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Messages - morganism

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1
Permafrost / Re: Toward Improved Discussions of Methane & Climate
« on: January 19, 2020, 12:01:56 PM »
nanning,

Your familiar with the quote that " sufficiantly advanced sciences appear to be magic".

The newer one is that sufficiantly advanced technology appears to be biology.

Check out Helion Energy for a simple and modular fusion engine is in buildout phase. Fits in a boxcar, and uses magneto accelerated plasmas to impact with each other. They then use thermoelects to pull off electricity. You could mount one in a ship. Or a spaceship. 

Luddism is only for 20 something's. Baby's, adults, and old folks need healthcare, lights, heat or cooling. And we will need bio reactors and 3D printing to offset material shipping, and manufacuring foods from algae.

If you want simple tech, change your focus to get rid of patents, and turn to asteroid mining for materials. People will keep inventing tech and med, but we need to optimize on best design, modular construction, and recyclable materials. Asteroid mining and lunar ISRU, can teach us to shovel in mine waste, or river siltation, or even landfill waste, and get back separated base materials.

There is a great group doing open source, simple design, robust and modular farm tech, think it's Open Source Tech, or something. Tech can multiply horsepower, and reduce damage to ecosystems more than simply reducing population back to 500k humans...

2
Permafrost / Re: Toward Improved Discussions of Methane & Climate
« on: January 19, 2020, 11:35:42 AM »
Graphene is a wonder material, and turns out edges control whether semi or full conductors. Likewise, adding strain, by twisting ribbons, allows you to attach conducting leads.

In ASTRO-geo, it's been found that 10% off all IDP's are nano diamond, and most stony meteorites appear to have same. And in those same dust particles, they have watched graphite re-shuttle molecules across their own structure to rebuild damaged portions, that they disrupted in experiments. They think that the graphite is also converted to diamond from cosmic ray hits.

2d surfaces, and carbon in particular, are pretty amazing.

3
Arctic sea ice / Re: Arctic Ocean salinity, temperature and waves
« on: January 19, 2020, 11:15:54 AM »
 Ice disc forms in river, not Arctic , but still...

Didn't see this last year.

https://www.theguardian.com/us-news/2020/jan/19/maines-giant-spinning-ice-disc-looks-like-its-reforming


4
Permafrost / Re: Toward Improved Discussions of Methane & Climate
« on: January 17, 2020, 10:16:14 PM »
These "strange metals" clathrates, really are going to be interesting to crustal geology too. If these materials can push phonons along on the 2D surface, it could change some basic theory of seismic signals, heat transfer, and even planetary magnetism.

Seems like the "filler" materials in the "cages" could also be usefull for tracking blobs and plumes across boundries too. Signatures of volcanic emissions may be better grouped than the micro glass structures they are using now too.

who knew clathrates were going to end up being classed as "strange metals"?

Gonna be interesting how it works out....

5
Permafrost / Re: Toward Improved Discussions of Methane & Climate
« on: January 17, 2020, 10:05:32 PM »
and out today in Science...

"With strange metals, there is an unusual connection between electrical resistance and temperature," said corresponding author Silke Bühler-Paschen of TU Wien's Institute for Solid State Physics. "In contrast to simple metals such as copper or gold, this does not seem to be due to the thermal movement of the atoms, but to quantum fluctuations at the absolute zero temperature."

"The hallmark of the quantum critical point that they were advancing with co-workers is that the quantum entanglement between spins and charges is critical.

"At a magnetic quantum critical point, conventional wisdom dictates that only the spin sector will be critical," he said. "But if the charge and spin sectors are quantum-entangled, the charge sector will end up being critical as well."

DOI: 10.1126/science.aag1595

https://phys.org/news/2020-01-strange-metals.html

6
Permafrost / Re: Toward Improved Discussions of Methane & Climate
« on: January 13, 2020, 11:08:07 PM »
A "diamond" cage of carbon and boron create a new type of clathrate.

https://carnegiescience.edu/news/superdiamond-carbon-boron-cages-can-trap-and-tap-different-properties

"The result is a 3D, carbon-based framework with diamond-like bonding that is recoverable to ambient conditions. But unlike diamond, the strontium atoms trapped in the cages make the material metallic—meaning it conducts electricity—with potential for superconductivity at notably high temperature.

