Arctic Sea Ice : Forum

Cryosphere => Antarctica => Topic started by: Laurent on October 27, 2013, 08:30:02 PM

Title: What's new in Antarctica ?
Post by: Laurent on October 27, 2013, 08:30:02 PM
Metallica will play a show in Antartica !
http://todaynewsgazette.com/metallica-antarctica/ (http://todaynewsgazette.com/metallica-antarctica/)
Title: Re: What's new in Antarctica ?
Post by: Laurent on October 27, 2013, 08:33:27 PM
What's the thickness of the ice !
http://www.huffingtonpost.co.uk/2013/06/10/what-does-antarctica-look-like-under-the-ice_n_3414021.html (http://www.huffingtonpost.co.uk/2013/06/10/what-does-antarctica-look-like-under-the-ice_n_3414021.html)
Title: Re: What's new in Antarctica ?
Post by: Laurent on November 01, 2013, 04:56:11 PM
Delegates frustrated as talks to create huge Antarctic marine reserves fail
http://www.theguardian.com/environment/2013/nov/01/antarctic-marine-reserve-talks-fail (http://www.theguardian.com/environment/2013/nov/01/antarctic-marine-reserve-talks-fail)
Title: Re: What's new in Antarctica ?
Post by: Laurent on November 17, 2013, 09:44:31 PM
A question to solve the problem of the milankovitch cycle changing from 40.000 years to 120.000 years.

Where to find 1.5 million yr old ice for the IPICS “Oldest-Ice”
ice core
http://www.clim-past.net/9/2489/2013/cp-9-2489-2013.pdf (http://www.clim-past.net/9/2489/2013/cp-9-2489-2013.pdf)
Title: Re: What's new in Antarctica ?
Post by: Laurent on January 03, 2014, 12:00:59 PM
All Passengers Rescued From Russian Ship Stranded in Antarctic
http://en.ria.ru/world/20140102/186163137/Passenger-Rescue-From-Stranded-Russian-Ship-Delayed-by-Ice.html (http://en.ria.ru/world/20140102/186163137/Passenger-Rescue-From-Stranded-Russian-Ship-Delayed-by-Ice.html)
Title: Re: What's new in Antarctica ?
Post by: Laurent on January 06, 2014, 05:43:41 PM
The story is not finished !
http://www.smh.com.au/environment/icebreaking-rescue-costs-soar-into-the-millions-20140106-30dn0.html (http://www.smh.com.au/environment/icebreaking-rescue-costs-soar-into-the-millions-20140106-30dn0.html)
Title: Re: What's new in Antarctica ?
Post by: Laurent on January 09, 2014, 01:29:03 PM
THE LOST WORLD OF LAKE VOSTOK
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=4-cRDkuFaQQ#t=10 (http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=4-cRDkuFaQQ#t=10)
Title: News items about Antarctica
Post by: Pmt111500 on January 13, 2014, 03:20:22 AM
http://phys.org/news/2014-01-giant-antarctic-glacier.html (http://phys.org/news/2014-01-giant-antarctic-glacier.html)
Title: Re: What's new in Antarctica ?
Post by: AbruptSLR on February 13, 2014, 02:00:26 AM
Selected quotes from the linked opinion article are as follow:

" Although the only form of exploration currently allowed in Antarctica is scientific — as the Antarctic Treaty, and the Protocol on Environmental Protection to this treaty, ban any other activities relating to the continent’s mineral resources — this may change in 2048 when the moratorium on exploration and exploitation is up for a review."

"Allocating a large budget to Antarctic research and hosting scientific facilities on the continent are considered suitable ways for a country to signal its presence in this territory, experts say such actions could aid future claims if access to fishing resources is expanded or access to mineral resources is ever granted.
 
“From 2048, only the consultative countries of the Antarctic Treaty will have the right to vote [on any proposed changes to the treaty],” says Marcello Melo da Gama, deputy secretary of Brazil’s Inter-ministerial Commission for the Resources of the Sea (CIRM), the national agency responsible for implementing the country’s Antarctic programme. Twenty-eight countries are consultative parties to the Antarctic Treaty because they were original signatories or now conduct substantial research in Antarctica.
 
“And countries need to have a presence in Antarctica and carry out scientific research there and even have a research base in order to become a consultative party — that is one of the political and strategic reasons to have a base in Antarctica.”
 
As a result, several nations are building or hoping to build new research centres on the continent. This year, both Brazil and China will build research stations."


http://www.trust.org/item/20140212132723-awc5o/?source=hppartner (http://www.trust.org/item/20140212132723-awc5o/?source=hppartner)
Title: Re: What's new in Antarctica ?
Post by: JackTaylor on February 13, 2014, 04:22:40 PM
" Although the only form of exploration currently allowed in Antarctica is scientific — as the Antarctic Treaty, and the Protocol on Environmental Protection to this treaty, ban any other activities relating to the continent’s mineral resources — this may change in 2048 when the moratorium on exploration and exploitation is up for a review."

http://www.trust.org/item/20140212132723-awc5o/?source=hppartner (http://www.trust.org/item/20140212132723-awc5o/?source=hppartner)
THANKS for the reminder on this, (2048 date).

Of note, from the link, is the additional
"tensions are quietly rising regarding sovereignty over the Antarctic continent and the resources on and around it"

Could be an interesting 34 years.
Title: Re: What's new in Antarctica ?
Post by: Laurent on April 12, 2014, 07:22:03 PM
Australia's Antarctic Research Division Faces Cuts

http://news.sciencemag.org/asiapacific/2014/04/australias-antarctic-research-division-faces-cuts (http://news.sciencemag.org/asiapacific/2014/04/australias-antarctic-research-division-faces-cuts)

Title: Re: What's new in Antarctica ?
Post by: crandles on April 13, 2014, 01:22:51 AM
Antarctic sea ice back up to positive anomaly of over 1.5 m Km^2.

2014.2712   1.5424454   5.8333502   4.2909045

Only 4 years have been higher and they are all recent: 2007, 2008, 2010 and 2013.

This puts global anomaly at nearly +1.1 the highest since 2008 reached +1.237 at a very similar time of year:

2014.2712   1.0981402  18.9336891  17.8355484
2008.2767   1.2369218  19.1605587  17.9236374
Title: Re: What's new in Antarctica ?
Post by: Laurent on April 25, 2014, 08:26:27 PM
Paleoclimate studies suggest that increased global warmth during the Eocene epoch was greatly amplified at high latitudes, a state that climate models cannot fully reproduce. However, proxy estimates of Eocene near-Antarctic sea surface temperatures (SSTs) have produced widely divergent results at similar latitudes, with SSTs above 20 °C in the southwest Pacific contrasting with SSTs between 5 and 15 °C in the South Atlantic.

http://www.pnas.org/content/early/2014/04/16/1321441111.abstract?sid=416fb7a8-dbf3-43d0-9dba-8b4bbcf0c1a0 (http://www.pnas.org/content/early/2014/04/16/1321441111.abstract?sid=416fb7a8-dbf3-43d0-9dba-8b4bbcf0c1a0)
Title: Re: What's new in Antarctica ?
Post by: Stephen on May 05, 2014, 06:55:07 AM
http://www.nature.com/nclimate/journal/vaop/ncurrent/full/nclimate2226.html (http://www.nature.com/nclimate/journal/vaop/ncurrent/full/nclimate2226.html)

New nature article suggest instability in Wilkes basin

Quote from Matthias Mengel of the Potsdam Institute for Climate Impact Research
"The Wilkes is vulnerable because it is held in place by a small rim of ice, resting on bedrock below sea level by the coast of the frozen continent. That ice plug might melt away in coming centuries if ocean waters warm up."
Title: Re: What's new in Antarctica ?
Post by: Laurent on June 17, 2014, 01:02:28 AM
'Weedy thing' thrives as Antarctic shores warm
http://www.bbc.com/news/science-environment-27831958 (http://www.bbc.com/news/science-environment-27831958)
Title: Re: What's new in Antarctica ?
Post by: Laurent on June 30, 2014, 04:29:57 PM
Emperor Penguins are now endangered, warn biologists
http://www.telegraph.co.uk/earth/environment/climatechange/10933964/Emperor-Penguins-are-now-endangered-warn-biologists.html (http://www.telegraph.co.uk/earth/environment/climatechange/10933964/Emperor-Penguins-are-now-endangered-warn-biologists.html)

Melting ice puts emperor penguins on a slippery slope
http://www.newscientist.com/article/dn25812-melting-ice-puts-emperor-penguins-on-a-slippery-slope.html?cmpid=RSS (http://www.newscientist.com/article/dn25812-melting-ice-puts-emperor-penguins-on-a-slippery-slope.html?cmpid=RSS)|NSNS|2012-GLOBAL|environment#.U7FxilFJzlc
Title: Re: What's new in Antarctica ?
Post by: DavidR on July 08, 2014, 01:16:49 AM
Australian Scientists have identified a mechanism that  will accelerate the loss of Antarctic ice over the next Century.
"Warm water is likely to increasingly displace cold water around the Antarctic coastline, prompting accelerated ice melt and more sea level rise, according to new Australian research. "
http://www.abc.net.au/news/2014-07-07/giant-antarctic-ice-shelves-could-melt-faster-than-expected/5579678 (http://www.abc.net.au/news/2014-07-07/giant-antarctic-ice-shelves-could-melt-faster-than-expected/5579678)
Title: Re: What's new in Antarctica ?
Post by: wili on July 08, 2014, 03:00:45 PM
So when you put all the accelerating factors toward increased slr that we have been hearing about for the past few months together, where does that put us?

Before all these studies, iirc, the consensus estimate was about one meter by the end of the century. So where are we now? A meter by mid-century? In thirty years? Twenty?...Two meters by century's end? Three? Four?

Has anyone put all these together to come up with new estimates with probabilities for each?

ASLR, are you out there?
Title: Re: What's new in Antarctica ?
Post by: AbruptSLR on July 08, 2014, 06:59:37 PM
wili,

First, no new published papers have yet been issued putting together all of these different recent accelerating factors, and no new expert survey's have been published reflecting any specific changes in SLR expert thought on this matter.  NOAA already has a curve showing 2m of SLR by 2100 for their "high range" value.

Second, as for myself, I have had essentially no change in my position on projected SLR by 2100 in my over 2,500 posts, so if you go to the "Philosophical" thread you can see my projections posted there from over 1.5 years ago, where I already assumed all of the findings just newly being published now.

Third, I doubt that policy makers will change any guidance on this matter for another several years (maybe 10-years), as they can still hide behind uncertainty until the glacier models become much more sophisticated than they current are.

Best,
ASLR
Title: Re: What's new in Antarctica ?
Post by: AbruptSLR on July 08, 2014, 07:14:29 PM
wili,

I guess that I should add that given the limitations of the glacial models, Eric Rignot is currently working on a Big Data approach to estimate coming SLR estimates; however, I have already seen articles by denialists saying that Big Data approaches are biased and cannot be relied upon by policy makers entrusted with the public purse.  Therefore, it appears that there will not be a global consensus on eustatic SLR anytime soon; which will leave various local authorities using different projections based on their risk tolerance.

Best,
ASLR

Title: Re: What's new in Antarctica ?
Post by: wili on July 08, 2014, 08:18:44 PM
Thanks, ASLR. I wonder if a statistical number cruncher like tamino might take this on.

So just to be clear (and so I don't have to read again through all 2500+ of your wonderful posts, educational as that would be  :) ), you are sticking with Hansen's projection of 5 meters by 2100?
Title: Re: What's new in Antarctica ?
Post by: steve s on July 08, 2014, 08:37:35 PM
Two meters by 2100 is roughly an inch or 2.5 cm per year on average. If, as most of us on this thread seem to think, this proves low estimate, policy makers will soon be forced to accept SLR as important. Actually, much earlier as Rignot has set the stage for the rate of change of the rate of change entering the public awareness as a justification.

("Let the cry ring out to all who will listen: To arms, to arms, for the Thwaites is coming.")

A Pyrrhic victory, no matter how soon the recognition comes, but sooner is better.

Title: Re: What's new in Antarctica ?
Post by: AbruptSLR on July 09, 2014, 12:21:11 AM
wili,

As I live in California, and I am convinced that the world will more or less stay on a BAU pathway through at least 2050, I have provided the attached projections for RSLR in California for RCP 8.5 forcing scenario.  While these are close to Hansen's projections they are different on a number of counts, and a the third image shows an assumed grounding line retreat comparable to that stated by Rignot to be the onset of the rapid collapse phase for the ASE marine glaciers (the "WAIS Collapse" thread contains may other details):

(edit: note that these PDFs include all sources of RSLR and include a 1.4 multiplier on eustatic SLR contribution from the WAIS for the RSLR in California)

Best,
ASLR
Title: Re: What's new in Antarctica ?
Post by: solartim27 on July 18, 2014, 12:46:10 AM
The CT chart shows a crash in the AASI anomaly of over 1M km2.  The graphs from the previous 2 years also show similar pauses in growth, but nothing that dramatic.  Anyone have any theories?
http://arctic.atmos.uiuc.edu/cryosphere/IMAGES/seaice.recent.antarctic.png (http://arctic.atmos.uiuc.edu/cryosphere/IMAGES/seaice.recent.antarctic.png)
Title: Re: What's new in Antarctica ?
Post by: Gray-Wolf on July 18, 2014, 01:36:43 PM
Cryosat2 data for Antarctica now out;

http://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/10.1002/2014GL060111/abstract (http://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/10.1002/2014GL060111/abstract)

seems we saw west antarctica step up it's losses from 2005 to 2010 by 31%???
Title: Re: What's new in Antarctica ?
Post by: AbruptSLR on July 18, 2014, 10:56:19 PM
solartim 27,

Per the attached link, the AAO has been largely positive since about June 7 2014, so maybe this has changed the wind patterns sufficiently to slow the rate of Antarctic sea ice formation (particularly in the Weddell, and Ross, Seas):

http://ossfoundation.us/projects/environment/global-warming/antarctic-oscillation-aao (http://ossfoundation.us/projects/environment/global-warming/antarctic-oscillation-aao)

Best,
ASLR
Title: Re: What's new in Antarctica ?
Post by: AbruptSLR on July 19, 2014, 03:37:08 PM
Sleepy,

Thanks for the great legwork on this matter.  While the AAO still might be one contributing factor to the behavior you indicate, I also note that the Indian Ocean Dipole (IOD) went negative in this general timeframe (which could encourage the export of warm winds from Australia southward; see attached the first attached image of the recent IOD history plot through July 13 2014, and the second attached figure of the IOD forecast, both by the BoM):
Title: Re: What's new in Antarctica ?
Post by: AbruptSLR on July 23, 2014, 05:01:56 AM
Sleepy (and AlanW),

Thanks again.

Best,
ASLR
Title: Re: What's new in Antarctica ?
Post by: Laurent on August 10, 2014, 04:33:13 PM
What to do when the power goes out in Antarctica
http://www.newscientist.com/article/dn26019-what-to-do-when-the-power-goes-out-in-antarctica.html?cmpid=RSS (http://www.newscientist.com/article/dn26019-what-to-do-when-the-power-goes-out-in-antarctica.html?cmpid=RSS)|NSNS|2012-GLOBAL|environment#.U-d-bZjodeQ
Title: Re: What's new in Antarctica ?
Post by: Laurent on August 21, 2014, 09:46:43 AM
Antarctic hides extreme ecosystem
http://www.bbc.com/news/science-environment-28853387 (http://www.bbc.com/news/science-environment-28853387)
Title: Re: What's new in Antarctica ?
Post by: solartim27 on August 31, 2014, 05:37:10 PM
Not really 'new', but thought it would be of interest.
http://www.latimes.com/science/la-sci-antarctic-sea-ice-20140830-story.html#page=1 (http://www.latimes.com/science/la-sci-antarctic-sea-ice-20140830-story.html#page=1)
Title: Re: What's new in Antarctica ?
Post by: Laurent on September 13, 2014, 09:21:33 AM
26. August 2014: Greenhouse Gases in the Southern Ocean: First Evidence of Active Methane Emission at the Antarctic Seafloor
http://www.awi.de/en/news/press_releases/detail/item/greenhouse_gases_in_the_southern_ocean_first_evidence_of_active_methane_emission_at_the_antarctic_s/?tx_list_pi1 (http://www.awi.de/en/news/press_releases/detail/item/greenhouse_gases_in_the_southern_ocean_first_evidence_of_active_methane_emission_at_the_antarctic_s/?tx_list_pi1)[mode]=6&cHash=ac9056f0576b288b18d7c3989cf78865
Title: Re: What's new in Antarctica ?
Post by: Laurent on September 18, 2014, 07:04:36 PM
33 Amazing Species -- And a Chance to Save Them
http://www.huffingtonpost.com/john-hocevar/33-amazing-species-and-a-_b_5823668.html?utm_hp_ref=green&ir=Green (http://www.huffingtonpost.com/john-hocevar/33-amazing-species-and-a-_b_5823668.html?utm_hp_ref=green&ir=Green)

http://antarcticocean.org (http://antarcticocean.org)
Title: Re: What's new in Antarctica ?
Post by: Laurent on September 26, 2014, 12:50:12 AM
http://www.whiteicecycle.com/ (http://www.whiteicecycle.com/)
Title: Re: What's new in Antarctica ?
Post by: Laurent on October 31, 2014, 09:55:31 PM
China And Russia Block International Plan To Create Antarctic Ocean Sanctuary
http://www.huffingtonpost.com/2014/10/31/plan-antarctic-ocean-sanctuary_n_6082986.html?utm_hp_ref=green&ir=Green (http://www.huffingtonpost.com/2014/10/31/plan-antarctic-ocean-sanctuary_n_6082986.html?utm_hp_ref=green&ir=Green)
Title: Re: What's new in Antarctica ?
Post by: Laurent on November 29, 2014, 12:55:12 PM
Researchers stock up on way to Antarctic
http://www.ecns.cn/2014/11-19/143291.shtml (http://www.ecns.cn/2014/11-19/143291.shtml)

China's 31st Antarctic expedition group is set to call in at Hobart, Australia, to pick up supplies before continuing its journey aboard the Xuelong, or Snow Dragon, the country's only research icebreaker.
Title: Re: What's new in Antarctica ?
Post by: Laurent on December 02, 2014, 01:35:29 PM
A complete breeding failure in an Adélie penguin colony correlates with unusual and extreme environmental events
http://www.ecography.org/accepted-article/complete-breeding-failure-adelie-penguin-colony-correlates-unusual-and-extreme (http://www.ecography.org/accepted-article/complete-breeding-failure-adelie-penguin-colony-correlates-unusual-and-extreme)
Title: Re: What's new in Antarctica ?
Post by: Laurent on December 20, 2014, 10:33:15 AM
Antarctic photo science archive unlocked
http://www.bbc.com/news/science-environment-30471542 (http://www.bbc.com/news/science-environment-30471542)
Title: Re: What's new in Antarctica ?
Post by: Sigmetnow on December 29, 2014, 03:21:37 PM
What happened to the tourist/research ship that got stuck in Antarctic ice last year.  Some of their findings on sea flow and marine life were quite surprising.
Article and 20-min video.
http://www.theguardian.com/science/2014/dec/25/rescued-scientists-warning-from-antarctica (http://www.theguardian.com/science/2014/dec/25/rescued-scientists-warning-from-antarctica)
Title: Re: What's new in Antarctica ?
Post by: Laurent on January 10, 2015, 10:58:38 AM
Extreme Ice Survey: Farewell to the Antarctic Peninsula
http://www.huffingtonpost.com/lindblad-expeditions/extreme-ice-survey-farewe_b_6439318.html?utm_hp_ref=green&ir=Green (http://www.huffingtonpost.com/lindblad-expeditions/extreme-ice-survey-farewe_b_6439318.html?utm_hp_ref=green&ir=Green)
Title: Re: What's new in Antarctica ?
Post by: AbruptSLR on January 10, 2015, 05:37:48 PM
While I have seen some minor criticisms that Richard Alley can be too caution, I disagree with such criticisms, given the state of our current decision making system/process.  Therefore, I would like to congratulate Richard Alley on winning the 2015 BBVA Foundation Frontiers of Knowledge Award in the Climate Change category, for his pioneering work on abrupt climate change.

http://www.prnewswire.com/news-releases/the-bbva-foundation-frontiers-of-knowledge-award-goes-to-richard-alley-the-interpreter-of-ice-who-uncovered-the-evidence-of-sudden-climate-changes-300018445.html (http://www.prnewswire.com/news-releases/the-bbva-foundation-frontiers-of-knowledge-award-goes-to-richard-alley-the-interpreter-of-ice-who-uncovered-the-evidence-of-sudden-climate-changes-300018445.html)

Extract: "The seventh annual BBVA Foundation Frontiers of Knowledge Award in the Climate Change category goes to U.S. glaciologist Richard Alley for his "pioneering research" into the "mechanics of ice and its implications for abrupt climate change," in the words of the jury's citation."

Also see:
http://www.fbbva.es/TLFU/tlfu/ing/microsites/premios/fronteras/index.jsp (http://www.fbbva.es/TLFU/tlfu/ing/microsites/premios/fronteras/index.jsp)
Title: Re: What's new in Antarctica ?
Post by: Laurent on January 12, 2015, 10:15:40 AM
Should tourists be banned from Antarctica?
http://www.bbc.com/news/magazine-30709924 (http://www.bbc.com/news/magazine-30709924)
Title: Re: What's new in Antarctica ?
Post by: Yuha on January 18, 2015, 03:48:16 PM
Did Meteorite Carve Icy Antarctic Crater?
http://www.livescience.com/49398-antarctica-ice-meteorite-crater-found.html (http://www.livescience.com/49398-antarctica-ice-meteorite-crater-found.html)
Title: Re: What's new in Antarctica ?
Post by: Laurent on January 21, 2015, 05:32:03 PM
Antarctic toothfish poaching ships shrug off New Zealand navy
http://www.theguardian.com/environment/2015/jan/21/antarctic-toothfish-poaching-ships-shrug-off-new-zealand-navy (http://www.theguardian.com/environment/2015/jan/21/antarctic-toothfish-poaching-ships-shrug-off-new-zealand-navy)
Title: Re: What's new in Antarctica ?
Post by: solartim27 on January 24, 2015, 02:20:36 AM
Huh
http://www.scientificamerican.com/article/discovery-fish-live-beneath-antarctica1/ (http://www.scientificamerican.com/article/discovery-fish-live-beneath-antarctica1/)
Title: Re: What's new in Antarctica ?
Post by: AbruptSLR on January 24, 2015, 05:33:49 PM
Did Meteorite Carve Icy Antarctic Crater?
http://www.livescience.com/49398-antarctica-ice-meteorite-crater-found.html (http://www.livescience.com/49398-antarctica-ice-meteorite-crater-found.html)

The nearly 2 miles (3 kilometers) wide ring of sunken ice on the Roi Baudoin Ice Shelf in East Antarctica is most likely not an meteor impact crater but instead is actually an ice doline formed by water draining out of a sub-ice-surface lake (see linked article below).

http://www.nbcnews.com/science/weird-science/scientists-shoot-down-meteorite-theory-antarctica-crater-mystery-n292326 (http://www.nbcnews.com/science/weird-science/scientists-shoot-down-meteorite-theory-antarctica-crater-mystery-n292326)
Title: Re: What's new in Antarctica ?
Post by: Laurent on February 03, 2015, 08:43:25 PM
Lewis Pugh to undertake 'world's most dangerous swim' in Antarctic for campaign to make Ross Sea a protected area
http://www.independent.co.uk/environment/lewis-pugh-to-undertake-worlds-most-dangerous-swim-in-antarctic-for-campaign-to-make-ross-sea-a-protected-area-10021130.html (http://www.independent.co.uk/environment/lewis-pugh-to-undertake-worlds-most-dangerous-swim-in-antarctic-for-campaign-to-make-ross-sea-a-protected-area-10021130.html)
Title: Re: What's new in Antarctica ?
Post by: Laurent on February 04, 2015, 10:16:43 AM
Subglacial Lake Vostok cracked for a second time
http://www.newscientist.com/article/dn26907-subglacial-lake-vostok-cracked-for-a-second-time.html?cmpid=RSS (http://www.newscientist.com/article/dn26907-subglacial-lake-vostok-cracked-for-a-second-time.html?cmpid=RSS)|NSNS|2012-GLOBAL|environment#.VNHhO2N3_z8
Title: Re: What's new in Antarctica ?
Post by: johnm33 on February 04, 2015, 11:31:42 AM
Anyone have a sub to N.S. to access this http://www.newscientist.com/article/mg22530060.400-thaw-point-why-is-antarcticas-sea-ice-still-growing.html (http://www.newscientist.com/article/mg22530060.400-thaw-point-why-is-antarcticas-sea-ice-still-growing.html)
Title: Re: What's new in Antarctica ?
Post by: Jim Hunt on February 04, 2015, 01:14:17 PM
Anyone have a sub to N.S. to access this?

Yes - What would you like to know?
Title: Re: What's new in Antarctica ?
Post by: johnm33 on February 04, 2015, 03:29:41 PM
 JimHunt "Yes - What would you like to know?" Well breifly his veiw, I checked out the BAS site and couldn't find anything there, the press part of it seemed dysfunctional, tried a wider search and had no luck.
Sands back at Porthleven btw.
johnm
Title: Re: What's new in Antarctica ?
Post by: Jim Hunt on February 07, 2015, 07:11:27 PM
Just posted by NASA - A chip off the King Baudouin Ice Shelf:

http://earthobservatory.nasa.gov/IOTD/view.php?id=85235 (http://earthobservatory.nasa.gov/IOTD/view.php?id=85235)

While large icebergs calve regularly from fast-flowing ice shelves in West Antarctica, the coast of cooler, drier East Antarctica tends to be less active. That made it a mild surprise when a 70-square-kilometer chunk of ice broke off from the King Baudouin Ice Shelf in January 2015. The last time that part of King Baudouin calved such a large iceberg was in the 1960s.

Also visible on WorldView on February 3rd, having already moved a fair distance: http://1.usa.gov/1EOlIwN (http://1.usa.gov/1EOlIwN)

Title: Re: What's new in Antarctica ?
Post by: Jim Hunt on February 07, 2015, 08:23:29 PM
Well breifly his veiw, I checked out the BAS site and couldn't find anything there.

Sorry John. I missed this. Too busy battling the forces of darkness (http://greatwhitecon.info/2015/02/a-letter-to-the-editor-of-the-mail-on-sunday/)! How about this bit?

There is no longer an autumn lockstep between wind and ice. The most glaring clash is in the Bellingshausen Sea. There, the autumn winds have become stronger. They blow from the north, which must be shoving more ice in towards the coast, keeping it from spreading, as well as carrying warmer air from temperate regions. Indeed, the overall area of autumn sea ice here has declined, which would seem to fit with that idea. But if the stronger winds were the key factor affecting ice growth, the ice should be growing more slowly. In fact, during autumn it is growing faster than it did a few decades ago. "That destroys my earlier work," Holland says.

He now thinks that to understand these changes in sea ice, we need to focus on what's happening in the spring. In the Bellingshausen Sea, ice is now retreating earlier in the springtime, letting the ocean absorb more solar heat. That warming should delay the regrowth of ice – accounting for the decline in ice area in autumn. But when the ice does grow back, it does so quickly, because now the ocean is open to the air, it rapidly loses its heat again.

In other words, sea ice has a tendency to bounce back from big spring losses. This was first noted in Antarctica by Stammerjohn, in a 2008 study (http://dx.doi.org/10.1029/2007JC004269) that looked at how ice is changing region by region and season by season.

or this?

Dirk Notz, however, is not convinced that Holland is right to focus on whether sea ice is melting or forming faster or more slowly than it used to. "He is looking at a change in a rate of change," he says. "I do not think it's a measure that is important."

So Notz's team thinks that the wind explanation still holds. The reason most climate models have been projecting sea ice losses, they argue in a study (http://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/10.1002/2014GL061659/abstract) published in December, is that they are too coarse-grained. They miss details of Antarctic topography that deflect winds northwards and spread out sea ice, allowing more ice to form.

Returning to a still somewhat chilly SW England.

Sands back at Porthleven btw.

I'm glad to hear it!
Title: Re: What's new in Antarctica ?
Post by: Laurent on February 12, 2015, 10:08:29 AM
Fishing vessel trapped in Antarctic ice; U.S. Coast Guard on rescue mission
http://www.latimes.com/nation/la-na-coast-guard-20150211-story.html (http://www.latimes.com/nation/la-na-coast-guard-20150211-story.html)
Title: Re: What's new in Antarctica ?
Post by: solartim27 on February 12, 2015, 09:51:40 PM
I don't know how new this is, but I found that Polar View also has antarctic Sentinel images available, though i find the coverage lacking
http://www.polarview.aq/antarctic (http://www.polarview.aq/antarctic)

There is also another site that looks like it is new from University of Alaska, Fairbanks.  I don't know how much coverage it will give to the Antarctic.
https://www.asf.alaska.edu/ (https://www.asf.alaska.edu/)
Title: Re: What's new in Antarctica ?
Post by: wili on February 15, 2015, 06:16:16 PM
Sorry if this was already covered somewhere, but it seems like kind of a big deal:

http://www.the-cryosphere-discuss.net/9/861/2015/tcd-9-861-2015.html (http://www.the-cryosphere-discuss.net/9/861/2015/tcd-9-861-2015.html)

Newly developing rift in Larsen C Ice Shelf presents significant risk to stability


An established rift in the Larsen C Ice Shelf, formerly constrained by a suture zone containing marine ice, grew rapidly during 2014 and is likely in the near future to generate the largest calving event since the 1980s and result in a new minimum area for the ice shelf. Here we investigate the recent development of the rift, quantify the projected calving event and, using a numerical model, assess its likely impact on ice shelf stability. We find that the ice front is at risk of becoming unstable when the anticipated calving event occurs.

