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Messages - Phil.

Pages: [1] 2 3 4
1
Arctic sea ice / Re: Hurricane energy and Arctic sea ice
« on: September 15, 2017, 01:43:49 PM »
It'll be interesting to see what happens in a couple of weeks time as it looks like the remnants of hurricane Jose is projected to be heading into the arctic by then.

2
Arctic sea ice / Re: Northwest Passage thread
« on: August 31, 2017, 01:48:34 PM »
Crystal Serenity is now trailing in the wake of two icebreakers:


Heading for the open water?

Looks like their journey has mainly been in open water, it looks like they're going to head through the Bellott Strait next, not much ice en route.

3
Arctic sea ice / Re: Northwest Passage thread
« on: August 29, 2017, 04:57:46 AM »
How far along is Crystal Serenity?

Cambridge Bay:

And so far no ice!

4
Arctic sea ice / Re: Northwest Passage thread
« on: August 23, 2017, 09:31:53 PM »
C3 is now at Gjoa Havn

https://canadac3.ca/en/expedition/live-feed/

It was rather different in 1905 when Amundsen left the ice.

5
Arctic sea ice / Re: Northwest Passage thread
« on: August 18, 2017, 08:25:52 PM »
There appears to be some confusion as to what Serenity may encounter in Larsen Sound. Note in the above ice chart area B is 7/10 Old ice, and now in the chart below, that area (now C) has been changed to 7/10 First-year... Something not right about that!

Looking at the weather forecast for Talyoak for the next week they expect highs of 60+ and clear sunny weather so maybe we'll see some significant changes.

6
Arctic sea ice / Re: Northern Sea Route thread
« on: August 10, 2017, 10:23:48 PM »

Scroll up Phil:

The four-stroke Wärtsilä 50DF engines, which run on LNG and light or heavy fuel oils, deliver a total power output of 64.35MW.

The spec. in the link says it's a diesel engine.  Further reading says that the fuel oil is supplemented with LNG boil-off, so it uses both.  :-)
As I understand it the engines are usually run with between 15 and 85% gas.

7
Arctic sea ice / Re: Northern Sea Route thread
« on: August 10, 2017, 07:03:00 PM »
I is  confused. Are these 15 ships carrying LNG or using LNG as fuel or both.
"I want to know!"

Carrying LNG.

ARCTIC LNG CARRIER FOR THE YAMAL LNG PROJECT
Length:   299 metres
Width:   50 metres
Draught (Loading):   11.8 metres
Capacity and type of propulsion system:   3х15 megawatts, diesel-electric ship with three rudder propellers
Ice-breaking capability:   Up to 2.1 m in floe ice when navigating stern-first

8
Arctic sea ice / Re: Northern Sea Route thread
« on: August 10, 2017, 06:19:40 PM »
In terms of the Northern Sea route being open to these ships according to Yamal operations from Sabetta will be year round with the East route being utilized from July to December, The full fleet of 15 will be in operation by the end of 2020, which is a lot of LNG.


http://www.scf-group.ru/en/fleet/business_scope/projects/item1658.html


Is LNG the most "environmentally friendly" of the three fuels it can use?


The link says it uses diesel.

9
Arctic sea ice / Re: Northwest Passage thread
« on: August 09, 2017, 09:14:50 PM »
Looks like Bellot strait will be the way to go this year.

10
Arctic sea ice / Re: The 2017 melting season
« on: July 28, 2017, 03:17:01 AM »
I assume the PAC has some part in this. What was, originally, a very compact and homogenous Beaufort is being torn to shreds and sent out to melt in warmer waters.

Whilst this, in itself, is not a single major factor, it seems that 2017 has been characterised with a head start and multiple small pushes to keep it on track.

Looking at Barrow it's currently about 15ºF above average and expected to stay in that range for about three more days so i'd expect some significantly warming water up there.  Offshore winds too.

