Support the Arctic Sea Ice Forum and Blog

Show Posts

This section allows you to view all posts made by this member. Note that you can only see posts made in areas you currently have access to.


Messages - nanning

Pages: [1] 2 3 ... 46
1
Electric cars won't solve our pollution problems
– Britain needs a total transport rethink
https://www.theguardian.com/commentisfree/2020/sep/23/electric-cars-transport-train-companies
  by George Monbiot


All vehicles create carbon emissions and cause congestion. The coronavirus crisis should help us break our dependence on them

 article text without HS2:
If the government has a vision for transport, it appears to be plug and play. We’ll keep our existing transport system, but change the kinds of vehicles and train companies that use it. But when you have a system in which structural failure is embedded, nothing short of structural change will significantly improve it.

A switch to electric cars will reduce pollution. It won’t eliminate it, as a high proportion of the microscopic particles thrown into the air by cars, which are highly damaging to our health, arise from tyres grating on the surface of the road. Tyre wear is also by far the biggest source of microplastics pouring into our rivers and the sea. And when tyres, regardless of the engine that moves them, come to the end of their lives, we still have no means of properly recycling them.

Cars are an environmental hazard long before they leave the showroom. One estimate suggests that the carbon emissions produced in building each one equate to driving it for 150,000km. The rise in electric vehicle sales has created a rush for minerals such as lithium and copper, with devastating impacts on beautiful places. If the aim is greatly to reduce the number of vehicles on the road, and replace those that remain with battery-operated models, then they will be part of the solution. But if, as a forecast by the National Grid proposes, the current fleet is replaced by 35m electric cars, we’ll simply create another environmental disaster.

Switching power sources does nothing to address the vast amount of space the car demands, which could otherwise be used for greens, parks, playgrounds and homes. It doesn’t stop cars from carving up community and turning streets into thoroughfares and outdoor life into a mortal hazard. Electric vehicles don’t solve congestion, or the extreme lack of physical activity that contributes to our poor health.

So far, the government seems to have no interest in systemic change. It still plans to spend £27bn on building even more roads, presumably to accommodate all those new electric cars. An analysis by Transport for Quality of Life suggests that this road-building will cancel out 80% of the carbon savings from a switch to electric over the next 12 years. But everywhere, even in the government’s feted garden villages and garden towns, new developments are being built around the car.

If one thing changes permanently as a result of the pandemic, it is likely to be travel. Many people will never return to the office. The great potential of remote technologies, so long untapped, is at last being realised. Having experienced quieter cities with cleaner air, few people wish to return to the filthy past.

Like several of the world’s major cities, our capital is being remodelled in response. The London mayor – recognising that, while fewer passengers can use public transport, a switch to cars would cause gridlock and lethal pollution – has set aside road space for cycling and walking. Greater Manchester hopes to build 1,800 miles of protected pedestrian and bicycle routes.

Cycling to work is described by some doctors as “the miracle pill”, massively reducing the chances of early death: if you want to save the NHS, get on your bike. But support from central government is weak and contradictory, and involves a fraction of the money it is spending on new roads. The major impediment to a cycling revolution is the danger of being hit by a car.

Even a switch to bicycles (including electric bikes and scooters) is only part of the answer. Fundamentally, this is not a vehicle problem but an urban design problem. Or rather, it is an urban design problem created by our favoured vehicle. Cars have made everything bigger and further away. Paris, under its mayor Anne Hidalgo, is seeking to reverse this trend, by creating a “15-minute city”, in which districts that have been treated by transport planners as mere portals to somewhere else become self-sufficient communities – each with their own shops, parks, schools and workplaces, within a 15-minute walk of everyone’s home.

This, I believe, is the radical shift that all towns and cities need. It would transform our sense of belonging, our community life, our health and our prospects of local employment, while greatly reducing pollution, noise and danger. Transport has always been about much more than transport. The way we travel helps to determine the way we live. And at the moment, locked in our metal boxes, we do not live well.

