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1
Arctic sea ice / Re: Annual temperatures in the Arctic
« on: February 22, 2017, 04:09:55 PM »
Mean annual surface air temperature (MAAT) anomaly 70-90oN compared to the WMO normal period 1961-1990, as estimated by Hadley CRUT. HadCRUT4 temperature data from the Climatic Research Unit (CRU) has been used to prepare the diagram. The number of high latitude meteorological stations is low in the early part of the 20th century, but increased from 1923 and especially 1933. Last year shown: 2016. Latest update: 20 January 2017.

http://climate4you.com/

2
Arctic sea ice / Re: Annual temperatures in the Arctic
« on: February 17, 2017, 09:30:58 AM »
Siberia.

3
Arctic sea ice / Re: Annual temperatures in the Arctic
« on: February 17, 2017, 09:27:34 AM »
The western part of the Russian Arctic.

4
Arctic sea ice / Re: Annual temperatures in the Arctic
« on: February 17, 2017, 09:25:50 AM »
Svalbard and northern Norway.

5
Arctic sea ice / Re: Annual temperatures in the Arctic
« on: February 17, 2017, 09:24:45 AM »
Iceland.

6
Arctic sea ice / Re: Annual temperatures in the Arctic
« on: February 17, 2017, 09:23:45 AM »
Alaska.

7
Arctic sea ice / Re: Annual temperatures in the Arctic
« on: February 17, 2017, 09:22:32 AM »
Canada.

8
Arctic sea ice / Re: Annual temperatures in the Arctic
« on: February 17, 2017, 09:21:20 AM »
In the GISS base added 2016 year. Current сharts annual temperatures for different regions of the Arctic.

Greenland.

9
Strangely, they think GIPS2 contrary colder current station.

Quote
[11] To place the Greenland temperature proxy reconstruction into a historical context, we incorporate two additional Summit temperature records. One record is obtained from a compilation of Summit Automatic Weather Station ∼2 m surface air temperature (SAT) observations (hereafter AWS or in-situ record) that spans 23 years (1987–2010). The AWS were situated within 20 km of the GISP 2 coring site and within 25 m elevation of the ice sheet topographical summit (Figure 1, top, red line). The series begins in May 1987 with Automatic Weather Station data after Stearns and Weidner [1991]. Shuman et al. [2001] merge this record with data from the Greenland Climate Network (GC-Net) AWS data [Steffen and Box, 2001] to produce the first 12 years of this compilation. Gaps before June 1996 are in-filled using daily passive microwave emission brightness temperatures. GC-Net data then comprise the period spanning June 1996 to December 2003 with gaps in-filled by Danish Meteorological Institute (DMI) Summit AWS data [Vaarby-Laursen, 2010]. The DMI data exclusively form this data series from January 2004 through December 2010.

10
Today I found another paper on the topic of temperature reconstructions from GISP2.

http://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/10.1029/2011GL049444/full
High variability of Greenland surface temperature over the past 4000 years estimated from trapped air in an ice core
Quote
The current decadal average surface temperature (2001–2010) at the GISP2 site is −29.9°C.

It is unclear why they have different values of current temperature?


11
Some difference between the two indicators (the temperature reconstruction of the core and summit melt frequency) may be due to the fact that summer in the Northern Hemisphere is now warming slower than average annual temperatures. Past warming were caused by astronomical factors (Milankovitch cycles).
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Milankovitch_cycles

Summit melt frequency in West Antarctica is reversed.
http://www.whoi.edu/cms/files/DasAlley2008_31763.pdf
Rise in frequency of surface melting at Siple Dome through the Holocene: Evidence for increasing marine influence on the climate of West Antarctica.

12
But is it an apples to apples comparison. In other words, what are the difficulties when splicing current temps to that graph?

