://scx2.b-cdn.net/gfx/news/2019/5-emperorpengu.jpg)
Title: Re: Wildlife
Post by: ivica on December 08, 2019, 04:23:30 PM
We have to protect whales from us (https://forum.arctic-sea-ice.net/index.php/topic,2346.msg239927.html#msg239927) so that whales can help diversity and sustainability of life (https://forum.arctic-sea-ice.net/index.php/topic,2346.msg239962/topicseen.html#msg239962), our lives included!

The Sea Shepherds Protecting Humpbacks From Whaling! | The Blue Realm | Real Wild Documentary, Published Feb 7, 2019

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Xu4PT_gkCPE

"Humpback whales were hunted to the brink of extinction until a moratorium was implemented in the 1980s. After finally rebounding in numbers, whaling nations are exploring ways to re-open the hunt. In Antarctica, Japan is targeting minke, fin and now...humpbacks. We explore how The Sea Shepherd Society is protecting Humpbacks from these attacks!"

Title: Re: Wildlife
Post by: ivica on December 10, 2019, 11:09:32 AM
Karnataka WildLife and Nature Video

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=KxHN1xQIX9Y
by Ricky Kej et al.
Title: Re: Wildlife
Post by: nanning on December 10, 2019, 05:28:21 PM
I think you may like this ivica:


Orca grandmothers babysit young whales, study finds
Research on 378 killer whales finds those with grandmothers live longer and the older females help them when food is scarce.

https://www.theguardian.com/environment/2019/dec/10/orca-grandmothers-babysit-young-whales-study-finds

First paragraphs:

Doting killer whale grandmothers help their grand calves survive, particularly in times of food scarcity, scientists reported in a paper that sheds new light on the evolutionary role of menopause.

Orca females stop reproducing in their thirties or forties but can continue to live for decades more, a phenomenon known only to exist in humans and four other mammal species, all of which are whales.


edit: in a living nature environment older males have better sperm because dna changes with experience throughout a males' life. But only in the natural world. i.e. Paradise, because it's everything you're made for.
Title: Re: Wildlife
Post by: ivica on December 10, 2019, 05:54:49 PM
Thanks for the post  nanning.
Short remark on "We also suspect babysitting": Even sparrows do babysitting - kindergarten style, i witnessed it many times. (and, a crow not only babysitting juvenile rook but also teaching it to fly...)
Title: Re: Wildlife
Post by: sidd on February 23, 2020, 12:13:55 AM
Leakey is pessimistic: Anderson interview at new yorker

" I am not persuaded of the prospects for wildlife unless something gives, and I don’t see it."

“Our population is growing too fast; our resource base isn’t growing with it, and, with the crisis of climate change ... the fact is that the mean temperature is getting warmer, the rainfall is getting less, the snowmelt is increasing, the ice formation is less, oceans are rising. It’s a strangulation grip on the environment ... if you take the change in climate and you take the impact of temperature and the unavailability of land to grow viable crops on, your animal husbandry is getting squeezed out because there isn’t the open-range land on which you can raise cattle which you can sell in markets, so there’s a narrowing down of the options for humanity, and how you fit people and animals into that has to be a big question mark.”

"The fact is that the problems we all face now are far beyond the power of individual conservationists to cope with."

"my time frame is only fifty years to look for some really positive change. I think the potential’s there. I don’t see the signs that it’s started yet, but I have been an ardent believer that the elephants must live and the rhinos shouldn’t be destroyed"

"It may not be possible to recover the environment sufficiently for wildlife in the next thirty or forty years ... I think you could probably sustain enough biodiversity and genetic material to bring back the ecosystems with the range of species that once lived there, but you can’t do it unless you recognize that for a while you may go through some very bleak times"

"in the longer term, say, in a timescale of several hundred years, I can be very optimistic."

https://www.newyorker.com/culture/culture-desk/can-the-wildlife-of-east-africa-be-saved-a-visit-with-richard-leakey

sidd
Title: Re: Wildlife
Post by: sidd on February 23, 2020, 12:27:42 AM
Self medicating animals: Motivans at ZME

"Michael Huffman saw a sick chimp ridden with parasites that chewed on leaves of a noxious plant and recovered by the next day. Other researchers have observed bonobos take leaves that cause itchy skin and layer many of them on their tongues, carefully avoiding touching their skin. They use saliva to stick a whole ball of leaves together that they then swallow whole. The reason that they layer the leaves is so that it becomes a sort of time-release medication that acts over a longer period of time."