More, and image, here: http://www.desdemonadespair.net/2015/02/image-of-day-satellite-view-of-rift.html (http://www.desdemonadespair.net/2015/02/image-of-day-satellite-view-of-rift.html)

ETA: Ah, I see ASLR (of course) has a couple posts on this with many good images on the neighboring thread "Discussion of Antarctic Peninsula"
Title: Re: What's new in Antarctica ?
Post by: AbruptSLR on February 17, 2015, 02:34:15 AM
The linked article states that: "Penguins can taste only sour and salty food, scientists have discovered.  A genetic study suggests the flightless birds lost three of the five basic tastes long ago in evolution."


http://www.bbc.com/news/science-environment-31490623 (http://www.bbc.com/news/science-environment-31490623)
Title: Re: What's new in Antarctica ?
Post by: Laurent on February 20, 2015, 02:03:34 PM
You want a job in Antartica ?
http://www.ukaht.org/about-us/jobs (http://www.ukaht.org/about-us/jobs)
Title: Re: What's new in Antarctica ?
Post by: Chuck Yokota on March 16, 2015, 06:31:03 PM
East Antarctica Melting Could be Explained by Oceanic Gateways

http://www.utexas.edu/news/2015/03/16/east-antarctica-melting-could-be-explained-by-oceanic-gateways/ (http://www.utexas.edu/news/2015/03/16/east-antarctica-melting-could-be-explained-by-oceanic-gateways/)

AUSTIN,Texas — Researchers at The University of Texas at Austin’s Institute for Geophysics (UTIG) in the Jackson School of Geosciences have discovered two seafloor gateways that could allow warm ocean water to reach the base of Totten Glacier, East Antarctica’s largest and most rapidly thinning glacier. The discovery, reported in the March 16 edition of the journal Nature Geoscience, probably explains the glacier’s extreme thinning and raises concerns about how it will affect sea level rise.

Totten Glacier is East Antarctica’s largest outlet of ice to the ocean and has been thinning rapidly for many years. Although deep, warm water has been observed seaward of the glacier, until now there was no evidence that it could compromise coastal ice. The result is of global importance because the ice flowing through Totten Glacier alone is sufficient to raise global sea level by at least 11 feet, equivalent to the contribution of the West Antarctic Ice Sheet if it were to completely collapse.

“We now know there are avenues for the warmest waters in East Antarctica to access the most sensitive areas of Totten Glacier,” said lead author Jamin Greenbaum, a UTIG Ph.D. candidate.

The ice loss to the ocean may soon be irreversible unless atmospheric and oceanic conditions change so that snowfall outpaces coastal melting. The potential for irreversible ice loss is due to the broadly deepening shape of Totten Glacier’s catchment, the large collection of ice and snow that flows from a deep interior basin to the coastline.
Title: Re: What's new in Antarctica ?
Post by: crandles on March 27, 2015, 03:06:26 AM
Volume loss from Antarctic ice shelves is accelerating

The floating ice shelves surrounding the Antarctic Ice Sheet restrain the grounded ice-sheet flow. Thinning of an ice shelf reduces this effect, leading to an increase in ice discharge to the ocean. Using eighteen years of continuous satellite radar altimeter observations we have computed decadal-scale changes in ice-shelf thickness around the Antarctic continent. Overall, average ice-shelf volume change accelerated from negligible loss at 25 ± 64 km3 per year for 1994-2003 to rapid loss of 310 ± 74 km3 per year for 2003-2012. West Antarctic losses increased by 70% in the last decade, and earlier volume gain by East Antarctic ice shelves ceased. In the Amundsen and Bellingshausen regions, some ice shelves have lost up to 18% of their thickness in less than two decades.

http://www.sciencemag.org/content/early/2015/03/25/science.aaa0940 (http://www.sciencemag.org/content/early/2015/03/25/science.aaa0940)

http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/science-environment-31965454 (http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/science-environment-31965454)
Title: Re: What's new in Antarctica ?
Post by: DavidR on March 27, 2015, 09:17:54 AM
New research shows Antarctic ice shelves thinned rapidly in the last decade and much faster than scientists had thought.
This may just  be another take on the articles report by  crandles.
http://www.abc.net.au/news/2015-03-27/antarctic-ice-shelves-thinning-more-rapidly-scientists-thought/6354530 (http://www.abc.net.au/news/2015-03-27/antarctic-ice-shelves-thinning-more-rapidly-scientists-thought/6354530)
Title: Re: What's new in Antarctica ?
Post by: Clare on March 29, 2015, 07:34:57 AM
Tim Naish -Director of the Antarctic Research Centre at Victoria University of Wellington. He will discuss the new findings this week on the decrease in volume of Antarctic ice on Radio NZ.

http://www.radionz.co.nz/national/programmes/saturday/audio/20172781/tim-naish-antarctic-ice-shelves (http://www.radionz.co.nz/national/programmes/saturday/audio/20172781/tim-naish-antarctic-ice-shelves)

He always explains things v clearly, this is a summary of recent research for a general audience, the interviewer herself has been to Antarctica in past.
Pic =Travelling out to Andrill drill site on Ross Ice Shelf in 2006 with Tim
Title: Re: What's new in Antarctica ?
Post by: Sleepy on March 29, 2015, 09:06:23 AM
Thanks Clare, that was indeed a very nice interview.
No big news for a lot of people reading here, but I think it's very usable in communicating the scientific view to those who never read.
I'll add the mp3 version here.
Title: Re: What's new in Antarctica ?
Post by: Sigmetnow on March 29, 2015, 07:18:11 PM
The warmest temperature ever recorded on the continent of Antarctica may have occurred on Tuesday, March 24, 2015, when the mercury shot up to 63.5°F (17.5°C) at Argentina's Esperanza Base on the northern tip of the Antarctic Peninsula. According to weather records researcher Maximiliano Herrera, the previous hottest temperature recorded in Antarctica was 63.3°F (17.4°C) set just one day previously at Argentina's Marambio Base, on a small islet just off the coast of the Antarctic Peninsula. Prior to this week's remarkable heat wave, the hottest known temperature in Antarctica was the 62.8°F (17.1°C) recorded at Esperanza Base on April 24, 1961. (The World Meteorological Organization—WMO—has not yet certified that this week's temperatures are all-time weather records for Antarctica, though the Argentinian weather service has verified that the temperatures measured at Esperanza Base and Marambio Base were the highest ever measured at each site.) A new all-time temperature record for an entire continent is a rare event, and Weather Underground's weather historian, Christopher C. Burt, has full details in his latest post.
Dr. Jeff Masters:
http://www.wunderground.com/blog/JeffMasters/comment.html?entrynum=2944&cm_ven=tw-jm (http://www.wunderground.com/blog/JeffMasters/comment.html?entrynum=2944&cm_ven=tw-jm)

Christopher C. Burt:
http://www.wunderground.com/blog/weatherhistorian/comment.html?entrynum=323# (http://www.wunderground.com/blog/weatherhistorian/comment.html?entrynum=323#)

WaPo:
http://www.washingtonpost.com/blogs/capital-weather-gang/wp/2015/03/27/antarctica-may-have-set-highest-temperature-ever-recorded-tuesday/ (http://www.washingtonpost.com/blogs/capital-weather-gang/wp/2015/03/27/antarctica-may-have-set-highest-temperature-ever-recorded-tuesday/)

Title: Re: What's new in Antarctica ?
Post by: Laurent on April 01, 2015, 10:07:51 AM
Antarctica records unprecedented high temperatures in two new readings
http://www.theguardian.com/environment/2015/mar/31/potential-record-high-temperature-in-antarctica-alarms-scientists (http://www.theguardian.com/environment/2015/mar/31/potential-record-high-temperature-in-antarctica-alarms-scientists)
Title: Re: What's new in Antarctica ?
Post by: AbruptSLR on May 06, 2015, 01:26:35 AM
The linked NY Times article discusses China's power-play in Antarctica:

http://www.nytimes.com/2015/05/04/world/asia/china-pursuing-strategic-interests-builds-presence-in-antarctica.html?_r=0 (http://www.nytimes.com/2015/05/04/world/asia/china-pursuing-strategic-interests-builds-presence-in-antarctica.html?_r=0)
Title: Re: What's new in Antarctica ?
Post by: Laurent on May 08, 2015, 09:54:45 AM
Antarctic creatures found on Niwa trip
http://www.stuff.co.nz/environment/68378627/antarctic-creatures-found-on-niwa-trip (http://www.stuff.co.nz/environment/68378627/antarctic-creatures-found-on-niwa-trip)
Title: Re: What's new in Antarctica ?
Post by: Laurent on May 11, 2015, 03:42:30 PM
Ice loss in west Antarctica is speeding up
http://www.theguardian.com/environment/climate-consensus-97-per-cent/2015/may/11/ice-loss-in-west-antarctica-is-speeding-up (http://www.theguardian.com/environment/climate-consensus-97-per-cent/2015/may/11/ice-loss-in-west-antarctica-is-speeding-up)
Title: Re: What's new in Antarctica ?
Post by: johnm33 on May 24, 2015, 01:06:28 AM
Sorry if this has been linked elsewhere http://phys.org/news/2015-05-sudden-onset-ice-loss-antarctica.html (http://phys.org/news/2015-05-sudden-onset-ice-loss-antarctica.html)
ftp://ftp-projects.zmaw.de/seaice/AMSR2/Ant_latest_yesterday_AMSR2_3.125km.png (http://ftp://ftp-projects.zmaw.de/seaice/AMSR2/Ant_latest_yesterday_AMSR2_3.125km.png)
Title: Re: What's new in Antarctica ?
Post by: solartim27 on June 06, 2015, 09:20:51 PM
Less ice means more seaweed
http://earthsky.org/earth/seaweed-colonizing-ice-free-parts-of-antarctica (http://earthsky.org/earth/seaweed-colonizing-ice-free-parts-of-antarctica)
Title: Re: What's new in Antarctica ?
Post by: solartim27 on June 06, 2015, 11:46:42 PM
Deep ice core in Antarctica used to compare to conditions in Greenland:
http://www.realclimate.org/index.php/archives/2015/04/how-long-does-it-take-antarctica/ (http://www.realclimate.org/index.php/archives/2015/04/how-long-does-it-take-antarctica/)
Title: Re: What's new in Antarctica ?
Post by: Clare on June 28, 2015, 11:52:55 AM
Good long detailed Q&A with Nancy Bertler:
"Antarctica - our big icy threat"
http://www.nzherald.co.nz/nz/news/article.cfm?c_id=1&objectid=11472481 (http://www.nzherald.co.nz/nz/news/article.cfm?c_id=1&objectid=11472481)

& you can see her 'on the job' in this clip from Thin Ice:
https://vimeo.com/43012949 (ftp://vimeo.com/43012949)

(sorry but I cant fathom how to embed this as a video. :-(  )

http://thiniceclimate.org/blog/details/2013/digging-a-snow-pit-in-antarctica-nancy-bertler (http://thiniceclimate.org/blog/details/2013/digging-a-snow-pit-in-antarctica-nancy-bertler)

Clare
Title: Re: What's new in Antarctica ?
Post by: Jim Hunt on July 03, 2015, 09:52:06 AM
(sorry but I cant fathom how to embed this as a video. :-(  )

The forum software doesn't seem to understand Vimeo. Is there a YouTube version of the same video?
Title: Re: What's new in Antarctica ?
Post by: johnm33 on July 15, 2015, 11:19:38 AM
Large version ftp://ftp-projects.zmaw.de/seaice/AMSR2/Ant_20150702_res3.125_LARGE.png from ftp://ftp-projects.zmaw.de/seaice/AMSR2/
Title: Re: What's new in Antarctica ?
Post by: AbruptSLR on July 15, 2015, 05:27:35 PM
The linked article discusses fifty-million-year-old worm sperm cells found frozen in Antarctic ice:

http://www.huffingtonpost.com/entry/worlds-oldest-sperm-discovered-in-antarctica_55a65d9ce4b0c5f0322bcb6f (http://www.huffingtonpost.com/entry/worlds-oldest-sperm-discovered-in-antarctica_55a65d9ce4b0c5f0322bcb6f)

Extract: "Fifty-million-year-old sperm cells from a worm have been found in Antarctica, National Geographic reports. The fossilized sperm, which was preserved in the walls of an egg case, is the “oldest fossil animal sperm yet known,” according to a paper published Wednesday in the journal Biology Letters by researchers at the Swedish Museum of Natural History in Stockholm."
Title: Re: What's new in Antarctica ?
Post by: Lennart van der Linde on October 06, 2015, 09:14:41 AM
Zwally et al 2015 on snowfall in the interior of Antarctica offsetting ice loss at the edges, for now:
http://www.nature.com/news/gains-in-antarctic-ice-might-offset-losses-1.18486?WT.mc_id=TWT_NatureNews (http://www.nature.com/news/gains-in-antarctic-ice-might-offset-losses-1.18486?WT.mc_id=TWT_NatureNews)

If true, this would imply more ice loss from GIS or small glaciers, and/or more thermal expansion, and/or less overall SLR, for now.
Title: Re: What's new in Antarctica ?
Post by: AbruptSLR on October 06, 2015, 05:29:42 PM
Zwally et al 2015 on snowfall in the interior of Antarctica offsetting ice loss at the edges, for now:
http://www.nature.com/news/gains-in-antarctic-ice-might-offset-losses-1.18486?WT.mc_id=TWT_NatureNews (http://www.nature.com/news/gains-in-antarctic-ice-might-offset-losses-1.18486?WT.mc_id=TWT_NatureNews)

If true, this would imply more ice loss from GIS or small glaciers, and/or more thermal expansion, and/or less overall SLR, for now.

The following extract is from the author & indicates that his findings do not mean that we do not need to worry about AIS contribution to SLR, only that there is still uncertainty about timing & rate of contribution:

Extract: "The findings do not mean that Antarctica is not in trouble, Zwally notes. “I know some of the climate deniers will jump on this, and say this means we don’t have to worry as much as some people have been making out,” he says. “It should not take away from the concern about climate warming.” As global temperatures rise, Antarctica is expected to contribute more to sea-level rise, though when exactly that effect will kick in, and to what extent, remains unclear."
Title: Re: What's new in Antarctica ?
Post by: A-Team on October 07, 2015, 01:28:55 PM
The Zwally paper has been accepted but the stodgy Journal of Glaciology does not provide an online copy and there's no telling when it will appear, firewalled, in an issue. Reviewer comments are kept secret permanently.

A copy could like be obtained by emailing Zwally at his NASA profile page. His older papers are available for download at https://www.researchgate.net/profile/H_Zwally2/publications (https://www.researchgate.net/profile/H_Zwally2/publications)

Mass gains of the Antarctic ice sheet exceed losses
H. Jay Zwally, Jun Li, John W. Robbins, Jack L. Saba, Donghui Yi, Anita C. Brenner
accepted Journal of Glaciology #15J071

Antarctica mass balance has gone back and forth for years by ±75 Gt, Grace gravity vs laser altimetry. The latter has serious issues with firn modelling. Zwally attributes the difference to how GRACE researchers account for changes in the height of the bedrock (isostatic rebound). We have not yet heard from the other side.
Glacial ice forms as snow compresses under its own weight. In this case, the gain in ice mass in parts of Antarctica has not come from snowfall in the modern era, but from heavier snows that fell about 10,000 years ago, says Zwally. That snow became ice and started to flow slowly towards the sea — but so slowly that the ice began to thicken.
In my view, the mass gain approach makes sense until it doesn't. The issue today is really warm ocean waters lapping at the underside of vast ice shelves. As these come to destabilize grounded ice up-glacier, any slight excess of snowfall over ablation will fall through the floor quantitatively speaking.

The Swally paper is also saying Greenland mass balance has been figured quite wrong, ie it is contributing more to sea level rise than thought. I'm recalling 1/3 which would have to go to 2/3 since thermal expansion is not likely to be misfigured. Yet Greenland, being so much smaller and experimentally accessible than Antarctica, is better studied by these very same two techniques. So how do we get to 100% error in Greenland measurements?
Title: Re: What's new in Antarctica ?
Post by: Lennart van der Linde on October 14, 2015, 11:17:37 PM
New study by Golledge et al on Antarctic ice loss projections for the coming centuries/millennia:
http://nature.com/articles/doi:10.1038/nature15706 (http://nature.com/articles/doi:10.1038/nature15706)
Title: Re: What's new in Antarctica ?
Post by: Wipneus on October 16, 2015, 07:22:11 AM
NSIDC announced Antarctic sea ice maximum on October the 6th.

http://nsidc.org/arcticseaicenews/2015/10/antarctic-sea-ice-at-its-2015-maximum/ (http://nsidc.org/arcticseaicenews/2015/10/antarctic-sea-ice-at-its-2015-maximum/)

2015 was not record high:

It is likely that this slowing of late-winter ice growth is related in part to the build-up of the El Niño conditions.
(...)
Patterns of sea ice concentration around Antarctica (the deviation from average ice concentration) for El Niño years show a similar pattern, with more ice near the Peninsula.


(https://forum.arctic-sea-ice.net/proxy.php?request=http%3A%2F%2Fnsidc.org%2Farcticseaicenews%2Ffiles%2F2015%2F10%2FFigure41.png&hash=c314b4fb433e5a355cc9c016752aed2d)
Title: Re: What's new in Antarctica ?
Post by: crandles on October 16, 2015, 03:30:04 PM
NSIDC
Only one year, 2002, has had a later maximum (October 12).

However area maximum reached on day 248 is equal 8th earliest area maximum.

Early area maximum and late extent maximum would, I guess, be another sign of the 'slowing of late-winter ice growth'  that is likely due to El Nino.

(The years with earlier area maximums: 2010 2004 2002 1994 1992 have at least some El Nino nearby even if 1989 and 1985 do not.)
Title: Re: What's new in Antarctica ?
Post by: Timothy Astin on October 16, 2015, 03:30:58 PM
Hansen and Sato's manuscript paper

http://www.columbia.edu/~jeh1/mailings/2015/20151012_IceMeltPredictions.pdf (http://www.columbia.edu/~jeh1/mailings/2015/20151012_IceMeltPredictions.pdf)

(earlier version dated 21st September was the subject of a brief forum thread https://forum.arctic-sea-ice.net/index.php/topic,1406.0.html (https://forum.arctic-sea-ice.net/index.php/topic,1406.0.html))

They also comment on the EL Nino impact on 2015 winter extent of Antarctic sea ice.  The map in Wpneus' post shows the positive anomalies in ice being particularly in the western hemisphere, especially west of the Antactic peninsula, which is where Hansen and Sato predict the maximum outflow of land-ice meltwater, a pattern they predict to intensify.
Title: Re: What's new in Antarctica ?
Post by: Timothy Astin on October 16, 2015, 03:59:01 PM
New study by Golledge et al on Antarctic ice loss projections for the coming centuries/millennia:
http://nature.com/articles/doi:10.1038/nature15706 (http://nature.com/articles/doi:10.1038/nature15706)

Anyone got access to the full article care to comment on this paper?  From the abstract and publically available figures, it appears "conservative" in its predictions compared to other recent papers, presumably because of the viscous ice model used.  But I'd need to read the text to make a judgement.

Even if the paper's predictions are at the lower end of best current knowledge (as I think they probably are), its predictions for sea level change have all sorts of implications.

Just one example local to me. The regional council are keen to build some 7000 new houses on the Trent coastal floodplain, and planning officers advised by the UK Environment Agency believe that it will remain above water in 85 years time.
Title: Re: What's new in Antarctica ?
Post by: AbruptSLR on October 16, 2015, 08:39:26 PM
The linked reference finds that wind induced snow mass loss from East Antarctica is dominated by sublimation with the mass transported downwind as water vapor.  This new finding indicates that the AIS contribution to SLR will be greater than previously recognized:

Indrani Das, Ted A. Scambos, Lora S. Koenig, Michiel R. van den Broeke, Jan T. M. Lenaerts (2015), "Extreme wind-ice interaction over Recovery Ice Stream, East Antarctica", Geophysical Research Letters, by DOI: 10.1002/2015GL065544

http://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/10.1002/2015GL065544/abstract (http://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/10.1002/2015GL065544/abstract)

Abstract: "Surface snow accumulation over East Antarctica is an important climate indicator but a difficult parameter to constrain. Surface mass ablation dominates over persistent wind-scour zones as near-surface katabatic winds accelerate over locally steeper ice surface topography, and sublimate and redistribute snow. Here we quantify ablation rates and downwind redeposition of snow over wind-scour zones in the upper Recovery Ice Stream catchment. Airborne radio echo-soundings show a gradual ablation of ~16–18 m of firn, corresponding to ~200 years of accumulation, over these zones and ablation rates of ~54 kg m−2 a−1 (54 mm water equivalent a−1). We conclude that mass loss is dominated by sublimation and mass is transported downwind as water vapor, because snow redeposition downslope of the wind-scour zones constitutes only a small fraction (<10%) of the cumulative mass loss."
Title: Re: What's new in Antarctica ?
Post by: AbruptSLR on October 18, 2015, 06:48:23 PM
The following article provides an overview while siding a little on the side of least drama (as most of the published reports that it cites are):

http://www.smh.com.au/environment/antarctica-trouble-at-the-edge-of-the-world-20151013-gk7w4m.html (http://www.smh.com.au/environment/antarctica-trouble-at-the-edge-of-the-world-20151013-gk7w4m.html)
Title: Re: What's new in Antarctica ?
Post by: Laurent on October 19, 2015, 05:12:02 PM
Warming Oceans May Threaten Krill, a Cornerstone of the Antarctic Ecosystem
http://www.nytimes.com/2015/10/20/science/australia-antarctica-krill-climate-change-ocean.html?partner=rss&emc=rss (http://www.nytimes.com/2015/10/20/science/australia-antarctica-krill-climate-change-ocean.html?partner=rss&emc=rss)
“We thought the krill might be more robust,” said Dr. Kawaguchi, a biologist who works for the Australian government’s Antarctic Division. “We were not expecting such a clear result.”
Title: Re: What's new in Antarctica ?
Post by: Laurent on November 26, 2015, 11:49:06 AM
Big data reveals glorious animation of Antarctic bottom water
http://nci.org.au/2015/11/24/big-data-reveals-glorious-animation-of-antarctic-bottom-water/ (http://nci.org.au/2015/11/24/big-data-reveals-glorious-animation-of-antarctic-bottom-water/)

https://www.youtube.com/watch?feature=player_embedded&v=8VMSF28J9H4 (https://www.youtube.com/watch?feature=player_embedded&v=8VMSF28J9H4)
Title: Re: What's new in Antarctica ?
Post by: A-Team on November 26, 2015, 04:57:53 PM
That's a fabulous animation from the technical standpoint, worth watching over and over. To phong-render this many frames at this HD resolution might take months on a personal computer.

It also very good at making its talking points which, being inherently 3D, are very difficult to convey with a cartoon or explain in verbiage.

The main quibble would be, how could the underlying experimental data possibly be reliable over a vast area that is rarely and sparsely sampled and not visible to satellite? The response: it is entirely the output of a model, presumably constrained to the little concrete data that exists. This doesn't matter too much if what it is conveying is a representative simulation of actual conditions.

[Update: just noticed a quote "so much data was used, that it took seven hours to process just one second of the animation." http://nci.org.au/2015/11/24/big-data-reveals-glorious-animation-of-antarctic-bottom-water/ (http://nci.org.au/2015/11/24/big-data-reveals-glorious-animation-of-antarctic-bottom-water/)]
Title: Re: What's new in Antarctica ?
Post by: oren on November 27, 2015, 02:16:17 PM
Beautiful animation
Title: Re: What's new in Antarctica ?
Post by: AbruptSLR on December 03, 2015, 12:12:08 AM
The linked article discusses the first commercial air flight to Antarctica as well as possible future commercial flights:

http://www.popularmechanics.com/flight/news/a18380/first-commercial/ (http://www.popularmechanics.com/flight/news/a18380/first-commercial/)

Extract: "On November 26, a commercial Boeing 747 passenger jet successfully landed on a blue-ice field in Antarctica for the first time. The landing was organized by Antarctic Logistics & Expeditions (ALE), and the airliner was piloted by Loftleidir Icelandic as "part of a larger investigation into the use of such aircraft for ALE's Antarctic operations."
The Boeing 747 was landed on Union Glacier, near ALE's primary camp. ALE transports between 400 and 500 people to Antarctica each year, primarily scientists traveling to the frigid continent to conduct research projects. Passengers have traditionally traveled in combination cargo/passenger planes that are well equipped to handle ice landings, such as the Lockheed L 100 Hercules and Ilyushin Il-76. "The Boeing 757-200 ER, fitted with 62 business class seats, will enhance passenger comfort yet maintain the safety of ALE's activities and aircraft resources," says ALE.
Successfully landing passenger airliners on Antarctica also opens the door for tourism and recreational trips. Traditionally, travelers to Antarctica who are not part of an official scientific expedition have arrived in boats from Chile or South Africa."
Title: Re: What's new in Antarctica ?
Post by: AbruptSLR on December 03, 2015, 12:41:41 AM
 The linked article discusses how the Halley VI British Antarctic Station is being relocated this Austral Summer to avoid being part of a major calving event for the Brunt Ice Shelf (see that attached image):

https://www.newscientist.com/article/dn28600-massive-crevasse-in-the-ice-forces-early-move-for-antarctic-base/ (https://www.newscientist.com/article/dn28600-massive-crevasse-in-the-ice-forces-early-move-for-antarctic-base/)

Extract: "Life on a floating ice shelf is precarious enough, but when a massive crack is heading your way, you know you’re in trouble. This nightmare scenario is what’s forcing the UK’s newest research station in Antarctica to relocate.

Halley VI opened in 2013 to much fanfare due to its space-age design. It’s built as eight modules on skisso that it can be towed to a new location if the ice conditions change.



The crack is extending in the direction of Halley VI at a rate of 1.7 km a year, and is 8 km away from the base. “We don’t know what will happen,” says Gudmundsson. “It might stop growing, but we can’t exclude the possibility of a big calving event.”
The main concern is that Chasm 1 will grow so much that it makes it impossible to relocate the base in the future. That’s why a move is now underway."
Title: Re: What's new in Antarctica ?
Post by: Laurent on December 04, 2015, 08:08:58 PM
Rising atmospheric carbon dioxide actually cools part of Antarctica
http://news.sciencemag.org/environment/2015/12/rising-atmospheric-carbon-dioxide-actually-cools-part-antarctica (http://news.sciencemag.org/environment/2015/12/rising-atmospheric-carbon-dioxide-actually-cools-part-antarctica)

In a world where most regions are warming because of increasing concentrations of atmospheric carbon dioxide (CO2), central Antarctica has been cooling slightly in recent years. Greenhouse gases such as CO2 typically trap heat radiated back toward space from the planet’s surface, but large swaths of the East Antarctic Ice Sheet (the broad pink mass on the right side of the image) are, on average, actually colder than the upper layers of the atmosphere for much of the year—the only place on Earth where that’s true. When the team looked at the overall balance between the radiation upward from the surface of the ice sheet and the radiation both upward and downward from the upper levels of the atmosphere across all infrared wavelengths over the course of a year, they found that in central Antarctica the surface and lower atmosphere, against expectation, actually lose more energy to space if the air contains greenhouse gases, the researchers report online and in a forthcoming Geophysical Research Letters. And adding more CO2 to the atmosphere in the short-term triggered even more energy loss from the surface and lower atmosphere there, the team’s climate simulations suggest. The topsy-turvy temperature trend stems, in part, from the region’s high elevation; much of the surface of the ice sheet smothering East Antarctica lies above an elevation of 3000 meters, so it is much colder than it would be at lower altitudes. Moreover, that region often experiences what meteorologists call a temperature inversion, where temperatures in the lowest levels of the atmosphere are cooler than those higher up. For the lower-altitude fringes of the icy continent, and for the rest of the world (even Siberia and Greenland), the greenhouse effect still works as expected.
Title: Re: What's new in Antarctica ?
Post by: AbruptSLR on December 04, 2015, 08:16:28 PM
Rising atmospheric carbon dioxide actually cools part of Antarctica

What they don't note is that this effect will help sustain strong circumpolar wind speeds as the ozone hole heals itself, thus maintaining the advection of unusually high volumes of warm CDW to the grounding lines of key Antarctic marine glaciers (like PIG).
Title: Re: What's new in Antarctica ?
Post by: oren on December 25, 2015, 03:04:40 PM
Rising atmospheric carbon dioxide actually cools part of Antarctica
http://news.sciencemag.org/environment/2015/12/rising-atmospheric-carbon-dioxide-actually-cools-part-antarctica (http://news.sciencemag.org/environment/2015/12/rising-atmospheric-carbon-dioxide-actually-cools-part-antarctica)

In a world where most regions are warming because of increasing concentrations of atmospheric carbon dioxide (CO2), central Antarctica has been cooling slightly in recent years. Greenhouse gases such as CO2 typically trap heat radiated back toward space from the planet’s surface, but large swaths of the East Antarctic Ice Sheet (the broad pink mass on the right side of the image) are, on average, actually colder than the upper layers of the atmosphere for much of the year—the only place on Earth where that’s true. When the team looked at the overall balance between the radiation upward from the surface of the ice sheet and the radiation both upward and downward from the upper levels of the atmosphere across all infrared wavelengths over the course of a year, they found that in central Antarctica the surface and lower atmosphere, against expectation, actually lose more energy to space if the air contains greenhouse gases, the researchers report online and in a forthcoming Geophysical Research Letters. And adding more CO2 to the atmosphere in the short-term triggered even more energy loss from the surface and lower atmosphere there, the team’s climate simulations suggest. The topsy-turvy temperature trend stems, in part, from the region’s high elevation; much of the surface of the ice sheet smothering East Antarctica lies above an elevation of 3000 meters, so it is much colder than it would be at lower altitudes. Moreover, that region often experiences what meteorologists call a temperature inversion, where temperatures in the lowest levels of the atmosphere are cooler than those higher up. For the lower-altitude fringes of the icy continent, and for the rest of the world (even Siberia and Greenland), the greenhouse effect still works as expected.

