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Messages - Susan Anderson

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1
Permafrost / Re: Permafrost general science thread
« on: April 23, 2019, 03:06:30 PM »
A new study says the release of methane and carbon dioxide from thawing permafrost will accelerate global warming and add up to $70tn (£54tn) to the climate bill. Tried to find the article and failed. See summary from the guardian way down below or go to ...https://www.theguardian.com/environment/2019/apr/23/melting-permafrost-in-arctic-will-have-70tn-climate-impact-study

But I did find instead
https://www.nature.com/articles/s41467-018-08.240-4 that shows worrying increases in the temperature of permafrost all over the Arctic

Permafrost is warming at a global scale
Quote
Abstract
Permafrost warming has the potential to amplify global climate change, because when frozen sediments thaw it unlocks soil organic carbon. Yet to date, no globally consistent assessment of permafrost temperature change has been compiled. Here we use a global data set of permafrost temperature time series from the Global Terrestrial Network for Permafrost to evaluate temperature change across permafrost regions for the period since the International Polar Year (2007–2009). During the reference decade between 2007 and 2016, ground temperature near the depth of zero annual amplitude in the continuous permafrost zone increased by 0.39 ± 0.15 °C. .....
Introduction
Carbon release resulting from permafrost degradation will potentially impact the Earth’s climate system because large amounts of carbon previously locked in frozen organic matter will decompose into carbon dioxide and methane. This process is expected to augment global warming by 0.13–0.27 °C by 2100 and by up to 0.42 °C by 2300. Despite this, permafrost change is not yet adequately represented in most of the Earth System Models14 that are used for the IPCC projections for decision makers. One major reason for this was the absence of a standardized global data set of permafrost temperature observations for model validation.
________________________________________________

Melting permafrost in Arctic will have $70tn climate impact - study
Study shows how destabilised natural systems will worsen man-made problem

Quote
Jonathan Watts Global environment editor

The release of methane and carbon dioxide from thawing permafrost will accelerate global warming and add up to $70tn (£54tn) to the world’s climate bill, according to the most advanced study yet of the economic consequences of a melting Arctic.

If nations fail to improve on their current Paris agreement commitments, this feedback mechanism combined with a loss of heat-deflecting white ice will cause a near 5% amplification of global warming and its associated costs, says the paper, which was published on Tuesday in Nature Communications.

The authors say their study is the first to calculate the economic impact of permafrost melt and reduced albedo – a measure of how much light that hits a surface is reflected without being absorbed – based on the most advanced computer models of what is likely to happen in the Arctic as temperatures rise. It shows how destabilised natural systems will worsen the problem caused by man-made emissions, making it more difficult and expensive to solve.

They assessed stocks of CO2 and methane trapped in the permafrost by using samples taken from a depth of three metres at multiple points across the Arctic. These were run through the world’s most advanced climate simulation software in the US and at the UK Met Office to predict how much gas will be released at different levels of warming. Even with supercomputers, the number crunching took weeks because the vast geography and complex climate interactions of the Arctic throw up multiple variables. The researchers then applied previous economic impact models to assess the likely costs.

Permafrost melt is the main concern. Greenhouse gases, which have been frozen below the soil for centuries, have already begun to escape at the current level of 1 degrees Celsius of global heating. So far the impact is small. Ten gigatonnes of CO2 have been released from the ice but this source of emissions will grow rapidly once temperatures rise beyond 1.5C.

On the current trajectory of at least 3C of warming by the end of the century, melting permafrost is expected to discharge 280 gigatonnes of carbon dioxide and 3 gigatonnes of methane, which has a climate effect that is 10 to 20 times stronger than CO2.

This would increase the global cost of destruction, adaptation and emissions reduction by $70tn between now and 2300. This is 10 times higher than the projected benefits from a melting Arctic, such as easier navigation for ships and access to minerals, says the paper.

2
Greenland and Arctic Circle / Re: The Nares Strait thread
« on: April 18, 2019, 06:48:08 PM »
The 'nose' of the largest floe to enter Nares Strait recently is going faster than its tail.  The nose section moved nearly 50 km in one day, while the tail moved 10 km less [i.e., it broke].  (The little island next to the nose, by the way, is Joe Is. [map]  Hans Is. is nearly 70 km downstream, and the channel's width between Hans Is. and the side of Judge Daly Promontory (Elsmere Is.) appears to be less than the width of the nose at its widest.  The tail, of course, is wider still.)

Edit: Floes in Kane Basin and Smith Sound moved 45-50 km between April 16 and 17 DMI images (not pictured).

3
Arctic sea ice / Re: The 2019 melting season
« on: April 17, 2019, 05:59:39 PM »
There has been a major shift in the atmospheric circulation pattern around the Arctic. The ridging which persisted over Alaska in February and March has ended while a strong ridge has set up over Scandinavia. This has allowed for an apparent recovery on the Alaskan side of the Arctic, although the reformed ice is very thin and won't last long. The heat on the Atlantic side won't show large effects on metrics because it is going over thick ice that was piled up at the exit to the Fram strait.

One not so good thing for sea ice about this atmospheric circulation pattern is that the coldest anomaly is focused on Baffin bay with strong north winds down the bay. This will enhance the circulation of warm salty water into the bay along the coast of Greenland and the flow of icy fresh water out of the bay into the Labrador sea. This will favor continued overturning in the Labrador sea and the release of oceanic heat to atmosphere over the far north Atlantic and subpolar seas.