2
Policy and solutions / Re: Electric cars
« on: Today at 12:30:29 PM »
Electric cars won't solve our pollution problems

https://www.theguardian.com/commentisfree/2020/sep/23/electric-cars-transport-train-companies
  by George Monbiot


All vehicles create carbon emissions and cause congestion. The coronavirus crisis should help us break our dependence on them

  article text without HS2:
If the government has a vision for transport, it appears to be plug and play. We’ll keep our existing transport system, but change the kinds of vehicles and train companies that use it. But when you have a system in which structural failure is embedded, nothing short of structural change will significantly improve it.

A switch to electric cars will reduce pollution. It won’t eliminate it, as a high proportion of the microscopic particles thrown into the air by cars, which are highly damaging to our health, arise from tyres grating on the surface of the road. Tyre wear is also by far the biggest source of microplastics pouring into our rivers and the sea. And when tyres, regardless of the engine that moves them, come to the end of their lives, we still have no means of properly recycling them.

Cars are an environmental hazard long before they leave the showroom. One estimate suggests that the carbon emissions produced in building each one equate to driving it for 150,000km. The rise in electric vehicle sales has created a rush for minerals such as lithium and copper, with devastating impacts on beautiful places. If the aim is greatly to reduce the number of vehicles on the road, and replace those that remain with battery-operated models, then they will be part of the solution. But if, as a forecast by the National Grid proposes, the current fleet is replaced by 35m electric cars, we’ll simply create another environmental disaster.

Switching power sources does nothing to address the vast amount of space the car demands, which could otherwise be used for greens, parks, playgrounds and homes. It doesn’t stop cars from carving up community and turning streets into thoroughfares and outdoor life into a mortal hazard. Electric vehicles don’t solve congestion, or the extreme lack of physical activity that contributes to our poor health.

So far, the government seems to have no interest in systemic change. It still plans to spend £27bn on building even more roads, presumably to accommodate all those new electric cars. An analysis by Transport for Quality of Life suggests that this road-building will cancel out 80% of the carbon savings from a switch to electric over the next 12 years. But everywhere, even in the government’s feted garden villages and garden towns, new developments are being built around the car.

If one thing changes permanently as a result of the pandemic, it is likely to be travel. Many people will never return to the office. The great potential of remote technologies, so long untapped, is at last being realised. Having experienced quieter cities with cleaner air, few people wish to return to the filthy past.

Like several of the world’s major cities, our capital is being remodelled in response. The London mayor – recognising that, while fewer passengers can use public transport, a switch to cars would cause gridlock and lethal pollution – has set aside road space for cycling and walking. Greater Manchester hopes to build 1,800 miles of protected pedestrian and bicycle routes.

Cycling to work is described by some doctors as “the miracle pill”, massively reducing the chances of early death: if you want to save the NHS, get on your bike. But support from central government is weak and contradictory, and involves a fraction of the money it is spending on new roads. The major impediment to a cycling revolution is the danger of being hit by a car.

Even a switch to bicycles (including electric bikes and scooters) is only part of the answer. Fundamentally, this is not a vehicle problem but an urban design problem. Or rather, it is an urban design problem created by our favoured vehicle. Cars have made everything bigger and further away. Paris, under its mayor Anne Hidalgo, is seeking to reverse this trend, by creating a “15-minute city”, in which districts that have been treated by transport planners as mere portals to somewhere else become self-sufficient communities – each with their own shops, parks, schools and workplaces, within a 15-minute walk of everyone’s home.

This, I believe, is the radical shift that all towns and cities need. It would transform our sense of belonging, our community life, our health and our prospects of local employment, while greatly reducing pollution, noise and danger. Transport has always been about much more than transport. The way we travel helps to determine the way we live. And at the moment, locked in our metal boxes, we do not live well.

3
Consequences / Re: COVID-19
« on: Today at 11:55:36 AM »
Eradicating the virus means short-term world wide lockdown, isolation and masks.
The problem with that, apart from greylib's arguments, is family situations and especially children. You need to keep absolutely everyone isolated for weeks, world wide in my view. We still have to eat and go shopping and e.g. essential work, infrastructure/maintenance, food supply and administrative tasks must go on in that situation.
Most people have a low capacity in understanding and a growing group doesn't trust science and government and will not comply.
I don't think that extirpating the virus is feasible in our contemporary economic growth and fake news societies. Alas.

4
Consequences / Re: COVID-19
« on: Today at 09:31:42 AM »
<snip>
Isolate the young people for the biggest party on earth. Let them get sick, and immune, so that the older generation can retain their freedom...