"There’s a special type of anti-parasitic milkweed and only infected butterflies lay their eggs on it; healthy butterflies don’t look twice at it. However, by laying their eggs on it, infected butterflies ensure that their offspring are protected from infection. "

"the woolly bear caterpillar, which ingests plants that are toxic to parasites, and fruit flies, which lay their eggs in the alcohol from fermented fruit to keep parasitic wasps away from their offspring."

"Some birds have started stuffing an unlikely material into their nests: cigarette butts. No, they’re not ne’er-do-well parents. On the contrary, they could actually be using the chemicals in the butts as medicine against parasitic mites,"

"Honey bees often collect resins produced by plants and stick them onto their hive. In particular, they use resins as medication after a fungal infection."

"lizards that eat a particular root after being bitten by a venomous snake, baboons with flatworms that cause schistosomiasis eat the leaves from a particular plant to get rid of those nasty parasites, and pregnant elephants in Kenya that eat tree leaves to induce delivery"

https://www.zmescience.com/ecology/animals-ecology/animals-take-medicine-when-they-are-sick-a-few-striking-cases/

sidd
Title: Re: Wildlife
Post by: sidd on February 23, 2020, 12:30:06 AM
Kill your lawn: Breyer at treehugger

"Each one of us can work to bring back those populations by collaborating on what I call the 'Homegrown National Park,' a collective preserve built in and out of our own private yards,"

"if every landowner converted just half of their lawn to productive native plant communities, we could transform more than 20 million acres of "ecological wasteland" into insect-supporting habitat."

"Homeowners in all but the driest areas of the country should plant oaks, Those who want meadows should be sure to have goldenrod, asters, and sunflowers. In general, native plants support the life cycles of 10 to 100 times more insect species than nonnative plants, and a few plants (such as native cherries and willows) serve as hosts for 10 to 100 times more insects than most other native varieties."

"homeowners use more insecticides per acre than farms do."

https://www.treehugger.com/lawn-garden/please-kill-your-lawn.html

sidd
Title: Re: Wildlife
Post by: sidd on March 03, 2020, 07:39:23 AM
Deep voices, deep thoughts: Lieff on the lives, deaths, and discourse of giants

"Three million years ago elephants took their current form at the time of the early human ancestors in Africa ...  Elephant’s brain size appeared to increase at the same time as humans (the past million years)."

"The elephant’s primary social unit is a mother, related females and children."

"It was once thought that males are loners because they wander by themselves much of the time. But, it is now known that they, also, form an elaborate network of friends and relations that last their entire life."

"Elephant communication is elaborate involving many different verbalizations—trumpets, low deep sounds, and chirps—and many different gestures—taps, nudges, kicks, caresses of the trunk, flapping ears, head movements, leaning and posturing."

"Elephants can communicate in low deep rumbles that humans cannot hear. These sounds can travel up to five miles. "

"elephants can distinguish between different human languages and the sex and age of the speaker by just hearing human speech."

"Elephants hold a council to make decisions. "

"Elephants pay special attention to any elephant bones they find—not other species. They walk very carefully to the bones, systematically investigate and caress them with their trunk, and then try to cover them with dirt and leaves. "

"Elephants mourn loved ones by returning to the body and bones of the deceased for years to place leaves and sticks on the site."

"In one incident, a group of elephants walked on a long journey to mourn a lost human friend."

"elephants are extremely aware and compassionate—frequently consoling each other."

"elephants use primarily touch, smell and sound. Sight is not as significant. "

"Elephants have an internal sense of self, an advanced sense of family, social interactions and loyalty that extends for many decades. "

" Some elephants have learned to paint—holding the brush with their trunks and dipping the brush into a variety of paint colors in bowls. "

" the way that elephants are kept in most zoos is equivalent to a prison sentence."

"Of the 300 in accredited zoos in US, 80% have behavioral ticks and most are physically ill. Studies show they live much longer when not in captivity."