4
Greenland and Arctic Circle / Re: The Nares Strait thread
« on: April 17, 2019, 05:38:20 PM »
Quote
The Nares Strait is, I believe, bordered by extremely hard limestones and dolomites.
This is "true" as far as it goes. 
Here is a partial 'grab' of rock types associated with each group of formations identified on first map from Denmark (yes, lots of dolomite, some of it 'hard') [some great photographs showing examples of outcrops]:
  • ‘Ellesmere Island – Inglefield Land belt’:  used to describe occurrences of the same gneiss, supracrustal and igneous suites on both sides of Smith Sound (Dawes 1988).
  • The Thule Basin is defined by a thick sedimentary-volcanic succession.  K-Ar ages of 676 and 627 Ma
  • Palaeozoic Franklinian Basin
    • Dallas Bugt Formation: Red to purple-brown arkosic sandstones with con-glomerates form the basal strata, overlain by white to pale yellow weathering, crossbedded sandstones, and topped by finer grained sandstones interbedded with green bioturbated mudstones
    • Humboldt Formation: basal fluvial sandstones and conglomerates, are succeeded by cross-bedded, bioturbated, shallow marine clastics of tidal origin, with the upper interbedded sandstone and mudstone
    • Ryder Gletscher Group: carbonate and siliciclastic deposits:  cliff-forming dolomites, crossstratified dolomites, hard grey dolomite, grey dolomites, with some thin silty horizons, mottled lime mudstones with silty laminations and horizons, together with dolomite-filled burrows and small mounds, locally dolomitised burrowed lime mudstones and minor conglomerates with some interbeds of grey, often glauconitic, calcareous finegrained sandstones; in the south-west glauconitic sandstones and siltstones dominate, with some more resistant limestone beds, uniform and hard, locally dolomitised oolitic limestone, bedded platy lime mudstone with silty laminae, and laterally extensive beds of intraformational flat-pebble conglomerate, massive thin bedded dolomites, stromatolitic mounds, siltstones and bituminous limestones, grainstones and white, brown-weathering sandstones, cliff-forming, burrow-mottled, grey lime mudstones with subordinate intermixed stromatolitic to thrombolitic limestones, sponge mounds and flat-pebble conglomerates, shaly dolomites, laminated lime mudstones and shales with both algal and wave-formed lamination, and dolomitic sandstones. Conspicuous beds of laminated to massive anhydrite and gypsum.
    • Morris Bugt Group: cliff-forming dolomitic limestones, with one distinctive recessive argillaceous unit
    • Washington Land Group: reef-derived deposits, lime mudstones, dolomitic limestones, dolomites and resedimented limestone conglomerates, together with subsidiary siltstones and shales.
    • Peary Land Group: siltstone and sandstone turbidites

The second map is from a Geologic Map of the Arctic from Canada with a few place names added in red.  A plate-boundary transverse fault (with complications) runs through the Strait.

5
Greenland and Arctic Circle / Re: Greenland 2019 Melt Season
« on: April 17, 2019, 11:07:05 AM »
http://polarportal.dk/en/greenland/surface-conditions/ as at 16 April 2019

I was wrong - again. The melting event has persisted into the 16th April.
Quote
The 13th April melting event has continued to 15th April, only a little one but a bit stronger on the 15th. It may well be the last such event for at least 10 days

6
Arctic background / Re: Barneo 2019
« on: April 17, 2019, 04:14:08 AM »
Videos of the ice this year looked bad when they first landed. I'm not surprised they called it off. I wonder if the political haggling was an excuse to fog the reality that the ice wasn't suitable for occupation this year.

7
Antarctica / Re: PIG has calved
« on: April 14, 2019, 06:36:31 PM »
Very late in the season for an optical image but here it is. With a solar elevation of just 1.45 degrees (IIRC that is just three solar disks), the shadowed cracks are shown in exquisite detail.

Notice that the pair of major cracks are getting accompanied by a couple more to the right. This is a new feature, these new ones are not visible on a similar image 9 days older.

Uploaded in the native 15m/pix resolution, you must click the image for the better view.

8
I'm a Bernie supporter, Neven.

Did Bernie pass your test yet ?

No, not yet. And if he doesn't, it's because he has to pander to people like you, or because he's compromised. It's not easy to do what he's trying to do in a fascist deep state, with such a large part of the population brainwashed by corporate mainstream media.

Have you considered the possibility that maybe it's not the mainstream media and the entire population of the USA, but instead YOU are the one who is brainwashed ?

I mean "fascist deep state" ?
Are you serious ?

9
Arctic sea ice / Re: 2019 sea ice area and extent data
« on: April 06, 2019, 08:19:58 AM »
JAXA ARCTIC EXTENT : 13,090,953 km2(April 5, 2019)

- Extent lowest in the satellite record for 7 days in a row.
- Extent loss on this day 41k, 0 k more than the average loss of 41 k on this day.
- Extent loss from maximum 1,180k, 727 k (161%) greater than the average of 453k loss from maximum by this day,
- On average 4.6% of the melting season done, with 161 days to average date of minimum (13 September)

The Perils of Projections.
Average remaining melt would give a minimum of 3.66 million km2, 2nd lowest in the satellite record, and 0.48 million km2 above the 2012 low of 3.18 million km2. Incidentally, 2012 extent on this day was 1.275 million km2 GREATER THAN 2019. The current position does not necessarily reflect the final result.