We know that very likely immunity lasts only a couple of months. As with influenza.
So those youngsters will get infected again and will be (mostly presymptomaticly/asymptomaticly) contagious again.
The effects of repetitive infections with sars-cov-2 are still not known.

A party is always nice (Can I please join that party?) but it will not be effective.

5
Walking the walk / Re: On the individual level? A mea culpa
« on: Today at 07:19:00 AM »
Sorry, but I have to speak up for the forgotten majority again.
You 'earned it' likely because of your above-average brain capacities when you were born. That 'earning'? ;)
Thinking of all the other people here with less born-with talents, or 'earning', or 'network/family', or 'rich parents', or 'luck/opportunity', or 'the right country'.
That would be IQ-ist of you. Please be also aware of that in seeing yourself as 'successful' and 'earned'.

When many people leave the packaging at the supermarket, what do you think the supermarket will do? Don't you think that they'll change the way they package or choose different suppliers? Can't you see the ripple effect of that throughout supply systems?
Colective action is VERY powerful.

6
<snap>
With the right public policies, you'd be able to use diesel equipment, fueled by bio diesel, available at the filling station.

But that would mean that those FF machines (& infrastructure & industry) will still be in use and in demand. To be able to continue working the way you know, with government support, will be very attractive and a brake on the transition.

"bio diesel" doesn't come from a factory, it comes from farming. As a replacement for diesel in agri machines, you'll need a whole lot of farm land to create this "bio diesel", many transport Km (by electrical trucks? or bio-diesel trucks?) and factories for conversion etc. Do the machines that work the 'bio diesel' fields also run on bio diesel?

That humongous extra acreage of fertile land, set aside for bio diesel, could've grown food for us. All the transport etc. will most likely include much FF use.
AGW will considerably decrease the amount and quality of harvests around the world.

Burning dio biesel emits GHG. We can do without that.

7
Policy and solutions / Re: Renewable Energy Transition and Consumption
« on: September 23, 2020, 11:48:11 AM »
Dear oren,

I disagree with you that ralfy is posting anti-renewable propaganda. But perhaps I missed something. Anyhow, he brings up interesting and important downsides of green BAU and the rich consumers' dream.
Also Bruce's post is not anti-renewable and I think his example cannot be (s)wiped aside. Very interesting arguments from Bruce imo.

The picture is bit more complicated than just 'get it on'. And it's a pity that I don't read anything from you about all the non-rich countries in your example. ralfy touched on that by highlighting the to be expected enormous increase in energy demand and consumption of the global poor majority. Why not give them all a bit of our energy and consumption in stead of the rich getting richer and getting all the new technologies that the rest cannot buy. Give them e.g. a fridge since most global poor live in warm/hot countries.

'The economy' doesn't include the global poor. They are always in the back of the mind, even though they are the majority of humans on this planet.

8
The politics / Re: The Trump Presidency
« on: September 23, 2020, 10:56:12 AM »
wili, sorry to hear that your father is dying. I wish it is not COVID-19 related and that his departure will be a moment of unity and love. I think it's okay to hug people if each turns their face to the same side.
I'll miss you for a while.

---

All dogma's are wrong.
People lose sight of the reasons behind the dogma, and dogma is a fixed set of behaviour and rules which makes it completely closed to changes in society/culture, new science-based insights and the fact that humans cannot be put in one category. Furthermore it implies a ruler but many times the ruler is long gone and people keep blindly following old dogma without leader or original arguments. Such as economic growth; tidiness; forced monogamy; a pet animal; material accumulation.

This is my opinion, not an attack on other opinions. And not specific to abortion.
Child death is completely natural.

Oren, you're right, this leads to nowhere because in general people with dogma's are very biased and are not open for change.

Tom, please give it a rest. There's no sense in trying to change our opinions of your dogma.

9
Walking the walk / Re: On the individual level? A mea culpa
« on: September 23, 2020, 08:11:53 AM »
HapHazard, that's very good of you! Only double the amount of what I throw away ;).

But I think your second paragraph is only applicable to people who have land to grow crops.
I rent an apartment and don't see how I could manage that. Imagine living in a high-rise in a city, which would make it even more difficult because they can't rent gardens. Even if I would again rent an allotment, I cannot imagine that I could feed myself from that through the year.
Perhaps you have overlooked your privileged situation ("very rural & large acreage") with that statement?