Another important indicator is the number of years with the melting on the Summit.

http://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/10.1002/grl.50456/pdf

Quote
The brief record surface melt in July 2012, which extended over the traditional dry snow facies, including Summit, was unprecedented during the satellite era [Nghiem et al., 2012]. Prior to this event, the most recent melt event at Summit occurred in 1889, which was one of only eight such events to have occurred in the past ~1500 years [Clausenet al., 1988; Meese et al., 1994]. Summit melt frequency has varied throughout the Holocene, ranging from once per ~82 years from 5500 to 8500 BP, to once per ~250 years from 1000 to 4000 BP [Alley and Anandakrishnan, 1995].

http://blog.hotwhopper.com/2016/01/greenland-really-has-been-melting-can.html




13
Also some statistics. The warmest years at the top of Greenland were 2010 and 2016. Then was -25,6 и -26,2 С.

14
In addition, probably modern temperature is slightly higher than on my chart as the current station (Summit) is a little colder drilling locations (GISP2).

The distance between them is less than a kilometer.

http://berkeleyearth.lbl.gov/stations/155346
SUMMIT
Latitude:   72.5830 ± 0.0005 N
Longitude:   38.4500 ± 0.0005 W
Elevation:   3,207.00 ± 0.05 m

http://berkeleyearth.lbl.gov/stations/14820
GISP2
Latitude:   72.5800 ± 0.0050 N
Longitude:   38.4600 ± 0.0050 W
Elevation:   3,205.00 ± 0.05 m

Summit on 2 meters above and to the north GISP2. The difference in temperature measurement can be 0.4 degrees Celsius.

http://journals.ametsoc.org/doi/pdf/10.1175/1520-0450(2001)040%3C0741%3AADYOTO%3E2.0.CO%3B2

15
Thanks for the suggestion. )

But is it an apples to apples comparison. In other words, what are the difficulties when splicing current temps to that graph?

I think in addition be interested this work.

http://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/10.1002/grl.50456/pdf

Recent warming at Summit, Greenland: Global context and implications.

16
This reconstruction ends with 1905 and represents the average values at intervals of 10-25 years.

ftp://ftp.ncdc.noaa.gov/pub/data/paleo/icecore/greenland/summit/gisp2/isotopes/gisp2_temp_accum_alley2000.txt

But what is the average annual temperature at the top of Greenland now?

ftp://ftp.ncdc.noaa.gov/pub/data/gsod/
There is a temperature measuring stations GISP2 (1989-1997) and SUMMIT (1998-2017). Files with the code 049999-00003 and 044160-99999. In total there are 8329 values of the average daily temperature for the period 1989-2017 years. As a result, it is more than 23 years of observations, which is comparable with the intervals in the ice core.

The average annual temperature in these modern measurement data is equal to - 28.3 degrees Celsius. It is half a degree Celsius higher than any temperatures in the ice core.


17
On 1 July 1993, after five years of drilling, the Greenland Ice Sheet Project Two (GISP2,) penetrated through the ice sheet and 1.55 meters into bedrock recovering an ice core 3053.44 meters in depth, the deepest ice core recovered in the world at the time.

http://www.gisp2.sr.unh.edu/

An analysis of the ice core got  temperature reconstruction was in past.

18
Arctic sea ice / Re: The 2016/2017 freezing season
« on: February 06, 2017, 09:04:36 AM »
ASCAT day 35:

You can see all the years since 2010. Each year is unique. 2017 highlighted the strong fragmentation of old ice (a consequence of the summer cyclones). Plus only in 2013 and 2017 do not have the flow of old ice in the Beaufort Sea.

Only a cold summer can save the Arctic from a new low in September 2017.

19
Arctic background / Re: The oldest records of lake ice
« on: February 06, 2017, 07:29:51 AM »
Picture number of years without ice from the same work:

Quote
Figure 2. Proportion of extreme warm events over time as indicated by ice dates. In Suwa (A, black), a year was extreme if the lake did not freeze.

20
Arctic background / Re: The oldest records of lake ice
« on: February 06, 2017, 07:24:02 AM »
That spike in the early 16th century sticks out like a sore thumb, it seems to be too large a variance to be taken seriously.