For the last 7 days ice extent has written on a previously unused part of the graph paper. It looks very much if this will continue for at least 2 weeks longer.

Other Stuff
GFS indicates that overall the Arctic temperature anomaly will gradually drift down from a +5.5 today to around +3 over the next 10 days.

Will extent loss also gradually moderate (or will it just keep on going, or be cold enough for a refreeze in e.g. the Kara and Laptev seas)?

ps: I have added 2016 (and 2017 for completeness) to the total extent graph as 2016 is mostly the front-runner for the next month or two.

10
Arctic sea ice / Re: Arctic Image of the Day
« on: April 03, 2019, 03:07:03 PM »
Polar bears sparring while a wolf walks by


11
I agree that the IPCC has mishandled uncertainty and the carbon budgets are based on false confidence. The IPCC has ignored processes that have been identified but not well quantified. There may be processes not yet discovered. What we have learned between each iteration of the IPCC reports has tended to discover that the climate is more sensitive to GHGs than previously estimated.

A better handling of uncertainty would lead to less confidence in budgets and more urgency for action because the uncertainties skew towards higher impacts of GHGs on climate change.

12
The rest / Re: How Educated are we as a Forum
« on: March 31, 2019, 01:56:06 PM »
Though educational attainment is crudely associated with knowledge, that is at best a very crude estimator.

Advanced education tends to focus on narrowly defined areas of expertise. It is all too common for experts in very narrowly defined areas to be woefully uninformed in broader areas of knowledge.

Also, knowledge is not synonymous with wisdom, insight or vision.

you nail it quite spot on, after i first studied economics i later did philosophy and the best thing i ever did was to study atrophysics at a relatively high age. it is crucial to drop self-importnance to be open and less biased and limited in mind (i say less, not NOT LOL) of course failure is a daily thing while as long as we learn (as quickly as possible) from mistakes, failure is education and a must, at least when considering that we're barely born wise or took in wisdom with baby food.

narrow views and the likes is a huge problem, one can solve HIS problem and as a side-effect destroy spaceship earth (as it happens) we call them "Fachidioten" quite spot on somehow.

Thing is that masses tend to treat each new breakthrough like a mantra, making it a religion which pust all those single and disconnected finds to high in rating and allow for abuse and narrow minded solutions.

There is quite of bit of truth to this.  These breakthroughs then fall into groupthink, whereby everyone researching the breakthrough contributes to the current thinking, with very few daring to challenge the new mantra. 

13
The rest / Re: How Educated are we as a Forum
« on: March 31, 2019, 11:56:41 AM »
Though educational attainment is crudely associated with knowledge, that is at best a very crude estimator.

Advanced education tends to focus on narrowly defined areas of expertise. It is all too common for experts in very narrowly defined areas to be woefully uninformed in broader areas of knowledge.

Also, knowledge is not synonymous with wisdom, insight or vision.

you nail it quite spot on, after i first studied economics i later did philosophy and the best thing i ever did was to study atrophysics at a relatively high age. it is crucial to drop self-importnance to be open and less biased and limited in mind (i say less, not NOT LOL) of course failure is a daily thing while as long as we learn (as quickly as possible) from mistakes, failure is education and a must, at least when considering that we're barely born wise or took in wisdom with baby food.

narrow views and the likes is a huge problem, one can solve HIS problem and as a side-effect destroy spaceship earth (as it happens) we call them "Fachidioten" quite spot on somehow.

Thing is that masses tend to treat each new breakthrough like a mantra, making it a religion which pust all those single and disconnected finds to high in rating and allow for abuse and narrow minded solutions.

14
Antarctica / Re: What's new in Antarctica ?
« on: March 29, 2019, 12:24:03 PM »
The ice-free days project by Tealight's Avatar Nico Sun also shows so well the marked change in Antarctica over the last 4 years.

(I wish I had a computer half as good as his.)

15
The rest / Re: The Media: Examples of Good AND Bad Journalism
« on: March 29, 2019, 01:08:32 AM »
Bad journalism. Has anybody here changed his opinion on Rachel Maddow in the past couple of months? I used to think she was awesome, but she has sunk so low. Not as low as Keith Olbermann though. That guy lost his mind because of Trump.

Jimmy Dore: "See, with WMDs in Iraq, it actually led to a real war that they wanted. So, it worked. But with Russiagate, ehhh... Well, I guess what they really wanted, was a distraction from the Democrats' loss to Donald Trump, a political novice. and game show host. How did they lose to him? So, it actually did fulfill its purpose."

 

Dore is being obtuse.  We don't have the Mueller report, we have the Barr summary of the report.
Mueller's grand jury is still going on, "robustly."
Many of his investigative leads have been handed off to other prosecutors.
Ratings aren't relevant.  If they were, the Kardashians would be more important than climate change.

The journalists who have been on the various Trump scandals aren't, as I see it, warmongering for war with Russia, they're trying to follow in the footsteps of Woodward and Bernstein.  W+B are seen (rightly, I think) as hero-journalists who were instrumental in bringing down a corrupt and criminal President through dogged, tireless journalism.  A whole generation of journalists were inspired to their profession by that legacy.  If some of these journalists try a bit too hard, I think it's understandable.