Interesting, though an anecdote in the grand scheme of things.
Title: Re: What's new in Antarctica ?
Post by: AbruptSLR on December 29, 2015, 04:28:16 PM
The linked New York Times article discusses how new technology is making Antarctica more accessible to more countries; which are jockeying for strategic & commercial opportunities:

http://www.nytimes.com/interactive/2015/12/29/world/countries-rush-for-upper-hand-antarctica.html?hp&action=click&pgtype=Homepage&clickSource=story-heading&module=photo-spot-region&region=top-news&WT.nav=top-news&_r=0 (http://www.nytimes.com/interactive/2015/12/29/world/countries-rush-for-upper-hand-antarctica.html?hp&action=click&pgtype=Homepage&clickSource=story-heading&module=photo-spot-region&region=top-news&WT.nav=top-news&_r=0)

Extract: "But an array of countries are rushing to assert greater influence here, with an eye not just toward the day those protective treaties expire, but also for the strategic and commercial opportunities that exist right now.
“The newer players are stepping into what they view as a treasure house of resources,” said Anne-Marie Brady, a scholar at New Zealand’s University of Canterbury who specializes in Antarctic politics.
Some of the ventures focus on the Antarctic resources that are already up for grabs, like abundant sea life. China and South Korea, both of which operate state-of-the-art bases here, are ramping up their fishing of krill, the shrimplike crustaceans found in abundance in the Southern Ocean, while Russia recently thwarted efforts to create one of the world’s largest ocean sanctuaries here.
Some scientists are examining the potential for harvesting icebergs from Antarctica, which is estimated to have the biggest reserves of fresh water on the planet. Nations are also pressing ahead with space research and satellite projects to expand their global navigation abilities.
Building on a Soviet-era foothold, Russia is expanding its monitoring stations for Glonass, its version of the Global Positioning System. At least three Russian stations are already operating in Antarctica, part of its effort to challenge the dominance of the American GPS, and new stations are planned for sites like the Russian base, in the shadow of the Orthodox Church of the Holy Trinity.



“The old days of the Antarctic being dominated by the interests and wishes of white men from European, Australasian and North American states is over,” said Klaus Dodds, a politics scholar at the University of London who specializes in Antarctica. “The reality is that Antarctica is geopolitically contested.”"
Title: Re: What's new in Antarctica ?
Post by: Stephen on December 30, 2015, 12:18:43 AM
...Some scientists are examining the potential for harvesting icebergs from Antarctica, w...

It's been done. (http://hoaxes.org/af_database/permalink/the_sydney_iceberg/)

(https://forum.arctic-sea-ice.net/proxy.php?request=http%3A%2F%2Fwww.smh.com.au%2FffxImage%2Furlpicture_id_1048653852095_2003%2F03%2F28%2Fnws_320dicksmith%2C0.jpg&hash=ea361740b76702ed526620e2d9c8f061)


Title: Re: What's new in Antarctica ?
Post by: AbruptSLR on January 04, 2016, 11:25:49 PM
The linked (open access) reference leads to an assessment of using GRACE data to estimate ice mass loss from Antarctica in the 2003 to 2009 timeframe:

Zammit-Mangion, Andrew; Bamber, Jonathan L.; Schoen, Nana W.; Rougier, Jonathan C. (2015), "A data-driven approach for assessing ice-sheet mass balance in space and time", Annals of Glaciology, Volume 56, Number 70, DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.3189/2015AoG70A021 (http://dx.doi.org/10.3189/2015AoG70A021)


http://www.ingentaconnect.com/content/igsoc/agl/2015/00000056/00000070/art00020?token=005c1c0cf32784d772646e586546243125425747794c7d786c255c5e4e2663433b393f6a333f25667ef295853a2a (http://www.ingentaconnect.com/content/igsoc/agl/2015/00000056/00000070/art00020?token=005c1c0cf32784d772646e586546243125425747794c7d786c255c5e4e2663433b393f6a333f25667ef295853a2a)

Abstract: "Combinations of various numerical models and datasets with diverse observation characteristics have been used to assess the mass evolution of ice sheets. As a consequence, a wide range of estimates have been produced using markedly different methodologies, data, approximation methods and model assumptions. Current attempts to reconcile these estimates using simple combination methods are unsatisfactory, as common sources of errors across different methodologies may not be accurately quantified (e.g. systematic biases in models). Here we provide a general approach which deals with this issue by considering all data sources simultaneously, and, crucially, by reducing the dependence on numerical models. The methodology is based on exploiting the different space–time characteristics of the relevant ice-sheet processes, and using statistical smoothing methods to establish the causes of the observed change. In omitting direct dependence on numerical models, the methodology provides a novel means for assessing glacio-isostatic adjustment and climate models alike, using remote-sensing datasets. This is particularly advantageous in Antarctica, where in situ measurements are difficult to obtain. We illustrate the methodology by using it to infer Antarctica's mass trend from 2003 to 2009 and produce surface mass-balance anomaly estimates to validate the RACMO2.1 regional climate model."
Title: Re: What's new in Antarctica ?
Post by: solartim27 on January 06, 2016, 07:55:14 PM
Short post about new seismic monitoring stations getting installed:
http://earthsky.org/earth/new-glimpse-of-geology-under-antarcticas-ice (http://earthsky.org/earth/new-glimpse-of-geology-under-antarcticas-ice)
"Using technology built to withstand the harsh winters, scientists have managed to map the volcanos, rifts, and basins hidden under West Antarctica’s ice sheet."
Title: Re: What's new in Antarctica ?
Post by: Espen on January 06, 2016, 08:59:59 PM
We are heading for a record low or something similar this year, that is my unqualified estimate:
Title: Re: What's new in Antarctica ?
Post by: Buddy on January 06, 2016, 09:39:23 PM
We are heading for a record low or something similar this year, that is my unqualified estimate

And there is a nice fairly "significant warm anomaly" in the southern Pacific (between New Zealand and southern Chile) that has been gaining strength (warmth) over the past few weeks....

Not good....

Title: Re: What's new in Antarctica ?
Post by: Buddy on January 06, 2016, 09:40:43 PM
Warm anomaly in southern Pacific....

http://climatechangegraphs.blogspot.com/2013/02/sea-surface-temperature-anomaly.html (http://climatechangegraphs.blogspot.com/2013/02/sea-surface-temperature-anomaly.html)
Title: Re: What's new in Antarctica ?
Post by: Espen on January 06, 2016, 10:46:49 PM
It is definitely heading south:
Title: Re: What's new in Antarctica ?
Post by: AbruptSLR on January 06, 2016, 10:53:37 PM
It is definitely heading south:

Most likely this is due to the near El Nino in 2014 and the current Super 2015-16 El Nino that is creating anomalously high surface temperatures in Western Antarctica (see attached image of the 5-day average anom forecast)
Title: Re: What's new in Antarctica ?
Post by: sidd on January 07, 2016, 07:07:12 AM
Where would you say Mercer's canary, the 0C midsummer isotherm will wind up this year ? i suppose the 0C isotherm for December-Jan averaged is a good enuf approximation, thats whats i look at on merra and such, i wonder what it will look like this year
Title: Re: What's new in Antarctica ?
Post by: AbruptSLR on January 07, 2016, 05:00:04 PM
Where would you say Mercer's canary, the 0C midsummer isotherm will wind up this year ? i suppose the 0C isotherm for December-Jan averaged is a good enuf approximation, thats whats i look at on merra and such, i wonder what it will look like this year

sidd,

The first attached image is the Nullschool Earth Surface Wind and Temperature forecast for January 11, 2016.  The green color is above freezing, so the 0C isotherm on that day will be right around the edges of the Pine Island Bay, will could cause hydrofracture for either the PIG or the Thwaites Glacier later this austral summer.

Best,
ASLR

Edit the second attached image shows the Nullschool Earth 1000-hPa Wind and Temperature forecast for Jan 11 2016, showing that the coastline (at 1000-hPa) from the Ross Sea to Pine Island Bay is projected to be above freezing on that date.
Title: Re: What's new in Antarctica ?
Post by: Laurent on January 13, 2016, 08:40:53 PM
'Gigantic chasm under Antarctic ice'
http://www.bbc.com/news/science-environment-35303779 (http://www.bbc.com/news/science-environment-35303779)
A vast, previously unrecognised canyon system could be hidden under the Antarctic ice sheet.

Hints of its presence are seen in the shape of the white continent's surface, in a largely unexplored region called Princess Elizabeth Land.

If confirmed by a proper geophysical survey - now under way - the winding canyon network would be over 1,000km long and in places as much as 1km deep.

These dimensions would make it bigger than the famous Grand Canyon in the US.

"We know from other areas of Antarctica that the shape of the ice surface is obviously dependent on the shape of the landscape underneath - because the ice is flowing over that landscape," explained Dr Stewart Jamieson, from Durham University, UK.

"When we look in Princess Elizabeth Land with satellite data, there seem to be some linear features in the surface ice that to us look very reminiscent of a canyon.

"We have traced these faint lineations from the centre of Princess Elizabeth Land all the way to the coast, off to the north. It's a pretty substantial system," he told BBC News.

There are suggestions also that the canyon network is connected to a previously undiscovered subglacial lake.
Title: Re: What's new in Antarctica ?
Post by: AbruptSLR on January 14, 2016, 11:00:37 PM
'Gigantic chasm under Antarctic ice'
http://www.bbc.com/news/science-environment-35303779 (http://www.bbc.com/news/science-environment-35303779)
A vast, previously unrecognised canyon system could be hidden under the Antarctic ice sheet.

Hints of its presence are seen in the shape of the white continent's surface, in a largely unexplored region called Princess Elizabeth Land.

If confirmed by a proper geophysical survey - now under way - the winding canyon network would be over 1,000km long and in places as much as 1km deep.

These dimensions would make it bigger than the famous Grand Canyon in the US.

"We know from other areas of Antarctica that the shape of the ice surface is obviously dependent on the shape of the landscape underneath - because the ice is flowing over that landscape," explained Dr Stewart Jamieson, from Durham University, UK.

"When we look in Princess Elizabeth Land with satellite data, there seem to be some linear features in the surface ice that to us look very reminiscent of a canyon.

"We have traced these faint lineations from the centre of Princess Elizabeth Land all the way to the coast, off to the north. It's a pretty substantial system," he told BBC News.

There are suggestions also that the canyon network is connected to a previously undiscovered subglacial lake.

While I do not expect that this new finding will have any implication in my lifetime, I thought that it would not hurt to provide a more complete reference citation:

Stewart S.R. Jamieson, Neil Ross, Jamin S. Greenbaum, Duncan A. Young, Alan R.A. Aitken, Jason L. Roberts, Donald D. Blankenship, Sun Bo and Martin J. Siegert (2015), "An extensive subglacial lake and canyon system in Princess Elizabeth Land, East Antarctica", Geology, doi: 10.1130/G37220.1


http://geology.gsapubs.org/content/early/2015/12/22/G37220.1.abstract (http://geology.gsapubs.org/content/early/2015/12/22/G37220.1.abstract)


Abstract: "The subglacial landscape of Princess Elizabeth Land (PEL) in East Antarctica is poorly known due to a paucity of ice thickness measurements. This is problematic given its importance for understanding ice sheet dynamics and landscape and climate evolution. To address this issue, we describe the topography beneath the ice sheet by assuming that ice surface expressions in satellite imagery relate to large-scale subglacial features. We find evidence that a large, previously undiscovered subglacial drainage network is hidden beneath the ice sheet in PEL. We interpret a discrete feature that is 140 × 20 km in plan form, and multiple narrow sinuous features that extend over a distance of ∼1100 km. We hypothesize that these are tectonically controlled and relate to a large subglacial basin containing a deep-water lake in the interior of PEL linked to a series of long, deep canyons. The presence of 1-km-deep canyons is confirmed at a few localities by radio-echo sounding data, and drainage analysis suggests that these canyons will direct subglacial meltwater to the coast between the Vestfold Hills and the West Ice Shelf."
Title: Re: What's new in Antarctica ?
Post by: Sigmetnow on January 19, 2016, 12:04:30 AM
Astronaut aboard the International Space Station photographs massive iceberg in southern ocean.

Scott Kelly: Just spotted this massive iceberg in the southern Indian Ocean. #YearInSpace

https://twitter.com/stationcdrkelly/status/689182696845750272

Olivia D'Souza:  @StationCDRKelly I believe it is Iceberg C-16 near Ross Island @PC0101 @DaveAtCOGS @gavinmcmorrow @CaliaDomenico

https://twitter.com/olivia_dsouza/status/689185273612091394
Title: Re: What's new in Antarctica ?
Post by: AbruptSLR on January 27, 2016, 04:18:27 PM
The linked article indicates that Kiwi geologists are studying fossils near Mt Discovery, Antarctica, that could shed light on the risk of portions of the EAIS collapsing as the current climate approaches Pliocene conditions:

http://www.nzherald.co.nz/nz/news/article.cfm?c_id=1&objectid=11576382 (http://www.nzherald.co.nz/nz/news/article.cfm?c_id=1&objectid=11576382)

Extract: "Call it extreme geology: a team of Kiwi scientists is venturing to a remote part of Antarctica to dig up ancient evidence of a warmer world.
The treasure trove of fossilised marine life buried in the rock near Mt Discovery - about 50km from Scott Base - could help us better understand what might happen to our planet under future climate change.
It's a place exposed to the continent's unforgiving weather - including 150km/h wind storms that recently shredded tents at a US camp.
The expedition, led by Dr Richard Levy of GNS Science and Professor Tim Naish of Victoria University's Antarctic Research Centre, aims to follow up descriptions of a similar site found nearby about 50 years ago.
The discoverers found shells of organisms that could not live in the sea ice that covers the environment today.
"The samples are telling us it was a warmer world, but we want to know when that was and how old the deposit is; we think it's probably from about three million years ago," said Professor Naish. "This period is a pretty important window for understanding what might happen with global warming."
Called the Pliocene, it was the most recent time when there were 400 parts per million of carbon dioxide in the Earth's atmosphere.
That same level has been reached today through the human carbon emissions projected to heat the climate by several degrees by 2200.

While sensitive areas of the West Antarctic Ice Sheet such as Pine Island were important because they were already experiencing rapid mass loss and melting, Mt Discovery provided evidence of what the much larger East Antarctic Ice Sheet may have done during the warmer ancient climate.
"The thing is, when this place starts to melt, it's the last to go - so you know you're in real trouble.""
Title: Re: What's new in Antarctica ?
Post by: wili on January 27, 2016, 05:29:08 PM
Apologies if this has already been posted somewhere, and hat tip to Hank Roberts at RealClimate for the link:

http://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/10.1002/2015GL066612/abstract (http://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/10.1002/2015GL066612/abstract)

Oliver J. Marsh, Helen A. Fricker, Matthew R. Siegfried, Knut Christianson, Keith W. Nicholls, Hugh F. J. Corr, Ginny Catania
First published: 14 January 2016
DOI: 10.1002/2015GL066612

High basal melting forming a channel at the grounding line of Ross Ice Shelf, Antarctica


Antarctica’s ice shelves are thinning at an increasing rate, affecting their buttressing ability. Channels in the ice shelf base unevenly distribute melting, and their evolution provides insight into changing subglacial and oceanic conditions. Here we used phase-sensitive radar measurements to estimate basal melt rates in a channel beneath the currently stable Ross Ice Shelf.

Melt rates of 22.2 ± 0.2 m a−1 (>2500% the overall background rate) were observed 1.7 km seaward of Mercer/Whillans Ice Stream grounding line, close to where subglacial water discharge is expected. Laser altimetry shows a corresponding, steadily deepening surface channel.

Two relict channels to the north suggest recent subglacial drainage reorganization beneath Whillans Ice Stream approximately coincident with the shutdown of Kamb Ice Stream. This rapid channel formation implies that shifts in subglacial hydrology may impact ice shelf stability.
Title: Re: What's new in Antarctica ?
Post by: cats on February 02, 2016, 08:28:49 PM
An interesting project to get more info on Antarctic ice shelves http://polarfever.com/2016/02/02/physical-oceanographers-on-ice/ (http://polarfever.com/2016/02/02/physical-oceanographers-on-ice/)

Summary -
 The phase sensitive radars were developed and built at the British Antarctic Survey (BAS) and very precisely measure changes in ice thickness. This means that we get a direct measurement of the ice shelf melt rate. Satellites can also be used to measure this, but will only give average values over several years, while we will get a value every 2 hours from the phase sensitive radars. In combination with the moorings that we have deployed at the ice shelf front, this will allow us to directly link changes in ocean temperature to changes in the ice shelf melt rate. The aim of the seismic surveys is to find out how much seawater there is between the floating ice shelf and the bedrock.
Title: Re: What's new in Antarctica ?
Post by: Sigmetnow on February 05, 2016, 03:38:40 AM
Scar Inlet ice shelf said to be poised to disintegrate.

Glaciologists anticipate massive ice shelf collapse
Since late 2011, the larger bay where the Larsen B once resided has been covered with a solid sheet of frozen ocean ice, called ‘fast ice’ because it is ‘fastened’ or frozen to the coastline,” Scambos said. “We suspect this ice is supporting the weakened Scar Inlet ice shelf and that the shelf is poised to break up if the thin fast ice breaks away. One good windstorm could set some of this process in motion.”
http://news.uaf.edu/61609-2/ (http://news.uaf.edu/61609-2/)
Title: Re: What's new in Antarctica ?
Post by: A-Team on February 09, 2016, 12:28:50 PM
Sounds like this could be monitored just as easily from home. The article does not provide the Landsat accession number that would make this easier for us. Sentinel 1A radar could make a nice adjunct. I am skeptical that they will be measuring anything out there on the ice under this breakup scenario -- it seems to be more for experiencing the experience. Oh well, it could make for a neat video.

Scambos said the Scar Inlet ice shelf has been showing signs of increased melting and large-scale fracturing over the past 14 years. The only support holding back more fracturing could be the 6 to 10 feet of frozen ocean in front of it — a thin, fragile crust compared to the ice shelf plate.

“Since late 2011, the larger bay where the Larsen B once resided has been covered with a solid sheet of frozen ocean ice, called ‘fast ice’ because it is ‘fastened’ or frozen to the coastline,” Scambos said. “We suspect this ice is supporting the weakened Scar Inlet ice shelf and that the shelf is poised to break up if the thin fast ice breaks away. One good windstorm could set some of this process in motion.”

“This will be the first time anybody records ground-based data from an ice shelf that is ready to break up,” Truffer said. “The prize, of course, would be to witness the actual break-up, but, even if we miss that, we will have a detailed record of ongoing weakening of the shelf. An unnamed mountaineer from the British Antarctic Survey will help them navigate.”
Title: Re: What's new in Antarctica ?
Post by: Laurent on February 13, 2016, 11:41:53 AM
150,000 penguins die after giant iceberg renders colony landlocked
http://www.theguardian.com/world/2016/feb/13/150000-penguins-killed-after-giant-iceberg-renders-colony-landlocked (http://www.theguardian.com/world/2016/feb/13/150000-penguins-killed-after-giant-iceberg-renders-colony-landlocked)
Penguins of Cape Denison in Antarctica effectively trapped by iceberg the size of Rome and face 120km round trip to feed
There are fears the colony of Adelie penguins will be wiped out in 20 years’ time unless the iceberg moves.
There are fears the colony of Adelie penguins will be wiped out in 20 years’ time unless the iceberg moves. Photograph: Alamy

Guardian staff

Saturday 13 February 2016 06.56 GMT
Last modified on Saturday 13 February 2016 10.15 GMT

    Share on Pinterest
    Share on LinkedIn
    Share on Google+

Shares
1,223
Comments
508
Save for later

An estimated 150,000 Adelie penguins living in Antarctica have died after an iceberg the size of Rome became grounded near their colony, forcing them to trek 60km to the sea for food.

The penguins of Cape Denison in Commonwealth Bay used to live close to a large body of open water. However, in 2010 a colossal iceberg measuring 2900sq km became trapped in the bay, rendering the colony effectively landlocked.
Penguins suffering from climate change, scientists say
Read more

Penguins seeking food must now waddle 60km to the coast to fish. Over the years, the arduous journey has had a devastating effect on the size of the colony.

Since 2011 the colony of 160,000 penguins has shrunk to just 10,000, according to research carried out by the Climate Change Research Centre at Australia’s University of New South Wales. Scientists predict the colony will be gone in 20 years unless the sea ice breaks up or the giant iceberg, dubbed B09B, is dislodged.

Penguins have been recorded in the area for more than 100 years. But the outlook for the penguins remaining at Cape Denison is dire.

“The arrival of iceberg B09B in Commonwealth Bay, East Antarctica, and subsequent fast ice expansion has dramatically increased the distance Adélie penguins breeding at Cape Denison must travel in search of food,” said the researchers in an article in Antarctic Science.

“The Cape Denison population could be extirpated within 20 years unless B09B relocates or the now perennial fast ice within the bay breaks out”

“This has provided a natural experiment to investigate the impact of iceberg stranding events and sea ice expansion along the East Antarctic coast.”

In contrast, a colony located just 8km from the coast of Commonwealth Bay is thriving, the researchers said.

The iceberg had apparently been floating close to the coast for 20 years before crashing into a glacier and becoming stuck.
Title: Re: What's new in Antarctica ?
Post by: AbruptSLR on February 17, 2016, 11:31:24 AM
While the linked Dec 2015 article is not exactly news, it does present a long discussion of some of the key issues associated with the risk of rapid ice sheet mass loss in the coming decades/centuries:


http://www.irishexaminer.com/lifestyle/features/the-long-read-are-the-secrets-we-need-to-battle-climate-change-hidden-in-the-glaciers-369801.html (http://www.irishexaminer.com/lifestyle/features/the-long-read-are-the-secrets-we-need-to-battle-climate-change-hidden-in-the-glaciers-369801.html)

Extract: "When I asked Richard Alley, almost certainly the most respected glaciologist in the United States, whether he would be surprised to see Thwaites collapse in his lifetime, he drew a breath. Alley is 58. “Up until very recently, I would have said, ‘Yes, I’d be surprised,’” he told me. “Right now, I’m not sure. I’m still cautiously optimistic that in my life, Thwaites has got enough stability on the ridge where it now sits that I will die before it does. But I’m not confident about that for my kids. And if someday I have grandkids, I’m not at all confident for them.”

Rignot answers the same question more bluntly. “That’s what we’re seeing right now — they are in a state of collapse,” he says. “We’ve never seen it before, so it’s hard to identify it and say, ‘We know exactly what it looks like, and this is what it looks like.’ We’re still in the early stage.”

Rignot predicts that in 30 or 40 years, people will be accustomed to watching Thwaites and Pine Island disintegrate constantly, iceberg by iceberg, into the ocean."

Edit: Personally, I think that Rignot should be the most respected glaciologist in the US.
Title: Re: What's new in Antarctica ?
Post by: jimbenison on February 18, 2016, 08:12:11 PM
150,000 penguins die after giant iceberg renders colony landlocked
http://www.theguardian.com/world/2016/feb/13/150000-penguins-killed-after-giant-iceberg-renders-colony-landlocked (http://www.theguardian.com/world/2016/feb/13/150000-penguins-killed-after-giant-iceberg-renders-colony-landlocked)
Penguins of Cape Denison in Antarctica effectively trapped by iceberg the size of Rome and face 120km round trip to feed
There are fears the colony of Adelie penguins will be wiped out in 20 years’ time unless the iceberg moves.
There are fears the colony of Adelie penguins will be wiped out in 20 years’ time unless the iceberg moves. Photograph: Alamy

Guardian staff

Saturday 13 February 2016 06.56 GMT
Last modified on Saturday 13 February 2016 10.15 GMT

    Share on Pinterest
    Share on LinkedIn
    Share on Google+

Shares
1,223
Comments
508
Save for later

An estimated 150,000 Adelie penguins living in Antarctica have died after an iceberg the size of Rome became grounded near their colony, forcing them to trek 60km to the sea for food.

The penguins of Cape Denison in Commonwealth Bay used to live close to a large body of open water. However, in 2010 a colossal iceberg measuring 2900sq km became trapped in the bay, rendering the colony effectively landlocked.
Penguins suffering from climate change, scientists say
Read more

Penguins seeking food must now waddle 60km to the coast to fish. Over the years, the arduous journey has had a devastating effect on the size of the colony.

Since 2011 the colony of 160,000 penguins has shrunk to just 10,000, according to research carried out by the Climate Change Research Centre at Australia’s University of New South Wales. Scientists predict the colony will be gone in 20 years unless the sea ice breaks up or the giant iceberg, dubbed B09B, is dislodged.

Penguins have been recorded in the area for more than 100 years. But the outlook for the penguins remaining at Cape Denison is dire.

“The arrival of iceberg B09B in Commonwealth Bay, East Antarctica, and subsequent fast ice expansion has dramatically increased the distance Adélie penguins breeding at Cape Denison must travel in search of food,” said the researchers in an article in Antarctic Science.

“The Cape Denison population could be extirpated within 20 years unless B09B relocates or the now perennial fast ice within the bay breaks out”

“This has provided a natural experiment to investigate the impact of iceberg stranding events and sea ice expansion along the East Antarctic coast.”

In contrast, a colony located just 8km from the coast of Commonwealth Bay is thriving, the researchers said.

The iceberg had apparently been floating close to the coast for 20 years before crashing into a glacier and becoming stuck.

Some are suggesting that the penguins haven't died; they just moved.

http://news.discovery.com/animals/dead-antarctica-penguins-are-probably-fine-160216.htm (http://news.discovery.com/animals/dead-antarctica-penguins-are-probably-fine-160216.htm)

Also, it appears that the fast ice cleared out of Commonwealth Bay on about the 15th. The berg is still there though.
Title: Re: What's new in Antarctica ?
Post by: sidd on February 19, 2016, 05:58:06 AM
Lets be clear about this. They didn't just move. We evicted them. And they have no lobbyists in Beiging, Brussels or Washington, or at least not any who have as much money as fossil interests.
Title: Re: What's new in Antarctica ?
Post by: bligh8 on February 20, 2016, 04:35:37 PM
Don’t look now Mr. Sidd,  but your empathetic values are showing……again.
Title: Re: What's new in Antarctica ?
Post by: sidd on February 21, 2016, 07:10:12 AM
"empathetic values are showing……again."

o dear, i must tuck them back in.

But it does irk me that we humans bewail inconvenience from ice sheet collapse, while almost entirely ignoring the harm it does and will do to a myriad other live things. We live in vast ecology, and we are burning so, so much of structure beneath our feet, and the obscenity is that _we do not even know_ who or how many we kill.