What’s more, the properties of the clathrate can change depending on the types of guest atoms within the cages.

“The trapped guest atoms interact strongly with the host cages,” Strobel remarked. “Depending on the specific guest atoms present, the clathrate can be tuned from a semiconductor to a superconductor, all while maintaining robust, diamond-like bonds. Given the large number of possible substitutions, we envision an entirely new class of carbon-based materials with highly tunable properties.”

7
Developers Corner / Change Detection See changes in the map - hivemapper
« on: December 12, 2019, 11:29:26 AM »
Built in machine intelligence
Augment human analysis with AI built directly into your map.

https://hivemapper.com/change-detection


9
Arctic sea ice / Re: The 2019/2020 freezing season
« on: November 02, 2019, 10:10:27 PM »
Alaska is having a hell of a time growing sea ice

https://mashable.com/article/arctic-sea-ice-alaska-will-not-grow/

""It has been a remarkable freeze-season (or lack of) so far," noted Zack Labe, a climate scientist and PhD candidate at the University of California, Irvine. "Overall, the last month has featured large areas of open water north of Alaska and Siberia."

10
Consequences / Re: Near Term Human Extinction
« on: September 29, 2019, 11:20:43 AM »
Facing Extinction
by Catherine Ingram

https://www.catherineingram.com/facingextinction/

Because the subject is so tragic and because it can scare or anger people, this is not an essay I ever wanted to write; it is one I would have wanted to read along the way.  But the words on these pages are meant only for those who are ready for them. I offer no hope or solutions for our continuation, only companionship and empathy to you, the reader, who either knows or suspects that there is no hope or solution to be found. What we now need to find is courage.


11
Policy and solutions / Re: Electric cars
« on: September 21, 2019, 10:19:39 PM »
I didn't realize the alane hydrogen systems had ratcheted up their density so much. Very nice setups now.

https://ardica.com/fuel/

https://www.nationaldefensemagazine.org/articles/2017/5/26/fuel-cells-fail-to-make-inroads-with-the-military

https://patents.google.com/patent/US8377415B2/en

"We are developing a patented, next generation process that greatly reduces the need for the more expensive feedstock components. By recycling spent aluminum back into this process, large quantities of Alane can be produced at extremely low cost. And with that achievement, the full potential of this powerful compound can be unlocked."

12
Consequences / Re: Climate change, the ocean, agriculture, and FOOD
« on: September 20, 2019, 01:15:01 AM »
Peer Reviewed Research on Climate Change by USDA Authors
January 2017-August 2019

https://www.politico.com/f/?id=0000016d-4aa1-de7e-ab6d-efb938460000

Research Tags:
Forestry: Forests, trees, wildfires
Weather: Temperature change,
temperature variability,
drought, storms, and wildfires
Soil: Soil health,
soil carbon content,
and nutrients
Water: Bodies of water,
health of water bodies
Crops:
Commodities
grown for human consumption or animal feed
Livestock: Animals raised by humans
Wildlife: Wild, non-domesticated animals
Emissions: Greenhouse gas emissions,
criteria pollution emissions
Energy: Electricity,
renewable energy,
heating,
biofuels
Grassland: Meadows, savannahs, prairies, tundras
Economics: Money, commodity prices,
farm economics
Research: Tools, modeling, designs, other items related to research

13
Science / Re: The Science of Aerosols
« on: September 19, 2019, 03:22:48 AM »
Dust from a giant asteroid crash caused an ancient ice age

http://www.fieldmuseum.org/about/press/dust-giant-asteroid-crash-caused-ancient-ice-age

“Our hypothesis is that the large amounts of extraterrestrial dust over a timeframe of at least two million years played an important role in changing the climate on Earth, contributing to cooling,” says Heck.