16
Science / Re: Earthquakes and climate change
« on: March 21, 2019, 04:35:45 AM »
Strange waves rippled around the world, and nobody knows why

An answer for MrVisible and Terry ...

Mysterious Planetwide Rumble May Have Come From the Largest Underwater Eruption Ever Recorded   
https://gizmodo.com/mysterious-planetwide-rumble-may-have-come-from-the-lar-1833327445

... scientists eventually agreed that it could only have originated from a volcanic event, one involving the movement of a vast volume of magma beneath the seafloor, causing the ground there to significantly deflate.

Now, a new paper by researchers at the French Geological Survey and France’s Ecole Normale Supérieure has been uploaded to the public server EarthArXiv. Although there are plenty of unanswered questions, this first-order estimation of what happened between May and mid-November matches up with the calculations of those geoscientists that took to social media. In fact, the volume of magma involved is so huge that this is certainly one of the largest offshore volcanic events to be spotted by modern scientific instrumentation.

According to the data from the onshore GPS stations, as well as the seismic signals—including the weird November 11 event—the rumbling is definitely being generated by volcanic activity of some sort. The way the ground on Mayotte is moving implies that the seafloor off its eastern shoreline is sinking at a rate of around 0.4 inches per month. At the same time, Mayotte itself is shifting eastward at a rate of 0.63 inches per month. Both indicate something huge underground is on the move, causing some serious deflation.

The nature of these tremors suggest that the magmatic source is centered at a depth of 16 miles beneath the seafloor. In the first six months of the sequence alone, at least 0.24 cubic miles of magma has shifted around. That’s roughly equivalent to 385 Great Pyramids of Giza. 

There is even an ecological element to the story that’s currently unexplained: the emergence of lots of dead fish offshore from Mayotte.

-----------------------

Point of comparison:

Krakatoa threw into the air nearly 5 cubic miles (21 cubic km) of rock fragments, and large quantities of ash fell over an area of some 300,000 square miles (800,000 square km).

17
Trump Once Again Requests Deep Cuts in U.S. Science Spending
https://www.sciencemag.org/news/2019/03/trump-once-again-requests-deep-cuts-us-science-spending

For the third year in a row, President Donald Trump’s administration has unveiled a budget request to Congress that calls for deep spending cuts at many federal science agencies, including a 13% cut for the National Institutes of Health (NIH) and a 12% cut for the National Science Foundation (NSF), while providing hefty increases for the military.

----------------------

Trump's New Science Adviser Says It's Not His Job to Correct the President on Climate Change 
https://news.vice.com/amp/en_us/article/zma8qe/trumps-new-science-adviser-says-its-not-his-job-to-correct-the-president-on-climate-change

https://medium.com/datadriveninvestor/scientists-put-trump-on-a-turd-and-twitter-freaked-out-620c76772140

19
Antarctica / Re: PIG has calved
« on: March 10, 2019, 09:09:34 PM »
Finally a new Sentinel Picture from March 02 is available. Unfortunately it is not as clear as the 20 Feb or 01 Jan picture. Nevertheless I took the chance to compare it with previous ones.
Main findings:
1. The Pine Island Ice Shelf continues its WNW movement, the SW Tributary moves northward
2. The cracks are almost the same as on Feb 20 or Jan 21.
3. New little cracks are highlighted in yellow.
4. A minor calving has taken place at the merger of PIIS and the SW tributary. The area lost was about 0.3 x 0.1 km, not much of a deal (circled in red)
I took several features and measured their movement. The speed differs from place to place. I calculated them (March 2 minus Dec 28 to have a longer time distance) and wrote them into the picture. Unfortunately the central and eastern part does not present useful features which can be followed easily, therefore there is no data in that region.

See attached picture.

20
Wunderground.com says the USA is going to get a classic slow-moving March storm next week.

https://www.wunderground.com/news/storms/winter/news/2019-03-08-march-system-severe-flooding-snow-wind-west-plains-south

The balance between rain and snow is going to be interesting. The first image from Wunderground shows a lot of area with rain and less with snow. The 2nd image GFS shows more or less the same. The last image shows that warmth in North America is moving North as does the sun.

So my little prediction that belongs to me for North America (NA) is that by next weekend
- a goodly part of the current thin snow cover in the more southerly latitudes of the USA will be gone, i.e. SCE will be heading South (see image 4.png),
- NA-SWE (snow mass) will either be dithering around the max or will show a loss.

21
The rest / Re: The Media: Examples of Good AND Bad Journalism
« on: March 05, 2019, 06:09:35 PM »
The Making of the Fox News White House
https://www.newyorker.com/magazine/2019/03/11/the-making-of-the-fox-news-white-house

Fox News has always been partisan. But has it become propaganda?

In January, during the longest government shutdown in America’s history, President Donald Trump rode in a motorcade through Hidalgo County, Texas, eventually stopping on a grassy bluff overlooking the Rio Grande. The White House wanted to dramatize what Trump was portraying as a national emergency: the need to build a wall along the Mexican border. The presence of armored vehicles, bales of confiscated marijuana, and federal agents in flak jackets underscored the message.