Truly, we believe absurdities, so we commit atrocities.

sidd
Title: Re: What's new in Antarctica ?
Post by: wili on February 21, 2016, 08:48:40 AM
" we believe absurdities, so we commit atrocities" Nice Voltaire paraphrase!
Title: Re: What's new in Antarctica ?
Post by: bligh8 on February 21, 2016, 03:20:56 PM
Wili

Voltaire seemed a bit much for me, but Nietzsche, Byron, Blake and  Shelly were more of my thinking.  In keeping with the title thread…I recall Shelly's "The Cloud" where every word was intrinsically interwoven with the last and next… it brought to mind the Purkey & Johnson paper
Antarctica bottom water…(2013) masterfully written where no word seemed wasted. 
Title: Re: What's new in Antarctica ?
Post by: sidd on February 21, 2016, 10:59:12 PM
I think Wili refers to my twisting of the famous aphorism by Voltaire from the passage:

"Mais, monsieur, en étant persuadés par la foi, des choses qui paraissent absurdes à notre intelligence, c'est-à-dire, en croyant ce que nous ne croyons pas, gardons-nous de faire ce sacrifice de notre raison dans la conduite de la vie. Il y a eu des gens qui ont dit autrefois: Vous croyez des choses incompréhensibles, contradictoires, impossibles, parce que nous vous l’avons ordonné; faites donc des choses injustes parce que nous vous l’ordonnons. Ces gens-là raisonnaient à merveille. Certainement qui est en droit de vous rendre absurde est en droit de vous rendre injuste."

(Very) roughly translated,

"But sir, once faith persuades us of things which appear absurd to our intellect, that is to say, into believing what intellect cannot believe, the danger arises of abandoning reason as a governor of our lives. People in the past said to us: You will believe incomprehensible, contradictory and impossible things because we order it; you must do unjust things because we order you. They had marvellous reasoning. Certainly, he who can make you absurd can make you unjust."

This was, of course, an attack on  religion, but Voltaire was nothing if not an acute logician, and touched the heart of the matter in his inimitable style ...
Title: Re: What's new in Antarctica ?
Post by: bligh8 on February 22, 2016, 12:24:35 AM
Thank you Mr. Sidd for your explanation……I point out empathy as it is one of our most enduring qualities that separate us from the beast.

Bligh
Title: Re: What's new in Antarctica ?
Post by: Jim Hunt on March 11, 2016, 01:46:07 PM
A visual image (http://www.esa.int/spaceinimages/Images/2016/03/Ice_cracked) from the recently launched Sentinel 3A satellite:

(https://forum.arctic-sea-ice.net/proxy.php?request=http%3A%2F%2Fwww.esa.int%2Fvar%2Fesa%2Fstorage%2Fimages%2Fesa_multimedia%2Fimages%2F2016%2F03%2Fice_cracked%2F15853452-1-eng-GB%2FIce_cracked_node_full_image_2.jpg&hash=822947ce6f883ac8dc6f55e549cb1093)

One of the first images from Sentinel-3A’s Sea and Land Surface Temperature Radiometer (SLSTR) shows a long crack running through the ice shelf to the east of the centre part of the Antarctic Peninsula. The crack is about 2 km wide, but widens to 4 km or more in some places. There are also finer cracks and structures visible in the ice shelf.
Title: Re: What's new in Antarctica ?
Post by: sidd on March 14, 2016, 11:15:38 PM
DOI: 10.1038/NGEO2675

Nice Antarctic wide study by Alley (not that one) et al. of basal channel melt under ice shelves, tells where the hot water is in detail. They see polynas associated with some, and one disturbing interpretation of Totten.

" ... one [polynya] was in front of the Totten Ice Shelf, in a region with the highest channel density of any ice shelf region ..."

I was kinda hoping that hot water hadn't yet got there. (I inserted the bracketed word "polynya" in the previous quote.)

sidd
Title: Re: What's new in Antarctica ?
Post by: solartim27 on April 21, 2016, 05:06:33 AM
There are some new icebergs from Nansen
http://earthobservatory.nasa.gov/IOTD/view.php?id=87859 (http://earthobservatory.nasa.gov/IOTD/view.php?id=87859)
Nansen broke apart on Apr 8th.  Very considerate to do so before we lost the view to winter.
http://earthobservatory.nasa.gov/IOTD/view.php?id=87657 (http://earthobservatory.nasa.gov/IOTD/view.php?id=87657)

The linked article discusses field work about the influence of tides on Antarctic ice shelves in order to develop better ice shelf/ice sheet models.  I note that the Nansen Ice Shelf is about to break free:

http://phys.org/news/2016-03-nasa-tracking-tides-ice-shelves.html (http://phys.org/news/2016-03-nasa-tracking-tides-ice-shelves.html)

Extract: "he NASA scientists worked with personnel from the Korea Polar Research Institute to install instruments on the Nansen Ice Shelf, a roughly 30-mile-long ice shelf sticking out from the coast of Antarctica's Victoria Land.

Title: Re: What's new in Antarctica ?
Post by: charles_oil on April 25, 2016, 09:46:49 PM
Tourism - busy in the Arctic and Antarctic too !

http://www.bloomberg.com/news/articles/2016-04-25/antarctica-luxury-cruises-world-s-hottest-coldest-tourist-spot (http://www.bloomberg.com/news/articles/2016-04-25/antarctica-luxury-cruises-world-s-hottest-coldest-tourist-spot)
Title: Re: What's new in Antarctica ?
Post by: AbruptSLR on April 26, 2016, 05:03:18 PM
Robert Scribbler provides a nice update on ice shelf activity in Antarctica focused on the recent major Nansen Ice Shelf calving event:

https://robertscribbler.com/2016/04/25/melt-expanding-into-east-antarctica-as-nansen-ice-shelf-crack-produces-20-kilometer-long-iceberg/

Extract: "Melt Expanding into East Antarctica as Nansen Ice Shelf Crack Produces 20 Kilometer Long Iceberg"
Title: Re: What's new in Antarctica ?
Post by: AbruptSLR on April 26, 2016, 06:05:34 PM
Per the linked SciAm article climate change is dramatically changing the penguin populations on the Antarctic Peninsula:

http://www.scientificamerican.com/article/penguin-populations-are-changing-dramatically/ (http://www.scientificamerican.com/article/penguin-populations-are-changing-dramatically/)

Extract: "Penguin Populations Are Changing Dramatically
Rapid warming on the Antarctic Peninsula is killing some species but helping others"
Title: Re: What's new in Antarctica ?
Post by: AbruptSLR on April 28, 2016, 05:24:46 PM
A large subglacial lake and canyon system has been identified under the ice in Princess Elizabeth Land in East Antarctica:

http://www.csmonitor.com/Science/2016/0427/Massive-secret-lake-and-canyons-found-deep-beneath-Antarctic-ice (http://www.csmonitor.com/Science/2016/0427/Massive-secret-lake-and-canyons-found-deep-beneath-Antarctic-ice)

Extract: "Scientists, presenting at the European Geosciences Union in Vienna last week, revealed data that indicates the existence of a canyon system beneath Princess Elizabeth Land on the Eastern coast of the continent. The researchers predict that a large subglacial lake runs through that system.
If true, the discovery of the lake could help fill in gaps about one of the most enigmatic areas of Antarctica."
Title: Re: What's new in Antarctica ?
Post by: AbruptSLR on April 30, 2016, 12:05:45 AM
The linked article discusses three recent paper about "What lies beneath the ice in West Antarctica":

http://www.sciencecodex.com/what_lies_beneath_west_antarctica-181414 (http://www.sciencecodex.com/what_lies_beneath_west_antarctica-181414)
Title: Re: What's new in Antarctica ?
Post by: charles_oil on May 09, 2016, 02:20:11 AM
Saw part of a news article on moving the Halley research station to avoid falling in a chasm - if you can get it on iPlayer:

http://www.bbc.com/news/36201053 (http://www.bbc.com/news/36201053)

http://www.bbc.co.uk/iplayer/episode/b079s24p/horizon-20152016-8-ice-station-antarctica (http://www.bbc.co.uk/iplayer/episode/b079s24p/horizon-20152016-8-ice-station-antarctica)

Title: Re: What's new in Antarctica ?
Post by: Adam Ash on May 19, 2016, 10:46:34 AM
http://www.nature.com/ngeo/journal/v8/n4/full/ngeo2388.html (http://www.nature.com/ngeo/journal/v8/n4/full/ngeo2388.html)

Ocean access to a cavity beneath Totten Glacier in East Antarctica
'...If thinning trends continue, a larger water body over the trough could potentially allow more warm water into the cavity, which may, eventually, lead to destabilization of the low-lying region between Totten Glacier and the similarly deep glacier flowing into the Reynolds Trough. We estimate that at least 3.5 m of eustatic sea level potential drains through Totten Glacier, so coastal processes in this area could have global consequences.'

Another Antarctic glacier, another discovery of a method of rapid destabilisation and subsequent sea level rise and storm intensity consequences.  Sigh.
Title: Re: What's new in Antarctica ?
Post by: AbruptSLR on May 27, 2016, 04:47:14 PM
The linked article discusses new research that indicates that the Antarctic Polar Front (see image) is not unbroken and allows seaweed/kelp to float all the way to Antarctica where it can off-load marine species into Antarctic waters where that currently/previously to not exist:

http://theconversation.com/antarctica-may-not-be-as-isolated-as-we-thought-and-thats-a-worry-59969 (http://theconversation.com/antarctica-may-not-be-as-isolated-as-we-thought-and-thats-a-worry-59969)

Extract: "Modelling and oceanographic research has started to indicate that the polar front is not the unbroken, continuous barrier was thought to be. Rather, it is a dynamic, shifting series of water jets that can be breached by features such as eddies, which transport pockets of water through the convergence zone.
New evidence published this month from observations of floating kelp at sea indicates that drifting marine species can cross the polar front and enter Antarctic waters from the north.

Floating kelps act as the “taxi service” of the sea, forming rafts that can transport diverse species – even entire communities – across hundreds of kilometres of open ocean."
Title: Re: What's new in Antarctica ?
Post by: bligh8 on June 03, 2016, 04:14:41 PM
"Floating kelps act as the “taxi service” of the sea, forming rafts that can transport diverse species – even entire communities – across hundreds of kilometres of open ocean."

This I have seen, in a different setting of course. The Gulf Stream with it’s eddies and meanderings form a warm ring which results in unproductive Sargasso Sea water transferred into the productive waters of the continental margin.

In October I’ve seen tropical fish who’s eggs caught in Sargasso kelp drift up against the coast resulting in tropical fish visible within the inlets. 

The apex of the Stream lies several hundred miles South East of this location.
Title: Re: What's new in Antarctica ?
Post by: johnm33 on June 04, 2016, 03:39:06 PM
So whats happening? hat tip to Ben Burch on the blog.
 (https://forum.arctic-sea-ice.net/proxy.php?request=http%3A%2F%2Farctic.atmos.uiuc.edu%2Fcryosphere%2FIMAGES%2Fseaice.recent.antarctic.png&hash=d413fc2067eace6198996f43dddfd0af)
Title: Re: What's new in Antarctica ?
Post by: Neven on June 04, 2016, 06:28:05 PM
That graph is showing the same faulty data from the malfunctioning sensor. This one from Uni Bremen based on AMSR2 shows a slowdown in ice growth, but I don't know where or why it's taking place (I don't think it's exceptional or anything):
Title: Re: What's new in Antarctica ?
Post by: GeoffBeacon on June 15, 2016, 11:07:52 AM
Is this report in Carbon Brief significant?

Scientists have unearthed a 100m-thick river of ice beneath Antarctica’s Larsen C ice shelf, which they fear could accelerate its path to eventual collapse (http://www.carbonbrief.org/discovery-exposes-fragility-of-antarcticas-larsen-c-ice-shelf).
Title: Re: What's new in Antarctica ?
Post by: Clare on June 15, 2016, 12:21:32 PM
http://www.sciencemag.org/news/2016/06/emergency-rescue-launched-ill-worker-south-pole (http://www.sciencemag.org/news/2016/06/emergency-rescue-launched-ill-worker-south-pole)

"Two propeller-driven planes took off today from Calgary, Canada, on a perilous rescue mission to the U.S. research station at the South Pole. If all goes well, one of the planes will arrive in 6 days to pick up a member of the winter-over crew suffering from an unspecified medical emergency that requires treatment at a hospital.
The Twin Otter aircraft are operated by the Canadian firm Kenn Borek Air, Ltd., which contracts with NSF to provide logistical support to the U.S. Antarctic Program. The aircraft will fly via South America to the British Antarctic Survey’s Rothera Research Station on the Antarctic Peninsula. One will remain there as a backup for search-and-rescue operations; the other will travel another 2400 kilometers to the South Pole."

Currently windchill = -77'C, bleak & DARK.
http://www.usap.gov/videoclipsandmaps/spwebcam.cfm (http://www.usap.gov/videoclipsandmaps/spwebcam.cfm)
Title: Re: What's new in Antarctica ?
Post by: AbruptSLR on June 15, 2016, 09:59:27 PM
Is this report in Carbon Brief significant?

Scientists have unearthed a 100m-thick river of ice beneath Antarctica’s Larsen C ice shelf, which they fear could accelerate its path to eventual collapse (http://www.carbonbrief.org/discovery-exposes-fragility-of-antarcticas-larsen-c-ice-shelf).

I think that it is potentially significant (in a few decades time with continued global warming), as it indicates that numerous Antarctic ice shelves may become more fragile in the future due to the cumulative affects of repeated surface ice melt and drainage cycles.  I have posted about this in Antarctic Peninsula thread.
Title: Re: What's new in Antarctica ?
Post by: AbruptSLR on June 16, 2016, 04:43:28 PM
The linked article is entitled: "Antarctic CO2 Hit 400 PPM For First Time in 4 Million Years", see the following extract & attached plot of South Pole CO₂ concentrations through early June 2016.

http://www.climatecentral.org/news/antarctica-co2-400-ppm-million-years-20451 (http://www.climatecentral.org/news/antarctica-co2-400-ppm-million-years-20451)

Extract: "In the remote reaches of Antarctica, the South Pole Observatory carbon dioxide observing station cleared 400 ppm on May 23, according to an announcement from the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration on Wednesday. That’s the first time it’s passed that level in 4 million years (no, that’s not a typo)."
Title: Re: What's new in Antarctica ?
Post by: Sigmetnow on June 18, 2016, 03:12:01 AM
A rare, risky mission is underway to rescue sick scientists from the South Pole
https://www.washingtonpost.com/news/speaking-of-science/wp/2016/06/16/a-rare-risky-mission-is-underway-to-rescue-sick-scientists-from-the-south-pole/ (https://www.washingtonpost.com/news/speaking-of-science/wp/2016/06/16/a-rare-risky-mission-is-underway-to-rescue-sick-scientists-from-the-south-pole/)
Title: Re: What's new in Antarctica ?
Post by: Adam Ash on June 20, 2016, 02:08:16 PM
That graph is showing the same faulty data from the malfunctioning sensor. This one from Uni Bremen based on AMSR2 shows a slowdown in ice growth, but I don't know where or why it's taking place (I don't think it's exceptional or anything):

Hi Neven!  I live 2600 km of stormy ocean north of Antarctica. I can assure you we have had an unusually mild winter to date.  Midnight and its 5 degrees C here, when usually we have a lot of snow and ice around and minus 5, not plus.  Fohn winds have melted snow off the tops, and weather forecasts warn of a large sub-topical zone of warm air forming to the west (969hPa in the core) to produce un-seasonally warm weather for the shortest day and beyond. 

My bees are still out gathering nectar and pollen when they would usually be safely in bed munching on their honey stores. The vege garden is still lush green when it would 'normally' (aka 'historically') be a rotting down frozen mess.

So if what I see at 46 south is any indication, its just plain getting warmer.  Climate, that is, not just weather.
Title: Re: What's new in Antarctica ?
Post by: AbruptSLR on June 29, 2016, 07:18:47 PM
The linked article indicates that penguin populations are projected to be in trouble with continued global warming:


http://www.upi.com/Science_News/2016/06/29/Penguin-population-may-be-halved-by-end-of-century/3961467202270/ (http://www.upi.com/Science_News/2016/06/29/Penguin-population-may-be-halved-by-end-of-century/3961467202270/)


Also see:
http://www.nature.com/articles/srep28785 (http://www.nature.com/articles/srep28785)
Title: Re: What's new in Antarctica ?
Post by: Adam Ash on June 30, 2016, 01:55:06 PM
Right now there is a very fine blast of 70 km/h x 6 degC wind heading directly south from the east coast of Australia almost all the way to the coast of Antarctica just west of the Ross Sea.  This is blocking the seal level circumpolar wind flow (the Roaring 40s) and must be bring a vast amount of energy south.  The following pix from EarthNullSchool show surface, 250hPa (Jetstream) winds and surface temperatures.

I don't recall seeing a block of the Roaring 40s like this before  - usually we in southern New Zealand enjoy a constant progression of low pressure then high pressure cyclonic systems which (used to) bring us the routine sequence of calm-warm with fohn wind-gale and rain - calm and cold weather.  Not any more!
Title: Re: What's new in Antarctica ?
Post by: TerryM on June 30, 2016, 06:36:58 PM
Has this been documented in the past? Is it related to RS's "Gravity Wave" that broke through the equator?
This can't be good.
Terry
Title: Re: What's new in Antarctica ?
Post by: AbruptSLR on June 30, 2016, 10:13:58 PM
Per the linked article the Antarctic Ozone Hole is beginning to heal itself:

http://www.sciencemag.org/news/2016/06/ozone-layer-mend-thanks-chemical-ban (http://www.sciencemag.org/news/2016/06/ozone-layer-mend-thanks-chemical-ban)

Title: Re: What's new in Antarctica ?
Post by: Adam Ash on July 01, 2016, 08:38:31 AM
I wonder what this is doing to the circumpolar current?  Everything seems to be conspiring to send it in reverse...

If the circumpolar current slows what does that do to heat transport to the Antarctic glaciers' underbellies?  To sea ice formation and longevity?

(First image shows 'normal' circumpolar current configuration, second shows today's winds which cannot be helping.)
Title: Re: What's new in Antarctica ?
Post by: AbruptSLR on July 01, 2016, 04:59:48 PM
I wonder what this is doing to the circumpolar current?  Everything seems to be conspiring to send it in reverse...

If the circumpolar current slows what does that do to heat transport to the Antarctic glaciers' underbellies?  To sea ice formation and longevity?

The conventional thinking is that by itself having the ozone hole heals itself would slow the circumpolar winds around the Southern Ocean; however, increasing GHG concentrations over Antarctica will serve to maintain these winds in the "sweet-spot" that they are currently in for advecting warm CDW toward the grounding lines of key Antarctic marine glaciers.  Furthermore, Hansen's ice-climate positive feedback is also kicking in to promote more marine glacial ice melting and lastly the recently observed transmission of NH Tropical Pacific heat across the equator by a Jetstream directed towards the WAIS may eventually accelerate the date when DeConto & Pollard's hydrofracturing occurs in the WAIS (and the Antarctic Peninsula).

The linked Scribbler article indicates that global warming is flattening the atmospheric slope to the extent that Tropical Pacific atmospheric energy is being directed to Western Antarctica via atmospheric gravity waves.

https://robertscribbler.com/2016/06/28/gigantic-gravity-waves-to-mix-winter-with-summer-wrecked-jet-stream-now-runs-from-pole-to-pole/#comments

Extract: "The upper level air flow that originated near the North Pole joins with a building Southern Hemisphere Jet Stream ridge pattern over the Southeast Pacific. Feeding into very strong upper level winds, it turns southward into a high amplitude wave that crosses the Horn of South America and slams itself, carrying with it a big pulse of extreme warmth, into the upper level airs over Western Antarctica.



All these observations combined point to a very serious concern that Polar warming is flattening the atmospheric slope from Equator to Pole to such an extent that an increasing violation of the Hemisphere to Hemisphere seasonal dividing line may be a new climate change related trend. And that’s a kind of weather weirding that we are not at all really prepared to deal with."
Title: Re: What's new in Antarctica ?
Post by: sidd on July 01, 2016, 08:52:25 PM
ACC has existed since the Drake Passage opened, will not be disrupted so easily ...
Title: Re: What's new in Antarctica ?
Post by: Laurent on July 06, 2016, 09:42:24 PM
Australian Uranium Mining Is Polluting Antarctica Some 6,000 Miles Away
http://www.huffingtonpost.co.uk/entry/australian-uranium-mining-is-polluting-antarctica-some-6000-miles-away_uk_577b8d4ee4b073366f0fb3e5?edition=uk (http://www.huffingtonpost.co.uk/entry/australian-uranium-mining-is-polluting-antarctica-some-6000-miles-away_uk_577b8d4ee4b073366f0fb3e5?edition=uk)

Scientists have discovered that uranium mining in Australia is polluting the Antarctic, despite being 6,000 nautical miles away from each other.

The damning news comes just a few days after research showed that the enormous ozone hole over Antarctica had in fact started to heal as a result of human action.
Title: Re: What's new in Antarctica ?
Post by: solartim27 on July 10, 2016, 01:15:44 AM
Avoiding the news here in the US, catching up on podcasts I heard this.  15 days left to listen to the stream.
http://www.bbc.co.uk/programmes/p03yptx1 (http://www.bbc.co.uk/programmes/p03yptx1)
Oldest Antarctic Ice Found
The Science Hour
The importance of analysing the trapped past atmospheres contained in bubbles in ice cores is invaluable to our understanding of our climate. Until now, ice cores drilled in Antarctica only go back to 800,000 years old. But geologists exploring a little known valley, high up in the Trans-Antarctic Mountain chain, have discovered ice that is more than a million years old. And they did not have to use expensive drills to get it, just a shovel! The ice was under a thin layer of debris, pushed up from the deep.

Title: Re: What's new in Antarctica ?
Post by: Adam Ash on July 14, 2016, 11:15:32 AM
Has anybody estimated what the effect on sea level rise will be from the resulting isostatic rebound? 

Assuming it all rebounds to near or above present-day sea level, that displacement would add several metres more to the current maximum estimated sea level rise.  Both Antarctica and Greenland have massive ice overburden on top of land held below sea level which will no doubt rise (and hence displace ocean) when the load is removed.
Title: Re: What's new in Antarctica ?
Post by: Laurent on July 14, 2016, 11:40:58 AM
What some centimetres of that plate would do to sea level... https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Antarctic_Plate 11% of earth surface ?...
Title: Re: What's new in Antarctica ?
Post by: folke_kelm on July 14, 2016, 02:54:43 PM
Adam Ash,

Since isostatic rebound is a question of geology i may answer because just that is my profession.
You have always  to consider that isostatic rebound is a complex movement of the plate and its surroundings. While Antarctica itself is depressed into the deeper layers, this material is squeezed aside and lifts up the surrounding plates without ice cap.
Due to the fact that Antarctica is surrounded by oceanic crust  this crust will sink as a reaction of the isostatic rebound of Antarctica. This will counteract a potential sea level rise due to a rebounding antarctic plate.

Title: Re: What's new in Antarctica ?
Post by: AbruptSLR on July 14, 2016, 08:05:32 PM
Has anybody estimated what the effect on sea level rise will be from the resulting isostatic rebound? 

Assuming it all rebounds to near or above present-day sea level, that displacement would add several metres more to the current maximum estimated sea level rise.  Both Antarctica and Greenland have massive ice overburden on top of land held below sea level which will no doubt rise (and hence displace ocean) when the load is removed.

The following reference indicates that after GIA correction the Amundsen Sea sector is contributing more to SLR than model GRACE measurements indicate, possibly by as much as 40%:

An investigation of Glacial Isostatic Adjustment over the Amundsen Sea sector, West Antarctica
by: A. Groh; H. Ewert, M. Scheinert, M. Fritsche, A. Rülke, A. Richter, R. Rosenau, R. Dietrich
http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.gloplacha.2012.08.001 (http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.gloplacha.2012.08.001)

Abstract
The present study focuses on the Amundsen Sea sector which is the most dynamical region of the Antarctic Ice Sheet (AIS). Based on basin estimates of mass changes observed by the Gravity Recovery and Climate Experiment (GRACE) and volume changes observed by the Ice, Cloud and Land Elevation Satellite (ICESat), the mean mass change induced by Glacial Isostatic Adjustment (GIA) is derived. This mean GIA-induced mass change is found to be 34.1 ± 11.9 Gt/yr, which is significantly larger than the predictions of current GIA models. We show that the corresponding mean elevation change of 23.3 ± 7.7 mm/yr in the Amundsen Sea sector is in good agreement with the uplift rates obtained from observations at three GPS sites. Utilising ICESat observations, the observed uplift rates were corrected for elastic deformations due to present-day ice-mass changes. Based on the GRACE-derived mass change estimate and the inferred GIA correction, we inferred a present-day ice-mass loss of − 98.9 ± 13.7 Gt/yr for the Amundsen Sea sector. This is equivalent to a global eustatic sea-level rise of 0.27 ± 0.04 mm/yr. Compared to the results relying on GIA model predictions, this corresponds to an increase of the ice-mass loss or sea-level rise, respectively, of about 40%.
Title: Re: What's new in Antarctica ?
Post by: sidd on July 14, 2016, 09:41:33 PM
Nice paper on CDW melt on Antarctic Peninsula, showing melt of southern glaciers due to warming at depth.

DOI: 10.1126/science.aae0017

 I attach fig 1.
Title: Re: What's new in Antarctica ?
Post by: AbruptSLR on July 29, 2016, 07:44:44 PM
The atmospheric CO₂ concentration has now passed the 400ppm mark:

http://www.envirotech-online.com/news/environmental-laboratory/7/breaking_news/antarctic_carbon_dioxide_concentration_hits_440ppm_for_first_time_in_four_million_years/39743/ (http://www.envirotech-online.com/news/environmental-laboratory/7/breaking_news/antarctic_carbon_dioxide_concentration_hits_440ppm_for_first_time_in_four_million_years/39743/)

Extract: "On May 23rd, the continent of Antarctica finally surpassed the 400PPM mark, making it the last region on Earth to succumb to our relentless pollution of the atmosphere. It’s the first time that the continent has witnessed such high levels of CO2 in at least four million years."
Title: Re: What's new in Antarctica ?
Post by: FishOutofWater on July 30, 2016, 07:46:16 PM
Remember that isostatic rebound is a slow process that is still going on from the last glacial period more than 10,000 years ago.
Title: Re: What's new in Antarctica ?
Post by: AbruptSLR on August 02, 2016, 03:30:18 AM
Remember that isostatic rebound is a slow process that is still going on from the last glacial period more than 10,000 years ago.

You should remember from school, that isostatic rebound from current ice mass loss is associated with two processes, with the first due to elastic rebound (related you Young's Modulus) which happens immediately after the ice mass is lost (only the second process is slow due to magma migration).
Title: Re: What's new in Antarctica ?
Post by: AbruptSLR on August 09, 2016, 12:18:53 AM
The Polar Meteorology Group has some interesting research going on:

http://bpcrc.osu.edu/groups/polar-meteorology-group (http://bpcrc.osu.edu/groups/polar-meteorology-group)
http://polarmet.osu.edu/ (http://polarmet.osu.edu/)

Title: Re: What's new in Antarctica ?
Post by: sidd on August 09, 2016, 05:36:12 AM
bprc.osu.edu is the Byrd Polar research centre, one of my favorite places. The great Lonnie Thompson, his wife Ellen-Mosely who is a formidable researcher also, Ian Howat, Leonid Polyak and many others. Mercer was from there also, more recently Box and Enderlin who have moved on.

In misty days of yore, I stole ... borrowed ... equipment and facilities from and supplied some to them as well. They have accumulated one of the largest ice core archives under the Thompsons and many others.

Nice place. Check em out on the web, or if you are in Columbus, in person. They frequently have talks which are always worth attending, most are streamed on the net.

sidd
Title: Re: What's new in Antarctica ?
Post by: FishOutofWater on August 09, 2016, 02:56:17 PM
Large volumes of magma are not moving around eastern Canada and Scandinavia.

Isostatic adjustment occurs by mantle creep. At the high temperatures of the upper mantle the rock undergoes plastic deformation. Because the effective viscosity of solid ultramafic rock is very high, isostatic adjustment is very slow.

http://gji.oxfordjournals.org/content/157/3/1297.full (http://gji.oxfordjournals.org/content/157/3/1297.full)
Title: Re: What's new in Antarctica ?
Post by: AbruptSLR on August 09, 2016, 06:35:24 PM
Large volumes of magma are not moving around eastern Canada and Scandinavia.

Isostatic adjustment occurs by mantle creep. At the high temperatures of the upper mantle the rock undergoes plastic deformation. Because the effective viscosity of solid ultramafic rock is very high, isostatic adjustment is very slow.

http://gji.oxfordjournals.org/content/157/3/1297.full (http://gji.oxfordjournals.org/content/157/3/1297.full)

FishOutofWater,
Thanks for the useful/relevant information about isostatic rebound in Northern Latitudes; however, as the following re-posted information indicates the tectonic behavior in the WAIS is more complex as the mantle below the Byrd Subglacial Basin (BSB) and Marie Byrd Land has magma with very low viscosity, as discussed in the two re-posted Replies from the Antarctic Tectonic thread (also the rate of ice mass loss from the BSB is exceptionally high).