Leaving packaging at the store does do much; it enormously decreases the amount of waste for the waste collectors and makes you more aware of the problem, and sets a good example for other consumers in the store. It is one thing of many that one can do, and it all adds up.

10
The rest / Re: Good music
« on: September 22, 2020, 06:16:06 PM »
This artist has many more great songs.

Sam Cooke - Chain Gang (1960)
(2m36)

11
Thanks for that info Phil42, please keep us updated.
My sister ist Schweizerin.

12
Policy and solutions / Re: Renewable Energy Transition and Consumption
« on: September 22, 2020, 12:40:29 PM »
This video is largely about energy and consumption and explains many problems. I think it adds to the discussion.
(please ignore the small SLR part. sources are listed on the youtube page)

(14m35)

13
Policy and solutions / Re: Renewable Energy Transition and Consumption
« on: September 22, 2020, 12:34:03 PM »
oren, are you of the opinion that the energy transition problem has to be solved for all humans and not just for the rich parts?
I presume you do :).

I find it very morally refreshing and most welcome that ralfy takes all humans into account and shines a light on the 'forgotten' majority of the world population. And in that process finds many drawbacks of the kind of energy transition that is advertised in this and the renewable energy threads.
A bit like popping a rich consumers 'dream'. A very low morality dream of people who already have everything and don't want to share, they just want more nice and shiny 'stuff'.
I would leave this forum if it remains a rich consumers' dominated/biased discussion. It stinks.

The law of diminishing returns does very much apply to this discussion imo. Thanks ralfy for not dreaming.

Re: science
Not everything has to be solved using academic science. We need to open our hearts and include the people that have been colonised & exploited for centuries. It's about time. Beds are burning.


Low hanging fruit in the energy transition and mitigation is: Stop giving trillions of euro's of money from tax payers to FF industry.
We haven't even set the very first step for a global solution. We let the profit maximising commerce handle our future. They have no hearts to open. Please do not listen to them and please ignore their marketing talk.

14
Arctic sea ice / Re: The 2020/2021 freezing season
« on: September 22, 2020, 10:29:36 AM »
According to climatereanalyzer, there's a 973 HPa low north of Novaya Zemlya.

15
Consequences / Re: COVID-19
« on: September 22, 2020, 10:13:48 AM »
<snippy>
So do I prefer that we would still be in conditions mankind was in around, say, 1850 ? No, not all. And I can't imagine even a healthy young man like bbr would do so.

I would actually prefer that Andre, and, if it had a voice, all of living nature would prefer it too. Nature must have been beautifully rich and diverse before industrialisation/pollution/population explosion. I know many 'downsides', but to me, that's life.
1650 would be better. Wait. Make it 0 so I can meet that interesting guy.

16
Policy and solutions / Re: Renewable Energy Transition and Consumption
« on: September 22, 2020, 08:21:34 AM »
Thanks wili, I share that view.

A pity that no discussion followed from my post about the Guardian article. I'd say that it gives an extremely important view for discussions in this thread.

Wili wrote:
"And the global wealthy (which probably includes most posters on this forum) are the juggernauts of that economy. "

Well, what to expect. The pigs weren't open to critique in "Animal Farm".
This   is   the   main   problem

17
Policy and solutions / Re: Robots and AI: Our Immortality or Extinction
« on: September 21, 2020, 06:22:24 PM »
Omegad. What a hell is being created in the name of progress profit.

18
Arctic sea ice / Re: The 2020 melting season
« on: September 21, 2020, 06:02:59 PM »
That's beautifully creative BornFromTheVoid. I like. A good one for next season for seeing the other minima crossed and the plume of course. Could go a bit slower for the last three weeks, but perhaps I'm too slow :).

19
Consequences / Re: COVID-19
« on: September 21, 2020, 05:54:48 PM »
SH, that's a good, and creative :), way of explaining my experience just now.

Netherlands has >2000 positives a day now, and rising from ca. 500 a day since 3 weeks. Contract tracing has mostly stopped because of not enough personnel.