But the photo op dramatized something else about the Administration. After members of the press pool got out of vans and headed over to where the President was about to speak, they noticed that Sean Hannity, the Fox News host, was already on location. Unlike them, he hadn’t been confined by the Secret Service, and was mingling with Administration officials, at one point hugging Kirstjen Nielsen, the Secretary of Homeland Security. The pool report noted that Hannity was seen “huddling” with the White House communications director, Bill Shine. After the photo op, Hannity had an exclusive on-air interview with Trump. Politico later reported that it was Hannity’s seventh interview with the President, and Fox’s forty-second. Since then, Trump has given Fox two more. He has granted only ten to the three other main television networks combined, and none to CNN, which he denounces as “fake news.”

Hannity was treated in Texas like a member of the Administration because he virtually is one. The same can be said of Fox’s chairman, Rupert Murdoch. Fox has long been a bane of liberals, but in the past two years many people who watch the network closely, including some Fox alumni, say that it has evolved into something that hasn’t existed before in the United States. Nicole Hemmer, an assistant professor of Presidential studies at the University of Virginia’s Miller Center and the author of “Messengers of the Right,” a history of the conservative media’s impact on American politics, says of Fox, “It’s the closest we’ve come to having state TV.” ...

----------------------

Fox News’s Propaganda Isn’t Just Unethical — Research Shows It’s Enormously Influential
https://www.vox.com/2019/3/4/18249847/fox-news-effect-swing-elections

Fox’s propaganda broadcasting matters. It’s a somewhat underexplored topic in political science research, but the information that’s available suggests that right-wing propaganda broadcasting — led by Fox but also including Sinclair Broadcast Group — has a decisive influence on American politics.

A study by Emory University political scientist Gregory Martin and Stanford economist Ali Yurukoglu estimates that watching Fox News translates into a significantly greater willingness to vote for Republican candidates. ... they find that if Fox News hadn’t existed, the Republican presidential candidate’s share of the two-party vote would have been 3.59 points lower in 2004 and 6.34 points lower in 2008. Without Fox, in other words, the GOP’s only popular vote win since the 1980s would have been reversed and the 2008 election would have been an extinction-level landslide.

22
Antarctica / Re: PIG has calved
« on: March 03, 2019, 08:27:30 PM »
The clean-up of Pine Island Bay from fast sea ice continues. After about two weeks of cloudiness EOSDIS offered a very clear view on Pine Island Bay.
I marked the missing (comparison with Feb. 04, 2019) areas of fast sea ice in red.
Please also note the big "crack" at the eastern shore of Thwaites Ice tongue. It is no crack, it is just the gap between the ice tongue and the sea ice/iceberg mélange that was pushed towards the ice tongue the last days.
The "green" iceberg in the centre is the biggest remain of the last calving event (Oct 2018). It has moved slightly inland the last days and rotated by around 300° compared to a month ago.
I wonder whether "this will be it" for this melting season, we're approaching equinox in a few weeks.

See attached picture.

23
The rest / Re: Russia, Russia, Russia
« on: February 25, 2019, 03:29:04 PM »
Lots of McCabe interviews around... Colbert's perhaps best:




24
The rest / Re: The Media: Examples of Good AND Bad Journalism
« on: February 22, 2019, 05:20:58 AM »
So, according to the resident troll, Jimmy Dore has now officially defected to Russia Today. (Well, things can always get more hilarious according to Florifulgurator... (*) )

So (again) history. You shure don't want to hear from lesbian atomic war provocing Rachel Maddow, spanning the fathom from GHWB vs. Q to Saudi Arabia (not Russia, but fossil...). Alas leaving out the potatoe [sic] incident...

fuck, yet another category of journalism, meeting history in a Rachel Maddow Venn diagram.


---------------------------
P.S.: For full appreciation of the joke, study Carlo Rovelli's Relational Quantum Mechanics - the possibly best resolution of the Einstein-Podolski-Rosen paradox.

25
The rest / Re: The Media: Examples of Good AND Bad Journalism
« on: February 19, 2019, 09:04:07 PM »
Meanwhile I have a WaPo subscription. The Dave Weigel piece mentioned above has a link to an RT piece and explains why it is BS.
https://www.washingtonpost.com/news/the-fix/wp/2017/05/20/the-seth-rich-conspiracy-shows-how-fake-news-still-works/
Required reading for those who haven't yet sorted out the DNC-Bernie thing - and more evidence for my recent statement here about spreading Trumputin propaganda.
Quotes later.
(my striking out)
The article is incomplete on the DNC-Bernie thing, but that wasn't its purpose anyhow. What is missing is Donna Brazile's leaking of primary debate questions. But that is a nothingburger, too. (Who da thunk someone in Flint MI would ask about lead in water. Who da thunk someone would ask about death penalty. Anyhow the questions came out differently.)

Yet, RT makes a big thing about this frivolous lawsuit by some Berners:

‘Total blackout’: Lawyer suing DNC for fraud speaks out on lack of media coverage
https://www.rt.com/usa/388882-dnc-lawsuit-media-blackout/

-------------------
Another similar thing I might dig out from German RT: The case of Lisa F, an underage German-Russian girl supposedly abducted and raped. That was all over Russian media and sparked demonstrations in Germany by the Russian infiltrated right wing. (The AfD party even had it's crazy party program printed in Russian). German RT recently had a follow-up, to stir that crock again.