11
Greenland and Arctic Circle / Re: The Nares Strait thread
« on: July 25, 2017, 04:13:27 PM »
Seems to be good flow of ice through the Nares still looking at latest Modis images.  Also the surface ice downstream of the Pietermann glacier has fractured and moved down the channel.

12
Arctic sea ice / Re: The 2017 melting season
« on: July 14, 2017, 03:22:22 AM »
I wonder what a 'fluid dynamics' knowledgeable person would say about those pretty swirls, and especially their opinion about any vertical mixing associated with them.

Looks a bit like a von Karman vortex street.

http://cimss.ssec.wisc.edu/goes/blog/archives/113

13
Greenland and Arctic Circle / Re: The Nares Strait thread
« on: July 07, 2017, 09:32:17 PM »
The North end of the Nares strait is now crammed with mobile ice it'll be interesting to see how fast it moves through.

14
Greenland and Arctic Circle / Re: The Nares Strait thread
« on: July 04, 2017, 01:39:45 PM »
"Balanced"?  Viewing successive EOSDIS Worldview images (from June 21), the Bell Floe has moved at least 15 km each day until yesterday (between June 28 and 29 [video below]) when one corner of it moved only a few km (northward).  With wind out of the north (per Windytv's now-cast, at least), this northward movement of the floe would be due to the gyre.  Smaller floes in the area aren't moving much.  (There are a few quite small floes (bergs?) near the lower right corner of this animation that don't move, including a "" shaped one.) [Bell Floe is about 15 km wide.]
Judging by the latest Sentinel image the Bell Floe has broken up somewhat.

http://ocean.dmi.dk/arctic/images/MODIS/Kane/20170703s01b.ASAR.jpg

15
Greenland and Arctic Circle / Re: The Nares Strait thread
« on: June 30, 2017, 05:44:13 PM »
I also like the white fringe along the [would-be] 'open' edge of the bell on the Sentinel images.

Given the 'Bell Floe' is in Kane Basin and has wandered away from the Elsmere coast, it is liable to get caught up in the Kane Basin Gyre and remain there awhile.

It's actually been balanced on a cluster of floes stuck on the Greenland side for a couple of days at 79º30' N 70ºW.  Looks like a good puff of wind would shift it though.

16
Greenland and Arctic Circle / Re: The Nares Strait thread
« on: June 26, 2017, 01:35:28 PM »
Looks pretty intact, lucky floe!  By the way:  thanks Clenchie and Phil for watching.

(The floes actively approaching Nares Strait in the Lincoln Sea are all pretty small already.  The largest floes in the Lincoln Sea are hugging the Greenland coast and appear to be (temporarily) frozen in place.)

That floe has now made it unscathed past the two islands now. It seems that the ice near the entrance to the strait in the Lincoln sea has broken up into fairly small fragments compared with a week or so ago.

https://lance3.modaps.eosdis.nasa.gov/cgi-bin/imagery/single.cgi?image=crefl2_143.A2017173074500-2017173075000.250m.jpg

It is surprising how fast such a large floe can proceed down the channel.

Indeed, the fragment we were talking about is now about 55 miles south of Franklin Island.

The distinctive shape makes it easy to track.  Hopefully it is thick enough to remain intact and survive for another winter, currents allowing.

Now it's about 83 miles south of Franklin.

17
Arctic sea ice / Re: What the Buoys are telling
« on: June 24, 2017, 06:44:54 PM »
I would guess that this (your animated graphs) shed light to us "ASIF Lurkers" ond others on how gigantic areas of the Arctic ice just suddenly vanish when the heat eventually gets through from top or bottom.

I don't think that you'll find that the floe on which 2017A is sitting is going to "suddenly vanish" any time soon. Once the blue line has risen completely above the dotted red line is when bottom melt can begin in earnest. Melting away to nothing takes a lot longer.

Not quite sure why this is called 'bottom' melt?  According to the plot for 17A the ice above 25cm is above the melting point and so should be melting now, the deeper ice is still below the melting point.  The ice is getting warmer from above, soon we'd expect to get a profile without a minimum and ice at all depths will be melting but fastest at the surface.