"It doesn’t seem possible to keep an elephant healthy in a zoo. Most spend 80% of their time cramped indoors. They can’t sleep because they don’t like concrete. "

"It is time to protect them and release them from prisons."

http://jonlieffmd.com/blog/elephant-culture

I like elephants. As a child i spent summer holidays around a bunch of them. They were very kind to me.

sidd
Title: Re: Wildlife
Post by: Tom_Mazanec on March 03, 2020, 09:11:47 AM
The honey badger that is smarter than his owner:
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=c36UNSoJenI
Title: Re: Wildlife
Post by: nanning on March 03, 2020, 09:29:32 AM
It is not funny to imprison an elephant.

It is not funny to imprison a badger.
Title: Re: Wildlife
Post by: Tom_Mazanec on March 03, 2020, 11:28:50 AM
It is not funny to imprison an elephant.

It is not funny to imprison a badger.
Stoffle is in a wildlife rehabilitation center. He was injured as a cub and imprinted on his human caregivers in the center. He cannot be released to the wild.
He was injured by one of the center's lions, and tried to go back to them. The center is doing the best it can.
Title: Re: Wildlife
Post by: Tom_Mazanec on March 05, 2020, 05:23:30 PM
I know ferrets are domesticated, not wildlife, but this is too adorable.
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=7wzNIP-7yQE
Title: Re: Wildlife
Post by: blumenkraft on March 23, 2020, 10:42:14 AM
Starvation death looms as huge amount of snow piles up over icy crust

Quote
“It’s a serious crisis,” says Elisabeth Aspaker, County Governor of Norway’s northernmost region. She calls on everyone not to disturb the reindeer as “they need all their energy to find food.”

Link >> https://thebarentsobserver.com/en/ecology/2020/03/starvation-death-looms-reindeer-huge-amount-snow-pile-over-icy-crust
Title: Re: Wildlife
Post by: blumenkraft on March 31, 2020, 12:03:19 PM
Climate refugees: Kittiwakes flee bird cliffs to resettle in urban spaces

Quote
For humans they are noisy and messy neighbours, but they come for a reason. Stronger storms and wilder weather by the coast give fewer surviving chicks in their natural bird cliff habitat.

Link >> https://thebarentsobserver.com/en/ecology/2020/03/climate-refugees-kittiwakes-flee-bird-cliffs-resettle-urban-space
Title: Re: Wildlife
Post by: Sigmetnow on April 07, 2020, 01:08:43 AM
”Somewhere in China there's a bat getting high-fives from every other animal he sees.”


https://twitter.com/thetweetofgod/status/1243234026002870272
Title: Re: Wildlife
Post by: Tor Bejnar on June 01, 2020, 06:47:22 PM
For India’s Wildlife, the [Covid-19] Lockdown Isn’t the Good News Many Think It Is (https://science.thewire.in/environment/sorry-to-burst-your-bubble-the-lockdown-isnt-helping-wildlife-in-india/)
Quote
... The skies are bluer, the birds are chirping, and deer, peacock and elephants are reclaiming the streets.

A different story, however, is unfolding for wildlife in India’s national parks.
...
... in reality, wildlife tourism – with its many additional eyes and income streams – keeps illegal hunting and excessive resource extraction at bay.
...
Not surprising, but sad.
Title: Re: Wildlife
Post by: blumenkraft on June 07, 2020, 07:11:36 PM
A bacterium common to farm animals is threatening the Arctic’s muskoxen

Link >> https://www.arctictoday.com/a-bacterium-common-to-farm-animals-is-threatening-the-arctics-muskoxen
Title: Re: Wildlife
Post by: Freegrass on June 14, 2020, 04:33:48 AM
Want to hear something magical?  Experimental director, composer and playwright Jim Wilson recorded the sound of crickets and then slowed down the recording, revealing something so amazing. The crickets sound like they are singing the most angelic chorus in perfect harmony. Though it sounds like human voices, everything you hear is the crickets themselves.  There are two tracks, one is played at regular speed and the other is the slowed version. The singing you hear are the crickets only. No instruments or voices were added. 


https://youtu.be/OP6JGlv32nw (https://youtu.be/OP6JGlv32nw)
Title: Re: Wildlife
Post by: kassy on June 15, 2020, 03:28:29 PM
That is so cool.  :)

Title: Re: Wildlife
Post by: Freegrass on June 15, 2020, 04:32:39 PM
That is so cool.  :)
I love it when the chant comes in after 55 seconds. It truly is "angelic". Amazing nature. :)
Title: Re: Wildlife
Post by: Sigmetnow on July 01, 2020, 08:06:04 PM
Hundreds of elephants dead in mysterious mass die-off
Wed 1 Jul 2020
Quote
More than 350 elephants have died in northern Botswana in a mysterious mass die-off described by scientists as a “conservation disaster”.