Maybe this is a very rare case of a cold spring. In another study, other abnormal date (about 1600) is also believed to be accurate, but doubts about the records of 18-19 centuries.

http://www.nature.com/articles/srep25061

Quotes from the article to the attached picture:

Quote
(A, ice freeze). Black dots indicate ice dates. Solid black lines indicate the best fit line of mean ice dates, and solid blue lines bound the 95% confidence interval around the estimated means. For Suwa (A), black dots with white centers indicate years when the lake did not freeze and gray points indicate years where the ice dates were considered unreliable (please see Methods for details).
...

Ice-freeze dates for Suwa were first recorded in 1443. Ice freeze date, defined as the first date of complete cover, was decided by observers from the shoreline. The name of the family observing ice freeze is provided, although the unique name of the observer is not given but would have included at least 15 generations of observers16. The Shinto Shrine also reported the Omiwatari date of ice ridge formation . Fujiwhara14 wrote that of the various ice phenomena recorded by the Shinto Shrine, first complete ice cover was the most robust14,16. Unfortunately, there are missing data in the midyears of the time series (1505–1515) and more importantly, data from 1682–83 to 1922–23 are considered unreliable for analysis ice cover freeze dates14,16,43,56. In those middle years, various changes in the calendar confused the record, ice cover dates often were indicated as approximate or were not provided even though the lake did freeze over, the group making the observations varied, and Omiwatari date or even the Omiwartari ceremony often were substituted for the ice cover date. We eliminated all data from 1682–1923 from the analyses to reduce the uncertainty in dates of ice freeze14,16,43,56.

...
However, the ice-freeze date between 1443–1682 and 1924–2014, in addition to the presence or absence of lake freeze from 1443–2014 are considered to be very reliable14,16,43,56.

The most reliable for years without ice.

21
Arctic background / The oldest records of lake ice
« on: February 05, 2017, 07:21:06 PM »
Quote
In 1442, Shinto priests in Japan began keeping records of the freeze dates of a nearby lake. Together they create the oldest inland water ice records in human history and mark the first inklings of climate change, says a new report published today out of York University and the University of Wisconsin. In recent years, says Magnuson, both waters have also exhibited more extreme ice dates corresponding with increased warming. For Lake Suwa, that means more years without full ice cover even occurring. Before the Industrial Revolution, Lake Suwa froze over 99 per cent of the time. More recently, it does so only half the time.

The records from Lake Suwa in the Japanese Alps, says Sharma, were collected by Shinto priests observing a legend about a male god who crossed the frozen lake to visit a female god at her shrine.

For example, the study found that, from 1443 to 1683, Lake Suwa's annual freeze date was moving almost imperceptibly to later in the year -- at a rate of 0.19 days per decade. From the start of the Industrial Revolution, however, that trend in a later freeze date grew 24 times faster, pushing the lake's "ice on" date back 4.6 days per decade.


Quote
Extreme weather events have also become more common. In the first 250 years, the Shinto priests recorded, there were only three years when the lake did not freeze. Between 1955 and 2004, there 12 years when the lake didn’t freeze. Between 2005 and 2014, there were five.


https://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2016/04/160426110653.htm

http://www.zmescience.com/ecology/climate/climate-change-japanese-monks/

http://www.nature.com/articles/srep25061

https://nsidc.org/data/docs/noaa/g01377_lake_river_ice/

http://www.city.suwa.lg.jp/scm/dat/special/omiwatari/index.htm#3

Winter seasons without ice on Lake Suwa after 1443:

1546-1547, 1555-1556, 1671-1672, 1701-1702, 1724-1725, 1734-1735, 1737-1738, 1739-1740, 1759-1760, 1770-1771, 1793-1794, 1800-1801, 1804-1805, 1842-1843, 1844-1845, 1853-1854, 1865-1866, 1866-1867, 1867-1868, 1868-1869, 1879-1880, 1889-1890, 1915-1916, 1932-1933, 1948-1949, 1971-1972, 1978-1979, 1986-1987, 1988-1989, 1991-1992, 1992-1993, 1993-1994, 1994-1995, 1999-2000, 2001-2002, 2004-2005, 2006-2007, 2008-2009, 2009-2010, 2010-2011, 2013-2014, 2014-2015, 2015-2016.