18
Greenland and Arctic Circle / Re: The Nares Strait thread
« on: June 24, 2017, 06:29:50 PM »
Looks pretty intact, lucky floe!  By the way:  thanks Clenchie and Phil for watching.

(The floes actively approaching Nares Strait in the Lincoln Sea are all pretty small already.  The largest floes in the Lincoln Sea are hugging the Greenland coast and appear to be (temporarily) frozen in place.)

That floe has now made it unscathed past the two islands now. It seems that the ice near the entrance to the strait in the Lincoln sea has broken up into fairly small fragments compared with a week or so ago.

https://lance3.modaps.eosdis.nasa.gov/cgi-bin/imagery/single.cgi?image=crefl2_143.A2017173074500-2017173075000.250m.jpg

It is surprising how fast such a large floe can proceed down the channel.

Indeed, the fragment we were talking about is now about 55 miles south of Franklin Island.

19
Greenland and Arctic Circle / Re: The Nares Strait thread
« on: June 22, 2017, 02:50:43 PM »
Looks pretty intact, lucky floe!  By the way:  thanks Clenchie and Phil for watching.

(The floes actively approaching Nares Strait in the Lincoln Sea are all pretty small already.  The largest floes in the Lincoln Sea are hugging the Greenland coast and appear to be (temporarily) frozen in place.)

That floe has now made it unscathed past the two islands now. It seems that the ice near the entrance to the strait in the Lincoln sea has broken up into fairly small fragments compared with a week or so ago.

https://lance3.modaps.eosdis.nasa.gov/cgi-bin/imagery/single.cgi?image=crefl2_143.A2017173074500-2017173075000.250m.jpg

20
Greenland and Arctic Circle / Re: The Nares Strait thread
« on: June 21, 2017, 04:49:11 PM »
We may know this afternoon (eastern North America time) how intact 'largish floe' remains after its (at least) close encounter with Hans Island.  (Yesterday's DMI Sentinel image annotated screen print of Kennedy Channel)

Right now it appears to be jammed up against the island but still intact according to MODIS.

https://lance3.modaps.eosdis.nasa.gov/cgi-bin/imagery/single.cgi?image=crefl2_143.A2017172084000-2017172084500.250m.jpg

21
There has been tsunamis recorded from glacier calving before here's a paper on one:
http://www.the-cryosphere.net/10/995/2016/tc-10-995-2016.pdf

22
Arctic sea ice / Re: The 2017 melting season
« on: June 13, 2017, 01:26:09 AM »


As you can see, there are even less melt ponds than last year. In fact, it looks very similar to 2013. David Schröder wrote to me in an e-mail:


Looking at the Archipelago on MODIS today it looks very blue, is that not melt ponds?

https://lance3.modaps.eosdis.nasa.gov/cgi-bin/imagery/single.cgi?image=crefl1_143.A2017163181500-2017163182000.2km.jpg

23
Greenland and Arctic Circle / Re: The Nares Strait thread
« on: May 28, 2017, 11:11:12 AM »
To get an idea how much ice has left the Lincoln sea into Nares strait, I have tracked some floes back to the 12th when they were at the position they had when the ice arch broke.

That's great Andreas, it really highlights how much is leaving.  Not much sign that it's going to stop any time soon.

24
Greenland and Arctic Circle / Re: The Nares Strait thread
« on: May 27, 2017, 04:31:50 PM »
Now there is a steady 'river' of fragments flowing down the west side of the strait.

25
Greenland and Arctic Circle / Re: The Nares Strait thread
« on: May 24, 2017, 03:18:30 AM »
A big polynya just opened up north of the entrance to Nares st, the ice there is becoming more and more fragmented.

https://lance3.modaps.eosdis.nasa.gov/cgi-bin/imagery/single.cgi?image=crefl1_143.A2017143201500-2017143202000.2km.jpg

26
Greenland and Arctic Circle / Re: The Nares Strait thread
« on: May 21, 2017, 05:45:58 PM »
without offering any evidence I seem to remember that the western side of the straight is usually flowing faster than the eastern side, this made big chunk rotate so swiftly I  think. The odd thing is that it isn't drawn towards the west or does another rotation. Maybe the wind has an effect?