Best,
ASLR

The following abstract comes from the International Glacial Society Proceeding 65 at the following link:

http://www.igsoc.org/symposia/2014/chamonix/proceedings/procsfiles/procabstracts_65.htm (http://www.igsoc.org/symposia/2014/chamonix/proceedings/procsfiles/procabstracts_65.htm)

It is particularly interesting that Wilson et al 2014 indicate that the magma beneath Marie Byrd Land has very low viscosity:

70A1149
The POLENET-ANET integrated GPS and seismology approach to understanding glacial isostatic adjustment and ice mass change in Antarctica

Terry WILSON, Michael BEVIS, Stephanie KONFAL, Richard ASTER, Julien CHAPUT, David HEESZEL, Douglas WIENS, Sridhar ANANDAKRISHNAN, Ian DALZIEL, Audrey HUERTA, Eric KENDRICK
Corresponding author: Terry Wilson
Corresponding author e-mail: wilson.43@osu.edu

Abstract: "The POLENET-ANET project is simultaneously resolving crustal motions, measured by GPS, and Earth structure and rheological properties, mapped by seismology. Measured vertical and horizontal crustal motion patterns are not explained by extant glacial isostatic adjustment (GIA) models. These models have ice histories dominated by ice loss following the Last Glacial Maximum (LGM) and rely on 1-D Earth models, with rheological properties varying only radially. Seismological results from POLENET-ANET are revealing significant complexity in lateral variation in Earth properties. For example, crustal thickness variations occur not only across the East-West Antarctic boundary, but also between crustal blocks within West Antarctica. Modeling of mantle viscosity based on shear wave velocities shows a sharp lateral gradient from high to low viscosity in the Ross Embayment, a much more gradual gradient in the Weddell Embayment, and very low viscosities below Marie Byrd Land and the Amundsen Sea Embayment (ASE). Remarkable vertical and horizontal bedrock crustal motion velocity magnitudes, directions and patterns correlate spatially, in many aspects, with Earth property variations mapped by seismology. Within the ASE, extremely high upward velocities are flanked by subsiding regions – neither predicted by GIA models. Given the thin crust and low mantle viscosity, it is likely that this is not an LGM signal, which would have already relaxed, and uplift due to the elastic response to modern ice mass change clearly is important. As in other regions where rapid GIA-induced uplift has been measured, the crustal velocities in the Amundsen Embayment may also record a viscoelastic response to ice loss on decadal–centennial timescales. Along the East-West Antarctic boundary in the Ross Embayment, GIA-induced horizontal crustal motions are toward rather than away from the principal ice load center, correlating spatially with the strong lateral gradient in mantle viscosity. In the Weddell Embayment region, where crustal thickness is intermediate between East and West Antarctica and mantle viscosity values are moderate, crustal motions show the best match with predictions of GIA models. It is clear that lateral variations in Earth properties fundamentally control the isostatic response to ice mass changes in Antarctica. Ongoing integrated seismic-GPS studies are critical to developing the next generation of GIA models."

Also see:
The following linked reference cites evidence of low upper mantle velocities inland of the Amundsen Sea.  Such low-velocity zones indicate the presence of a significant degree of partial melting, and thus to potential for rapid rebound when ice mass is lost from the Byrd Subglacial Basin:

Natalie J. Accardo, Douglas A. Wiens, Stephen Hernandez, Richard C. Aster, Andrew Nyblade, Audrey Huerta, Sridhar Anandakrishnan, Terry Wilson, David S. Heeszel and Ian W. D. Dalziel, (2014), "Upper mantle seismic anisotropy beneath the West Antarctic Rift System and surrounding region from shear wave splitting analysis", Geophys. J. Int. (2014) doi: 10.1093/gji/ggu117

http://gji.oxfordjournals.org/content/early/2014/05/21/gji.ggu117.abstract (http://gji.oxfordjournals.org/content/early/2014/05/21/gji.ggu117.abstract)

Abstract: "We constrain azimuthal anisotropy in the West Antarctic upper mantle using shear wave splitting parameters obtained from teleseismic SKS, SKKS and PKS phases recorded at 37 broad-band seismometres deployed by the POLENET/ANET project. We use an eigenvalue technique to linearize the rotated and shifted shear wave horizontal particle motions and determine the fast direction and delay time for each arrival. High-quality measurements are stacked to determine the best fitting splitting parameters for each station. Overall, fast anisotropic directions are oriented at large angles to the direction of Antarctic absolute plate motion in both hotspot and no-net-rotation frameworks, showing that the anisotropy does not result from shear due to plate motion over the mantle. Further, the West Antarctic directions are substantially different from those of East Antarctica, indicating that anisotropy across the continent reflects multiple mantle regimes. We suggest that the observed anisotropy along the central Transantarctic Mountains (TAM) and adjacent West Antarctic Rift System (WARS), one of the largest zones of extended continental crust on Earth, results from asthenospheric mantle strain associated with the final pulse of western WARS extension in the late Miocene. Strong and consistent anisotropy throughout the WARS indicate fast axes subparallel to the inferred extension direction, a result unlike reports from the East African rift system and rifts within the Basin and Range, which show much greater variation. We contend that ductile shearing rather than magmatic intrusion may have been the controlling mechanism for accumulation and retention of such coherent, widespread anisotropic fabric. Splitting beneath the Marie Byrd Land Dome (MBL) is weaker than that observed elsewhere within the WARS, but shows a consistent fast direction, possibly representative of anisotropy that has been ‘frozen-in’ to remnant thicker lithosphere. Fast directions observed inland from the Amundsen Sea appear to be radial to the dome and may indicate radial horizontal mantle flow associated with an MBL plume head and low upper mantle velocities in this region, or alternatively to lithospheric features associated with the complex Cenozoic tectonics at the far-eastern end of the WARS."
Title: Re: What's new in Antarctica ?
Post by: FishOutofWater on August 09, 2016, 08:19:28 PM
Very interesting papers about rebound in Antarctica. If rebound can happen quickly there because of large scale magma movement towards the region of ice loss then the whole process of deglaciation and sea level rise may speed up. It's a good problem for folks testing numerical models.

Then there's the possibility of increased volcanic activity caused by decompression melting of upper mantle and lower crustal rock.

I had no idea that Antarctica had rapid rebound. Low silica magmas have low viscosity so we can guess that the magma composition is basaltic to ultramafic.  Hmmm....

Thanks. There's a lot to think about.
Title: Re: What's new in Antarctica ?
Post by: AbruptSLR on August 09, 2016, 09:08:54 PM
Very interesting papers about rebound in Antarctica. If rebound can happen quickly there because of large scale magma movement towards the region of ice loss then the whole process of deglaciation and sea level rise may speed up. It's a good problem for folks testing numerical models.

Then there's the possibility of increased volcanic activity caused by decompression melting of upper mantle and lower crustal rock.

I had no idea that Antarctica had rapid rebound. Low silica magmas have low viscosity so we can guess that the magma composition is basaltic to ultramafic.  Hmmm....

Thanks. There's a lot to think about.

The linked thread on Antarctic Tectonics addresses many of the issues that you raise:

http://forum.arctic-sea-ice.net/index.php/topic,393.0.html (http://forum.arctic-sea-ice.net/index.php/topic,393.0.html)
Title: Re: What's new in Antarctica ?
Post by: AbruptSLR on August 24, 2016, 11:36:35 PM
The linked article discusses how one Antarctic ice core was obtained & transported to the USA:

http://arstechnica.com/science/2016/08/from-the-south-pole-to-the-science-section-how-ice-becomes-knowledge/ (http://arstechnica.com/science/2016/08/from-the-south-pole-to-the-science-section-how-ice-becomes-knowledge/)

Extract: "The newest specimen in the Antarctic collection is the US-National-Science-Foundation-funded South Pole ice (SPICE) core, a 1,750-meter-long stick of ice drilled just a few kilometers from the permanent Amundsen-Scott South Pole Station. Obtaining it took two two-month campaigns.
One of the most distinctive aspects of this core is that it will contain a record of extremely trace gases. University of Washington researcher TJ Fudge explained to Ars, “If we’re thinking about carbon dioxide, that’s measured in parts per million. If we’re thinking about methane, that’s measured in parts per billion. This core is going to be good for measuring COS [carbonyl sulfide]; that’s measured in parts per trillion.”
“The reason this is a good site for it is that it has a unique combination of being very cold, because it’s so far [south] at the pole, yet it has a relatively high snowfall because it gets moisture [traveling] from the West Antarctic side over to the East Antarctic side,” he continued. Higher snowfall means thicker annual layers of ice, so you can make measurements at higher resolution—even if you need a fair number of trapped bubbles of gas to make your delicate measurement. Since the South Pole is so isolated even by Antarctic standards, the ice contains little in the way of impurities that make measuring trace chemicals difficult.

The other key piece of information is the evidence of volcanic eruptions marked by sulfate (and occasionally ash) in the core. “What’s nice about the South Pole,” Erich Osterberg said, “is that we’ve got this southern polar vortex—you can almost think about it like this big drain in the atmosphere, or this big whirlpool—and all the [volcanic material] that’s up in the stratosphere gets funneled down and focused into the middle of Antarctica. So at the South Pole, we think that we will get to see a more clean picture of what’s happening for volcanic eruptions around the world.”
That’s interesting in its own right, as large eruptions have short-term impacts on climate worth studying. But it’s also extremely useful for nailing down the timeline of the ice core. The fallout from an eruption will show up in that year’s ice in many cores, so this provides a firm marker you can use to tie all the timelines together. That adds an independent check on your annual layer count, and at depths in the core where annual layers become too thin to pick apart, it sets known points to work between.
“That’s a big part of what we’re doing, because the whole science community that is gonna use this ice core, they need that timescale. All the science is really constrained by how good the timescale is,” Osterberg said. “If we want to do analyses, or start to understand what’s forcing the climate, how the climate is responding, if you don’t know exactly when these [things] are happening you can’t compare to other records, you can’t compare to other ice cores, you can’t compare to the records from the ocean telling us what the ocean is doing.”
Once ages are assigned to every point along the ice core, the rest of the science can begin. That includes examining the temperatures recorded by isotopes of oxygen and hydrogen, as well as greenhouse gas concentrations. But the South Pole ice core will make other, more distinct contributions.
First, it will provide pristine records of trace gases like carbonyl sulfide [COS], carbon monoxide, and methyl chloride. “The thing about COS, unlike CO2, is that it isn’t respired by plants,” TJ Fudge said. “It’s taken up by plants, but it isn’t respired by plants. So looking at changes in COS through time has the potential to tell us about global biological production—essentially, what are the plant life changes that occur through these climate changes?”
Carbon monoxide plays a significant role in the network of reactions that eats up gases like methane (converting it to CO2), but we don’t understand the natural sources of carbon monoxide nearly as well as we do other gases. Getting a long-term record of carbon monoxide behavior will help put its recent behavior in context, allowing scientists to better tease apart human impacts. And methyl chloride helps researchers finger the sources responsible for changes in methane concentrations. It’s also one of the compounds that naturally destroys ozone, so changes in methyl chloride shift the balance of ozone chemistry.

As it happens, there is also a record of phytoplankton growth trapped in this ice core. Phytoplankton produce dimethyl sulfide, an organic sulfur compound that drifts into the atmosphere where it contributes to cloud formation. Some of that dimethyl sulfide ends up in the Antarctic ice in the form of methanesulfonic acid (MSA). So when phytoplankton productivity goes up, the amount of MSA in the South Pole ice core should show it.
“So we’re actually able to look at both of those hypotheses. Do we see evidence that there would be more biological activity? And do we see evidence that just the winds themselves may have increased mixing and changed CO2?” Osterberg said.
There’s plenty more, like using an isotope of beryllium to track historic solar activity or an isotope of krypton to investigate local atmospheric pressure variability. "
Title: Re: What's new in Antarctica ?
Post by: budmantis on August 25, 2016, 02:25:27 AM
Enjoyed reading your post ASLR. I'd be curious to know how many years this ice core will span.
Title: Re: What's new in Antarctica ?
Post by: AbruptSLR on August 25, 2016, 02:51:19 AM
Enjoyed reading your post ASLR. I'd be curious to know how many years this ice core will span.

It spans well over the past 40,000 years, and you can read about all the details about the SPICE program at the following link:

http://spicecore.org/ (http://spicecore.org/)
Title: Re: What's new in Antarctica ?
Post by: budmantis on August 25, 2016, 03:06:15 AM
Thanks!
Title: Re: What's new in Antarctica ?
Post by: Gray-Wolf on September 03, 2016, 09:42:51 PM
Couple of days of big drops in extent? First of the spring storms?
Title: Re: What's new in Antarctica ?
Post by: AbruptSLR on September 04, 2016, 12:10:18 AM
Couple of days of big drops in extent? First of the spring storms?

The linked article indicates that storm-force winds have flipped winter to summer conditions in West Antarctica:

https://robertscribbler.com/2016/09/02/warm-storm-force-winds-blowing-up-from-the-equator-change-west-antarctic-winter-to-summer/

Extract: "Warm, Storm-Force Winds Blowing From the Equator Flip West Antarctic Winter to Summer"

Title: Re: What's new in Antarctica ?
Post by: Buddy on September 15, 2016, 06:26:39 PM
Extract: "Warm, Storm-Force Winds Blowing From the Equator Flip West Antarctic Winter to Summer"

I'll say.  Looks like southern winter maximum came about 3 weeks early.....around August 22nd or so.  And then the ice extent has made an initial sharp move lower since then.

Looks like the earliest max in quite a while.....
Title: Re: What's new in Antarctica ?
Post by: Stephen on September 18, 2016, 12:27:30 PM
Extract: "Warm, Storm-Force Winds Blowing From the Equator Flip West Antarctic Winter to Summer"

I'll say.  Looks like southern winter maximum came about 3 weeks early.....around August 22nd or so.  And then the ice extent has made an initial sharp move lower since then.

Looks like the earliest max in quite a while.....

Have a look at the NSIDC extent graph for 2015. there was a similar, but smaller decline at this time, but then a steep increase from day 269 to 277
Title: abc australia article about antarctic sea ice plunge
Post by: sqwazw on September 21, 2016, 12:28:44 PM
Anecdotal thinning shelves near Mawson and Davis in Antarctica:

http://www.abc.net.au/news/2016-09-21/sea-ice-record-retreat-has-antarctic-experts-worried/7865732 (http://www.abc.net.au/news/2016-09-21/sea-ice-record-retreat-has-antarctic-experts-worried/7865732)

"Often the first voyage of the season is quite challenging getting close to Davis [station] so from a long way out we'll encounter ice some [160 to 320 kilometres] and that can be hard to get through," he said.

"With any luck that ability to get closer to the station will be easier.

"But it could be we don't have good enough ice beside the station in which to park the ship and unload our cargo onto the ice."

He said equipment may have to be dismantled and flown in to bases like Davis.

"We can use our helicopters to get our equipment and people onshore if the ice isn't good enough to drive on, however obviously we can't get our heavy equipment to shore in that case," Mr Clifton said.

Earlier this week a vehicle travelling outside Mawson station broke through a thin section of sea ice, but no one was hurt.
Title: Re: What's new in Antarctica ?
Post by: solartim27 on October 25, 2016, 07:17:01 PM
Colorized version of the film of Scott's expedition:
http://boingboing.net/2016/10/25/colorized-film-and-photos-of-a.html (http://boingboing.net/2016/10/25/colorized-film-and-photos-of-a.html)
In 1912, Herbert Ponting captured remarkable film and images of Captain Robert Falcon Scott's ill-fated Terra Nova Expedition. Amateurs and pros have all worked to restore and colorize Ponting's work.

Via the preservationists at BFI:

    The Great White Silence is one of the jewels in the crown of the BFI National Archive fully justifying this stunning tinted and toned restoration with new score by electronic musician Simon Fisher Turner. The official film record of the British Expedition of 1910-13 led by Scott was reworked by photographer Herbert Ponting to tell the tragic tale but It is the beauty of the images of Antarctica’s frozen landscapes in this film that linger.

Bonus: Interesting mini-doc on how they chose the scoring:  (viewable on website, includes quite a few bits of the movie)
The film also shows the "making-of" reverse of Ponting's stunning still, colorized by Imgurian ktrcoyote http://imgur.com/06LqCsG (http://imgur.com/06LqCsG):
Title: Re: What's new in Antarctica ?
Post by: solartim27 on October 25, 2016, 11:36:30 PM
I am sad to report the death of researcher Gordon Hamilton this weekend in an accident while working in Antarctica.

http://www.pri.org/stories/2016-10-25/us-climate-scientist-killed-antarctica-accident (http://www.pri.org/stories/2016-10-25/us-climate-scientist-killed-antarctica-accident)

http://www.nytimes.com/2016/10/25/science/gordon-hamilton.html?smid=tw-nytimesscience&smtyp=cur&_r=0 (http://www.nytimes.com/2016/10/25/science/gordon-hamilton.html?smid=tw-nytimesscience&smtyp=cur&_r=0)
The helicopter hovered 30 feet above a fjord in Greenland, a thrumming red speck of human ingenuity in a vast wilderness of rock and ice.

Gordon Hamilton leaned out the right side at a crazy angle, dropping a scientific instrument into the water below. He wore a seatbelt for safety, but he looked as if he might break free at any moment and plunge into the icy water.

He must have seen the worried look on my face, and he shot me a big grin. That moment, that smile: That is how I will always remember him, a man willing to court danger to do the job he loved.

Gordon Stuart Hamilton, 50, a glaciologist at the University of Maine, was killed over the weekend on a scientific expedition to Antarctica. He was surveying a trail to find the crevasses that can make working on glacial ice so dangerous, and his snowmobile plunged into one of them.

http://www.nytimes.com/2016/10/25/science/gordon-hamilton-climate-scientist-dies-accident-antarctica.html?action=click&contentCollection=Science&module=RelatedCoverage&region=Marginalia&pgtype=article (http://www.nytimes.com/2016/10/25/science/gordon-hamilton-climate-scientist-dies-accident-antarctica.html?action=click&contentCollection=Science&module=RelatedCoverage&region=Marginalia&pgtype=article)
Gordon Hamilton, a prominent climate scientist who studied glaciers and their impact on sea levels in a warming climate, died on Saturday in Antarctica when the snowmobile he was riding plunged into a 100-foot-deep crevasse. He was 50.

The National Science Foundation, which was funding his research, reported the death. The episode is under investigation, officials said.

Dr. Hamilton died on White Island in the continent’s Ross Archipelago, according to the University of Maine, in Orono, where he was an associate research professor in the glaciology group at the Climate Change Institute.
...
When not in the field, he taught undergraduate and graduate students at the University of Maine. He was also involved in statewide initiatives aimed at high school-age children.

Before joining the university’s Climate Change Institute as an assistant research professor in 2000, Dr. Hamilton worked at the Byrd Polar and Climate Research Center at Ohio State University and at the Norwegian Polar Institute, according to the National Science Foundation.

He is survived by his wife, Fiona, and two children, Martin and Calum.
Title: Re: What's new in Antarctica ?
Post by: Sleepy on October 26, 2016, 06:45:36 AM
Thanks solartim, not one single line about Hamilton here.
Title: Re: What's new in Antarctica ?
Post by: Tigertown on October 27, 2016, 05:52:02 AM
Article about Antarctic Ice melting faster and from below.

www.npr.org/sections/thetwo-way/2016/10/25/499206005/antarcticas-ice-sheets-are-melting-faster-and-from-beneath (http://www.npr.org/sections/thetwo-way/2016/10/25/499206005/antarcticas-ice-sheets-are-melting-faster-and-from-beneath)
Title: Re: What's new in Antarctica ?
Post by: jai mitchell on October 27, 2016, 07:24:06 PM
here is the article and a very very important graphic, note the elevation changes per year.

article here:  http://www.nature.com/articles/ncomms13243 (http://www.nature.com/articles/ncomms13243)

(https://forum.arctic-sea-ice.net/proxy.php?request=http%3A%2F%2Fwww.nature.com%2Farticle-assets%2Fnpg%2Fncomms%2F2016%2F161025%2Fncomms13243%2Fimages%2Fw926%2Fncomms13243-f1.jpg&hash=571748899855a4b57b8e148a1ffbddfd)
Title: Re: What's new in Antarctica ?
Post by: Tigertown on October 27, 2016, 08:12:37 PM
Just read that Smith's, Pine Island, and Thwaites Glaciers are all on retro-grade slopes away from the grounding lines.When warm water circulates under the ice shelf, it gets under the ice and flows downhill inland, melting away at these from underneath.
Title: Re: What's new in Antarctica ?
Post by: AbruptSLR on October 28, 2016, 05:48:30 PM
The linked article is entitled: "Space Weather from a Southern Point of View".  It indicates that Antarctic provides a unique vantage point for viewing near-Earth space:

https://eos.org/project-updates/space-weather-from-a-southern-point-of-view?utm_source=eos&utm_medium=email&utm_campaign=EosBuzz102816

Extract: "A recently completed instrument array in Antarctica provides a more complete understanding of the near-Earth space environment."
Title: Re: What's new in Antarctica ?
Post by: AbruptSLR on October 30, 2016, 11:55:15 PM
The linked reference is entitled: "Resonance vibrations of the Ross Ice Shelf and observations of persistent atmospheric waves":

Oleg A. Godin & Nikolay A. Zabotin (10 October 2016), "Resonance vibrations of the Ross Ice Shelf and observations of persistent atmospheric waves", JGR Space Physics, DOI: 10.1002/2016JA023226


http://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/10.1002/2016JA023226/abstract (http://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/10.1002/2016JA023226/abstract)

Abstract: "Recently reported lidar observations have revealed a persistent wave activity in the Antarctic middle and upper atmosphere that has no counterpart in observations at midlatitude and low-latitude locations. The unusual wave activity suggests a geographically specific source of atmospheric waves with periods of 3–10 h. Here we investigate theoretically the hypothesis that the unusual atmospheric wave activity in Antarctica is generated by the fundamental and low-order modes of vibrations of the Ross Ice Shelf (RIS). Simple models are developed to describe basic physical properties of resonant vibrations of large ice shelves and their coupling to the atmosphere. Dispersion relation of the long surface waves, which propagate in the floating ice sheet and are responsible for its low-order resonances, is found to be similar to the dispersion relation of infragravity waves in the ice-free ocean. The phase speed of the surface waves and the resonant frequencies determine the periods and wave vectors of atmospheric waves that are generated by the RIS resonant oscillations. The altitude-dependent vertical wavelengths and the periods of the acoustic-gravity waves in the atmosphere are shown to be sensitive to the physical parameters of the RIS, which can be difficult to measure by other means. Predicted properties of the atmospheric waves prove to be in a remarkable agreement with the key features of the observed persistent wave activity."

See also the associate article entitled: "Weird 'Gravity' Waves Above Antarctica Caused by Ice Vibrations":

http://www.livescience.com/56686-ice-vibrations-cause-weird-waves-above-antarctica.html (http://www.livescience.com/56686-ice-vibrations-cause-weird-waves-above-antarctica.html)
Title: Re: What's new in Antarctica ?
Post by: Sigmetnow on November 03, 2016, 12:30:35 PM
Photos from this year's NASA Operation IceBridge mission over Antarctica.
http://www.nbcnews.com/slideshow/fly-over-country-stunning-aerial-views-antarctica-n676866 (http://www.nbcnews.com/slideshow/fly-over-country-stunning-aerial-views-antarctica-n676866)
Title: Re: What's new in Antarctica ?
Post by: AbruptSLR on November 05, 2016, 04:41:24 PM
Photos from this year's NASA Operation IceBridge mission over Antarctica.
http://www.nbcnews.com/slideshow/fly-over-country-stunning-aerial-views-antarctica-n676866 (http://www.nbcnews.com/slideshow/fly-over-country-stunning-aerial-views-antarctica-n676866)

Also the linked website offers some more stunning photos of Antarctica from NASA's IceBridge flights:

http://news.nationalgeographic.com/2016/11/nasa-ice-bridge/ (http://news.nationalgeographic.com/2016/11/nasa-ice-bridge/)

Title: Re: What's new in Antarctica ?
Post by: Gray-Wolf on November 14, 2016, 02:42:49 PM
http://www.nature.com/articles/ncomms13243 (http://www.nature.com/articles/ncomms13243)

Getting twitchy about this now. I had been keeping up to the travels of warmed bottom waters as they broke through the circumpolars ( whist they were being augmented by the Ozone hole ) and headed around the continent finally reaching Ross in 2012.

Now the Ozone hole is showing some recovery and the Pacific forcings supposedly reversed in 2014 meaning the losses, noted above, will now rapidly increase.
Title: Re: What's new in Antarctica ?
Post by: Tigertown on November 14, 2016, 06:28:10 PM
I have been reading for a while now about the crack in Larson C ,but this is the newest info that I can find.

www.climatecentral.org/news/rift-speeds-up-across-antarctic-ice-shelf-20752 (http://www.climatecentral.org/news/rift-speeds-up-across-antarctic-ice-shelf-20752)

Anyone runs across any updates, please share, as this will be a huge iceberg, when it breaks off.
Title: Re: What's new in Antarctica ?
Post by: Sleepy on November 14, 2016, 06:46:49 PM
Tigertown, there's a dedicated thread on Larsen C here:
http://forum.arctic-sea-ice.net/index.php/topic,1175.0.html (http://forum.arctic-sea-ice.net/index.php/topic,1175.0.html)
Title: Re: What's new in Antarctica ?
Post by: Tigertown on November 14, 2016, 08:46:55 PM
Tigertown, there's a dedicated thread on Larsen C here:
http://forum.arctic-sea-ice.net/index.php/topic,1175.0.html (http://forum.arctic-sea-ice.net/index.php/topic,1175.0.html)

Thanks. I will follow henceforth.
Title: Re: What's new in Antarctica ?
Post by: CalamityCountdown on November 16, 2016, 03:54:07 AM
Mysterious Winds Cause Rapid Melting of Antarctic Ice
http://news.nationalgeographic.com/2016/11/foehn-winds-melt-ice-shelves-antarctic-peninsula-larsen-c/ (http://news.nationalgeographic.com/2016/11/foehn-winds-melt-ice-shelves-antarctic-peninsula-larsen-c/)
Title: Re: What's new in Antarctica ?
Post by: solartim27 on November 16, 2016, 06:56:27 AM
That was a good article.  Here's a gif of the area above Larsen B from Nov 10 to 15.  Looking pretty blue.  Remarkable how fast the sea ice can scurry away.
Title: Re: What's new in Antarctica ?
Post by: oren on November 17, 2016, 09:37:40 PM
Mysterious Winds Cause Rapid Melting of Antarctic Ice
http://news.nationalgeographic.com/2016/11/foehn-winds-melt-ice-shelves-antarctic-peninsula-larsen-c/ (http://news.nationalgeographic.com/2016/11/foehn-winds-melt-ice-shelves-antarctic-peninsula-larsen-c/)
Very interesting, and disturbing.
Title: Re: What's new in Antarctica ?
Post by: Andre on November 19, 2016, 04:20:15 AM
Not sure if this has been posted already:

RIMS 2016: Sea Level Rise Will Be Worse and Come Sooner
http://www.insurancejournal.com/news/national/2016/04/12/405089.htm (http://www.insurancejournal.com/news/national/2016/04/12/405089.htm)

Abstract:
"Think sea level rise will be moderate and something we can all plan for? Think again.

Sea levels could rise by much more than originally anticipated, and much faster, according to new data being collected by scientists studying the melting West Antarctic ice sheet – a massive sheet the size of Mexico."
Title: Re: What's new in Antarctica ?
Post by: Tigertown on November 19, 2016, 04:31:45 AM
Good article, but failed to mention the geothermal activity under the W. Antarctica ice sheet. That could move the calendar up a bit.
Title: Re: What's new in Antarctica ?
Post by: oren on November 19, 2016, 02:06:00 PM
This talk has been mentioned before (note this is from April) but I believe the article itself was not. I wonder when these OMG findings might be made public.
Title: Re: What's new in Antarctica ?
Post by: Csnavywx on November 21, 2016, 01:04:01 AM
The "OMG findings" were her personal opinion (as per corrective e-mail to Eric Holtaus earlier this year). Worst case is 1m by 2050 atm (per the Hansen paper), which would cause plenty of issues on its own.
Title: Re: What's new in Antarctica ?
Post by: charles_oil on November 23, 2016, 09:55:05 PM
New article on the BBC news service:

Huge glacier retreat triggered in 1940s
By Jonathan Amos
BBC Science Correspondent

http://www.bbc.com/news/science-environment-38079838 (http://www.bbc.com/news/science-environment-38079838)

The melting Antarctic glacier that now contributes more to sea-level rise than any other ice stream on the planet began its big decline in the 1940s.
This is when warm ocean water likely first got under Pine Island Glacier (PIG) to loosen the secure footing it had enjoyed up until that point.
Researchers figured out the timing by dating the sediments beneath the PIG.
It puts the glacier’s current changes in their proper historical context, the scientists tell Nature magazine.

## When you go to the BBC article - and click on the ....tell Nature Magazine part, it takes you to the article in full (but un-downloadable).
Title: Re: What's new in Antarctica ?
Post by: Tigertown on November 29, 2016, 12:07:22 AM
Not my discovery, but a melt pond in the Mcmurdo Sound area.