News about the freezing lake in the current winter yet.

Percentage winters without ice in different centuries:

15th century - no winter without ice among the observed 57 years - <1%
16th century - two winters without ice - 2%
17th century - оnly one winter without ice - 1%
18th century - 8 winters without ice - 8%
19th century - 11 winters without ice - 11%
20th century - 12 winters without ice - 12%
21th century - 9 winters without ice among the observed оnly 16 years - 56% (!!!)

The rate of climate change in the 21st century is amazing.

22
Arctic sea ice / Re: Annual temperatures in the Arctic
« on: January 27, 2017, 04:29:45 AM »
http://www.columbia.edu/~mhs119/Temperature/T_moreFigs/

Greenland Station Locations and Annual Mean Temperature Change

23
Arctic sea ice / Re: Annual temperatures in the Arctic
« on: January 20, 2017, 05:19:34 PM »
https://data.giss.nasa.gov/gistemp/graphs/customize.html

Annual GISS temperature in the Arctic.

24
Arctic sea ice / Re: Annual temperatures in the Arctic
« on: January 16, 2017, 09:53:20 PM »
https://twitter.com/Permafrostee/status/820914541328560129

Quote
Brendan O'Neill

Add this to the pile with sea ice @EricHolthaus @ZLabe: 2016 was the warmest year in Svalbard #climatechange


25
Consequences / Re: 2017 ENSO
« on: January 07, 2017, 11:59:05 AM »

26
Arctic sea ice / Re: Annual temperatures in the Arctic
« on: January 07, 2017, 11:02:46 AM »
http://icepeople.net/2017/01/02/frighteningly-ordinary-record-high-temperatures-in-2016-nothing-new-for-longyearbyen-or-earth/

Quote
January 2, 2017
At this point it’s not really news to set a record-high temperature for a month or year since it’s an ongoing thing in Longyearbyen and much of the rest of the world. But that doesn’t mean it’s any less alarming for experts analyzing the long-term trends after the town’s warmest and wettest year in recorded history.
The average temperature for the year was minus 0.1 degrees Celsius, or 6.5 degrees Celsius above normal, according to Bernt Lie, a weather statistician who operates the website Vær og Vind (Weather and Wind). In addition, a record 310 millimeters of precipitation fell during the year, 63.2 percent more than normal and soundly topping the previous record of 267.9 millimeters in 2012.
“In July, October and November there was record heat,” he wrote.
Temperatures at Svalbard Airport in December were 7.4 degrees Celsius above normal, the 73rd straight month of above average temperatures, according to Lie.
Despite the longer-term records, there was only one daily high-temperature record of 10.3 degrees set in October. There was also only one low-temperature daily record of minus 18.5 degrees set on dec. 8.
“So few coldest days has not occurred since measures began at the airport in 1975,” Lie wrote.
The situation in Longyearbyen is hardly unique. The average global temperature record also set a new high in 2016, as did virtually every region of the Arctic.
Lie, in his summary of Longyearbyen’s weather statistics for 2016, called the trend here a “frightening development.”
“Over the last 26 years it has become more than 2.2 degrees (exactly 2.28 degrees) warmer in this populated part of the Arctic,” he wrote. “Continued temperature rise at the same pace in Longyearbyen until the year 2050 will provide a 30-year average temperature for the year of minus 1.4 degrees…or a rise of more than five degrees in 60 years.”

27
Arctic sea ice / Re: Annual temperatures in the Arctic
« on: January 07, 2017, 10:45:31 AM »
http://norwaytoday.info/news/svalbard-records-temperature-7-4-degrees-normal-december/

Quote
2016 became the warmest on Svalbard in the nearly 100 years that weather records had been kept in Longyearbyen.