“Our results show for the first time that such dust, at times, has cooled Earth dramatically,”


14
Policy and solutions / Re: Oil and Gas Issues
« on: September 19, 2019, 03:03:43 AM »
A new way to convert carbon dioxide into the building block for sustainable liquid fuels was very efficient in tests and did not have the reaction that destroys the conventional device.

https://news.stanford.edu/2019/09/16/catalyst-opens-way-sustainable-fuels-carbon-dioxide/

" Stripping oxygen from CO2 to make CO gas is the first step in turning CO2 into nearly any liquid fuel and other products, like synthetic gas and plastics. The addition of hydrogen to CO can produce fuels like synthetic diesel and the equivalent of jet fuel. The team envisions using renewable power to make the CO and for subsequent conversions, which would result in carbon-neutral products."

"One advantage sustainable liquid fuels could have over the electrification of transportation is that they could use the existing gasoline and diesel infrastructure, like engines, pipelines and gas stations."

"one with cerium oxide and the other with conventional nickel-based catalysts. The ceria electrode remained stable, while carbon deposits damaged the nickel electrode, significantly shortening the catalyst’s lifetime."

15
Science / Re: Trump Administration Assaults on Science and the Environment
« on: September 17, 2019, 12:01:47 AM »
Not just Kavanaugh: Another alarming reason to fear the Supreme Court

https://www.washingtonpost.com/opinions/2019/09/16/not-just-kavanaugh-another-alarming-reason-fear-supreme-court/?noredirect=on

"A new study offers an alarming answer to that question. It concludes that even if Democrats win the White House and Congress, the high court will likely strike down much of what they do to address the climate change crisis, even as the window for action is closing, perhaps exacerbating the threat of civilizational catastrophe.

The study represents a serious effort — one undertaken by two well-known academics — to develop a realistic projection of how the conservative justices might rule on climate legislation. As such, it may also fuel discussion among the Democratic presidential candidates about their various proposals to expand the court.

“Climate change legislation,” the report starkly concludes, is “unlikely to survive judicial review,” at a time when “leading scientists have concluded that only twelve years remain to avoid planetary climate change catastrophe.”

What makes the study interesting is that it uses the justices’ past rulings, as well as other conservative legal scholarship, to elaborate a picture of the specific legal doctrines they might employ to strike down efforts to legislate against global warming. The study concludes that their records clearly demonstrate they will have many such doctrines to weaponize in this fashion.

pdf:

https://static1.squarespace.com/static/5ce33e8da6bbec0001ea9543/t/5d7d429025734e4ae9c92070/1568490130130/Supreme+Court+Will+Overturn+Climate+Legislation+FINAL.pdf

16
Consequences / Re: Pathogens and their impacts
« on: September 15, 2019, 12:59:31 AM »
Rare Mosquito-Borne Disease That Kills 1/3 of The Infected Is Spreading Across The US

"At least a dozen cases of eastern equine encephalitis, a dangerous mosquito-borne illness, have been confirmed across the US so far this season. Two people have died from the disease.

https://www.sciencealert.com/previously-rare-deadly-mosquito-borne-disease-is-starting-to-spread-across-the-us

17
Permafrost / Re: Arctic Methane Release
« on: September 15, 2019, 12:46:06 AM »
Microorganisms reduce methane release from the ocean

june 19th

"Here we find the largest oxygen free area in the oceans - an area of more than 1 million square kilometers, where part of the water column is completely oxygen-free. This oxygen-free water contains methane.

Microorganisms remove 80 pct. of the methane produced"

The big question now is which microorganisms are at play and how? The researchers have got a hint that highly specialized bacteria and so-called archaea (bacterial-like organisms) are involved."

http://spaceref.com/news/viewpr.html?pid=54597

18
Policy and solutions / Re: Direct Air Capture (of Carbon Dioxide)
« on: September 15, 2019, 12:22:25 AM »
2 new catalyst tech coming soon. Catalysts are used to create 35% global GDP.

https://chemistry.harvard.edu/news/big-game-hunting-catalysts

"So, to contain the reactive nitrene, first-author Carsch built a massive cage in the form of a ligand. The ligand—like organic shrubbery surrounding the copper nitrene pair—keeps the catalyst intact. Cut back that shrubbery and introduce another substance—like a carbon-hydrogen bond—and the fiery nitrene gets to work. "

Synthesis of a copper-supported triplet nitrene complex pertinent to copper-catalyzed amination. Science, 2019 DOI: 10.1126/science.aax4423


and a new nano crystalline structure allows cranks up reactivity, and allows to "re-condition" expensive platinum surfaces.