(https://forum.arctic-sea-ice.net/proxy.php?request=http%3A%2F%2F&hash=35d7d5d7526c9897dfb55501e320295a)
Title: Re: What's new in Antarctica ?
Post by: Gray-Wolf on November 29, 2016, 10:44:13 AM
http://www.sciencealert.com/the-west-antarctic-ice-shelf-is-breaking-up-from-the-inside-researchers-find (http://www.sciencealert.com/the-west-antarctic-ice-shelf-is-breaking-up-from-the-inside-researchers-find)

More news on P.I.G. (and its upcoming collapse?)
Title: Re: What's new in Antarctica ?
Post by: Buddy on November 29, 2016, 12:42:16 PM
More news on P.I.G. (and its upcoming collapse?)

Day by day.....week by week....and month by month, mother earth is screaming at us, and many are turning a blind eye.

Next 1 - 5 years should certainly provide some scientific excitement in Antarctica as the sea ice most likely continues its melting march.

Title: Re: What's new in Antarctica ?
Post by: Gray-Wolf on November 29, 2016, 02:12:14 PM
As with ice loss in the Arctic the removal of the 'damping' that the ice provides means swells can impact permafrost cliffs at the shore. In Antarctica the removal of the 'damping' means the ice shelf's come under increased forcing and so fail more often.

With places like Ross removal of the front of the shelf would lead to the rapid collapse of the rear section. Work in the mid noughties showed past 'rapid collapse' events from Ross . I was brought up to believe that East Antarctica was beyond the reach of our warming planet yet since, decade following decade, we learned that we are already seeing impacts in East Antarctica.

If IPO had flipped into its positive state ( and we are not just noting an uptick in solar reaching the Pacific now Chinese pollution is reducing?) then we should expect another 20 years or so of the kind of Sea ice melt we are currently witnessing?

Couple an IPO+ve with the ongoing repair of Ozone over the continent and we should be expecting  rapid changes around the antarctic coasts?
Title: Re: What's new in Antarctica ?
Post by: solartim27 on November 29, 2016, 04:53:09 PM
Not my discovery, but a melt pond in the Mcmurdo Sound area.
That was the shadow from a cloud.
Title: Re: What's new in Antarctica ?
Post by: magnamentis on November 29, 2016, 05:44:47 PM
Not my discovery, but a melt pond in the Mcmurdo Sound area.
That was the shadow from a cloud.

definitely blue water, what's the purpose of that post?

even if it would be gone later on, could be freeze over night hours and snow covered, not saying but i was thinking why one would see this as cloud shadow and that's just one possible explanation should the lake not be visible on a later picture while it's important to have a close look at the time an eventual image without that blue pond was taken, earlier or indeed later than the one attached.

whether it's a pond or a polnya i can't tell because i'm not 100 savvy about terms here, distinguished by size or whether the difference is that a pond could be water ON ice and a polnya just open water withing the ice :-) others know that better.
Title: Re: What's new in Antarctica ?
Post by: Tigertown on November 29, 2016, 06:12:35 PM
Not my discovery, but a melt pond in the Mcmurdo Sound area.
That was the shadow from a cloud.

I took someone else's word for it. I should have known better.
Title: Re: What's new in Antarctica ?
Post by: wehappyfew on November 29, 2016, 06:21:54 PM
Definitely shadows from clouds.

In Worldview, toggle the different satellite feeds, like Aqua/MODIS vs Terra/MODIS, and slide the opacity from 0% to 100%. The shadows move as the local time of day changes the sun angle. Observe the shadows of nearby mountains - they can be the exact same dark blue at times (but not always).

The clouds responsible are visible, but just barely (white clouds over white ice).

Observe other cloud shadows over the sloping areas of nearby ice sheets that could never support melt ponds.

I love reading Robert Scribbler, but enthusiasm can, and has, led him to jump to incorrect conclusions. We all do that, but he does it more visibly by blogging so frequently.

Title: Re: What's new in Antarctica ?
Post by: Darvince on November 29, 2016, 06:58:40 PM
There was definitely a significant amount of melt action though, as you can see the glacier turning much darker blue only between the timespan of the Aqua pass and the Terra pass, as well as it becoming much darker on the 7-2-1 bands between days.

2016-11-25: http://go.nasa.gov/2gFBCAx (http://go.nasa.gov/2gFBCAx)

2016-11-28: http://go.nasa.gov/2gFySTS (http://go.nasa.gov/2gFySTS)
Title: Re: What's new in Antarctica ?
Post by: wehappyfew on November 29, 2016, 07:14:45 PM
Thank you Darvince.
Nice choice of Base Layers to highlight the white clouds casting shadows on the light blue surface.

Worldview 11-27-16 (https://worldview.earthdata.nasa.gov/?p=antarctic&l=MODIS_Aqua_CorrectedReflectance_Bands721,MODIS_Terra_CorrectedReflectance_Bands721(hidden),VIIRS_SNPP_CorrectedReflectance_TrueColor(hidden),MODIS_Aqua_CorrectedReflectance_TrueColor(hidden),MODIS_Terra_CorrectedReflectance_TrueColor(hidden),Coastlines&t=2016-11-27&z=3&v=370432,-1637504,616192,-1515904)

I see five clouds. Three are casting sharp blue shadows that look like melt ponds, two at the bottom are casting grey shadows - maybe because the surface is different, or maybe the clouds are thinner.

Title: Re: What's new in Antarctica ?
Post by: Tealight on November 29, 2016, 07:23:20 PM
As solartim27 and wehappyfew said its definitely a shadow of a cloud on blue ice. However there are some smaller melt ponds scattered over the glacier.

I attached a S2A image of the region (180 degrees rotated compared to Worldview)
Title: Re: What's new in Antarctica ?
Post by: Tigertown on November 29, 2016, 07:31:21 PM
Definitely shadows from clouds.

In Worldview, toggle the different satellite feeds, like Aqua/MODIS vs Terra/MODIS, and slide the opacity from 0% to 100%. The shadows move as the local time of day changes the sun angle. Observe the shadows of nearby mountains - they can be the exact same dark blue at times (but not always).

The clouds responsible are visible, but just barely (white clouds over white ice).

Observe other cloud shadows over the sloping areas of nearby ice sheets that could never support melt ponds.

I love reading Robert Scribbler, but enthusiasm can, and has, led him to jump to incorrect conclusions. We all do that, but he does it more visibly by blogging so frequently.
Thanks. I tried that and see that it both moves and changes shape.
Title: Re: What's new in Antarctica ?
Post by: AbruptSLR on December 04, 2016, 05:11:43 AM
The linked article is entitled: "Why is a blue cloud appearing over Antarctica?"

http://www.csmonitor.com/Science/2016/1203/Why-is-a-blue-cloud-appearing-over-Antarctica (http://www.csmonitor.com/Science/2016/1203/Why-is-a-blue-cloud-appearing-over-Antarctica)

Extract: "Noctilucent, or night-glowing, clouds appear over the South Pole each year. This year they arrived much earlier than usual, puzzling scientists.

The noctilucent clouds provide clues to the mesosphere's "connections to other parts of the atmosphere, weather, and climate," she wrote. They are summer phenomena, appearing above the Arctic in July and August and above the Antarctic in November and December."
Title: Re: What's new in Antarctica ?
Post by: magnamentis on December 04, 2016, 08:51:10 PM
would be interesting to find out how many tripple century drops have ever occurred in the antarctic or anywhere else?
Title: Re: What's new in Antarctica ?
Post by: Tigertown on December 04, 2016, 10:21:37 PM
would be interesting to find out how many tripple century drops have ever occurred in the antarctic or anywhere else?

I don't where to get the raw numbers with JAXA, but just looking at the graph, I don't see anything close to that. Off the top of my head,I think it may be a record. NSIDC I believe recently posted a drop of about 284k.
Title: Re: What's new in Antarctica ?
Post by: diablobanquisa on December 05, 2016, 12:23:55 AM
JAXA data is available here: https://ads.nipr.ac.jp/vishop/#/extent (just select "Antarctic" and click on "Download...")

In December, most years have at least one tripple century drop.
There are also a few years with quadruple century drops, and even a fivefold century drop in December 1993.


Title: Re: What's new in Antarctica ?
Post by: Gray-Wolf on December 07, 2016, 05:41:20 PM
https://www.theguardian.com/world/2016/dec/07/british-antarctic-research-station-crack-ice (https://www.theguardian.com/world/2016/dec/07/british-antarctic-research-station-crack-ice)

Looks like the B.A.S. are not taking any chances this summer?

With the ice already withdrawn in Weddell

https://worldview.earthdata.nasa.gov/?p=antarctic&l=VIIRS_SNPP_CorrectedReflectance_TrueColor(hidden),MODIS_Aqua_CorrectedReflectance_TrueColor(hidden),MODIS_Terra_CorrectedReflectance_TrueColor,Coastlines&t=2016-10-02&z=3&v=-775296,1355648,-600448,1437312 (https://worldview.earthdata.nasa.gov/?p=antarctic&l=VIIRS_SNPP_CorrectedReflectance_TrueColor(hidden),MODIS_Aqua_CorrectedReflectance_TrueColor(hidden),MODIS_Terra_CorrectedReflectance_TrueColor,Coastlines&t=2016-10-02&z=3&v=-775296,1355648,-600448,1437312)

will swells waggle that chasm fully across the shelf this summer? And what of the full moon in 7 days? that'll give quite a bit of a 'lift' along that central end of the chasm....
Title: Re: What's new in Antarctica ?
Post by: Tigertown on December 12, 2016, 11:04:26 PM
Under ice lakes and streams found in Antarctica similar to those in Greenland.

https://www.washingtonpost.com/news/energy-environment/wp/2016/12/12/this-dazzling-antarctic-lake-is-buried-in-floating-ice-and-that-has-scientists-worried/?utm_term=.9162c8c43b8d (https://www.washingtonpost.com/news/energy-environment/wp/2016/12/12/this-dazzling-antarctic-lake-is-buried-in-floating-ice-and-that-has-scientists-worried/?utm_term=.9162c8c43b8d)

(https://forum.arctic-sea-ice.net/proxy.php?request=http%3A%2F%2F&hash=35d7d5d7526c9897dfb55501e320295a)
Title: Re: What's new in Antarctica ?
Post by: Tigertown on December 16, 2016, 01:49:18 AM
Subglacial basin mapped out.
www.bbc.com/news/science-environment-38333629 (http://www.bbc.com/news/science-environment-38333629)
(https://forum.arctic-sea-ice.net/proxy.php?request=http%3A%2F%2F&hash=35d7d5d7526c9897dfb55501e320295a)
Title: Re: What's new in Antarctica ?
Post by: jai mitchell on December 16, 2016, 08:20:13 PM
https://www.washingtonpost.com/news/energy-environment/wp/2016/12/16/warm-ocean-water-is-slamming-into-and-melting-the-biggest-glacier-in-east-antarctica (https://www.washingtonpost.com/news/energy-environment/wp/2016/12/16/warm-ocean-water-is-slamming-into-and-melting-the-biggest-glacier-in-east-antarctica)

Scientists at institutions in the United States and Australia on Friday published a set of unprecedented ocean observations near the largest glacier of the largest ice sheet in the world: Totten glacier, East Antarctica. And the result was a troubling confirmation of what scientists already feared — Totten is melting from below.

see: http://advances.sciencemag.org/content/2/12/e1601610 (http://advances.sciencemag.org/content/2/12/e1601610)
Ocean heat drives rapid basal melt of the Totten Ice Shelf

    Stephen Rich Rintou et al.

Observations from the Totten calving front confirm that (0.22 ± 0.07) × 106 m3 s−1 of warm water enters the cavity through a newly discovered deep channel.

Title: Re: What's new in Antarctica ?
Post by: AbruptSLR on December 20, 2016, 10:16:22 AM
The linked article discusses how right now the Australian research vessel the "Aurora Australis" is traveling to East Antarctica to gather more/new data on the stability of marine glaciers (including Totten):

http://mashable.com/2016/12/19/east-antarctica-totten-glacier-melt-climate/#hmoYBXlpksqo (http://mashable.com/2016/12/19/east-antarctica-totten-glacier-melt-climate/#hmoYBXlpksqo)
Title: Re: What's new in Antarctica ?
Post by: solartim27 on December 20, 2016, 06:13:13 PM
I saw this little video clip, and couldn't help but wonder about all the yellowish gunk on the bottom of the ice.  Anyone have any thoughts?
The bow of the NG/Linblad Explorer slides through the seasonal sea ice on the Antarctic Peninsula.
https://www.instagram.com/p/BOOVgZujbuL/ (https://www.instagram.com/p/BOOVgZujbuL/)
Title: Re: What's new in Antarctica ?
Post by: Tigertown on December 20, 2016, 07:13:13 PM
Phytoplankton. Recently discovered under Arctic ice, now looks to be under Antarctic ice also. The water is relatively warm just below the surface.
Title: Re: What's new in Antarctica ?
Post by: georged on December 21, 2016, 04:04:40 AM
Antarctic under-ice phytoplankton has been well known for a while. It was a fairly established subject when my housemate was doing her PhD on it in 2006.
Title: Re: What's new in Antarctica ?
Post by: Tigertown on December 21, 2016, 06:19:31 AM
Just looking into news of the warmer than usual circumpolar current that is melting away at the Totten Ice Shelf and possibly making a cavity  at the entrance of an under-water canyon about 1200 meters or less down. This is a big concern because of a retrograde inland that would channel the warm water under the glacier. The basin there contains a huge volume of ice. I am learning as I go on this, so maybe others can add details. I do have some temp and salinity charts for the area of concern.
(https://forum.arctic-sea-ice.net/proxy.php?request=http%3A%2F%2F&hash=35d7d5d7526c9897dfb55501e320295a)
Title: Re: What's new in Antarctica ?
Post by: sidd on December 21, 2016, 06:44:42 AM
Ice at depth melts easier, i seem to recall that at 1000m ice melts at -1.2C, which is around 2.5C colder than water temp at that depth from the chart above.
Title: Re: What's new in Antarctica ?
Post by: Tigertown on December 21, 2016, 06:53:52 AM
Ice at depth melts easier, i seem to recall that at 1000m ice melts at -1.2C, which is around 2.5C colder than water temp at that depth from the chart above.
Allowing another  -1.8 for salinity would make that about a 4.3oC differential.
Title: Re: What's new in Antarctica ?
Post by: sidd on December 21, 2016, 10:48:56 PM
The salinity effect is irrelevant, since the phenoenon under discussion is the met of glacial ice derived from fresh water. If we were speaking of melting saline ice or freezing saline water the argument might hold. But we are speaking of melt of fresh ice.
Title: Re: What's new in Antarctica ?
Post by: Tigertown on December 22, 2016, 01:02:16 AM
The area under attack from the warm water has a current flowing against it. So it is a steady flow of salt water, not stationary,so it doesn't cool like saltwater melting ice normally would. Wouldn't this make the salt more effective than normal?
Title: Re: What's new in Antarctica ?
Post by: georged on December 22, 2016, 02:13:10 AM
Just looking into news of the warmer than usual circumpolar current that is melting away at the Totten Ice Shelf and possibly making a cavity  at the entrance of an under-water canyon about 1200 meters or less down. This is a big concern because of a retrograde inland that would channel the warm water under the glacier. The basin there contains a huge volume of ice. I am learning as I go on this, so maybe others can add details. I do have some temp and salinity charts for the area of concern.

It's my understanding that this depression is due to glacial weight? In any case, it is over 2700m deep at the grounding line. This is a phenomenal deep surface.

http://imagecache.jpl.nasa.gov/images/640x350/earth20150316b-16-640x350.jpg (http://imagecache.jpl.nasa.gov/images/640x350/earth20150316b-16-640x350.jpg)
Title: Re: What's new in Antarctica ?
Post by: Tigertown on December 22, 2016, 02:20:06 AM
Thanks georged. Hope you don't mind if I go ahead and post that image, as it is very helpful in understanding the situation better.
(https://forum.arctic-sea-ice.net/proxy.php?request=http%3A%2F%2F&hash=35d7d5d7526c9897dfb55501e320295a)
Title: Re: What's new in Antarctica ?
Post by: sidd on December 22, 2016, 05:40:34 AM
Re: saltwater current more effective than fresh at melting fresh ice

call the current velocity v, current density rho, specific heat Cp, the area exposed to the current A, and the temperature drop of the current dT     

in order of magnitude terms the heat extracted from the current Q available for ice melt  is

Q=rho*Cp*A*v*dT
 
(This neglects melt efflux mixed into the impinging current, roughness, turbulence and a whole bunch of things. But to order of magnitude, is ok)

Both rho and Cp are functions of salinity (and pressure and temperature ...) From the difference in the term rho*Cp between fresh water and water and sea water (at the relevant pressure and temperature ...)  we can calculate the difference in heat delivered. I leave this as an excercise for the reader, but i think it is a few percent.

sidd
Title: Re: What's new in Antarctica ?
Post by: Tigertown on December 22, 2016, 06:11:13 AM
Thanks sidd. From what I understand it is a very strong current right now. Looking forward to any additional info that anyone comes across about this in the near future.
Title: Re: What's new in Antarctica ?
Post by: johnm33 on December 22, 2016, 01:43:44 PM
Thanks for that image g+Tt, I'm going to keep an eye on hy-com for an outburst of fresh water thereabouts.
Title: Re: What's new in Antarctica ?
Post by: charles_oil on December 26, 2016, 11:30:25 AM
Huffington article and video about seafloor life in Antarctica - and the possible effects of CO2 changes.

http://www.huffingtonpost.co.uk/entry/rare-video-of-the-antarctic-seafloor-reveals-stunning-landscape_uk_585ab317e4b0d590e44ca05c?icid=maing-grid7%7Cmain5%7Cdl1%7Csec3_lnk1%26pLid%3D1285279572_uk (http://www.huffingtonpost.co.uk/entry/rare-video-of-the-antarctic-seafloor-reveals-stunning-landscape_uk_585ab317e4b0d590e44ca05c?icid=maing-grid7%7Cmain5%7Cdl1%7Csec3_lnk1%26pLid%3D1285279572_uk)

When you think of the seafloor in Antarctica you would be forgiven for thinking that it’s probably a barren wasteland, covered by vast swathes of ice in freezing cold temperatures.

While those last two points are accurate, an Australian Antarctic Division underwater research robot has captured a rare glimpse into the astonishing diversity that actually exists in this remotest of landscapes.

Rather than being a lifeless all-consuming mass of grey it seems Antarctica’s seafloor is brimming not only with life, but some dazzling colours too.
Title: Re: What's new in Antarctica ?
Post by: AbruptSLR on December 30, 2016, 12:09:56 AM
The linked article is entitled: "Satellite spots massive object hidden under the frozen wastes of Antarctica", and indicates that there may be a large asteroid impact crater buried beneath the ice in Wilkes Land.

http://www.news.com.au/technology/science/satellite-spots-massive-object-hidden-under-the-frozen-wastes-of-antarctica/news-story/dfdc58ee88bde178ceb611782185f39a (http://www.news.com.au/technology/science/satellite-spots-massive-object-hidden-under-the-frozen-wastes-of-antarctica/news-story/dfdc58ee88bde178ceb611782185f39a)

Extract: "The Sun reports the huge and mysterious “anomaly” is thought to be lurking beneath the frozen wastes of an area called Wilkes Land.

It stretches for a distance of 151 miles across and has a maximum depth of about 848 metres.
Some researchers believe it is the remains of a truly massive asteroid which was more than twice the size of the Chicxulub space rock which wiped out the dinosaurs.

If this explanation is true, it could mean this killer asteroid caused the Permian — Triassic extinction event which killed 96 per cent of Earth’s sea creatures and up to 70 per cent of the vertebrate organisms living on land."
Title: Re: What's new in Antarctica ?
Post by: Tealight on January 14, 2017, 08:02:26 PM
Iceberg B31 (calved in November 2013, from Pine Island Glacier) was mostly visible for a few days. It appears to stay in the same position, but it spins at around 50 degrees per day or a full rotation in 7 days. The edges are around 10km from the rotation center so they move at 9km/day linear speed. Does this greatly increase the melt rate?

http://go.nasa.gov/2iseuFX (http://go.nasa.gov/2iseuFX)
Title: Re: What's new in Antarctica ?
Post by: solartim27 on January 14, 2017, 09:39:39 PM
I saw two nice bits on research stations in Antarctica with lots of nice pictures.

How Antarctic bases went from wooden huts to sci-fi chic:
http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/magazine-38574003 (http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/magazine-38574003)

The incredible 'mad max' journey across Antarctica: Stunning satellite image reveals gruelling trek to resupply Earth's most remote research station
 Gruelling 10 day traverse is to reach Concordia, a giant two towered research station in Antarctica
The 'caravans' carry up to 300 tonnes of fuel, food and heavy equipment in 300 m-long convoys
http://www.dailymail.co.uk/sciencetech/article-4114796/The-incredible-mad-max-journey-Antarctica-Stunning-satellite-image-reveals-gruelling-trek-resupply-Earth-s-remote-research-stations.html (http://www.dailymail.co.uk/sciencetech/article-4114796/The-incredible-mad-max-journey-Antarctica-Stunning-satellite-image-reveals-gruelling-trek-resupply-Earth-s-remote-research-stations.html)
Title: Re: What's new in Antarctica ?
Post by: iwantatr8 on January 20, 2017, 01:46:15 PM
This looks like it might be a very useful resource for monitoring antartica data.

http://quantarctica.npolar.no/ (http://quantarctica.npolar.no/)

but it's a bit big!

Title: Re: What's new in Antarctica ?
Post by: Laurent on February 13, 2017, 08:32:10 PM
http://www.nature.com/ngeo/journal/vaop/ncurrent/full/ngeo2888.html (http://www.nature.com/ngeo/journal/vaop/ncurrent/full/ngeo2888.html)
Enhanced weathering and CO2 drawdown caused by latest Eocene strengthening of the Atlantic meridional overturning circulation

Abstract

On timescales significantly greater than 105 years, atmospheric pCO2 is controlled by the rate of mantle outgassing relative to the set-point of the silicate weathering feedback. The weathering set-point has been shown to depend on the distribution and characteristics of rocks exposed at the Earth’s surface, vegetation types and topography. Here we argue that large-scale climate impacts caused by changes in ocean circulation can also modify the weathering set-point and show evidence suggesting that this played a role in the establishment of the Antarctic ice sheet at the Eocene–Oligocene boundary. In our simulations, tectonic deepening of the Drake Passage causes freshening and stratification of the Southern Ocean, strengthening the Atlantic meridional overturning circulation and consequently raising temperatures and intensifying rainfall over land. These simulated changes are consistent with late Eocene tectonic reconstructions that show Drake Passage deepening, and with sediment records that reveal Southern Ocean stratification, the emergence of North Atlantic Deep Water, and a hemispherically asymmetric temperature change. These factors would have driven intensified silicate weathering and can thereby explain the drawdown of carbon dioxide that has been linked with Antarctic ice sheet growth. We suggest that this mechanism illustrates another way in which ocean–atmosphere climate dynamics can introduce nonlinear threshold behaviour through interaction with the geologic carbon cycle.

Title: Re: What's new in Antarctica ?
Post by: solartim27 on February 13, 2017, 10:57:21 PM
Just a fun gif of an iceberg wreacking havoc.  I believe it is B15AA.
Title: Re: What's new in Antarctica ?
Post by: zxy on February 26, 2017, 05:05:42 AM
Enderby Land has a chunk of ice approx 50km x 150km floating away. In gif is an animation from 10.2 to 25.2 2017.

And the link to worldview site:

https://worldview.earthdata.nasa.gov/?p=antarctic&l=VIIRS_SNPP_CorrectedReflectance_TrueColor(hidden),MODIS_Aqua_CorrectedReflectance_TrueColor(hidden),MODIS_Terra_CorrectedReflectance_TrueColor,Coastlines&t=2017-02-25&z=3&v=545791.9999999998,1195776,2184192,1994496&ab=off&as=2017-02-10&ae=2017-02-25&av=1.5&al=false (https://worldview.earthdata.nasa.gov/?p=antarctic&l=VIIRS_SNPP_CorrectedReflectance_TrueColor(hidden),MODIS_Aqua_CorrectedReflectance_TrueColor(hidden),MODIS_Terra_CorrectedReflectance_TrueColor,Coastlines&t=2017-02-25&z=3&v=545791.9999999998,1195776,2184192,1994496&ab=off&as=2017-02-10&ae=2017-02-25&av=1.5&al=false)

Title: Re: What's new in Antarctica ?
Post by: bairgon on February 26, 2017, 07:35:07 AM
Enderby Land has a chunk of ice approx 50km x 150km floating away. In gif is an animation from 10.2 to 25.2 2017.

That area suffered significant melting in April 2016, so the ice there is only one year old:

Title: Re: What's new in Antarctica ?
Post by: solartim27 on February 26, 2017, 07:25:33 PM
Just saw this 2015 documentary on Claude Lorius, "Antarctica  Ice and Sky"  Lots of great historical video and  information on doing the initial research.

http://imdb.com/rg/an_share/title/title/tt4466550/ (http://imdb.com/rg/an_share/title/title/tt4466550/)
Title: Re: What's new in Antarctica ?
Post by: dingojoe on February 26, 2017, 10:03:39 PM
Enderby Land has a chunk of ice approx 50km x 150km floating away. In gif is an animation from 10.2 to 25.2 2017.

That area suffered significant melting in April 2016, so the ice there is only one year old:

We've talked about that area on various threads, but it would have never occurred to me to look at April time frame for fast ice breakdown.
Title: Re: What's new in Antarctica ?
Post by: bairgon on February 27, 2017, 05:44:31 PM
Looking at the Weddell Sea, I've noticed that the ice has consistently been moving north from the shore for the last month or so. Hope the gif works; otherwise click.

New ice is forming in the gap. Also interesting to see the grounded iceberg which is perhaps helping to anchor the sea ice, but to little effect in this sequence.

Link: https://worldview.earthdata.nasa.gov/?p=antarctic&l=MODIS_Terra_CorrectedReflectance_TrueColor,MODIS_Aqua_CorrectedReflectance_TrueColor(hidden),Coastlines&t=2017-02-27&z=3&v=-1769401.1403176677,742212.6312051003,-786361.1403176677,1246532.6312051003&ab=off (https://worldview.earthdata.nasa.gov/?p=antarctic&l=MODIS_Terra_CorrectedReflectance_TrueColor,MODIS_Aqua_CorrectedReflectance_TrueColor(hidden),Coastlines&t=2017-02-27&z=3&v=-1769401.1403176677,742212.6312051003,-786361.1403176677,1246532.6312051003&ab=off)
Title: Re: What's new in Antarctica ?
Post by: Red on February 27, 2017, 09:34:17 PM
Enderby Land has a chunk of ice approx 50km x 150km floating away. In gif is an animation from 10.2 to 25.2 2017.

That area suffered significant melting in April 2016, so the ice there is only one year old:

We've talked about that area on various threads, but it would have never occurred to me to look at April time frame for fast ice breakdown.
If you go back through the Aprils to '13 you'll see that '16 was the first year that most of the bay opens. So a lot of that was MYI that let go last year. This melt season if you look at Ludzow-Holm Bay, the left side started to open against the mainland back in early December. This was melt out in MYI ice that existed at least back to '13, (thats as far as I know how to get to). Comparing various areas of East Antarctica's satellite records for the years from '13 to '16 it appears that every year there is a little more MYI goes missing by April. The area just in front of the Shirase toe has taken quite a hit this year compared to last. There are some icebergs coming free that haven't been loose in years. A little more MYI being lost consistently every year for the past four is not the end of days but, it would seem to indicate an increase in energy arriving at the surface during melt season year over year.
Title: Re: What's new in Antarctica ?
Post by: Neven on March 27, 2017, 09:00:59 PM
Here's a comment Hyperion made in the wrong thread:

Thanks slow wing. Especially for pointing out my elderly muddleheaded mixuped mismemoring of the enthalpy of vapourisation figure. How embarrassing to under calculate a figure by some 500 times. ::)
 And you Jai. Wish I had more time right now to read those papers. Very busy day unfortunately.  These worldwide changes to the circulation patterns we are used to seem to be happening almost hour by hour right now. It does seem like, particularly in the polar regions the tropopause has lifted suddenly and dramatically as predicted by some models and proposed as necessary for single cell circulation regimes in past equable climates. As for whether I'm a magnitude out in those estimated flow rates? As an engineer you tend to go "how bad could it get? What is the level of safety we need built in to handle it?" the precautionary principle with a mind to the future is the mindset. Not scientific understatement, with no credibility placed on any data but the solidly studied and proven historic data. And so I think it is possibly the best introduction we currently have, to what to expect in the late Arctic summer to observe whats going on down south here right now. That TPW fist that was heading for the Antarctic peninsula is now there. 15kg/sqm of water aboard and suddenly the whole peninsula is hotter by 6-10 degC. Up to 6 above freezing in places. The one heading for Ross, south of NZ is packing 30kg/sqm and came from mainly over Australia.  The Fist from the Indian Ocean Tropics is packing 45kg/sqm and just about to pass the Kerguellens at 52 sth and ram East Antarctica.
The huge 930hpa low taking up the whole space between Australia and Antarctica is the scariest mother I've ever seen, and looks capable of grabbing the whole of the Pacific Tropical airmass and squeezing all of it out on Antarctica. Especially as it comes across and meshes with the Anticyclone taking up nearly all the cental south pacific. Also absurdly large.
No I don't think its usual for the whole of the south Pacific trades to be turned from the tropics and sprayed on Antarctica Tigertown. It happened two weeks ago. There's even some of the Trades from Nth of the equator being pulled into the flow that just hit the Antarctic Peninsula, and the big puddle that just grazed our New Zealand east coast that's setting itself up to be shot south from between those two Flywheels.
Your Nth Atlantic Storm is looking serious. Its very tall, above 30km. Reckon its going to do much the same with the atlantic Tropical Air. We seem to have transitioned to a primarily Ferral cell circulation mode. The angular momentum of Polewards air is being stored in the jets, and retrieved by the high altitude equator wise backflows IMHO.


https://earth.nullschool.net/#current/wind/isobaric/1000hPa/overlay=total_precipitable_water/azimuthal_equidistant=159.15,-58.94,371
Title: Re: What's new in Antarctica ?
Post by: DrTskoul on March 30, 2017, 12:21:04 AM
Scientists highlight Antarctic ice upheaval in response to prehistoric climate change (https://m.phys.org/news/2017-03-scientists-highlight-antarctic-ice-upheaval.html)

The research, led by palaeoclimatologist Dr Diederik Liebrand as part of an International Ocean Discovery Program collaboration, suggests that 20 to 30 million years ago the Antarctic periodically gained and lost huge ice caps – equivalent to the entire modern-day East Antarctic Ice Sheet.