According to weather statistician, Bernt Lie, three of the calendar year’s twelve months set new records for monthly mean temperature in Longyearbyen.

‘December was the 73rd consecutive month that has been warmer than normal. Since December 2010, every month has been warmer than usual. That means that monthly temperatures remained well above normal’, wrote Lie on his website, Wind and Weather.

The year’s lowest temperature in 2016 was minus 18.5 degrees, and was measured on the 8th of December. As high a temperature on the coldest day hadn’t occurred since measurements at the airport had been kept from 1975, according to Bernt Lie.

2016 also set a record for rainfall. Annual precipitation was 310.0 mm, which is 63.2% more than normal (normal period 1961-1990), thus beating the rainfall record of 267.9 mm, set in 2012, by a solid margin.

http://svalbardposten.no/nyheter/engelsk/2016-warmest-and-wettest/19.7988

Quote
2016: Warmest and wettest
This year's temperatures at Svalbard Airport are unprecedented. 'Terrifying,' a climate scientist says.
The year has been filled with troubling weather records for both temperature and precipitation, and even now a new record is at hand. The final days of December will need to have an average temperature of minus 40 degrees Celsius for 2016 to avoid being the hottest year since measurements began in 1975.
The average annual temperature at Svalbard Airport is minus 6.7 degrees, and the warmest year recorded was in 2006, when the average temperature was minus 1.7 degrees.
This year, the average temperature is minus 0.34 degrees as of Dec. 18. Wh
ich means the final days will need to plunge into a severe deep freeze to avoid the record.
"It is a very special record that is occurring this year when we're talking about more than one degree above the previous record," said Ketil Isaksen, a climate researcher at the Norwegian Meteorological Institute who focuses on northern areas and Svalbard in particular.

Clear trend
High-temperature records were set in May, July, October and November of this year. The average temperature of minus 0.7 degrees in November was 9.6 degrees above normal. It was also the 72nd straight month of above-normal temperatures. The last time the temperature was below normal was in November of 2010.
"Svalbard is one of those places on Earth heating up fastest up now and is certainly a clear signal that things are changing," Isaksen said. "There is no doubt that the Arctic is undergoing strong warming."
There has been sharp rise in temperatures during the past 20 to 30 years.
"The long-term trend is very clear," Isaksen said. "There is now an average temperature about four degrees higher than before 1980."
He said he believes the trend will continue.

Deadly consequences
A total of 292.5 millimeters of precipitation has fallen at Svalbard Airport so far this year, which is 100 millimeters above normal. It also beats the previous high record of 267.9 millimeters in 2012.
"There is often a clear link between mild weather and rainy years," Isaksen said. "Warmer air, often from the south, will be able to hold more moisture."
Much of the precipitation this year has come in the form of rain.
"It is easier to measure rain than snow, so in that more precipitation has been rain that also means more is detected," he said.
Isaksen said the usual weather has definite consequences.
"The temperature of the sea and air is high, which allows the creation of diminishing ice and further warming," he said.
This year it took an extra long time before the ground froze again in the fall.
"Usually it happens in September, but this year the ground over the permafrost was thawed until November.," Isaksen said. "When the rain came it created new situations with landslides and various forms of debris flows that you usually don't have at this time of year. This is something we have not seen before."
Mild weather episodes during winter also create challenges for wildlife. Reindeer, which rely on digging through the snow to graze, may encounter ice on the ground, which makes their food situation critical.
"In 2012 there was a high mortality rate among reindeer caused by ice and hence the lack of food," Isaksen said.

28
Arctic sea ice / Re: Annual temperatures in the Arctic
« on: January 05, 2017, 03:21:06 PM »
Satellite measurements of lower troposphere temperature (database RSS channel TLT).
http://data.remss.com/msu/monthly_time_series/

Between 60 and 85 degrees temperature in 2016 exceeded the previous record (2010 year) on 0.4-0.6 C.