A cluster of elephant deaths was first reported in the Okavango Delta in early May, with 169 individuals dead by the end of the month. By mid June, the number had more than doubled, with 70% of the deaths clustered around waterholes, according to local sources who wish to remain anonymous.

“This is a mass die-off on a level that hasn’t been seen in a very, very long time. Outside of drought, I don’t know of a die-off that has been this significant,” said Dr Niall McCann, the director of conservation at UK-based charity National Park Rescue.
...
Local witnesses say some elephants were seen walking around in circles, which is an indication of neurological impairment. “If you look at the carcasses, some of them have fallen straight on their face, indicating they died very quickly. Others are obviously dying more slowly, like the ones that are wandering around. So it’s very difficult to say what this toxin is,” said McCann.

Elephants of all ages and both sexes have been dying, local reports found. Several live elephants appeared weak and emaciated, suggesting more will die in the coming weeks. The true number of deaths is likely to be even higher because carcasses can be difficult to spot, say conservationists. ...
https://www.theguardian.com/environment/2020/jul/01/more-than-350-elephants-dead-in-mysterious-mass-die-off-botswana-aoe
Title: Re: Wildlife
Post by: wdmn on July 02, 2020, 11:14:34 PM
This could also go in Oceans, Agriculture and FOOD, but the impacts are extensive on non-food species too.

Warming temperatures threaten hundreds of fish species the world relies on, study finds

https://www.cnn.com/2020/07/02/weather/fish-vulnerable-ocean-warming-climate-change-scn/index.html

"As the planet's oceans and rivers warm, increased heat could pose a grave threat to the fish populations the world depends on by the end of this century.

That's the alarming conclusion of a new study published Thursday in the journal Science.
Among the species the authors said are at risk are some of the most commercially important species on Earth -- including grocery store staples like Atlantic cod, Alaska pollock and sockeye salmon, and sport fishing favorites like swordfish, barracuda and brown trout.

In fact, 60% of the fish species examined could struggle to reproduce in their current habitat ranges by the year 2100 if the climate crisis continues unchecked, according to the researchers.

If governments recommit themselves to holding global warming to 1.5 degrees Celsius, however, the scientists found the number of species threatened could be far less -- just 10%.

...

The study was conducted by a team of researchers based in Germany, who analyzed temperature tolerance data for nearly 700 species of marine and freshwater fish from climate zones around the world."

Link to (paywalled) journal article:
Thermal bottlenecks in the life cycle define climate vulnerability of fish

https://science.sciencemag.org/content/369/6499/65

Abstract: Species’ vulnerability to climate change depends on the most temperature-sensitive life stages, but for major animal groups such as fish, life cycle bottlenecks are often not clearly defined. We used observational, experimental, and phylogenetic data to assess stage-specific thermal tolerance metrics for 694 marine and freshwater fish species from all climate zones. Our analysis shows that spawning adults and embryos consistently have narrower tolerance ranges than larvae and nonreproductive adults and are most vulnerable to climate warming. The sequence of stage-specific thermal tolerance corresponds with the oxygen-limitation hypothesis, suggesting a mechanistic link between ontogenetic changes in cardiorespiratory (aerobic) capacity and tolerance to temperature extremes. A logarithmic inverse correlation between the temperature dependence of physiological rates (development and oxygen consumption) and thermal tolerance range is proposed to reflect a fundamental, energetic trade-off in thermal adaptation. Scenario-based climate projections considering the most critical life stages (spawners and embryos) clearly identify the temperature requirements for reproduction as a critical bottleneck in the life cycle of fish. By 2100, depending on the Shared Socioeconomic Pathway (SSP) scenario followed, the percentages of species potentially affected by water temperatures exceeding their tolerance limit for reproduction range from ~10% (SSP 1–1.9) to ~60% (SSP 5–8.5). Efforts to meet ambitious climate targets (SSP 1–1.9) could therefore benefit many fish species and people who depend on healthy fish stocks.
Title: Re: Wildlife
Post by: kassy on July 03, 2020, 01:38:48 PM
Another good candidate would be The Holocene Extinction thread.  ;)
https://forum.arctic-sea-ice.net/index.php/topic,2305.msg271508.html#new
Title: Re: Wildlife
Post by: sidd on July 03, 2020, 11:35:14 PM
new sparrow song:

https://gizmodo.com/a-viral-new-bird-song-in-canada-is-causing-sparrows-t-1844245103

sidd
Title: Re: Wildlife
Post by: kassy on July 15, 2020, 09:28:46 AM
The Infinitesimal Life Aboard Sea Turtles


Migrating sea turtles carry entire worlds on their backs—ones teeming with life forms small enough to fit between grains of sand. Life on such a scale is easy to overlook, but these miniature communities hold clues that could help protect the living islands they call home.

It’s been known for years that sea turtles harbor metropolises composed, in part, of such visible organisms as barnacles, algae, and tiny crustaceans. But new research on loggerhead turtles in the Gulf of Mexico suggests the populations they ferry are far more diverse than scientists ever imagined.

Loggerheads transport a vast array of meiofauna, a group of animals that are bigger than bacteria but still too small to see with the unaided eye. Creatures on the meiofauna roster, including mud dragons and water bears, range from under a millimeter to just 20 micrometers in length. That means 100 of the smallest meiofauna could cuddle comfortably on a pinhead. A swimming reptile, by comparison, provides plenty of real estate.

Jeroen Ingels, a marine ecologist at Florida State University and lead author of the study, says his team found an average of 33,000 hitchhikers per turtle, with one loggerhead hosting nearly 150,000 passengers. “The numbers were a shock,” he says. “We expected to find thousands, but not hundreds of thousands.”

More surprising still was the scope of different species, particularly among nematodes—worm-like animals found in sediments the world over. Nearly 7,000 nematodes representing 111 genera were found on the turtles.

“We’d expect the shells to be dominated by certain species that are well-adapted to this kind of lifestyle,” says Ingels. So, to discover the same variety as might turn up in a bustling seafloor was extraordinary, he says. “It means there are so many microhabitats and niches on the back of this turtle. [They allow] all these species to be there in fully functioning communities.”

continues on:
https://www.hakaimagazine.com/news/the-infinitesimal-life-aboard-sea-turtles/
Title: Re: Wildlife
Post by: Aporia_filia on July 23, 2020, 01:08:37 PM
IMHO, is very important to change the way we look at animals, specially about their minds.

https://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/full/10.1111/mila.12302


Abstract

In this article, we analyze and reject two versions of the content‐argument against animal beliefs, namely, the ontological argument from Davidson and the epistemological argument from Stich. One of the main defects of the strongest version of the argument is that it over‐intellectualizes belief ascriptions in humans and thus sets the comparative bar for belief ascriptions in animals too high. In the second part of the article, we develop a gradualist notion of belief which captures basic beliefs as well as Davidsonian linguistic beliefs, and we specify the conditions under which belief ascriptions to nonlinguistic animals are justified.
Title: Re: Wildlife
Post by: kassy on July 25, 2020, 07:04:22 PM
Where are arctic mosquitoes most abundant in Greenland and why?
Examining the population dynamics during the larval life stage of these pests

...

As larvae, Arctic mosquitoes feed on microbial biofilms that are attached to detritus, dead organic matter in the ponds. Using a food web approach, in May and June 2018, Dartmouth researchers investigated how variation in the food quality (bottom up approach), the predaceous diving beetle (C. dolabratus) (top down approach) and other conditions such as temperature and nutrients, affected the larval population. The study sample was comprised of eight different ponds between Kangerlussuaq, Greenland and the margin of the Greenland Ice Sheet.

To measure biofilm productivity, the team used "biofilm samplers," which were left in the ponds for the microbial material to accumulate. Arctic mosquito larvae had access to some of the devices as a food source while others were intentionally blocked off, so that the biofilm could not be eaten. The researchers looked at how much biofilm the larvae consumed and conducted a lab analysis of what the microbial community was composed of.