20
The rest / Re: George Floyd murder and blowback
« on: September 21, 2020, 05:27:00 PM »
Good advice oren, and indeed 'medieval' is a bit over the top. I think it means torture chambers and blum would not do that :)

it's almost as if Tom keeps relighting the 'fire' on purpose. I might post a song in the good music thread about it ;)

21
Policy and solutions / Re: Robots and AI: Our Immortality or Extinction
« on: September 21, 2020, 08:29:24 AM »
Thanks for all your interesting posts Vox.

Those robots are doing the work that human employees do now.
How will this former employee get money to live? How can she/he pay the rent?

Off-topic, but you could say that warehouse robots and military robots are also not about our "immortality or extinction".


22
The rest / Re: Good music
« on: September 21, 2020, 08:12:12 AM »
When this song plays, I always turn up the volume. Just a very nice and easy song.

Rod McKuen - Amor, Amor (1977)
(2m57)

23
Policy and solutions / Re: If not Capitalism... then What? And, How?
« on: September 21, 2020, 08:03:09 AM »
The "Sin of Wealth". Interesting article Sig.
Good posts by Steve, gerontocrat and interstitial imo.

I am not really knowledgeable about 'magical' Finance (i.e. the rich people's world), but this is strange to me:
"Money is an IOU on goods and services."

I think this is incorrect.
How is trillions of money-printing by central banks in any way an IOU on goods and services? It comes out of thin air.

The speculative 'market' also makes
A house as a good has not the value of the bricks and mortar, but a speculative market-pricing. If it gets more expensive, how is that extra money in any way an IOU on goods and services?

+
I'd say that the sin of wealth is not just *wasting resources on yourself*, but also *withholding capital from society by storing enormous amounts in off-shore accounts*. Dead capital, extracted from the exploited poor and nature.

--

A thought on economic production:
All the construction work going on in large mansions for e.g. the creation of a 'new' garden, a new interior decoration or a billiard room is non-productive work. It is non-production and a waste of labour and materials.
Production would mean building a house for people who have no house.

24
Policy and solutions / Re: Renewable Energy Transition and Consumption
« on: September 21, 2020, 07:11:22 AM »
Since this is about energy transition and consumption, it fits here as well.  This is very IMPORTANT imo.

World's richest 1% cause double CO2 emissions of poorest 50%, says Oxfam
Charity says world’s fast-shrinking carbon budget should be used to improve lot of poorest

https://www.theguardian.com/environment/2020/sep/21/worlds-richest-1-cause-double-co2-emissions-of-poorest-50-says-oxfam
  by Fiona Harvey

 Excerpts: (bolding by me)

The wealthiest 1% of the world’s population were responsible for the emission of more than twice as much carbon dioxide as the poorer half of the world from 1990 to 2015, according to new research.

Carbon dioxide emissions rose by 60% over the 25-year period, but the increase in emissions from the richest 1% was three times greater than the increase in emissions from the poorest half.

The report, compiled by Oxfam and the Stockholm Environment Institute, warned that rampant overconsumption and the rich world’s addiction to high-carbon transport are exhausting the world’s “carbon budget”.

Such a concentration of carbon emissions in the hands of the rich means that despite taking the world to the brink of climate catastrophe, through burning fossil fuels, we have still failed to improve the lives of billions, said Tim Gore, head of policy, advocacy and research at Oxfam International.

The global carbon budget has been squandered to expand the consumption of the already rich, rather than to improve humanity,” he told the Guardian. “A finite amount of carbon can be added to the atmosphere if we want to avoid the worst impacts of the climate crisis. We need to ensure that carbon is used for the best.”


The richest 10% of the global population, comprising about 630 million people, were responsible for about 52% of global emissions over the 25-year period, the study showed.

Globally, the richest 10% are those with incomes above about $35,000 (£27,000) a year, and the richest 1% are people earning more than about $100,000.

..a finite carbon budget of how much carbon dioxide it is safe to produce, which scientists warn will be exhausted within a decade at current rates.

Oxfam argues that continuing to allow the rich world to emit vastly more than those in poverty is unfair. While the world moves towards renewable energy and phases out fossil fuels, any emissions that continue to be necessary during the transition would be better used in trying to improve poor people’s access to basic amenities.