Else I simply don't follow RT (and Sputnik) anymore, as I have cleaned my Facebook feeds of trolls and weirdos. I even de-friend real.world friends of mine on FB if necessary.
----------------------------------------------------------------------------


Back to Jimmy Dore. Once I used a swear word on him. Meanwhile the armchair psychiatrist has a diagnosis: Mediocre psychopathy. (*) That might explain why some non-Aspergers find him convincing. Here's is what triggered my finding.

Quoth WaPo's David Weigel:
Quote
Briefly, before Wheeler recanted his story, the Young Turks network's “Jimmy Dore Show” chewed over the revelation that Rich was in contact with WikiLeaks.
(my emph. of the bone of contention.)

Below is Jimmy Dore's reply. Note the exact text of the tweet sarcastically dismissed by Weigel. Dore makes a whole long rant out of it. Great example of projection. https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Psychological_projection

(Yes, Amazon Web Services won a contract with the CIA in the same year Bezos bought the WaPo. But that is an entirely different thing. AWS were simply better than IBM and already widely used by govt. And sure the CIA isn't that stupid to let Bezos read their stuff. They have serious encryption at the very base of the technology.)

Washington Post Reporter Dave Weigel Caught Publicly Lying About Conflicts (Part 1)


It is said that Bezos did some internet-age tech overhaul of the WaPo. The mediocre search engine does not hint at that. And only goes back to 2005. (Where's all the yummy Iraq stuff? :) )

For the following it is good enough. This link gives 60 articles for "bezos cia cloud":
https://www.washingtonpost.com/newssearch/?query=bezos%20cia%20cloud&sort=Date&datefilter=All%20Since%202005&spellcheck
They are obviously not keeping silent about this deal.


--------
(*) http://www.minddisorders.com/Flu-Inv/Hare-Psychopathy-Checklist.html

26
The rest / Re: The Media: Examples of Good AND Bad Journalism
« on: February 18, 2019, 08:10:01 PM »
Jimmy Dore loves BS, fails to check sources and facts:





--------
Meanwhile I have a WaPo subscription. The Dave Weigel piece mentioned above has a link to an RT piece and explains why it is BS.
https://www.washingtonpost.com/news/the-fix/wp/2017/05/20/the-seth-rich-conspiracy-shows-how-fake-news-still-works/
Required reading for those who haven't yet sorted out the DNC-Bernie thing - and more evidence for my recent statement here about spreading Trumputin propaganda.
Quotes later.

27
The forum / Re: Forum Decorum
« on: February 16, 2019, 11:54:39 PM »
"hey,easy there kids. make sure you don't get angry. Don't resort to tribalism. Take some time and listen to the democrats and republicans too. I know it sucks that my generation robbed you of your future, but just make sure you maintain decorum"
So fucken well said!

------------------------

My problem with the polit threads is not the decorum.
(
I am an advocate and activist of violent communication (and I can take a cordial "fuck you"). Some people in the public space can only be convinced by shame. (However, it is a tightrope: Violent communication is only effective when fact based and logical.) That's why there still is climate denialism and inactivism out there: In the last 20 years of climate "debate" I heard/read the wörd "bullshit" only one single time...
)

What irks me in the polit forums are the low standards of evidence and truth exhibited by some, incl. Neven. And the radical oversimplification of things (most often from Neven). This isn't about theory (Neven) vs. pragmatism (Martin). Oversimplified theories don't work, period, just like overcomplex theories. And more: the tolerance of bullshit and of known bullshit sources (like Russia Today). Who bullshits in science is dead as a scientist. Not so in the polit forums.

What is desperately needed in today's world is to try to apply the standards of scientific discourse to polit disourse.

---------------------
Apropos Valentine's Day,


28
The forum / Re: Arctic Sea Ice Forum Humor
« on: February 15, 2019, 01:02:36 PM »
https://www.theguardian.com/commentisfree/2019/feb/15/this-is-literally-the-biggest-news-story-in-the-world

This is literally the biggest news story in the world
First Dog on the Moon

It is with deep regret Brenda the Civil Disobedience penguin must inform you:
this is it folks, it’s over


Note how First Dog gets it right - Climate Change is the coup de grâce that finishes the job of extermination of the web of life.
__________________________________________________________________________
Borrowed directly from French and first appearing in English at the end of the 17th century, "coup de grâce" (literally, a "stroke of grace" or "blow of mercy") originally referred to a mercy killing, or the act of putting to death a person or animal who was severely injured and unlikely to recover.
___________________________________________________________________________

29
A "new" development at Zachariae Isstrøm, at least for me, I have not seen or read anything about the stream in the southern part of Zachariae Isstrøm before, I named it Zydstrømmen (it should have been Sydstrømmen in Danish, but I picked the Z as in Zachariae instead).
I can see from old satelite data that it started as a noticeable stream in the early 2000s, but you may have more to add?   

30
The rest / Re: The Media: Examples of Good AND Bad Journalism
« on: February 01, 2019, 09:53:31 PM »
This is much better than the average Russiagate-New-Cold-War-McCarthyite hysteria.

31
Antarctica / Re: PIG has calved
« on: February 01, 2019, 07:36:47 PM »
No problem, you're welcome   :)

32
Antarctica / Re: PIG has calved
« on: February 01, 2019, 06:27:31 PM »
This has been posted before in the Thwaites Glacier thread - Neven, could you remove this posting into the right thread? Thanks.