The researchers had hypothesized that Arctic mosquitoes do not make it to the larva stage because they either do not have enough to eat or they are consumed by the diving beetle. They were surprised by the results. The ponds with the best food quality had the lowest population growth rates, as the mosquitoes tended to overcrowd these sites. These sites had the highest hatching mosquitoes, resulting in intense competition for food and poor survival. In contrast, ponds with lower food quality had higher population growth rates. "Arctic mosquito populations appear to be driven by what they are eating rather than who is eating them," explained first author, Melissa H. DeSiervo, a graduate student in the Ecology, Evolution, Environment and Society program at Dartmouth.

...

https://www.eurekalert.org/pub_releases/2020-07/dc-waa072320.php
Title: Re: Wildlife
Post by: Sebastian Jones on July 26, 2020, 06:01:37 AM
IMHO, is very important to change the way we look at animals, specially about their minds.

https://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/full/10.1111/mila.12302

....

Cybernetics explores this question as well. In my opinion, very few of the scientists have lived and worked with animals in a natural (as opposed to lab or other controlled) environment. It is obvious to those who regularly work with animals that there is no sharp difference between how human minds and other minds work. Even second order thinking (thinking about thinking) which is horribly difficult to rule in or out in animals occurs on a spectrum, as we regularly observe in people.
Title: Re: Wildlife
Post by: Tom_Mazanec on July 26, 2020, 11:49:58 AM
There are exceptions SB. The three lady scientists who worked with great apes, or Anne Rasa with dwarf mongooses. Treasure these jewels.
Title: Re: Wildlife
Post by: Aporia_filia on July 28, 2020, 11:13:16 AM
Quote
" It is obvious to those who regularly work with animals that there is no sharp difference between how human minds and other minds work. Even second order thinking (thinking about thinking) which is horribly difficult to rule in or out in animals occurs on a spectrum, as we regularly observe in people."

Agree! And that gives us, people who work/live with animals enough perspective to look at those actually rejecting the fact of an animal mind, like those "scientists" at the end of the  XIX Century rejecting a mind and a soul in those
living in tribes in lost forests.
Title: Re: Wildlife
Post by: Reginald on July 29, 2020, 04:15:22 AM
Two good books on the subject:

Divorce Among The Gulls https://www.amazon.com/Divorce-Among-Gulls-Uncommon-Nature/dp/0865474265 (https://www.amazon.com/Divorce-Among-Gulls-Uncommon-Nature/dp/0865474265)

and

The Biological Basis of Human Behavior: Forging Links between Evolution and Behavior https://www.amazon.com/Biological-Roots-Human-Nature-Evolution/dp/0195062884 (https://www.amazon.com/Biological-Roots-Human-Nature-Evolution/dp/0195062884)

Title: Re: Wildlife
Post by: Reginald on July 29, 2020, 04:24:56 AM
I also ran across this article about consciousness (finally one I can largely get behind!) that talks about how it may have arisen gradually over deep time, rather than only inhering in humanity and closely-related species.

https://getpocket.com/explore/item/a-new-theory-explains-how-consciousness-evolved (https://getpocket.com/explore/item/a-new-theory-explains-how-consciousness-evolved)
Title: Re: Wildlife
Post by: Reginald on July 29, 2020, 04:39:39 AM
If AST is correct, 300 million years of reptilian, avian, and mammalian evolution have allowed the self-model and the social model to evolve in tandem, each influencing the other. We understand other people by projecting ourselves onto them. But we also understand ourselves by considering the way other people might see us. Data from my own lab suggests that the cortical networks in the human brain that allow us to attribute consciousness to others overlap extensively with the networks that construct our own sense of consciousness.
Title: Re: Wildlife
Post by: Alexander555 on August 05, 2020, 10:21:19 PM
The first little pack of wolves in the country, after a very very very long time. The Forestland Daltons. https://www.hln.be/in-de-buurt/houthalen-helchteren/nieuwe-beelden-opgedoken-van-vier-wolvenwelpjes~ac8d0967/
Title: Re: Wildlife
Post by: kassy on September 04, 2020, 02:32:01 PM
Secrets of male elephant society revealed in the wild

Older male elephants have an important role to play in the survival of the species by passing on their skills and knowledge to younger males, a study of African elephants suggests.

Matriarchs lead groups of daughters and their calves, while males grow up and leave the herd.

Mature bull elephants play an important role in leading these younger males, researchers have found.