https://news.northwestern.edu/stories/2019/09/gem-like-nanoparticles-of-precious-metals-shine-as-catalysts/

"The method is a general one; the study shows it works with five monometallic nanoparticles and a library of bimetallic nanoparticles, spanning seven different metals, including platinum, cobalt and nickel."
 “This type of technology is ready to be scaled up and utilized widely in the catalysis community,”

19
Policy and solutions / Re: Renewable Energy
« on: September 03, 2019, 10:06:44 PM »
Prototype Reactor Turns CO2 Into Formic Acid, Pure Liquid Fuel

"With its current reactor, the lab generated formic acid continuously for 100 hours with negligible degradation of the reactor's components, including the nanoscale catalysts. Wang suggested the reactor could be easily retooled to produce such higher-value products as acetic acid, ethanol or propanol fuels."

https://www.science20.com/news_staff/prototype_reactor_turns_co2_into_formic_acid_pure_liquid_fuel-241357

20
Actually, they found heat stress causes forests to be carbon emitters, even without fires, IIRC. One paper said that if you lose 20% of a forest, it won't come back.

I would think a farmers almanac would be a pretty hot trade item, along with portable sundials.

Govt will only bring supplies to midsize cities, they want to empty out large ones, but most plans i have seen hav Gov deploying supplies to freeways running into mid size cities near Nat Guard deployments. Keeps folks moving, instead of looting and burning out those cities that are still functional.


21
Science / Re: A list of missing feedbacks
« on: August 31, 2019, 01:33:35 AM »
x-post from geoengineering thread.

It seems this could explain some of the hydroxyl reduction, and methane concentration spikes. If more open water, then more waves. More waves, more spray. More spray, more hydroxyl reduction from the below H2o2 reaction.

"tests confirmed that water microdroplets spontaneously form hydrogen peroxide, that smaller microdroplets produced higher concentrations of the molecule, and that hydrogen peroxide was not lost when the microdroplets recombined into bulk water.

The researchers ruled out a number of possible explanations before arriving at what they argue is the most likely explanation for hydrogen peroxide's presence. They suggest that a strong electric field near the surface of water microdroplets in air triggers hydroxyl molecules to bind into hydrogen peroxide."

https://phys.org/news/2019-08-chemists-microdroplets-spontaneously-hydrogen-peroxide.html

www.pnas.org/cgi/doi/10.1073/pnas.1911883116

22
Consequences / Re: Hurricane Season 2019
« on: August 31, 2019, 01:08:51 AM »
With a blocking front headed towards AL/FL, it may stall Dorian long enough for the next 'cane to catch up.
The steering winds for that new one aren't blocked, or looping, so it may blow thru the Keys Gap, and then suck back up behind that blocking high, giving a double hit to NC/SC...

23
Policy and solutions / Re: Geoengineering, another rush for money?
« on: August 28, 2019, 10:21:30 PM »
"tests confirmed that water microdroplets spontaneously form hydrogen peroxide, that smaller microdroplets produced higher concentrations of the molecule, and that hydrogen peroxide was not lost when the microdroplets recombined into bulk water.

The researchers ruled out a number of possible explanations before arriving at what they argue is the most likely explanation for hydrogen peroxide's presence. They suggest that a strong electric field near the surface of water microdroplets in air triggers hydroxyl molecules to bind into hydrogen peroxide."

https://phys.org/news/2019-08-chemists-microdroplets-spontaneously-hydrogen-peroxide.html

www.pnas.org/cgi/doi/10.1073/pnas.1911883116

24
Policy and solutions / Re: Geoengineering, another rush for money?
« on: August 25, 2019, 12:15:30 AM »
Enhanced (adsortive) Natural Gas Storage to Help Reduce Global Warming

" Of these 29 distinct chemical structures, COP-150 was particularly noteworthy as it achieved a high deliverable gravimetric methane working capacity when cycled between 5 and 100 bar at 273 K, which is 98% of the total uptake capacity. This result surpassed the target set by the United States Department of Energy (US DOE).

COP-150 is the first ever structure to fulfil both the gravimetric and volumetric requirements of the US DOE for successful vehicular use, and the total cost to produce the COP-150 adsorbent was only 1 USD per kilogram.