The best possible, morally defensible purpose is for all humanity to live a decent life, but [the carbon budget] has been used up by the already rich, in getting richer,

25
Policy and solutions / Re: If not Capitalism... then What? And, How?
« on: September 21, 2020, 07:09:20 AM »
World's richest 1% cause double CO2 emissions of poorest 50%, says Oxfam
Charity says world’s fast-shrinking carbon budget should be used to improve lot of poorest

https://www.theguardian.com/environment/2020/sep/21/worlds-richest-1-cause-double-co2-emissions-of-poorest-50-says-oxfam
  by Fiona Harvey

 Excerpts: (bolding by me)

The wealthiest 1% of the world’s population were responsible for the emission of more than twice as much carbon dioxide as the poorer half of the world from 1990 to 2015, according to new research.

Carbon dioxide emissions rose by 60% over the 25-year period, but the increase in emissions from the richest 1% was three times greater than the increase in emissions from the poorest half.

The report, compiled by Oxfam and the Stockholm Environment Institute, warned that rampant overconsumption and the rich world’s addiction to high-carbon transport are exhausting the world’s “carbon budget”.

Such a concentration of carbon emissions in the hands of the rich means that despite taking the world to the brink of climate catastrophe, through burning fossil fuels, we have still failed to improve the lives of billions, said Tim Gore, head of policy, advocacy and research at Oxfam International.

The global carbon budget has been squandered to expand the consumption of the already rich, rather than to improve humanity,” he told the Guardian. “A finite amount of carbon can be added to the atmosphere if we want to avoid the worst impacts of the climate crisis. We need to ensure that carbon is used for the best.”


The richest 10% of the global population, comprising about 630 million people, were responsible for about 52% of global emissions over the 25-year period, the study showed.

Globally, the richest 10% are those with incomes above about $35,000 (£27,000) a year, and the richest 1% are people earning more than about $100,000.

..a finite carbon budget of how much carbon dioxide it is safe to produce, which scientists warn will be exhausted within a decade at current rates.

Oxfam argues that continuing to allow the rich world to emit vastly more than those in poverty is unfair. While the world moves towards renewable energy and phases out fossil fuels, any emissions that continue to be necessary during the transition would be better used in trying to improve poor people’s access to basic amenities.

The best possible, morally defensible purpose is for all humanity to live a decent life, but [the carbon budget] has been used up by the already rich, in getting richer,

26
Walking the walk / Re: Gardening
« on: September 20, 2020, 03:55:15 PM »
Thanks etienne and kassy for your advice. Most welcome.

27
Walking the walk / Re: Gardening
« on: September 20, 2020, 08:39:48 AM »
Thanks guys, that makes good sense. I'll try to think of some way to make several compost containers because I don't want to spend more money on this. It has been very interesting and I've learned a lot of important things from gardening, but I have made enough expenditures already and I've put some 'red tape' on this budget.

Luckily I have harvest from two auto flowering cannabis plants on my balcony. I'm already smoking it for a week and have enough for 10 more weeks it seems. To me that means some 400 euro saved, but I don't have that money yet. Many thanks to because for helping me out through the growing season.
The remaining (large) cannabis plant on my balcony has entered the flowering stage and looks alright. Perhaps even more valuable harvest in 8 weeks' time. Looking forward to smoking that stuff.

--

Interesting etienne. I wonder what kind of office it was :).
I will look into that but I don't have a garden and I don't know what to do with excess compost. I would want to save it for next growing season. Do I need to buy a special worm-composter, or can I put the worms into my little kitchen compost container? The worms might get bored.

El Cid, is it not feasible to get good compost from a smaller volume than 1m³ ?
It's far too large to have in my apartment, and I don't have a lot of organic material left over to get to that size. The small one (15x17x25 cm) in my kitchen has not filled up after several months of receiving left overs, even with adding many leaves from the cannabis plants. Every time I put something in, I can push it down, and the bottom feels warm to the touch.
From experience I know that there'll be fertile fluids down under. Is it a good idea to put a faucet in to tap the fluid?

28
The rest / Re: George Floyd murder and blowback
« on: September 19, 2020, 05:49:10 PM »
Tom, were blumenkraft still here, he would go completely medieval on you for that post. And rightly so imo.