And their loss by poaching or hunting could have "disastrous impacts".

The study, published in the journal Scientific Reports suggests older bulls are likely to occupy a similar role in male society as matriarchs in female breeding herds.

"It has long been known that older females make more effective leaders of breeding herds due to their enhanced experience - we provide compelling support for a similar role of older males in the male society," said Connie Allen of the University of Exeter and charity Elephants for Africa.

The researchers investigated the behaviour of more than 1,250 male African savannah elephants travelling to and from the Boteti River in the Makgadikgadi Pans National Park, Botswana.

Lone male elephants accounted for a fifth of sightings on elephant pathways using camera traps, with adolescent males travelling along these routes less often than expected, suggesting lone travel is riskier for younger and less experienced males.

Mature adult bulls were more likely to travel at the front of groups of males, suggesting they may be important leaders with valuable ecological knowledge.

and more on:
https://www.bbc.com/news/science-environment-54018133
Title: Re: Wildlife
Post by: Tor Bejnar on September 11, 2020, 04:10:42 PM
cross-post:
Discovery of new colonies by Sentinel2 reveals good and bad news for emperor penguins
https://zslpublications.onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/full/10.1002/rse2.176

Lots of information on how to find Emperor Penguin colonies using Sentinel 2 imaging with a complete list of known and recently discovered colonies.  I stumbled across this while searching for info on when we can expect to find new Sentinel 2 images for this upcoming season.
Title: Re: Wildlife
Post by: vox_mundi on September 13, 2020, 03:16:24 PM
Scientists Baffled by Orcas Ramming Sailing Boats Near Spain and Portugal
https://www.theguardian.com/environment/2020/sep/13/killer-whales-launch-orchestrated-attacks-on-sailing-boats
https://amp.theguardian.com/environment/2020/sep/13/the-tale-of-the-killer-whales

(https://cdn.abcotvs.com/dip/images/4211613_091118-orcas-1280.jpg)

In the last two months, from the Strait of Gibraltar to Galicia, orcas have been harassing yachts, damaging vessels and injuring crew; and sailors have sent distress calls after worrying encounters.

... On 29 July, off Cape Trafalgar, Victoria Morris was crewing a 46ft delivery boat that was surrounded by nine orcas. The cetaceans rammed the hull for over an hour, spinning the boat 180 degrees, disabling the engine and breaking the rudder, as they communicated with loud whistling.

It felt, she said, “totally orchestrated”. Earlier that week, another boat in the area reported a 50-minute encounter; the skipper said the force of the ramming “nearly dislocated the helmsman’s shoulder”.

At 11.30 the previous night, British couple Beverly Harris and Kevin Large’s 40ft yacht was brought to a sudden halt, then spun several times; Harris felt the boat “raise a little”.

Earlier that evening, Nick Giles was motorsailing alone when he heard a horrific bang “like a sledgehammer”, saw his wheel “turning with incredible force”, disabling the steering as his 34ft Moody yacht spun 180 degrees. He felt the boat lift and said he was pushed around without steering for 15 minutes.

... On 30 August, a French-flagged vessel radioed the coastguard to say it was “under attack” from killer whales. Later that day, a Spanish naval yacht, Mirfak, lost part of its rudder after an encounter with orcas under the stern.
Title: Re: Wildlife
Post by: gerontocrat on September 19, 2020, 08:17:13 AM
Wildlife needs habitat - that's a problem, for wildlife.

https://www.theguardian.com/environment/2020/sep/19/shocking-wilderness-the-size-of-mexico-lost-worldwide-in-just-13-years-study-finds
'Shocking': wilderness the size of Mexico lost worldwide in just 13 years, study finds

Researchers say loss of 1.9m square kilometres of intact ecosystems will have ‘profound implications’ for biodiversity

Quote
The loss of 1.9m square kilometres (735,000 sq miles) of intact ecosystems would have “profound implications” for the planet’s biodiversity, the study’s authors said.

Using mostly satellite imagery, 17 scientists across six countries examined the human footprint across the globe and how it had changed between 2000 and 2013. Almost 20% of the earth’s surface had deteriorated, the study found, while human pressure had eased on only six per cent of the planet. Russia, Canada, Brazil, and Australia held the largest intact areas, together responsible for 60% of the world’s most untouched places.