The block appears to have just developed a crack about two thirds of the way down, I expect we'll see more developments now.  The crack appears to have originated at the point of contact with the coast?

27
Greenland and Arctic Circle / Re: The Nares Strait thread
« on: May 20, 2017, 10:53:28 PM »
As of today that temporary dam has broken and many more chunks of ice are entering the strait.

https://lance3.modaps.eosdis.nasa.gov/cgi-bin/imagery/single.cgi?image=crefl1_143.A2017140180500-2017140181000.2km.jpg

28
Arctic sea ice / Re: Stupid Questions :o
« on: May 20, 2017, 01:04:04 PM »
This may well be totally OT, but it definitely qualifies as a stupid question.


There is a name for a river valley carved during the breakup of an ice sheet. The sudden ice/water outflow causes a deeper, wider, U-shaped trough to be carved and there is a name for this type of valley. I live adjacent to one of these features and at one time the name of the feature rolled off my tongue as easily as the name of the river. Today alas, it's gone & it aggravates me no end. It's like running into someone at a party whose face you remember, but you're unable to recall the name.

Happens to me all the time.  :(
From my recollection of geomorphology many years ago the terms used were 'fluvial V-shaped valley' and 'glacial U-shaped valley'.



29
Greenland and Arctic Circle / Re: The Nares Strait thread
« on: May 19, 2017, 05:12:14 PM »
"Big Chunk" moved about 4 km between May 17 and 18, while the "foot bridge" pieces moved about 85 km.  What will today bring? Winds, per windytv, are mildly contrary today (contrary for southward travel).  Currents favor export, winds favor stillness.

As of 11:15 UCT today it looks like three pieces have blocked the entrance (temporarily?), it'll be interesting to see what happens there.

30
Arctic sea ice / Re: The 2017 melting season
« on: May 14, 2017, 01:21:47 PM »
I keep wondering: will the debris from this breakup clog Nares Strait or will it just flush through? So far, it is flowing smoothly. Observe the 10th- 13th. CLICK IMAGE


Starting to move through this morning:
https://lance3.modaps.eosdis.nasa.gov/cgi-bin/imagery/single.cgi?image=crefl2_143.A2017134074000-2017134074500.250m.jpg

31
Arctic Background / Re: Barneo 2017
« on: April 20, 2017, 04:21:01 PM »
Here's a longer first-person account of the bear incident:

http://translate.google.com/translate?u=http%3A//www.binsack.ch/90-north-100-commitment-die-ankunft-am-nordpol-am-12-april-2017-und-der-eisbaer&hl=en&langpair=auto|en&tbb=1&ie=UTF-8

From that account you'd think that a family pet had been shot, not a hungry predator.  It was apparently within 30m of them and still approaching them.  Under the protocol for workers near Barrow that would qualify as 'encounter imminent', and the recommended practice is as follows:
"If the bear’s approach is such that a serious immediate threat is perceived, a warning shot(s) may be fired by armed and authorized personnel to scare off or slow the advance of the bear while withdrawal proceeds.
If the bear either charges, or if it’s rate of advance despite the warning shot is such as to pose an immediate threat to any member of the work group (or any other human being), the armed personnel are to fire on the bear, aiming preferably between the shoulders. Avoid headshots as the polar bear’s skull can deflect the bullet. Once the bear is hit, keep firing until the bear is still. Try to kill the bear cleanly and quickly. A wounded bear is very dangerous."

32
Arctic sea ice / Re: Arctic Image of the Day
« on: April 01, 2017, 03:19:57 AM »
Nor this one

http://www.telegraph.co.uk/science/2017/03/31/polar-bears-spotted-scotland-animals-flee-melting-arctic-ice/

But a few corpses appear to have been washed up on Britains beaches in the last year.