COP-150 can be produced using freely available and easily accessible plastic materials, and moreover, its synthesis takes place at room temperature, open to the air, and no previous purification of the chemicals is required. The pressure-triggered flexible structure of COP-150 is also advantageous in terms of the total working capacity of deliverable methane for real applications."

https://www.kaist.ac.kr/_prog/_board/?mode=V&no=100841&code=ed_news&site_dvs_cd=en&menu_dvs_cd=0601&list_typ=B&skey=&sval=&smonth=&site_dvs=&GotoPage=

This study, reported in Nature Energy on July 8, was supported by National Research Foundation of Korea (NRF) grants ( NRF-2016R1A2B4011027, NRF-2017M3A7B4042140, and NRF-2017M3A7B4042235

25
a blog post by one of the authors of the above mentioned "West Antarctic ice loss influenced by internal climate variability and anthropogenic forcing"

 www.realclimate.org/index.php/archives/2019/08/the-antarctic-ice-sheet-is-melting-and-yeah-its-probably-our-fault/

"What Figure 1 suggests is that the winds in this region have varied between easterly and westerly from decade to decade, throughout the 20th century. This is the natural variability associated with ENSO, and is no surprise. But in addition, there is a long-term trend. When averaged over several decades, the winds can be seen to have shifted from mean easterly in the 1920s through 1980s, to mean westerly thereafter.

The trend in the winds is small, and easily lost within the variability of individual model ensemble members, but it is robust (it occurs in all the ensemble members) and statistically significant. Moreover, we know its cause (at least in the model experiments): radiative forcing. Although these experiments also include radiative forcing changes resulting from the ozone hole, it’s clear that the trend in the winds begins well before ozone depletion begins in 1970s. Thus, the key forcing is greenhouse gases."

26
Policy and solutions / Re: Geoengineering, another rush for money?
« on: August 17, 2019, 11:43:16 PM »
Hadn't seen this one- reducing the number of trees in Siberia, to increase its albedo ?

https://elidourado.com/blog/dawn-of-geoengineering/

"The core idea is delightfully counterintuitive: Siberia has too many trees. In ages past, Siberia used to be grassland, and today it is mostly forest. Although trees can sequester carbon in their trunks and branches (at least until they burn or decompose), Siberian forests have significant drawbacks with respect to climate change.

First, forests don’t reflect a lot of solar radiation. A treeless, grassy Siberia would increase Earth’s albedo, reflecting more solar energy back into space. Forests absorb more solar radiation and put it into the ground as heat.

Second, forests are poor habitats for snow-trampling herd animals. In the winter, a thick layer of snow acts as an insulator on the permafrost, preventing frigid above-ground temperatures from reaching deep into the Earth’s crust, where they can shore up the frozenness of the permafrost. When large herds of grazing animals trample the snow, its insulating properties are reduced and the permafrost can hard freeze. Forests reduce these snow-trampling grazing populations."

27
A puffy pink seaweed that can stop cows from burping out methane is being primed for mass farming by Australian researchers.

https://www.goodnewsnetwork.org/gamechanging-pink-seaweed-reduces-cow-emissions/

“If we’re able to work out how to scale up the seaweed to such a level to that can feed all of the cows and the sheep and the goats around the world, then it’s going to have a huge impact on the climate; it’s going to address a whole lot of carbon-neutral agendas that different countries have; and it’s ultimately going to save us all billions of dollars,” he concluded.

This article was reprinted from the University of the Sunshine Coast.

Video interview at site

28
Permafrost / Re: Arctic Methane Release
« on: August 12, 2019, 12:20:36 AM »
undark.org

The Methane Detectives: On the Trail of a Global Warming Mystery

"Scientists continue to offer competing hypotheses to explain the global uptick, and there is no shortage of potential suspects.

Only three elements of the global methane budget are large enough to be plausible culprits: microbial emissions (from livestock, agriculture, and wetlands); fossil fuel emissions; and the chemical process by which methane is scrubbed from the atmosphere."

https://undark.org/article/methane-global-warming-climate-change-mystery/

think this was posted earlier, but a pdf link

Very Strong Atmospheric Methane Growth in the 4 Years
2014-2017: Implications for the Paris Agreement

https://agupubs.onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/pdf/10.1029/2018GB006009

29
Consequences / Re: Prepping for Collapse
« on: August 02, 2019, 11:38:54 PM »
CDMA Network Retirement (now extended to end o 2020)

"As we complete our network transition to 4G and 5G, we at Verizon would like to keep you up to date with some important activities.