29
Consequences / Re: Hurricane Season 2020
« on: September 19, 2020, 05:47:24 PM »
Klingon would be nice. Or runes. Or pictures. Or letter + digit. :)

30
Arctic sea ice / Re: The 2020 melting season
« on: September 19, 2020, 05:45:03 PM »
Thanks OffTheGrid.
If hycom is correct, and I must say that hycom's thickness graphs are a lot more likely than PIOMASS imo even with changed methods, then indeed a new record low volume is set. As is quite definitely expected by me after such an extreme melt season. Not very scientific of me of course but we do not have good 'sensors' regarding the arctic sea ice. There's a lot unknown and it's an extremely important piece of the planet, being a 'tipping point'. A couple of submarines would be nice. Dear Mr.Wadhams, do you still have some contacts there?

31
The forum / Re: Forum Decorum
« on: September 19, 2020, 05:36:14 PM »
Are you?

32
Walking the walk / Re: Gardening
« on: September 19, 2020, 05:29:35 PM »
Thanks Latent.
That's what I would do, but I'd like to know if this is the same thing that people do with 1m³ compost.
Sorry that my question was not that clear.
I wonder how compost from larger compost heaps get used. How do they do it? I guess that I can look it up but I like interaction with people :)

33
The rest / Re: George Floyd murder and blowback
« on: September 19, 2020, 12:48:27 PM »
I don't pretend to know all the trustworthy sources but before posting this specific article in this specific thread, you should check a bit more and realise what it is doing; what I described above.
It's trying to get the police off the hook. "Look over there". Changing the context and therefore the seriousness of what happened in the light of U.S.A. police using excessive voilence and deathly violence disproportionally on just your black/brown skinned fellow 'americans'. It is paramount that that behaviour stops and is highlighted every time. Not played down and victim-blaming.
The Guardian would never post an article like that.

34
Walking the walk / Re: Gardening
« on: September 19, 2020, 12:08:42 PM »
I have a question about composting.

There's this little compost container in my kitchen that's filling up but never seems full. Always room to put new stuff in (at my pace of consumption).
The lower half of the container is warmer than the air in my house, so I expect very nice compost in that part.

Now the question: How do I get that ready compost out to use it?

I could remove the container's top half but that is very messy. How do you do it?

35
Arctic sea ice / Re: MOSAiC news
« on: September 19, 2020, 12:00:28 PM »
Makes mostly sense to me,  a different style of writing, but then.. I am a smoker :)
I have been thinking about submarine landslides. Also to try to understand the north-east Greenland strangeness.

36
The forum / Re: Forum Decorum
« on: September 19, 2020, 08:10:37 AM »
Thanks oren. I have a 'thick skin' and recognize when someone capitulates :).

Grandul,
Serious questions about the 0Kg CO₂ and other personal conumptions etc. will be gladly answered. Note: These zero emissions are just my personal direct emissions. Re: fake, you have no idea of the amount of discipline and sacrifices by me to be able to be a good example for others and to live with my conscience. I have to be pure otherwise I have no base to stand on. "Full honesty" didn't fit on that line.

-----
wili,
I am not a native English speaker, and may easily have made an error.

I was not addressing gerontocrat in my post above whilst Steve did address ralfy in his post. To me, that's the difference.

Let me explain what I mean:
Addressing someone who's standing next to you, in the third person, in stead of directly addressing the person, is in my view disrespectful.
If Steve was not in a discussion with ralfy, then it is different. Then it is like talking about someone who isn't present.
I see a clear difference but do you see it too?
If I'm wrong with my interpretation, please explain it so that I may improve my English language skills.

-

"ribbing"
Learned a new word already, thank you wili :).

37
The rest / Re: George Floyd murder and blowback
« on: September 19, 2020, 06:41:42 AM »
Tom, this "very different light" is an attempt to play down the callous police violence.
Don't you see how it is doing that?
It is the same kind of "different light" that Pres.Trump shines on Portland; "it's the black protesters who loot and riot". Which in reality is the other way around; it were the federal agents and white supremacists.
Do you see what's being done?
Fighting that pattern of iies and obfuscation is one of the reasons for this thread.

Please do not post 'volatile' stuff without checking against other (trusted) sources because what you posted might be very insulting and painful for the e.g. mother of George Floyd. Focussing in this case on Fentanyl in stead of on the police violence is a racist thing to do.