The famous Lirpa Loof rears its head.   :)
I wonder if it will get the same response as the Isle of San Seriffe?

33
Arctic sea ice / Re: IJIS
« on: March 29, 2017, 04:54:23 PM »
Can't we stick with standard units? It is 70 times the size of Wales.

rydw i'n cytuno

mi hefyd

34
Arctic sea ice / Re: What are you expecting to see this melt Season?
« on: February 15, 2017, 05:06:11 PM »
"Once a ship can sail to the north pole without encountering any sea ice, and once images of blue sea to the horizon are transmitted, I think the message will have been sent."

There is an additional dimension to this, as messaging. Most people don't grok the full Arctic story. So fully ice free vs 1 million km^2 is 'blah;. But an ice free north pole is visceral.

Simple message. 2017? The year Santa drowned?

Last August two research vessels moored next to a floe at the N Pole with plenty of open water behind them.  Had a pretty easy trip to get there too.

35
Arctic sea ice / Re: The Mail's Great White Arctic Sea Ice Con
« on: February 10, 2017, 12:57:06 PM »
You may have a new friend in your ongoing battle against The Mail.

ROFL - She'll just have to join the queue! I'd like to think I've already got Geordie Greig by his dangly bits. I don't intend to let go even for the fragrant FLOTUS.

Apparently Wikipedia has dropped the Mail as a 'reliable source' and is in the process of editing a number of pages to reflect that.  Nothing to do with climate!
https://www.theguardian.com/technology/2017/feb/08/wikipedia-bans-daily-mail-as-unreliable-source-for-website

"The editors described the arguments for a ban as “centred on the Daily Mail’s reputation for poor fact checking, sensationalism and flat-out fabrication”."

36
Arctic sea ice / Re: The 2016/2017 freezing season
« on: January 23, 2017, 01:42:46 PM »
If everything settled down and allowed some recovery time, sure. But the Bering Sea, where thicker ice is getting pushed to now, is going through a storm with mslp of 944 at one point today and the Barents has not really settled down for a while now. Even when there is no major storm around, there seems to be rough seas all the time. As seaicesailor pointed out there is another storm on the way in a couple days. HYCOM is forecasting  large amounts of ice being exported including thick ice, which there is little left of. There are streaks of low concentration already all over the place, including some in the Beaufort. There are actually leads in the ESS, where the water is not quite as cool as it needs to be. The Laptev has been infiltrated with warm water (see below). Hudson Bay looks terrible, along with everything in that general area. It will take a huge amount of FDD's to make a recovery. Sorry, as I don't mean to spoil anyone's day.


Just took a look at the Barrow radar animation for the last 10 days, it shows a lot of mobile ice heading west in the first half of the period.

37
Arctic sea ice / Re: What are you expecting to see this melt Season?
« on: January 12, 2017, 09:19:46 PM »
I expect to see the 2017 minimum extent under 3 million KM2 and area under 2 million.  I expect we will have open water at the north pole (no pack ice within 100KM).  Volume may end up under 2000 KM3.

I agree, we had open water adjacent to the Pole last august, given recent developments I'd expect that to be surpassed this year.

https://www.instagram.com/p/BJatI8oj06U/

38
Arctic sea ice / Re: Stupid Questions :o
« on: January 11, 2017, 01:31:17 PM »
If you want a taste of a true flooded Earth, I'd read Flood by Stephen Baxter instead.

I always saw sea level rise as being somewhat less of an issue over, say, general climate erraticness causing problems for agriculture.

As a resident of South Florida, living in a home situated atop an ancient sandbar positioned between the rising Gulf and the soon-to-be-flooded Everglades, sea level rise is most definitely near the top of my personal list of concerns. ;-)

Jim, have you ever visited the Bok Tower in Lake Wales? It sits on the highest point on the Florida peninsula at 298 feet above sea level.