Red line - only ocean, blue line - land and ocean.

29
Antarctica / Re: Sea Ice Extent around Antarctica
« on: January 04, 2017, 07:22:30 PM »

30
Arctic sea ice / Re: IJIS
« on: January 04, 2017, 07:20:52 PM »

31
Arctic sea ice / Re: Annual temperatures in the Arctic
« on: January 04, 2017, 06:22:58 PM »
Satellite measurements of lower troposphere temperature (database UAH).
http://www.nsstc.uah.edu/data/msu/v6.0/tlt/uahncdc_lt_6.0.txt

North of 60 degrees temperature in 2016 exceeded the previous record (2010 year) on 0.4 C.

Red line - land and ocean, blue line - only ocean.

32
Arctic sea ice / Re: Annual temperatures in the Arctic
« on: January 03, 2017, 10:05:23 PM »
As a result, the average temperature on Svalbard in 2016 was also a record high for at least the last century, as well as in Alaska.

Here's another Svalbard temperature graph from the climate4you website, which is run by climate risk denier Ole Humlum. Unfortunately, the graph only runs up to March 2015:

Thank you for the link. Although the record warm year in Svalbard little doubt:

http://icepeople.net/2016/11/26/positive-outlook-svalbards-average-temperature-for-year-may-be-above-freezing-for-first-time-ever/

Quote
The warmest year until now was 2006, when the average temperature was minus 1.8 degrees, but he predicts this year’s average will be about zero degrees.

“This is a little bit shocking,” Isaksen said in a prepared statement. “If you had asked me five or 10 years ago, I could not have imagined such numbers in 2016.”

33
Arctic sea ice / Re: Annual temperatures in the Arctic
« on: January 03, 2017, 09:45:35 PM »
In the Russian Arctic in 2016 could not exceed the 2012 figures (the western part) and 2007 (for the eastern part). Only on the Franz Josef Land in 2016 was warmer than 2012 (on 0,2С).

In addition, the record placed on the Cape Chelyuskin (-10.1С against -10.3С in 2011).

More data   
Cape Golomyany (Severnaya Zemlya) -9.6С (in 2012 -9.3С)
Cape Whalen (Chukotka) -4.0С (in 2014 -3,7С)

34
Arctic sea ice / Re: Annual temperatures in the Arctic
« on: January 03, 2017, 08:02:27 PM »
In view of these graphs, I declare 2016 was a black swan because September arctic ice extent was NOT the lowest on record.
Nice plots ArcticMelt

I am glad that you liked the theme.

A record low in September, it was not because of the cold summer (the record for the warmest summer stays for 2007)
https://pbs.twimg.com/media/C1QeCozVIAArvwO.jpg


35
Arctic sea ice / Re: Annual temperatures in the Arctic
« on: January 03, 2017, 07:35:45 PM »
Continued.

36
Arctic sea ice / Re: Annual temperatures in the Arctic
« on: January 03, 2017, 07:34:28 PM »
In the Russian Arctic in 2016 could not exceed the 2012 figures (the western part) and 2007 (for the eastern part). Only on the Franz Josef Land in 2016 was warmer than 2012 (on 0,2С).

By 2013, the database BEST was used, after 2013 website http://pogodaiklimat.ru/



37
Arctic sea ice / Re: Annual temperatures in the Arctic
« on: January 03, 2017, 06:55:17 PM »
http://www.iopan.gda.pl/projects/AWAKE2/images/KI16.pdf

Svalbard series –Annual 1899-2013

http://polarresearch.net/index.php/polar/article/view/21349/html

Quote
LONG-TERM TEMPERATURE TRENDS AND VARIABILITY ON SPITSBERGEN: THE EXTENDED SVALBARD AIRPORT TEMPERATURE SERIES, 1898–2012

One of the few long instrumental records available for the Arctic is the Svalbard Airport composite series that hitherto began in 1911, with observations made on Spitsbergen, the largest island in the Svalbard Archipelago. This record has now been extended to 1898 with the inclusion of observations made by hunting and scientific expeditions. Temperature has been observed almost continuously in Svalbard since 1898, although at different sites. It has therefore been possible to create one composite series for Svalbard Airport covering the period 1898–2012, and this valuable new record is presented here.