We are moving all devices to our HD Voice LTE network, which offers superior coverage and performance compared to previous generation networks.  Starting January 1, 2020, Verizon will no longer allow any CDMA (3G and 4G Non-HD Voice) 'Like-for-Like' device changes.

Additional changes include but are not limited to:

    Starting 1/1/2020:
        No Longer Allowed:
            Transfer of Service, moving from one account to another account
            Bring Your Own Device (BYOD), providing a CDMA device to activate on an existing line
            Swapping one CDMA device for another CDMA device
            Roaming outside of the US

https://www.verizonwireless.com/support/knowledge-base-218813/

This hurts all of us in the western US, where CDMA/Verizin is the only thing that works in mountainous areas.

If you just need to contact your neighbors and you are pretty close, you can use a Go-tenna setup for making a text network over low power radio.

If you have good internet, you can set up a VoIP setup.

https://www.lifewire.com/free-sip-softphone-apps-3426673

5G has VERY limited range, and line of sight basically. In town, they are planning on making ALL routers open as wi-fi repeaters to make up for it, in the mountains, you will basically be losing fone service.

If you are going to add an CDMA/verizon fone before the deadline, make SURE it handles "digital voice" "LTE+" or HDvoice". All others won't work once they go to the new LTE platform.

I would be tempted to buy an el-cheapo , chinese, dual-sim card fone now (huewei?), activate it, and order another sim to use with the VoIP apps listed above.

I did get a Samsung J Luna Sky Pro, (in CDMA and LTE) which said it had HDvoice, but when received, it had no settings for that , just a "stereo voice" feature, which some say still counts. (tracfone)

If comms is important to you, you may want to get a teen to help you figure out what to do soon, before you can't add a new CDMA fone in your area.

for real tech and answers, you need to work the Howard Forums, where the techs hang out.

30
Consequences / Re: Places becoming less livable
« on: August 01, 2019, 09:43:44 AM »
Lessons from a genocide can prepare humanity for climate apocalypse

"If the political and social ramifications of global warming are anything like what happened during the last major climate fluctuation, the “Little Ice Age” of the 17th century, then we should expect a similarly horrific succession of famines, plagues, and wars. Historian Geoffrey Parker estimates that second-order effects of 1 °C global cooling that started around 1650 may have wiped out a third of the human population. Records from parts of China, Poland, Belarus, and Germany indicate losses of more than 50%."

https://www.technologyreview.com/s/613343/lessons-from-a-genocide-can-prepare-humanity-for-climate-apocalypse/


31
Consequences / Re: Prepping for Collapse
« on: July 30, 2019, 12:31:01 AM »
Currency (Restrictions on the Use of Cash) Bill 2019 (Australia)

"
14 days left to have your say
blackeconomy@treasury.gov
At a glance summary of how the cash payment limit will work 176.33 KB

In the 2018-19 Budget, the Government announced it would introduce an economy-wide cash payment limit of $10,000 for payments made or accepted by businesses for goods and services. Transactions equal to, or in excess of this amount would need to be made using the electronic payment system or by cheque. The Black Economy Taskforce recommended this action to tackle tax evasion and other criminal activities."

https://www.treasury.gov.au/consultation/c2019-t395788

32
Permafrost / Re: Permafrost general science thread
« on: July 29, 2019, 09:30:55 AM »
Pluto’s ocean is capped and insulated by gas hydrates

"Clathrate hydrates act as a thermal insulator, preventing the ocean from completely freezing while keeping the ice shell cold and immobile. The most likely clathrate guest gas is methane, derived from precursor bodies and/or cracking of organic materials in the hot rocky core. Nitrogen molecules initially contained and/or produced later in the core would probably not be trapped as clathrate hydrates, instead supplying the nitrogen-rich surface and atmosphere. The formation of a thin clathrate hydrate layer cap to a subsurface ocean may be an important generic mechanism to maintain long-lived subsurface oceans in relatively large but minimally heated icy satellites and Kuiper belt objects.

https://www.nature.com/articles/s41561-019-0369-8

33
Permafrost / Re: Siberian permafrost hole/blowout
« on: July 25, 2019, 11:41:41 AM »
Looks like major slumping in the burn areas themselves ?

https://www.roscosmos.ru/26604/

34
Policy and solutions / Re: Renewable Energy
« on: July 25, 2019, 09:50:45 AM »
carbon nanotubes boost efficiency by channeling heat to harvestable photons.