It's quite an impressive place, I went there with my daughter and granddaughter last year.

39
Arctic sea ice / Re: IJIS
« on: January 10, 2017, 03:41:22 PM »
thank you, welsh? is that the correct name for what would be "walisisch" in german? learning every day, may guess was on something else though, thanks again.

sorry for OT, just taking the opportunity to learn something really new :-) nice weekend all  8)
It's the english name equivalent to 'walisisch', it's derived from the anglo-saxon for 'foreigner'.  The correct name is 'cymraeg', the word for 'english' is 'saesneg' which comes from the welsh word for 'saxon'.

40
Arctic sea ice / Re: IJIS
« on: January 06, 2017, 06:27:25 PM »
Blwyddyn newydd dda i chi hefyd.  Cymru am byth!

41
Arctic sea ice / Re: I'm updating the ASIG next week. Any tips?
« on: January 06, 2017, 02:28:33 PM »
Given the demise of the CT area following the satellite problem I would definitely like to see Wipneus's version available.

42
Arctic sea ice / Re: The 2016/2017 freezing season
« on: December 25, 2016, 02:15:48 PM »
A Merry Christmas, Happy Hanukkah etc. to all at the Arctic Sea Ice Forum!

Let me see if I can embed this festive tweet. Apparently not! For DB techs everywhere:



He's making a Database
He's sorting it twice
SELECT * from contacts WHERE behavior = 'nice'
SQL clause is coming to town!


Merry Christmas everybody.

43
Arctic sea ice / Re: Stupid Questions :o
« on: December 21, 2016, 02:30:17 PM »
Regarding "potentially in a run-away mode until it hits some limit":  Just would would form that limit?  A cloudy Earth?
I am currently reading up on increased precipitation and carbon cycles.  I have found info on the way that increased CO2 produces increased water uptake, hence increased precipitation.  Increased precipitation as rain appears to be good for plants -
http://earthobservatory.nasa.gov/Features/CarbonHydrology/

Another factor which I am considering is the uptake of CO2 in rain.  Pure water rapidly absorbs CO2.  Rain would seem to take CO2 from the atmosphere and conduct it into aquifers, rivers and oceans.

Does anyone have any info to quantify this CO2 sink?

About 5x10^14 m^3 p.a. of rain globally.  The solubility of CO2 in fresh water is ~2 gms/l or 2kg/m^3 at 15ºC and 1atm partial pressure so that would be ~10^15x0.0004 kg/yr or 4x10^8 tonnes/yr. If my calculations are right that's about 5% of fossil fuel CO2 production.  Of course it's unlikely that it's all permanently sequestered. HTH

44
Arctic sea ice / Re: The 2016/2017 freezing season
« on: October 24, 2016, 03:19:41 PM »

What to expect in the future?

http://www.nims.go.jp/water/temp_water.html
Temperature of ice water in a glass



It would be cool if there were really clear practical descriptive experiments based around this principle to describe to people what happens when the arctic melts completely.

Nice to see that sort of an image again. Thanks.

Trouble is this is characteristic of freshwater not seawater, you'd see something quite different with saltwater.

45
Arctic sea ice / Re: IJIS
« on: September 30, 2016, 08:53:43 PM »
Not buying your "seeding" explanations as much as I am not a believer in any heat trapping due to fast refreezing.
Unless there is a pulse of water from the Pacific coincidental with the refreezing of Beaufort and Chukchi seas.

I'm not sure I buy "my" ice seeding argument either. Rather I think my revised point was increased surface area interface between existing ice and cold water capable of becoming ice.  Just like such interface melts ice floes around the edges during melt season, it should have a parallel reverse effect when conditions are right for freezing. Notice the Wrangel arm is growing from within itself rather than ice popping up out of nowhere in Beaufort's open water.