Approximate temperature in the last three years in Svalbard Airport:

2014   -2.1С
2015   -2.0С
2016   +0.1С


As a result, the average temperature on Svalbard in 2016 was also a record high for at least the last century, as well as in Alaska.

38
Arctic sea ice / Re: Annual temperatures in the Arctic
« on: January 03, 2017, 06:20:49 PM »
Other cities in Alaska

https://twitter.com/AlaskaWx/status/816058022183063552

Quote
Different place, same song: 2016 marks the first time #Nome has an annual average temperature above freezing. #akwx #Arctic @Climatologist49



https://twitter.com/AlaskaWx/status/816046905088061440

Quote
2016 easily warmest of the past 91 years at Bethel, Alaska; three of the five warmest years are: 2014, 2015 & 2016. #akwx @Climatologist49



https://twitter.com/AlaskaWx/status/815744862762848256

Quote
2016 at #Kotzebue the warmest year of record, just blo freezing. No sig bend in the 70-year trend line. #akwx #arctic @Climatologist49




39
Arctic sea ice / Re: Annual temperatures in the Arctic
« on: January 03, 2017, 06:12:51 PM »
Preliminary monthly temperature rankings (925mb, reanalysis) in the #Arctic (>70°N) over the satellite era through 2016

https://twitter.com/ZLabe/status/816310833852493824



https://twitter.com/Climatologist49/status/816098866495832064

Quote
2-meter temps from R1 Reanalysis for Alaska basically show the entire region with their warmest (red) year on record (since 1948). @AlaskaWx



https://twitter.com/Climatologist49/status/815739087797645312

Quote
Map showing Alaska stations that recorded their warmest year on record in 2016. The warmth was widespread. #akwx @AlaskaWx


40
Arctic sea ice / Re: Annual temperatures in the Arctic
« on: January 03, 2017, 06:05:38 PM »
Animation annual temperature north of 70 degrees north latitude from the NCEP Reanalysis Dataset

https://twitter.com/ZLabe/status/816323907451879424

Quote
Brian Brettschneider ‏@Climatologist49
The 2016 global Skin Temp from Reanalysis was easily the highest on record since 1948. Red means hottest for a spot.

https://twitter.com/Climatologist49/status/816080384010006528


41
Arctic sea ice / Re: Annual temperatures in the Arctic
« on: January 03, 2017, 05:49:54 PM »
Thank you dear Neven.

Annual temperature north of 70 degrees north latitude from the NCEP Reanalysis Dataset

http://www.esrl.noaa.gov/psd/cgi-bin/data/timeseries/timeseries1.pl


42
Arctic sea ice / Re: Annual temperatures in the Arctic
« on: January 03, 2017, 04:57:49 PM »
The annual temperature in Barrow (the northernmost Alaska)

https://twitter.com/AlaskaWx/status/815628328925151232




43
Arctic sea ice / Annual temperatures in the Arctic
« on: January 03, 2017, 04:44:36 PM »
In this topic, I decided to compile charts of annual temperatures in the Arctic. This is important due to the fact that 2016 was the warmest year, at least for the last thousand years.

http://arctic.noaa.gov/Report-Card/Report-Card-2016/ArtMID/5022/ArticleID/271/Surface-Air-Temperature



Fig. 1.1. Arctic (land stations north of 60° N) and global mean annual land surface air temperature (SAT) anomalies (in °C) for the period 1900-2016 relative to the 1981-2010 mean value. Note that there were few stations in the Arctic, particularly in northern Canada, before 1940. The data are from the CRUTEM4 dataset, which is available at www.cru.uea.ac.uk/cru/data/temperature/.

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