Dr Liebrand said: "Our research shows that even slow, naturally forced climate change is capable of driving rapid large-scale changes in ice volume in Antarctica – and therefore global sea levels.

"This is of particular interest to scientists because humans are now the main agents of climate change, and the rates of change today are much faster than those that occurred millions of years ago during the interval that we studied.

"Increasingly we are understanding that the Antarctic ice cap is not some enduring monolithic block but a much more slippery ephemeral beast – and the implications of that realisation for the future of Antarctic ice sheets in a very rapidly warming world have not escaped us."

The scientists examined oxygen isotopes in fossilised micro-organisms – found in a drill core of marine sediments taken from a water depth of 2.5km in the South Atlantic – to reach their findings, published this week in the journal Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America (PNAS).

Evolution of the early Antarctic ice ages, PNAS,
www.pnas.org/cgi/doi/10.1073/pnas.1615440114 (http://www.pnas.org/cgi/doi/10.1073/pnas.1615440114)

Provided by: University of Southampton
Title: Re: What's new in Antarctica ?
Post by: wili on April 03, 2017, 02:46:36 AM
This isn't new (sorry if it's already been posted here), and it's not exclusively relevant to the Antarctic, but it's a nice concise summary of the major feedbacks that affect ice sheet melt.

http://www.bitsofscience.org/sea-level-rise-ice-sheet-dynamics-melting-feedbacks-acceleration-7295/#more-7295 (http://www.bitsofscience.org/sea-level-rise-ice-sheet-dynamics-melting-feedbacks-acceleration-7295/#more-7295)

(Thanks to chilyb at PeakOilForums for the link)
Title: Re: What's new in Antarctica ?
Post by: FredBear on April 03, 2017, 01:14:41 PM
On arctic io :-  Some ice in old Larsen B area broke away 18/03/2017, lot more looks as if it may have melt-water from 29th? Bit late in the season but might be katabatic winds, other ice breaking off and blowing east further south (sea ice n. end of Larsen C, 28/03?)  .   .   .   
Title: Re: What's new in Antarctica ?
Post by: sidd on April 07, 2017, 07:53:31 AM
China will make hole on Amery:

http://en.people.cn/n3/2017/0406/c90000-9199657.html (http://en.people.cn/n3/2017/0406/c90000-9199657.html)

sidd
Title: Re: What's new in Antarctica ?
Post by: sidd on April 11, 2017, 11:17:07 PM
Landsat-8 derived surface velocities for 2014 and 2015 with a detailed comparison to previous estimates at doi:10.5194/tc-2017-34

Many pretty pictures. Worries in the Wilkes Basin. Open access. Read all about it at

 http://www.the-cryosphere-discuss.net/tc-2017-34/ (http://www.the-cryosphere-discuss.net/tc-2017-34/)
Title: Re: What's new in Antarctica ?
Post by: Hyperion on April 12, 2017, 10:29:41 AM
Cycles 57 and 49 (at ∼22.7 and 19.5 My ago), which are characterized by distinctly sawtooth-shaped ∼110-ky cycles, suggesting a causal link between cycle amplitude and asymmetry during the Early Miocene, but not during the MOGI. The distinctly asymmetric cycles suggest that the Early Miocene Antarctic ice sheets periodically underwent intervals of growth that were prolonged relative to astronomical forcing and then underwent subsequent rapid retreat in a manner akin to the glacial terminations of the Late Pleistocene glaciations, in which the large ice sheets of the Northern Hemisphere were major participants (27, 28, 32). The highly asymmetric (sawtooth) nature of Late Pleistocene glacial−interglacial cycles is thought to originate from a positive ice mass balance that persists through several precession- and obliquity-paced summer insolation maxima. This results in decreasing ice sheet stability and more rapid terminations every ∼110 ky, once the ablation of the Northern Hemisphere ice sheets increases dramatically in response to the next insolation maximum. The increase in ablation is caused by lowered surface elevation of the ice sheets resulting from crustal sinking and delayed isostatic rebound (33). Similar mechanisms are implied for the large Antarctic ice sheets of the OMT (∼22.5 My ago) but it is less clear why the smaller ice sheets of the Early Miocene (∼19.5 My ago) would exhibit this distinctly sawtooth-shaped pattern of growth and decay (Fig. 3).

As they point out here "delayed isostatic rebound" can be a factor in rapid ice sheet collapses. Though this is stated as causing rapid retreats through ablation, bottom melt processes could be a larger factor. Especially with Below sea level interiors like WA and Greenland. There is possibility here that this study, and even our data of the holocene deglaciation has even more rapid advance/ retreat behaviour smoothed out in published studies by preconceptions that have their root in the scientific consensus held until recently that major changes in large ice sheets take thousands of years to occur. Obviously data collected loses resolution with antiquity, and its not uncommon unfortunately for "anomalous" samples that don't fit the paradigm to be discarded and not even be mentioned in publication. As we appear to be learning that Atmosphere and ocean heat transport changes can produce large and rapid consequence, perhaps we should be considering the possibility that there may have been big Antarctic and Greenland melt backs in the meltwater pulses coming out of the last Glaciation. A process where the Laurentide and European Ice sheet melts trigger increased heat transport to poles via big storm systems caused by the temperature differentials in SSTs, then the process see-saws, causing a rapid meltback at the poles along with partial rebuilding of the L and E sheets via increased snowfalls caused by polar cyclone factories seems feasible. This would dampen the sea level changes as the 6x current total terrestrial ice sheet mass of 20ka bp crashed in several pulses over 10000 years to near current levels. Not a situation we currently can look forward to. With too much heat in the system the Temperate latitude caps can't build as the polar ones crash. But the runaway escalation of cyclone heat transport as Hansen's paper proposed for the end of the last interglacial 120 ka bp sure can. With the extra issues of far higher greenhouse burden and orbital forcings being more favourable to rapid meltings now.
Title: Re: What's new in Antarctica ?
Post by: sidd on April 20, 2017, 12:12:32 AM
New paper about surface meltwater in Antarctica doi:10.1038/nature22049
I attach Fig 1
Title: Re: What's new in Antarctica ?
Post by: sidd on April 20, 2017, 12:14:13 AM
And a paper showing evidence for meltwater stabilization of an ice shelf (?!) doi:10.1038/nature22048
Title: Re: What's new in Antarctica ?
Post by: AbruptSLR on April 20, 2017, 12:33:23 AM
New paper about surface meltwater in Antarctica doi:10.1038/nature22049

The associated article is entitled: "Scientists have discovered vast systems of flowing water in Antarctica. And that worries them."

https://www.washingtonpost.com/news/energy-environment/wp/2017/04/19/the-surface-of-antarctica-is-covered-with-flowing-water-that-has-scientists-worried/?utm_term=.a447caa06cea (https://www.washingtonpost.com/news/energy-environment/wp/2017/04/19/the-surface-of-antarctica-is-covered-with-flowing-water-that-has-scientists-worried/?utm_term=.a447caa06cea)

Extract: "The surface of the remote Antarctic ice sheet may be a far more dynamic place than scientists imagined, new research suggests. Decades of satellite imagery and aerial photography have revealed an extensive network of lakes and rivers transporting liquid meltwater across the continent’s ice shelves — nearly 700 systems of connected pools and streams in total.

“A handful of previous studies have documented surface lakes and streams on individual ice shelves over a span of a few years,” glaciologist Alison Banwell of the University of Cambridge wrote in a comment on the new research, published Wednesday in the journal Nature. “But the authors’ work is the first to extensively map meltwater features and drainage systems on all of Antarctica’s ice shelves, over multiple decades.”

The findings, presented Wednesday in a pair of papers in Nature, could upend our understanding of the way meltwater interacts with the frozen ice sheet."

Title: Re: What's new in Antarctica ?
Post by: AbruptSLR on April 24, 2017, 01:47:16 AM
And a paper showing evidence for meltwater stabilization of an ice shelf (?!) doi:10.1038/nature22048

Here is a more complete reference & a linked to an open access cop of the paper:

Jonathan Kingslake, Jeremy C. Ely, Indrani Das & Robin E. Bell (20 APRIL 2017), "Widespread movement of meltwater onto and across Antarctic ice shelves", NATURE, VOL 544, 349; doi:10.1038/nature22049

https://www.nature.com/articles/nature22049.epdf?referrer_access_token=F81z0TqwjGmb71By493OxNRgN0jAjWel9jnR3ZoTv0NWLAFAcjzSECmaCP-TuhnQnGZAtnvyAOn7AnGvU4eFIhvSEXoC1C_eSvhX66G7wIrelRihqRI2ZJiLFK7noXL2wRaVkuwepFW4IPEnI18R27P44CGAGzLWoi2s9p-L4iIXUTf9xLPsUKVG5QyR-syQVj_dX8IR8ikWvtV8j6UV4zYWWaEHHTVDErJ8Je1mG9hoI8AgdRFZYtm_R8vq6R96&tracking_referrer=www.cbsnews.com (https://www.nature.com/articles/nature22049.epdf?referrer_access_token=F81z0TqwjGmb71By493OxNRgN0jAjWel9jnR3ZoTv0NWLAFAcjzSECmaCP-TuhnQnGZAtnvyAOn7AnGvU4eFIhvSEXoC1C_eSvhX66G7wIrelRihqRI2ZJiLFK7noXL2wRaVkuwepFW4IPEnI18R27P44CGAGzLWoi2s9p-L4iIXUTf9xLPsUKVG5QyR-syQVj_dX8IR8ikWvtV8j6UV4zYWWaEHHTVDErJ8Je1mG9hoI8AgdRFZYtm_R8vq6R96&tracking_referrer=www.cbsnews.com)
Title: Re: What's new in Antarctica ?
Post by: sidd on April 25, 2017, 02:26:02 AM
"And a paper showing evidence for meltwater stabilization of an ice shelf (?!) doi:10.1038/nature22048"

the link above in the quote is to the Bell paper, not the Kingslake paper.

That Bell paper is quite interesting. Hydrofracture instability is slowed greatly by efficient export of surface melt.

"The ­calculated water export ranges from 0.04 km^3 to 0.56 km^3 in each season. In just seven days, the waterfall can export the entire annual surface melt volume produced by a melt rate of 0.5 m/yr over the shear-margin catchment. Present ice-sheet models produce rapid disintegration when surface melt rates reach 1.5 m/yr. However, our results show that this amount of ­surface melt could be removed by the waterfall in 21 days (Extended Data Fig. 6). This efficient export of surface meltwater highlights the capacity of rivers to efficiently buffer ice shelves against the damaging storage of melt."

Well, that immediately raises the question, why did this not buffer Larsen before it fell apart ? I wonder if Larsen has rivers for years before it fell apart, by we were not watching it carefully enuf. Well, good news, for a change, if it is borne out.

sidd

Title: Re: What's new in Antarctica ?
Post by: sidd on April 25, 2017, 02:30:18 AM
Re: Kingslake paper, doi:10.1038/nature22049

In the figure 1 i included earlier, inset d) is the the Roy Bauduoin shelf. There is a new paper at cryosphere-discuss by Berger et al. doi:10.5194/tc-2017-41 about spatial variation in basal melting on this shelf.

http://www.the-cryosphere-discuss.net/tc-2017-41/ (http://www.the-cryosphere-discuss.net/tc-2017-41/)

sidd
Title: Re: What's new in Antarctica ?
Post by: crandles on April 30, 2017, 05:20:21 PM
Antarctica's troublesome 'hairdryer winds' (ie 'Foen' winds)
http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/science-environment-39759329 (http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/science-environment-39759329)

A new study has found an atmospheric melting phenomenon in the region to be far more prevalent than anyone had realised.
Title: Re: What's new in Antarctica ?
Post by: Juan C. García on May 06, 2017, 04:00:50 AM
UAE plans to drag an ICEBERG from Antarctica to provide drinking water for millions

http://www.dailymail.co.uk/sciencetech/article-4476272/UAE-plans-drag-ICEBERG-Antarctic.html (http://www.dailymail.co.uk/sciencetech/article-4476272/UAE-plans-drag-ICEBERG-Antarctic.html)

 :o :P
Title: Re: What's new in Antarctica ?
Post by: FredBear on May 06, 2017, 12:50:09 PM
The iceberg would set an interesting set of environmental questions :-
!. Presumeably it would become surrounded with a pool of very cold fresh water to upset the local aquatic life.
2.The cold would strip moisture from the atmosphere, making it even drier, fog might even form?
3. Would the iceberg remain stable during the "mining", or would it topple or even explode?
4. Where do you park it?
5. ??

( I did once use a 2 litre, -20oC ice block as emergency cooling for a marine aquarium with good circulation - it cracked quite loudly and melted fast!)
Title: Re: What's new in Antarctica ?
Post by: Juan C. García on May 06, 2017, 04:11:31 PM
The iceberg would set an interesting set of environmental questions :-
!. Presumeably it would become surrounded with a pool of very cold fresh water to upset the local aquatic life.
2.The cold would strip moisture from the atmosphere, making it even drier, fog might even form?
3. Would the iceberg remain stable during the "mining", or would it topple or even explode?
4. Where do you park it?
5. ??

( I did once use a 2 litre, -20oC ice block as emergency cooling for a marine aquarium with good circulation - it cracked quite loudly and melted fast!)

Suppose that it could work. Do we need to take out ice from Antarctica to make greener the African deserts? To make them cooler on a world in which humanity is still emitting greenhouse gases?

They are talking about having infrastructure to make a routine with this icebergs movement!

Hope it will not work, if they try it!
Title: Re: What's new in Antarctica ?
Post by: ghoti on May 06, 2017, 04:46:24 PM
Towing icebergs for fresh water is a zombie idea that comes up regularly and never pans out. Here's an article from 2011 about it...
https://www.theatlantic.com/technology/archive/2011/08/the-many-failures-and-few-successes-of-zany-iceberg-towing-schemes/243364/]
[url]https://www.theatlantic.com/technology/archive/2011/08/the-many-failures-and-few-successes-of-zany-iceberg-towing-schemes/243364/ (http://[url)[/url]
Title: Re: What's new in Antarctica ?
Post by: Juan C. García on May 09, 2017, 11:07:40 PM
Towing icebergs for fresh water is a zombie idea that comes up regularly and never pans out. Here's an article from 2011 about it...

[url]https://www.theatlantic.com/technology/archive/2011/08/the-many-failures-and-few-successes-of-zany-iceberg-towing-schemes/243364/]https://www.theatlantic.com/technology/archive/2011/08/the-many-failures-and-few-successes-of-zany-iceberg-towing-schemes/243364/]
[url]https://www.theatlantic.com/technology/archive/2011/08/the-many-failures-and-few-successes-of-zany-iceberg-towing-schemes/243364/ (http://[url=https://www.theatlantic.com/technology/archive/2011/08/the-many-failures-and-few-successes-of-zany-iceberg-towing-schemes/243364/)[/url]

Thanks for the answers, Ghoti and FredBear!  ;)
Title: Re: What's new in Antarctica ?
Post by: sidd on May 11, 2017, 06:52:20 PM
Hellmer et al: Filchner-Ronne in jeopardy, as Hellmer had previously pointed out, he now puts timeframe on the cold-cavity to warm cavity transition.

"Derivatives of Circumpolar Deep Water are directed southward underneath the Filchner–Ronne Ice Shelf, warming the cavity and dramatically increasing basal melting ... The process is irreversible with a recurrence to twentieth-century atmospheric forcing and can only be halted through prescribing a return to twentieth-century basal melt rates. This finding might have strong implications for the stability of the Antarctic ice sheet."

"Our experiments indicate that the link between the hydrography on the southern Weddell Sea continental shelf and melt rates beneath the Filchner–Ronne Ice Shelf is controlled by a positive feedback mechanism: Once the reversal of the near-bottom density gradient across the Filchner Trough, together with a rising coastal thermocline, facilitates the direct inflow of the slope current into the trough, warm deep water flushes the ice shelf cavity, causing its warming, enhanced basal mass loss, and a vigorous outflow of glacial meltwater. The latter further freshens the shelf water and thus maintains a density and flow structure at the sill that supports further access of warm water to the ice shelf cavity. The increase in basal melting accelerates the cavity circulation, drawing in even more warm water of open ocean origin—a self-intensifying mechanism. Although the initial trigger for this transition is freshening on the continental shelf as a result of atmosphere–ocean interactions, once the system is in the warm-shelf phase, the only way to stop the inflow of the warm water is to return to twentieth-century atmospheric conditions and to reduce the meltwater input. At first, the latter could be realized by a reduction in the floating portion of the ice sheet. However, the resulting loss of buttressing of the inland ice sheet would accelerate the draining ice streams. The discharge of ice from the relevant catchment basin and a significant contribution to global sea level will be inevitable."

doi: 10.1175/JCLI-D-16-0420.1

open access. Read all about it.

sidd

Title: Re: What's new in Antarctica ?
Post by: sidd on May 11, 2017, 07:18:59 PM
An addendum to my previous comment:

Amundsen Sea glaciers are already destabilized. Filchner Ronne to go around 2070. Wonder how soon until the Ross goes, unleasing threeway attack on WAIS, and eventual open water communication as there once was. That recalled bryozoan data,  cf Vaughn(2011) doi:10.1029/2011GC003688 , also open access, read all about it. That paper says, hopefully,

"Continued ice-loss at present rates would open seaways between Amundsen and Weddell seas (A-W), and Amundsen and Bellingshausen seas (A-B), in around one thousand years. "

I think the timescale might be an order of magnitude faster. Ominously:

" ...  we conclude that opening could have occurred in MIS 5e (100 ka BP) when Antarctica was warmer than present and likely contributed to global sea levels higher than today."

Thats the Eemian. We are in Eemian temperatures now.

sidd
Title: Re: What's new in Antarctica ?
Post by: TerryM on May 14, 2017, 02:43:39 PM
Towing icebergs for fresh water is a zombie idea that comes up regularly and never pans out. Here's an article from 2011 about it...

[url]https://www.theatlantic.com/technology/archive/2011/08/the-many-failures-and-few-successes-of-zany-iceberg-towing-schemes/243364/]https://www.theatlantic.com/technology/archive/2011/08/the-many-failures-and-few-successes-of-zany-iceberg-towing-schemes/243364/]
[url]https://www.theatlantic.com/technology/archive/2011/08/the-many-failures-and-few-successes-of-zany-iceberg-towing-schemes/243364/ (http://[url=https://www.theatlantic.com/technology/archive/2011/08/the-many-failures-and-few-successes-of-zany-iceberg-towing-schemes/243364/)[/url]


Had a prof in the early 60's that had worked on Habakkuk and was still an enthusiast. Insisted that with chiller equipment aboard all that would be necessary after a bombing would be a fire hose to fill any craters. He was teaching in Hamilton at that time but did have a British accent.


I'd read something a decade or so ago where iceberg cowboys off Newfoundland were grounding them in coves and selling the melt water to a brewery because of it's purity.
Wonder it Cate would know?


Slightly OT, but I believe they mined the Mendenhall Glacier in Alaska for cooling cocktails in San Francisco from the Klondike days.
Terry
Title: Re: What's new in Antarctica ?
Post by: wili on May 17, 2017, 04:07:10 AM
Not sure if this has already been posted somewhere--Al Jazeera has a story on Antarctica:

http://interactive.aljazeera.com/aje/2017/antarctica-voyage/index.html#11 (http://interactive.aljazeera.com/aje/2017/antarctica-voyage/index.html#11)

Title: Re: What's new in Antarctica ?
Post by: wili on May 18, 2017, 05:20:44 PM
And now NYT has started a series on Antarctica as well...I think that's what's called 'trending'!

https://www.nytimes.com/interactive/2017/05/18/climate/antarctica-ice-melt-climate-change.html?hp&action=click&pgtype=Homepage&clickSource=story-heading&module=second-column-region&region=top-news&WT.nav=top-news&_r=0 (https://www.nytimes.com/interactive/2017/05/18/climate/antarctica-ice-melt-climate-change.html?hp&action=click&pgtype=Homepage&clickSource=story-heading&module=second-column-region&region=top-news&WT.nav=top-news&_r=0)
Title: Re: What's new in Antarctica ?
Post by: wili on May 18, 2017, 11:25:59 PM
And now there's a story in the Guardian, for the trifecta!

https://www.theguardian.com/science/2017/may/18/climate-change-is-turning-antarctica-green-say-reseatchers (https://www.theguardian.com/science/2017/may/18/climate-change-is-turning-antarctica-green-say-reseatchers)

 Climate change is turning Antarctica green, say researchers

In the past 50 years the quantity and rate of plant growth has shot up, says study, suggesting further warming could lead to rapid ecosystem changes
Title: Re: What's new in Antarctica ?
Post by: gerontocrat on May 20, 2017, 04:41:10 PM
Couldn't resist this image of the jetstream over Antarctica. An almost perfect outer ring with enormous (Rossby?) waves inside.

Title: Re: What's new in Antarctica ?
Post by: charles_oil on May 21, 2017, 10:05:07 AM

And CNN has picked up on greening too (quiet day in Trumpton for once)


http://edition.cnn.com/2017/05/19/europe/climate-change-antarctica-moss/index.html (http://edition.cnn.com/2017/05/19/europe/climate-change-antarctica-moss/index.html)

Title: Re: What's new in Antarctica ?
Post by: Hyperion on May 26, 2017, 02:25:07 PM
GADZOOKS!

 :o
Title: Re: What's new in Antarctica ?
Post by: Hyperion on June 10, 2017, 03:33:40 PM
Folks. We have a new record 1062 Hecto-pascal's in Antarctica. And in close proximity we have two deep depressions with 942 hecto-pascal centres. Thats a 100 hpa dipole differential. About 1.4 pounds per square inch. The Antarctic polar cell is revving. And Ferrell's are grunting strongly too mr Hadley is looking tame. https://earth.nullschool.net/#2017/06/10/0900Z/wind/isobaric/250hPa/overlay=mean_sea_level_pressure/winkel3=-189.41,-84.08,600/loc=93.006,-83.917
Title: Re: What's new in Antarctica ?
Post by: bairgon on June 23, 2017, 02:09:12 PM
Article on the UK Guardian newspaper website today about the changes in Antarctica and whether they are due to climate change. https://www.theguardian.com/science/2017/jun/23/melting-and-cracking-is-antarctica-falling-apart-climate-change (https://www.theguardian.com/science/2017/jun/23/melting-and-cracking-is-antarctica-falling-apart-climate-change)

Melting and cracking – is Antarctica falling apart?

The answer to these questions is no. Glaciologists are not alarmed about most of these processes; they are examples of Antarctica simply doing what we know Antarctica has done for thousands of years. But because there is a potential link between the ice sheet and climate change, glaciologists are suddenly faced with a situation where the spotlight is on our science on a seemingly daily basis, and every time a crack grows, or a meltstream forms, it becomes news. The situation is a conundrum: we want people to be aware of Antarctica and concerned about what might happen there in the near future as climate changes. But hyping research results to sound like climate change, when they are just improved understanding of natural behaviour, is misleading.

Helen Amanda Fricker is a professor at the Scripps Institution of Oceanography
Title: Re: What's new in Antarctica ?
Post by: charles_oil on June 23, 2017, 11:06:21 PM

... and NSIDC shows Antarctic ice dropping to be the lowest recorded for the date today (June 22nd) by 44,000km2 !

Title: Re: What's new in Antarctica ?
Post by: Hyperion on June 29, 2017, 07:32:43 AM
1066 hpa.  How high can she go? Where she stops nobody knows. Theres even a stream of wet tropical air bombing straight down on EA.
https://earth.nullschool.net/#current/wind/isobaric/250hPa/overlay=mean_sea_level_pressure/orthographic=-268.28,-67.88,297/loc=104.055,-79.101
Title: Re: What's new in Antarctica ?
Post by: AbruptSLR on July 03, 2017, 09:51:50 PM
The linked PBS article/video provides a convenient summary for beginners:

“Antarctica is melting faster than scientists expected”

http://www.pbs.org/newshour/bb/antarctica-melting-faster-scientists-expected/ (http://www.pbs.org/newshour/bb/antarctica-melting-faster-scientists-expected/)


Title: Re: What's new in Antarctica ?
Post by: wili on July 04, 2017, 02:03:23 PM

It’s Raining in Antarctica while Trump slashes Climate Science funding

 by Dahr Jamail at Truth-Out.
http://www.truth-out.org/news/item/41136-it-s-raining-in-antarctica-while-trump-slashes-climate-science-funding (http://www.truth-out.org/news/item/41136-it-s-raining-in-antarctica-while-trump-slashes-climate-science-funding)


parts of Antarctica are literally beginning to turn green, as scientists there are finding a four- to five-fold increase in the amount of moss growth on the ice continent's northern peninsula.

Even more stunning news comes from Antarctica in a study published in the June 15 issue of the journal Nature Communications which revealed that over an area of West Antarctica, scientists were stunned to find rainfall and a melt area larger than the size of Texas in 2016.

Yes, it is now raining in Antarctica.
Title: Re: What's new in Antarctica ?
Post by: gerontocrat on July 05, 2017, 01:51:56 PM
One thing Antarctica gives up is stunning images. Herewith cci-reanalyzer's image of the jet  stream.

Title: Re: What's new in Antarctica ?
Post by: sidd on July 05, 2017, 11:30:35 PM
Hillenbrand (2017) doi:10.1038/nature22995

"Here we present a multi-proxy data based reconstruction of variability in CDW inflow to the Amundsen Sea sector, the most vulnerable part of the West Antarctic Ice Sheet, during the Holocene epoch (from 11.7 thousand years ago to the present). The chemical compositions of foraminifer shells and benthic foraminifer assemblages in marine sediments indicate that enhanced CDW upwelling, controlled by the latitudinal position of the Southern Hemisphere westerly winds, forced deglaciation of this sector from at least 10,400 years ago until 7,500 years ago—when an ice-shelf collapse may have caused rapid ice-sheet thinning further upstream—and since the 1940s"

Nice paper. Ties right in to Smith (2017) doi:10.1038/nature20136

"Here we show that the present thinning and retreat of Pine Island Glacier in West Antarctica is part of a climatically forced trend that was triggered in the 1940s."

The last time PIG did this was 10K to 7.5K BP. Now if you look at Blanchon-2009, supplementary, you can see what the sea level was doing then. I attach fig s3.


sidd
Title: Re: What's new in Antarctica ?
Post by: Juan C. García on July 16, 2017, 11:36:18 PM
The linked PBS article/video provides a convenient summary for beginners:

“Antarctica is melting faster than scientists expected”

http://www.pbs.org/newshour/bb/antarctica-melting-faster-scientists-expected/ (http://www.pbs.org/newshour/bb/antarctica-melting-faster-scientists-expected/)

National Geographic: "The Larsen C Ice Shelf Collapse Is Just the Beginning—Antarctica Is Melting"

http://www.nationalgeographic.com/magazine/2017/07/antarctica-sea-level-rise-climate-change/ (http://www.nationalgeographic.com/magazine/2017/07/antarctica-sea-level-rise-climate-change/)
Title: Re: What's new in Antarctica ?
Post by: sidd on July 28, 2017, 10:08:15 PM
Two papers by Golledge et al, one dealing with Pliocene Antarctica, and the other with EAIS vulnerabilities. The first has a discussion of tipping points in the Pliocene through autocorrelation and variance analysis and some discussion of critical slowing down. The second indicates that the Recovery basin is most vulnerable to Weddel se warming.

Read all about it.

doi:10.5194/cp-13-959-2017

doi:10.1002/2016GL072422

sidd
Title: Re: What's new in Antarctica ?
Post by: Lennart van der Linde on July 31, 2017, 07:45:29 AM
Thanks, sidd.