I agree with you that I don't see how ice "traps heat," especially the idea that heat is trapped "deep in the ocean".  Heat rises to the surface because warmer water is less dense and cold water sinks because it's more dense.  Therefore, water at the top that refreezes into ice should already be the warmest water starting from the surface and going straight down to the bottom.  Any "heat" under the ice should rise and accumulate under the ice and cause localized melting, which then cools it to around the freezing point of salt water.

You're thinking of freshwater, the density depends on both temperature and salinity and there is a 'halocline' where temperature is a maximum.  If the ice is absent for a protracted period it's likely that storms etc. could mix the surface waters and give a different behavior.
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Halocline#/media/File:Arctic_sea_temperature_salinity_plot.svg

46
Arctic sea ice / Re: The 2016/2017 freezing season
« on: September 25, 2016, 12:38:48 PM »
Very informative plots, thanks A-Team! The re-freeze is impressive.

... There must have been hellacious winds to have blown so much ice eastward in the CAA channels and lower CAB, the effect extends over thousands of km.
  It's much too fast for wind-blown ice, which will typically travel at 5-10% of the wind speed.

  Instead, the water near to the ice is seen to be more susceptible to freeze-over. Speculating on some potential reasons:
  - fresher water, as is where ice has recently melted (& maybe with some residual ice still there)?
  - less windy near the ice?
  - colder water &/or air near the ice?

From the travels of O buoy 14 we know that it has been transported from the open ocean into the strait over the last month.  Started off in open water and then met up with the ice and was swept into the strait with it.

47
Arctic sea ice / Re: Northwest Passage thread
« on: September 13, 2016, 02:32:00 PM »
Well Amundsen announced to the world that he'd completed the NW Passage before he crossed the Arctic Circle so there is precedence.  ;)

48
Arctic sea ice / Re: Northwest Passage thread
« on: September 08, 2016, 09:29:37 PM »
Northabout is on the move again:

http://GreatWhiteCon.info/2016/08/northabout-braves-the-northwest-passage/#Sep-04

and so is Polar Bound:

http://GreatWhiteCon.info/2016/08/david-scott-cowper-makes-history-again/#Sep-04

Maybe they'll meet up somewhere shortly?

They just did:
SHIPSLOG Half Day Update 8 Sept

08/09/2016
N68 52 W 105 01 pressure 1002, water 5.8C, Air 3C 15.15 UTC 8 Sept

"Still punching against the wind, and still choppy seas. Hoping the wind will turn in next couple of hours. Heading down the coast, Cambridge bay behind now. Into Queen Mauld Gulf,

Just saw Polar Bound."

49
Arctic sea ice / Re: The 2016 melting season
« on: September 03, 2016, 02:51:04 PM »
I have one question about the different values of sea ice extent the IJIS(JAXA) and NSIDC give.
 I see that they give similar values(not identical but similar) generally, but for 2016 they give completely different.

NSIDC has 2 values: the daily value and the 5-day average daily value. On the public information, like the Chartic graph, it uses the last one. When there are big drops, the 5-day average has an important lag.

Date                 Daily        5-day avg.
28-ago-16        4.707   
29-ago-16        4.547   
30-ago-16        4.469   
31-ago-16        4.388   
01-sep-16        4.278         4.4778

Data on the daily value (2016):
ftp://sidads.colorado.edu/DATASETS/NOAA/G02135/north/daily/data/NH_seaice_extent_nrt_v2.csv

Which means that strictly the 5 day average represents 2.5 days earlier, so the 1 Sept average should be quoted for 30 Aug. When you do that you'll see a good correspondence between the daily and the 5-day when you do that (except when you have large fluctuations).

50
Arctic sea ice / Re: Northern Sea Route thread
« on: August 29, 2016, 12:50:47 PM »
At this moment, they appear to be anchored just outside of North Salt Lagoon, which contains the single pier of Barrow harbor (at least that's how I interpret the images). I thought at first they were blowing by Barrow, but no. To get to the harbor, they had to go around Point Barrow, and then come back in from the other side.

They had a planned stop over in Barrow for resupply, maintenance and crew change.

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