38
The forum / Re: Forum Decorum
« on: September 18, 2020, 07:17:17 PM »
gerontocrat gave his view on the news source. I found his post very interesting. It is not always the cold hard data that matter.

"Scissors, scissors..."
Are you a hairdresser perchance? ;)

There is a link at the bottom of every post that says "Report to moderator"
That's the one to use if you have complaints. No need to bother us all.

39
Policy and solutions / Re: Tesla glory/failure
« on: September 18, 2020, 06:54:28 PM »
Quote from: NeilT
So you are saying the Tesla just started itself up <snip>

Where does that come from? I haven't said anything of the sort.
"Please clarify" ?? What?

Please react to the matter and stay on topic of the post you're replying to.

--

Thank you for a good reply oren. I agree. But the vulnerability to software hacking and then doing a terrorist attack or kidnapping remains.

40
Consequences / Re: The Holocene Extinction
« on: September 18, 2020, 06:29:46 PM »
For decades David Attenborough delighted millions with tales of life on Earth. But now the broadcaster wants us to face up to the state of the planet
https://www.theguardian.com/environment/2020/sep/18/dont-look-away-now-are-viewers-finally-ready-for-the-truth-about-nature-aoe
  by Patrick Greenfield

&

(51m44)

41
Consequences / Re: COVID-19
« on: September 18, 2020, 05:14:37 PM »
I see that in Italy and in the U.K., there is a U-shaped recovery of the virus.

42
Policy and solutions / Re: Tesla glory/failure
« on: September 18, 2020, 05:04:03 PM »
Quote from: NeilT
"Stupid is as stupid does."
That's your only comment on what Vox posted? Confirmation bias much?

NeilT, a self-driving Tesla car on the wrong side of the road without a driver? Have you read that?
And one doing 150km/h, i.e. 40 km/h too fast on auto pilot with the driver sleeping?
Clearly this is not acceptable self-driving software from a safety viewpoint. A car remains a >1000kg high speed potential weapon of mass destruction. With such a driver-less car and some software tweaks, you could easily do a terrorist attack without danger to yourself.

43
Arctic sea ice / Re: The 2020/2021 freezing season
« on: September 18, 2020, 04:53:56 PM »
Bravo Samuel, beautiful. Thanks for all your efforts! :)
What ana says.

44
Arctic sea ice / Re: The 2020 melting season
« on: September 18, 2020, 04:48:55 PM »
In the same metaphore:
The symptoms are worsening fast. I fear the patient is already in the terminal phase ;)
(dunno what "AA" means)

What will next year bring? I can't wait to see the patient die.

The continued living of this patient is frustrating climate action because it takes too long for the population at large to unmistakenly see clear consequences and get really fearfull. In an existential emergency one should be fearful if one wants to live.
The sooner we 'stop', the better for life on Earth. At least for the children's future.
The emergency signs were flashing in our eyes. Bye bye.

45
The rest / Re: George Floyd murder and blowback
« on: September 18, 2020, 04:36:50 PM »
Thanks for responding to Tom, Steve.
Tom, didn't you have any seconds thoughts when you posted that? You seem an intelligent man who wants to be a good human.

46
The rest / Re: Good music
« on: September 18, 2020, 04:32:24 PM »
Nice rhythm, nice melody, nice girl choir. I can dance and whistle to this (not at the same time).

Donnie Brooks - Mission Bell (1960)
(2m25)

47
Consequences / Re: The Climatic Effects of a Blue Ocean Event
« on: September 18, 2020, 07:14:58 AM »
Beautiful gerontocrat. That gives much information, thank you.

48
Consequences / Re: Floods
« on: September 17, 2020, 05:50:34 PM »
I think you live in north-west Florida Tor. There's flooding in Florida because of 'stalled' tropical storm Sally. Are you okay?

49
Arctic sea ice / Re: The 2020 melting season
« on: September 17, 2020, 04:37:18 PM »
That's a great visual uniquorn. You succeeded imo. Perhaps a different colour scheme, but that's a personal taste.

A storm is still not out of the question, to extend the melting season.

50
Consequences / Re: COVID-19
« on: September 17, 2020, 04:30:02 PM »
Thanks for that SH.

Pages: [1] 2 3 ... 46