Some 1.1m sq km (425,000 sq miles) of wilderness identified from imagery in 2000 had some human impact 13 years later. Tropical savannahs and grasslands lost the most area to human pressure, the study, published in the journal One Earth, found.

Lead researcher Brooke Williams, of the University of Queensland, told the Guardian: “We were expecting there to be high levels of intact ecosystem and wilderness loss, but the results were shocking. “We found substantial area of intact ecosystems had been lost in just 13 years – nearly two million square kilometres – which is terrifying to think about. Our findings show that human pressure is extending ever further into the last ecologically intact and wilderness areas.”

Rainforests in Indonesia and Papua New Guinea that were both rich with species had lost large areas to human activities. Conversion of habitats to cash crops, including palm oil, was a big contributor to the losses.

The study did not try to identify the cause of the losses, but Williams said the direct clearing of landscapes for farming was a known major driver.

Co-author Prof James Watson, also of the University of Queensland and the global conservation group the Wildlife Conservation Society, said: ‘The data does not lie. Humanity keeps on shrinking the amount of land that other species need to survive.”

“In a time of rapid climate change, we need to proactively secure the last intact ecosystems on the planet, as these are critical in the fight to stop extinction and halt climate change,” Watson said. Looking across 221 nation states, only 26 had at least half of their land intact, the study found. In 2013, 41% of the world’s surface was either wilderness or was mostly intact.

Williams, who is also a conservationist at the Wildlife Conservation Society, said the losses undermined efforts to mitigate climate change because intact lands acted as storage spaces for carbon dioxide. She said: “Proactively protecting Earth’s intact ecosystems is humanity’s best mechanism for protecting against climate change, ensuring large-scale ecological and evolutionary processes persist, and safeguarding biological diversity into the future.”

The paper’s authors write: “Halting the loss of intact ecosystems cannot be achieved alongside current trajectories of development, population growth, and resource consumption.”

Prof Bill Laurance, the director of James Cook University’s centre for tropical environmental and sustainability science in Queensland, who was not involved in the study, said its findings were scary. “Humans are trashing much of the planet – no doubt about that,” he said. “The tropics are under particular pressure, and it’s not just forest destruction but also the loss of other habitat types, such as tropical savannahs and native grasslands, that are occurring apace.”

He said it was notable that tropical grasslands were heavily impacted because these were more easily converted to pasture or farmland. Declines in rainforests in south-east Asia were also “among the biologically richest ecosystems on Earth”. One example, he said, was the rainforests of Sumatra that were home to critically endangered species of orangutan, as well as tigers, elephants and rhinos. That country’s forests were either gone or being devastated.

He said: “If we don’t halt such changes, we’re going to see the continued rapid disruption and loss of Earth’s ecosystems, including the biologically richest habitats on the planet. And along with that will be continued declines in the quality of life for people.”

The study comes after research earlier this week found that protected areas around the world, such as national parks and world heritage areas, were becoming isolated. Only about 10% of the world’s protected areas were connected to similar habitats outside their borders. The research, in the journal Nature Climate Change, warned that as the globe warmed, species would look to move. But if protected areas were isolated, those species would have nowhere to go.

https://www.nature.com/articles/s41467-020-18457-x
Just ten percent of the global terrestrial protected area network is structurally connected via intact land
Quote
Abstract
Land free of direct anthropogenic disturbance is considered essential for achieving biodiversity conservation outcomes but is rapidly eroding. In response, many nations are increasing their protected area (PA) estates, but little consideration is given to the context of the surrounding landscape. This is despite the fact that structural connectivity between PAs is critical in a changing climate and mandated by international conservation targets. Using a high-resolution assessment of human pressure, we show that while ~40% of the terrestrial planet is intact, only 9.7% of Earth’s terrestrial protected network can be considered structurally connected. On average, 11% of each country or territory’s PA estate can be considered connected. As the global community commits to bolder action on abating biodiversity loss, placement of future PAs will be critical, as will an increased focus on landscape-scale habitat retention and restoration efforts to ensure those important areas set aside for conservation outcomes will remain (or become) connected.
Title: Re: Wildlife
Post by: Tom_Mazanec on September 19, 2020, 12:43:36 PM
Weasel mother (miscalled 'ferret') rescues her baby:
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=FOw0f8OO-_s
It ain't easy being a Mom.