33
The forum / Re: Arctic Sea Ice Forum Humor
« on: February 01, 2019, 03:00:06 PM »
...

34
Antarctica / Re: What's new in Antarctica ?
« on: January 28, 2019, 10:14:52 AM »
What a waste of resources, but I guess this is what makes us human.  :)

35
The rest / Re: The Media: Examples of Good AND Bad Journalism
« on: January 18, 2019, 07:09:20 AM »
And no, Neven, the Integrity Initiative for which Dan writes is NOT "covert", and neither is it "warmongering" or "parasite" as you suggest.

In fact, it's wide open and clear in its objectives.

https://www.integrityinitiative.net/

They openly state that they counter dis-information and propaganda, and they have plenty of articles that debunk dis- and mis-information. Mostly from Russia, since that's where most dis-information comes from nowadays.

And judging by the amount of Russian attack articles against them (on Sputnik and RT and sites from the PropOrNot list), they are doing something right.

36
The rest / Re: The Media: Examples of Good AND Bad Journalism
« on: January 18, 2019, 07:07:39 AM »
Kaszeta needs to make clear that he gets paid for that kind of stuff by covert organisations that get paid millions to fuel conflicts with Russia...

And here, my friends, is where the founder of the ASIF sounds exactly like the number one climate science denier and ClimateGate keeper : Stephen McIntyre, in their attack on fact-checkers like (Bellingcat's) Dan Kaszeta.

Just so you know.

37
The rest / Re: The Media: Examples of Good AND Bad Journalism
« on: January 18, 2019, 05:29:13 AM »
Ähmm what I wanted to suggest, seriously: Extend the topic to Good, Bad, and Bullshit journalism.
(For many years I suggested usage of that wörd in climate debate. It took poor Al Gore two Martinis to utter the wörd in closed session at Aspen. Then I stopped listening and suggesting.)


The neocons are full of paleo con men like McIntyre. Funny how some flowerpower people love to jump on their clown bus.

---------
Apropos: Flowers to Susan :)

P.S.:


38
The rest / Re: The Media: Examples of Good AND Bad Journalism
« on: January 18, 2019, 05:06:06 AM »
My last comment about Jimmy Dore may have been a bit over the top. Now (f...!) I won't apologize as planned (as I don't very seriously think Jimmy is a professional bullshitter - but sometimes an impression needs be told...).

But McIntyre definitely is 8) Ask e.g. Michael Mann. This source is truely toxic (not just a bit naive like Dore), a long rotten hopeless brain, thus no neurons or hormones should be wasted on any of its output.


39
The rest / Re: The Media: Examples of Good AND Bad Journalism
« on: January 17, 2019, 10:57:04 AM »
McIntyre posted an invoice sent by Kaszeta’s firm, Strongpoint Security, billing II’s parent organization, the Institute for Statecraft, for about $800 for an article penned by the man.

This reminds me of ClimateGate.
McIntyre once again relies on hacked documents, and uses them to smear his opponents.

In this case it was about this article by Kaszeta :
<no links to climate risk denier sites or to manipulating warmongering parasite sites, thanks; N.>

Which is a pretty good article, showing that Russia's alternate theories, about what happened to the Skripals, are pretty absurd.

40
The rest / Re: The Media: Examples of Good AND Bad Journalism
« on: January 17, 2019, 10:36:02 AM »
Global warming will happen faster than we think

Three trends will combine to hasten it, warn Yangyang Xu, Veerabhadran Ramanathan and David G. Victor.

https://www.nature.com/articles/d41586-018-07586-5

Prepare for the “new abnormal”. That was what California Governor Jerry Brown told reporters last month, commenting on the deadly wildfires that have plagued the state this year. He’s right.

California’s latest crisis builds on years of record-breaking droughts and heatwaves. The rest of the world, too, has had more than its fair share of extreme weather in 2018. The Lancet Countdown on health and climate change announced last week that 157 million more people were exposed to heatwave events in 2017, compared with 2000.

41
The rest / Re: The Media: Examples of Good AND Bad Journalism
« on: January 17, 2019, 10:31:32 AM »
Thank you, Susan.

When Neven says :

Quote
Thanks for re-iterating your opinions, Susan. Let's get back on-topic now.

I think what he is trying to say is that as long as we stay on topic, it's now OK to post opinions that differ from his.

Which would be a great relief.

No more stuff like this :

Quote
So, I would kindly ask you to go find some other place to do your thing. I think it would be better for you, and it would definitely be a lot better for me, because it's wearing me out and I don't want to quit this project just yet.

or stuff like this :

Quote
.... if you can't even admit something as simple as George Bush being a war criminal, it may be best that you start looking for a forum that is more to your liking, or at least restrict your presence to the Arctic Sea Ice board. I think it would be better for you, and it would definitely be less tiresome and depressing for me.
https://forum.arctic-sea-ice.net/index.php/topic,617.msg183118.html#msg183118

So, I think we are good to go.

Thank you, Neven !

42
The rest / Re: The Media: Examples of Good AND Bad Journalism
« on: January 15, 2019, 10:03:00 AM »
The point is, whether you are using or being used, be careful not to let your hatreds eat you alive, as you execute the agenda of those who wish to destroy and sow chaos, rather than work together to solve problems.