Golledge et al 2017 on Pliocene say in their abstract:
https://www.clim-past.net/13/959/2017/ (https://www.clim-past.net/13/959/2017/)

"we investigate how Antarctica evolved under orbital and greenhouse gas conditions representative of an interglacial in the early Pliocene at 4.23 Ma, when Southern Hemisphere insolation reached a maximum. Using offline-coupled climate and ice-sheet models, together with a new synthesis of high-latitude palaeoenvironmental proxy data to define a likely climate envelope, we simulate a range of ice-sheet geometries and calculate their likely contribution to sea level. In addition, we use these simulations to investigate the processes by which the West and East Antarctic ice sheets respond to environmental forcings and the timescales over which these behaviours manifest. We conclude that the Antarctic ice sheet contributed 8.6 ± 2.8 m to global sea level at this time, under an atmospheric CO2 concentration identical to present (400 ppm). Warmer-than-present ocean temperatures led to the collapse of West Antarctica over centuries, whereas higher air temperatures initiated surface melting in parts of East Antarctica that over one to two millennia led to lowering of the ice-sheet surface, flotation of grounded margins in some areas, and retreat of the ice sheet into the Wilkes Subglacial Basin. The results show that regional variations in climate, ice-sheet geometry, and topography produce long-term sea-level contributions that are non-linear with respect to the applied forcings, and which under certain conditions exhibit threshold behaviour associated with behavioural tipping points."
Title: Re: What's new in Antarctica ?
Post by: Lennart van der Linde on July 31, 2017, 07:55:36 AM
Golledge et al 2017 on Weddell say:
http://sci-hub.cc/10.1002/2016GL072422 (http://sci-hub.cc/10.1002/2016GL072422)

"we use an ensemble of idealized climates to drive ice-sheet simulations that explore regional and continental-scale thresholds, allowing us to identify a hierarchy of catchment vulnerabilities based on differences in long-term catchment-averaged ice loss. Considering this hierarchy in the context of recent observations and climate scenarios forecast for 2100 CE we conclude that the majority of future ice loss from East Antarctica, both this century and over subsequent millennia, will likely come from the Recovery subglacial basin in the eastern Weddell Sea."
Title: Re: What's new in Antarctica ?
Post by: bairgon on August 13, 2017, 07:43:46 AM
Guardian article: "Scientists discover 91 volcanoes below Antarctic ice sheet"

https://www.theguardian.com/world/2017/aug/12/scientists-discover-91-volcanos-antarctica (https://www.theguardian.com/world/2017/aug/12/scientists-discover-91-volcanos-antarctica)

Scientists have uncovered the largest volcanic region on Earth – two kilometres below the surface of the vast ice sheet that covers west Antarctica.

The project, by Edinburgh University researchers, has revealed almost 100 volcanoes – with the highest as tall as the Eiger, which stands at almost 4,000 metres in Switzerland.
Title: Re: What's new in Antarctica ?
Post by: Dry_Land_Is_Not_A_Myth on August 15, 2017, 04:33:45 AM
Title: Thirty Years After the Montreal Protocol, Solving the Ozone Problem Remains Elusive

Summary: "Despite a ban on chemicals like chlorofluorocarbons, the ozone hole over Antarctica remains nearly as large as it did when the Montreal Protocol was signed in 1987. Scientists now warn of new threats to the ozone layer, including widespread use of ozone-eating chemicals not covered by the treaty."

Meat:
" [DCM (dichloromethane)] it has not been regarded as a threat to the ozone layer, because its typical lifetime in the atmosphere before it is broken down in photochemical reactions is only about five months. It should, atmospheric chemists concluded, remain safely in the lower atmosphere...But that view collapsed"

"DCM...could delay the ozone hole’s recovery by 30 years, until at least 2095"

http://e360.yale.edu/features/thirty-years-after-the-montreal-protocol-solving-the-ozone-problem-remains-elusive (http://e360.yale.edu/features/thirty-years-after-the-montreal-protocol-solving-the-ozone-problem-remains-elusive)

Personal thoughts : Is UV radiation, and its predicted diminishing flux, taken into the modeling of Antarctica ice stability? If so, this summary suggests that this factor will remain stronger longer than expected.
Title: Re: What's new in Antarctica ?
Post by: Daniel B. on August 15, 2017, 03:27:12 PM
Most data shows a lessening of the Antarctic ozone hole, continuing throught this century.  The hole will still fluctuate based on the extent of winter temperatures.

https://www.nature.com/articles/s41598-017-00722-7 (https://www.nature.com/articles/s41598-017-00722-7)

https://www.epa.gov/ozone-layer-protection/current-state-ozone-layer (https://www.epa.gov/ozone-layer-protection/current-state-ozone-layer)

https://www.nasa.gov/feature/Goddard/2016/antarctic-ozone-hole-attains-moderate-size (https://www.nasa.gov/feature/Goddard/2016/antarctic-ozone-hole-attains-moderate-size)

https://www.sciencenews.org/article/antarctica-ozone-hole-top-science-stories-2016 (https://www.sciencenews.org/article/antarctica-ozone-hole-top-science-stories-2016)

Title: Re: What's new in Antarctica ?
Post by: Juan C. García on October 12, 2017, 10:26:06 PM
Washington Post -
Worrying new research finds that the ocean is cutting through a key Antarctic ice shelf

The new study calculates that as a result of this highly uneven melting, the Dotson ice shelf could be melted all the way through in 40 years, rather than 170 years, which would be the time it would take if the melt were occurring evenly. And it speculates that as the thinning continues, the shelf may not go quietly or steadily any longer — something dramatic could occur, such as a breakup.

https://www.washingtonpost.com/news/energy-environment/wp/2017/10/11/alarming-new-research-finds-that-the-ocean-is-cutting-through-a-key-antarctic-ice-shelf/?utm_term=.da94284bfb0f&wpisrc=nl_green&wpmm=1 (https://www.washingtonpost.com/news/energy-environment/wp/2017/10/11/alarming-new-research-finds-that-the-ocean-is-cutting-through-a-key-antarctic-ice-shelf/?utm_term=.da94284bfb0f&wpisrc=nl_green&wpmm=1)
Title: Re: What's new in Antarctica ?
Post by: logicmanPatrick on October 13, 2017, 12:33:09 AM
Hole the Size of Maine Opens in Antarctica Ice

http://news.nationalgeographic.com/2017/10/sea-ice-hole-antarctica-southern-ocean-spd/?utm_source=Twitter&utm_medium=Social&utm_content=link_tw20171011news-icehole&utm_campaign=Content&sf121110519=1 (http://news.nationalgeographic.com/2017/10/sea-ice-hole-antarctica-southern-ocean-spd/?utm_source=Twitter&utm_medium=Social&utm_content=link_tw20171011news-icehole&utm_campaign=Content&sf121110519=1)
Title: Re: What's new in Antarctica ?
Post by: Shared Humanity on October 13, 2017, 06:01:09 PM
Other articles on Dotson ice shelf.

http://www.iflscience.com/environment/an-upsidedown-ice-canyon-in-antarctica-is-slicing-through-an-ice-shelf/ (http://www.iflscience.com/environment/an-upsidedown-ice-canyon-in-antarctica-is-slicing-through-an-ice-shelf/)

http://www.iflscience.com/environment/an-upsidedown-ice-canyon-in-antarctica-is-slicing-through-an-ice-shelf/ (http://www.iflscience.com/environment/an-upsidedown-ice-canyon-in-antarctica-is-slicing-through-an-ice-shelf/)

https://www.livescience.com/60662-upside-down-canyon-antarctic-ice-underside.html (https://www.livescience.com/60662-upside-down-canyon-antarctic-ice-underside.html)
Title: Re: What's new in Antarctica ?
Post by: bligh8 on October 15, 2017, 02:35:57 AM
Penguin catastrophe leaves thousands of chicks dead with only two survivors

“A penguin colony in Antarctica has suffered a massive breeding failure, with only two chicks surviving the disaster.
Terre Adélie (Adélie Land) is home to more than 18,000 pairs of Adélie penguins, but this year almost all the seabirds' babies starved to death, a situation one expert described as "Tarantino does Happy Feet."
The World Wildlife Fund said unseasonably extensive amounts of sea ice around the colony in East Antarctica had forced the adult penguins to travel further than normal to forage for food.”

“Last year, research by oceanographers at the University of Delaware found that 60% of Antarctica's Adélie penguin habitat may become unsuitable for the birds by the end of the 21st century, because of warming seas and rain.”

That statement seems a rather optimistic remark.

http://www.cnn.com/2017/10/13/world/antarctica-penguin-chicks-die/index.html (http://www.cnn.com/2017/10/13/world/antarctica-penguin-chicks-die/index.html)
Title: Re: What's new in Antarctica ?
Post by: Susan Anderson on November 07, 2017, 09:18:39 PM
Don't know if  this is the right place to put this, but in my usual looksee at global temps and patterns at Nullschool, I noticed a number of above freezing temperatures and incursions at the West Antarctic peninsula. I assume this is likely for the time of year, (Nov = May in NH?) but it seemed to be worth sharing. Click for spot temperatures (those greens).
https://earth.nullschool.net/#current/wind/surface/level/overlay=temp/orthographic=-54.33,-82.99,568 (https://earth.nullschool.net/#current/wind/surface/level/overlay=temp/orthographic=-54.33,-82.99,568)
Title: Re: What's new in Antarctica ?
Post by: Shared Humanity on November 08, 2017, 04:27:48 PM
Don't know if  this is the right place to put this, but in my usual looksee at global temps and patterns at Nullschool, I noticed a number of above freezing temperatures and incursions at the West Antarctic peninsula. I assume this is likely for the time of year, (Nov = May in NH?) but it seemed to be worth sharing. Click for spot temperatures (those greens).
https://earth.nullschool.net/#current/wind/surface/level/overlay=temp/orthographic=-54.33,-82.99,568 (https://earth.nullschool.net/#current/wind/surface/level/overlay=temp/orthographic=-54.33,-82.99,568)

Not good given the current state of Larsen C ice shelf.
Title: Re: What's new in Antarctica ?
Post by: Susan Anderson on November 08, 2017, 05:01:21 PM
Interested parties might like to go over to Larsen C article for some gorgeous (depending on how you define gorgeous, if danger can be beautiful) visuals SharedHumanity provided from ClimateReanalyzer (above my trivial response): https://forum.arctic-sea-ice.net/index.php/topic,1175.200.html#lastPost (https://forum.arctic-sea-ice.net/index.php/topic,1175.200.html#lastPost)
Title: Re: What's new in Antarctica ?
Post by: FredBear on November 09, 2017, 12:24:52 PM
In arctic io (08.11.17) ( http://www.arctic.io/explorer/4Xa5A//4-N90-E0 ) above the Brunt ice shelf is large white quadrilateral iceberg which has been rotating along the coastline as it has been moving westward - it may be worth watching to see if it has any effect on Brunt if/when it passes? I saw it travelling last summer and it was frozen into the winter ice just above its present location, with the ice freeing it around 12-14.10.17. (It was above Georg von Neumayer Station on 29.03.2017)
Title: Re: What's new in Antarctica ?
Post by: Daniel B. on November 09, 2017, 03:48:58 PM
Penguin catastrophe leaves thousands of chicks dead with only two survivors

“A penguin colony in Antarctica has suffered a massive breeding failure, with only two chicks surviving the disaster.
Terre Adélie (Adélie Land) is home to more than 18,000 pairs of Adélie penguins, but this year almost all the seabirds' babies starved to death, a situation one expert described as "Tarantino does Happy Feet."
The World Wildlife Fund said unseasonably extensive amounts of sea ice around the colony in East Antarctica had forced the adult penguins to travel further than normal to forage for food.”

“Last year, research by oceanographers at the University of Delaware found that 60% of Antarctica's Adélie penguin habitat may become unsuitable for the birds by the end of the 21st century, because of warming seas and rain.”

That statement seems a rather optimistic remark.

http://www.cnn.com/2017/10/13/world/antarctica-penguin-chicks-die/index.html (http://www.cnn.com/2017/10/13/world/antarctica-penguin-chicks-die/index.html)

That statements seems rather odd and in contrast to the rest of the article.  The article stated that "unseasonably extensive amounts of sea ice around the colony in East Antarctica had forced the adult penguins to travel further than normal to forage for food."  Would it not follow that "warming seas and rain" would result in less extensive amounts of sea, allowing the penguins to travel less than normal?
Title: Re: What's new in Antarctica ?
Post by: Susan Anderson on November 09, 2017, 04:21:58 PM
@FredBaer: your image is of the Arctic. Did you mean to put that here with Antarctica?
Title: Re: What's new in Antarctica ?
Post by: Ajpope85 on November 09, 2017, 06:07:10 PM
Penguin catastrophe leaves thousands of chicks dead with only two survivors

“A penguin colony in Antarctica has suffered a massive breeding failure, with only two chicks surviving the disaster.
Terre Adélie (Adélie Land) is home to more than 18,000 pairs of Adélie penguins, but this year almost all the seabirds' babies starved to death, a situation one expert described as "Tarantino does Happy Feet."
The World Wildlife Fund said unseasonably extensive amounts of sea ice around the colony in East Antarctica had forced the adult penguins to travel further than normal to forage for food.”

“Last year, research by oceanographers at the University of Delaware found that 60% of Antarctica's Adélie penguin habitat may become unsuitable for the birds by the end of the 21st century, because of warming seas and rain.”

That statement seems a rather optimistic remark.

http://www.cnn.com/2017/10/13/world/antarctica-penguin-chicks-die/index.html (http://www.cnn.com/2017/10/13/world/antarctica-penguin-chicks-die/index.html)

That statements seems rather odd and in contrast to the rest of the article.  The article stated that "unseasonably extensive amounts of sea ice around the colony in East Antarctica had forced the adult penguins to travel further than normal to forage for food."  Would it not follow that "warming seas and rain" would result in less extensive amounts of sea, allowing the penguins to travel less than normal?

I don't know if this is the case here, but fresh water has a higher freezing point than sea water and if it's raining, then that fresh water and melting ice water can flow into the ocean and freeze when it hits the cooler ocean water.
Title: Re: What's new in Antarctica ?
Post by: Daniel B. on November 09, 2017, 06:52:16 PM
Penguin catastrophe leaves thousands of chicks dead with only two survivors

“A penguin colony in Antarctica has suffered a massive breeding failure, with only two chicks surviving the disaster.
Terre Adélie (Adélie Land) is home to more than 18,000 pairs of Adélie penguins, but this year almost all the seabirds' babies starved to death, a situation one expert described as "Tarantino does Happy Feet."
The World Wildlife Fund said unseasonably extensive amounts of sea ice around the colony in East Antarctica had forced the adult penguins to travel further than normal to forage for food.”

“Last year, research by oceanographers at the University of Delaware found that 60% of Antarctica's Adélie penguin habitat may become unsuitable for the birds by the end of the 21st century, because of warming seas and rain.”

That statement seems a rather optimistic remark.

http://www.cnn.com/2017/10/13/world/antarctica-penguin-chicks-die/index.html (http://www.cnn.com/2017/10/13/world/antarctica-penguin-chicks-die/index.html)

That statements seems rather odd and in contrast to the rest of the article.  The article stated that "unseasonably extensive amounts of sea ice around the colony in East Antarctica had forced the adult penguins to travel further than normal to forage for food."  Would it not follow that "warming seas and rain" would result in less extensive amounts of sea, allowing the penguins to travel less than normal?

I don't know if this is the case here, but fresh water has a higher freezing point than sea water and if it's raining, then that fresh water and melting ice water can flow into the ocean and freeze when it hits the cooler ocean water.

Maybe, but it seems more likely that the rain would freeze on the colder ice, than the warmer salt water.  Whatever the case, I do not see many projections of expanding sea ice around Antarctica in the coming decades.
Title: Re: What's new in Antarctica ?
Post by: FredBear on November 09, 2017, 07:32:15 PM
@FredBaer: your image is of the Arctic. Did you mean to put that here with Antarctica?
Sorry, I forgot arctic io reverts back to the Arctic, you have to use the drop-down menu on the right, select Antarctica, then add names, then zoom in on the appropriate part of the Weddell Sea. (I don't know how to lift images from the site - and also cannot find the code for the icebergs so I do not know where it originated.)
Title: Re: What's new in Antarctica ?
Post by: johnm33 on November 10, 2017, 10:16:53 AM
Brunt image (https://3c1703fe8d.site.internapcdn.net/newman/gfx/news/hires/2017/imagethehall.jpg) expandable, from https://phys.org/news/2017-10-image-halloween-antarctica-brunt-ice.html
Title: Re: What's new in Antarctica ?
Post by: charles_oil on November 10, 2017, 11:23:58 AM
Is "New Base" on the map where they plan to get to next ?
Title: Re: What's new in Antarctica ?
Post by: FredBear on November 10, 2017, 12:02:41 PM
"New Base" is where they parked Halley VI last year    .    .   .   then twitched about the Halloween crack to the east ('above' in the images). Halloween crack seems to show up on (ant)arctic io for 2017.11.04.
Title: Re: What's new in Antarctica ?
Post by: Susan Anderson on November 10, 2017, 09:54:13 PM
Thanks for explaining FredBaer, I'll try that.

Moving on ...
I've been wanting to post this but was trying to figure out how to make the image smaller using html without success. The simple image editor on the older Macs is gone, and I want to post this without further delay, so I'll come back and fix it later, meanwhile, people can click on it to see the whole thing.

Being a true amateur, I flounder around a bit. I don't know how helpful this might be to anyone, but it just popped up recently via Wunderground comments:
Hot News from the Antarctic Underground NASA Jet Propulsion Lab https://www.jpl.nasa.gov/news/news.php?release=2017-291 (https://www.jpl.nasa.gov/news/news.php?release=2017-291)

(https://www.jpl.nasa.gov/images/earth/20171107/Antarctic-volcano-16.jpg)
Study Bolsters Theory of Heat Source Under West Antarctica

A new NASA study adds evidence that a geothermal heat source called a mantle plume lies deep below Antarctica's Marie Byrd Land, explaining some of the melting that creates lakes and rivers under the ice sheet. Although the heat source isn't a new or increasing threat to the West Antarctic ice sheet, it may help explain why the ice sheet collapsed rapidly in an earlier era of rapid climate change, and why it is so unstable today.

Title: Re: What's new in Antarctica ?
Post by: charles_oil on November 11, 2017, 02:23:32 PM
Thanks Fred - seems odd they saw and marked the tracks from the earlier VI location -  wonder where next !
Title: Re: What's new in Antarctica ?
Post by: Shared Humanity on November 11, 2017, 03:26:18 PM
Thanks for link Susan.
Title: Re: What's new in Antarctica ?
Post by: solartim27 on November 16, 2017, 05:21:02 PM
What's new is actually very old
https://relay.nationalgeographic.com/proxy/distribution/public/amp/2017/11/ancient-fossil-forest-found-antarctica-gondwana-spd
Title: Re: What's new in Antarctica ?
Post by: Grygory on November 16, 2017, 09:08:20 PM
What do you think about this photo (Ross Ice shelf)? - Is a new iceberg created?
http://www.polarview.aq/images/105_S1jpgfull/S1B_EW_GRDM_1SDH_20171115T112359_75CF_S_1.final.jpg
Sorry if this is not the topic
Title: Re: What's new in Antarctica ?
Post by: sidd on December 12, 2017, 01:05:06 AM
Reese et al on vulnerable spots for ice shelf thinning:

doi: 10.1038/s41558-017-0020-x

This is a theoretical study using finite element analysis, so awaits validation by observation. They find that there are certain spots on ice shelves, that when thinned, induce flow acceleration of grounded ice hundreds of kilometers away. They characterize the vulnerability by a "response ratio " . This is " the ratio between the total changes in annual mass flux across all grounding lines to the magnitude of locally applied thinning"

I attach fig 1d showing the Amundsen Sea region. Black is a ratio of 100%

sidd
Title: Re: What's new in Antarctica ?
Post by: Susan Anderson on December 21, 2017, 06:29:02 AM
Very beautiful short flick here, I suspended my usual attitudes and questions and just enjoyed it. Lovely music, and I recommend putting it on full screen (source: my weekly Earth Observatory Newsletter which has all sorts of other goodies in it: https://earthobservatory.nasa.gov/ )

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=_LnH5fx5nyk

There are some interesting and odd things on the youtube collection as well.
Title: Re: What's new in Antarctica ?
Post by: sidd on December 23, 2017, 12:05:18 AM
Campbell et al. have an unsettling result about the Ross shelf. Apparently it will continue thinning this century even absent ocean warming. This is an analysis using surface heights from GLAS and IceSAT and but all they say about the ice model is that it is a "well-tested numerical model of ice shelf flow that simulates both mass and momentum balance responses to various forcings on the ice shelf."

I wonder which one it is.

doi: 10.1002/2017GL075794

sidd
Title: Re: What's new in Antarctica ?
Post by: sidd on December 23, 2017, 08:22:16 AM
In the light of Mercer's warning i look at 0C in antarctica around the solstice in december. So i did today. PIG/Thwaites and Amery-Holmes seem around freezing.

Amery has been worrying me for a long time.

sidd
Title: Re: What's new in Antarctica ?
Post by: Susan Anderson on December 25, 2017, 09:15:35 PM
I'm curious as to what is happening with east Antarctica. As I often do, I've been looking at Nullschool - https://earth.nullschool.net/#current/wind/surface/level/overlay=temp/orthographic=328.21,-93.13,569 (https://earth.nullschool.net/#current/wind/surface/level/overlay=temp/orthographic=328.21,-93.13,569) - and there appears to be quite a bit of warming in the area I think is in the area of Davis Sea and Enderby Land http://nsidc.org/arcticseaicenews/files/2014/07/antarctica_locator_map_nbv_20170213-1002x1024.png (http://nsidc.org/arcticseaicenews/files/2014/07/antarctica_locator_map_nbv_20170213-1002x1024.png)

Is that unusual or is it because summer is really getting starting at the south pole?
Title: Re: What's new in Antarctica ?
Post by: sidd on January 04, 2018, 09:13:43 AM
This post could easily belong on many threads, but i post here because it is a new and beautiful result from WAIS divide ice core. Bereiter et al. have produced a record of mean ocean temperature since the last deglaciation from isotope fractions of noble gases. The timespan is  from 24 kyr. to 7.5 kyr and from 4 Kyr to present. The unfortunate data gap is due to sample rejection. Over most of the data the time resolution is 250 yr.

In the quotes below MOT is mean ocean temperature, LGM is last glacial maximum

"It is interesting to note that since the LGM about the same amount of energy has gone into MOT as into melting grounded ice (Fig. 3b). This is not contradicting the understanding that most of the current anthropogenic warming has been taken up by the ocean ..."

"The warming from 12,750 yr bp to 12,050 yr bp (referred to as YD1) within the Younger Dryas represents the strongest global ocean warming phase within our record. The MOT change rate is 2.5 ± 0.53 mK yr −1 and the corresponding energy uptake (13.8 ± 2.9) × 1e21  J/yr. This unprecedented natural MOT warming rate is comparable to the strong warming since 1997 estimated in ref. 1, but clearly surpasses the estimate therein for the multidecadal trend from 1971 to 2005 ..."

I attach fig 2 because the data shows the pretty agreement between all the different isotope ratio estimates.  I also attach panel a) from fig 3 showing ocean heat uptake. The dashed vertical lines in Fig 3a are the same as in Fig 2 althoug the timescale is from 22 kyr to 7.5 kyr BP (before present, where "present" is taken to mean 1950)

doi: 10.1038/nature25152

sidd

Title: Re: What's new in Antarctica ?
Post by: AbruptSLR on January 09, 2018, 05:33:15 PM
For your edification:

Zhao, L., Moore, J. C., Sun, B., Tang, X., and Guo, X.: Where is the 1-million-year-old ice at Dome A?, The Cryosphere Discuss., https://doi.org/10.5194/tc-2017-269, in review, 2018.

https://www.the-cryosphere-discuss.net/tc-2017-269/

Abstract. Ice fabric influences the rheology of ice, and hence the age/depth profile at ice core drilling sites. We use the depth varying anisotropic fabric suggested by the recent polarimetric measurements around Dome A along with prescribed fabrics ranging from isotropic through girdle to single maximum in a three-dimensional, thermo-mechanically coupled full-Stokes model of a 70 × 70 km2 domain around Kunlun station. This model allows to simulate the near basal ice temperature and age, and ice flow around the location of the Chinese deep ice coring site. Ice fabrics and geothermal heat flux strongly affect the vertical advection and basal temperature which in consequence controls the age profile. Constraining modeled age-depth profiles with dated radar isochrones to 2/3 ice depth, the surface vertical velocity, and also the spatial variability of a radar isochrones dated to 153.3 kyr BP, limits the age of the deep ice at Kunlun to 649–831 kyr, a much smaller range than inferred previously. The simple interpretation of the polarmetric radar fabric data that we use produces best fits with a geothermal heat flux of 55 mWm−2. A heat flux of 50 mWm−2 is too low to fit the deeper radar layers, and a heat flux of 60 mWm−2 leads to unrealistic surface velocities. The modeled basal temperature at Kunlun reaches the pressure melting point with a basal melting rate of 2.2–2.7 mm yr−1. Using the spatial distribution of basal temperatures and the best fit fabric suggests that within 400 m of Kunlun station, 1 million-year old ice may be found 200 m above the bed, and there are large regions where even older ice is well above the bedrock within 1–2 km of the Kunlun station.
Title: Re: What's new in Antarctica ?
Post by: Tealight on January 14, 2018, 02:12:59 AM
A small part of the Ross Ice shelf has calved near Roosevelt Island. Now you can sail around 12 km closer to the South Pole. It also narrows the gap to the existing huge rift.

Nasa Worldview Link: https://go.nasa.gov/2FCpa1R
Title: Re: What's new in Antarctica ?
Post by: Susan Anderson on January 14, 2018, 09:56:44 PM
Fascinating, if scary. Combined with what is going on with PIG (https://forum.arctic-sea-ice.net/index.php/topic,429.msg138777.html#new (https://forum.arctic-sea-ice.net/index.php/topic,429.msg138777.html#new)), a southern "summer" to remember.
Title: Re: What's new in Antarctica ?
Post by: Gray-Wolf on January 15, 2018, 12:00:58 PM
I've been monitoring a huge crack that runs from roosevelt into the centre of the shelf. I spoke with McMurdo back in 09' and they were then putting sensors along the feature to monitor development. This calve opens up the Roosevelt Island end of that fissure
https://worldview.earthdata.nasa.gov/?p=antarctic&l=VIIRS_SNPP_CorrectedReflectance_TrueColor(hidden),MODIS_Aqua_CorrectedReflectance_TrueColor(hidden),MODIS_Terra_CorrectedReflectance_TrueColor,Coastlines&t=2017-12-14&z=3&v=-429312,-1278080,-79616,-1115008
and so may lead to further stresses as the ocean accesses the base there ( if the grounding line is not already there?).
Title: Re: What's new in Antarctica ?
Post by: FredBear on January 15, 2018, 04:20:41 PM
Gray-Wolf: There is also the 'loose tooth' berg half way along the Ross shelf (is it the 'ice' in current nsidc Antarctic maps - I cannot see any sea ice there?), and some fraying of the shelf at the Mt. Erebus end too. The "coastline" marking shows how much the shelf has advanced since (?). Recently nsidc sea ice extent has been trying to catch up (down!) with last year too. Jan 14 2018 view:-

https://worldview.earthdata.nasa.gov/?p=antarctic&l=VIIRS_SNPP_CorrectedReflectance_TrueColor(hidden),MODIS_Aqua_CorrectedReflectance_TrueColor(hidden),MODIS_Terra_CorrectedReflectance_TrueColor,Coastlines&t=2018-01-14&z=3&v=-689065.3881177683,-1434110.2019443244,-339369.38811776834,-1236560.9422758163
Title: Re: What's new in Antarctica ?
Post by: solartim27 on January 16, 2018, 04:56:49 PM
A nice series of pictures and videos from the Swiss Polar Institutes circumnavigation expedition in early 2017.
https://interactive.aljazeera.com/aje/2017/antarctica-voyage/index.html#11
Title: Re: What's new in Antarctica ?
Post by: Yuha on January 16, 2018, 08:38:38 PM
A nice series of pictures and videos from the Swiss Polar Institutes circumnavigation expedition in early 2017.
https://interactive.aljazeera.com/aje/2017/antarctica-voyage/index.html#11

Fascinating, well worth the time to watch it through. Some highlights:
Title: Re: What's new in Antarctica ?
Post by: Susan Anderson on January 16, 2018, 09:16:00 PM
A nice series of pictures and videos from the Swiss Polar Institutes circumnavigation expedition in early 2017.
https://interactive.aljazeera.com/aje/2017/antarctica-voyage/index.html#11

Fascinating, well worth the time to watch it through. Some highlights:

  • Rotten ice under Mertz glacier
  • A brittle star catching a living fish, which has never been observed before.

Indeed, amazing ... takes a while, do view all of it!