That's what I've been trying to get through to Rob again and again.

Seriously, Neven ?

I was the one pointing out that Bernie stated to "Bring people together" while you are the one "kicking Democrats out". Remember ?

There is even a thread about it.

43
The rest / Re: The Media: Examples of Good AND Bad Journalism
« on: January 15, 2019, 09:56:17 AM »
Rob, I'm not going through the same motions again, and I'm not booting anyone out.

True. You are not booting anyone out directly. Yet you are making it clear that people on the side of reason are no longer welcome on the ASIF, while Russian propagandists are.

Quote
Everyone is free to use the only really useful category on this forum: Cryosphere. The ghostbusting can be done everywhere else on the Internet.

Sure. Then why do the Lurk's and the Red's and the Terry's of several shades continue to spread their Russian propaganda on this forum, while people holding a more level-headed, evidence-based opinion are chased off the forum by you ?

Quote
Mainstream, neoliberal/neocon thinking has a firm grip in most places, so you really have nothing to complain

That starts to sound like a conspiracy theory.

Quote
(except of course that it's not going to solve AGW, but you don't see the connection).

Of course selecting one commenter over another is not going to solve AGW.

AGW is going to be solved by people making wise decisions, and politicians allowing renewable energy to thrive.

We'll get there with or without you selectively discouraging people to post on certain threads on the ASIF.

44
The rest / Re: The Media: Examples of Good AND Bad Journalism
« on: January 14, 2019, 08:54:13 AM »
<snip, I've decided not to go through the same motions>

Martin, maybe you haven't noticed, but ever since I've taken some measures to limit the amount of space mainstream conditioned thinking gets to take up on this forum, the belligerent bitching has been reduced by 90%. I really like it that way, much more quiet and interesting. Things have improved massively.

It's not that you have "taken some measures".
It's that a fair amount of commenters (including me) left, after we were told in no uncertain terms that our input on the ASIF was no longer appreciated.
And yes, that cleared up things tremendously, since now only the pro-Russia crowd is left over.
They are still promoting Jimmy Dore and RT, as you can see above.

It's just that there is no more push-back against that Russian propaganda.

Quote
This place can do without missionaries who impose their worn-out, 20th century narratives that come straight out of the divide-and-conquer strategies pushed by concentrated wealth (irrespective of nationality) to keep the wars and AGW going strong, because this Forum is about Arctic sea ice loss, not about politics.

You know, Neven : this hurts.

I came here in 2011, while fighting the deniers at WUWT, hoping to find here a crowd that was using evidence-based reasoning and science to come to conclusions about AGW and Arctic Sea Ice decline.

I feel extremely strong about AGW. Probably even more so than you do. But I approach the problem and the solution from a scientific, and engineering and economics point of view. For example : Solar farms make sense, and solar roads don't. Shutting down coal plants make sense, and so does installing grid batteries, but geo-engineering doesn't make sense, and neither does the Keystone XL (tar-sands) pipeline.

And yes, I feel very strong about Russia too. Russia has no business invading in Ukraine, and their role in the downing of MH17 cannot be denied, and neither can their meddling in foreign elections, including the US 2016 elections, and neither can we deny the poisoning of the Skripals in the UK nor the Russian bombing of hospitals in Syria.

I'm really sorry you disagree with me and some other posters here (like Martin, Susan, ASLR, Bob Wallace etc) on some issues.

But I think you are making a big mistake in booting these fine people out.

Instead, you could have booted out the Russian propagandists that we argued with.
That would have quieted down the discussion too.

45
Antarctica / Re: PIG has calved
« on: January 02, 2019, 12:11:30 PM »
Another calving in preparation ?
A big central crack appears to be opening, quite visible on this sharp image :
https://www.polarview.aq/images/105_S1jpgfull/S1B_IW_GRDH_1SSH_20181230T043510_02A2_S_1.final.jpg

46
The forum / Re: Arctic Sea Ice Forum Humor
« on: January 01, 2019, 02:37:01 PM »

48
The rest / Re: Russia, Russia, Russia
« on: December 21, 2018, 11:27:40 PM »
This stuff gets more crazy by the day...  ???

49
Greenland and Arctic Circle / Re: Greenland 2018 melt season
« on: August 14, 2018, 12:05:00 PM »
https://www.dmi.dk/en/groenland/maalinger/greenland-ice-sheet-surface-mass-budget/

As at 13 August 2018

Melt still high - down to 37% from 40% and not much precipitation giving another above average SMB loss.

The outlook on temperatures from now looks like warm fringes but a cold interior that will limit but not completely stop melting. And very little precipitation forecast for the next ten days. So maybe SMB will reduce a little bit more.

50
The rest / Re: The Trump Presidency (was "Presidential Poll")
« on: August 13, 2018, 01:27:33 AM »
I think that this video from February 2018 is worth watching:

Title: "DAVID CAY JOHNSTON: LIVING IN TRUMP'S AMERICA"



Extract: "In his new book, It’s Even Worse Than You Think, Johnston is going where the media won’t—into the weeds—to shed new light on the Trump administration’s policies and bureaucratic choices and how they will change America. Join Johnston for a revealing conversation about the Trump administration’s impact on our finances, health care, safety and much, much more."

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