Naik said adding the emitters to standard solar cells could boost their efficiency from the current peak of about 22%. “By squeezing all the wasted thermal energy into a small spectral region, we can turn it into electricity very efficiently,” he said. “The theoretical prediction is that we can get 80% efficiency.”

https://news.rice.edu/2019/07/12/rice-device-channels-heat-into-light/?T=AU

there are others also working on this step, most with nano dots or wells.

35
Policy and solutions / Re: Renewable Energy
« on: July 23, 2019, 01:23:43 AM »
Magnet doubles hydrogen yield from water splitting

"They coated a nickel foam anode with magnetic nickel zinc ferrite and used it in an electrolyzer running at about 1.6 V. When they placed a commercial neodymium magnet next to the anode, it roughly doubled the current density at the anode without requiring any additional voltage. This doubled the rate of oxygen production and caused an equivalent increase in hydrogen output."

https://cen.acs.org/physical-chemistry/Magnet-doubles-hydrogen-yield-water/97/web/2019/06

36
Permafrost / Re: Siberian permafrost hole/blowout
« on: July 23, 2019, 12:38:21 AM »
"The record heat in #Siberia this summer not only has caused massive fires, but large areas of rapid permafrost melt and resultant ground collapse."

https://twitter.com/rgatess/status/1152943527824777216


37
Consequences / Re: Floods
« on: July 08, 2019, 11:53:29 PM »
It's not over...

This developing low may go to trop storm. Then it gets nasty with the huge, cool low coming in from the PNW. All that moisture, and the cold front running into a TS.. I expect a huge tornado outbreak, and major flooding in the lower Miss.

https://www.wunderground.com/cat6/Invest-92L-Likely-be-Tropical-Storm-Gulf-Mexico-Saturday?cm_ven=cat6-widget

38
The rest / Rotator cuff tear physical therapy helps
« on: July 06, 2019, 10:01:54 PM »
"Rehab for this type of injury typically involves non-weight bearing, open-chain exercises. Patients might hold a band and rotate their arm.

USC’s research protocol involves what are called closed-chain exercises. Often these exercises rely on a patient’s own body weight — including push-ups, pull-ups, dips and reverse rows — while the end of the limb is braced."

https://news.usc.edu/141175/shoulder-injury-left-a-woman-in-excruciating-pain-but-therapy-made-her-whole-again/

39
Consequences / Re: Effects of Climate Change on the biosphere
« on: July 06, 2019, 08:32:49 PM »
Deserts 'greening' from rising CO2

https://www.csiro.au/en/News/News-releases/2013/Deserts-greening-from-rising-CO2

"Increased levels of carbon dioxide (CO2) have helped boost green foliage across the world’s arid regions over the past 30 years through a process called CO2 fertilisation, according to CSIRO research."

40
Policy and solutions / Re: If not Capitalism... then What? And, How?
« on: June 30, 2019, 11:27:51 PM »
America’s Monopoly Crisis Hits the Military

https://www.theamericanconservative.com/articles/americas-monopoly-crisis-hits-the-military/

"This shift happened because Wall Street, or “the LBO (leveraged buy-out) guys” as Hickey put it, bought up manufacturing facilities in the 1990s and moved them to China.

“The middle-class Americans who did the manufacturing work, all that capability, machine tools, knowledge, it just became worthless, driven by the stock price,” he said. “The national ability to produce is a national treasure. If you can’t produce you won’t consume, and you can’t defend yourself.”

"But it’s not just the dual-use commercial manufacturing base that is collapsing. Our policy empowering Wall Street and offshoring has also damaged the more specialized defense base, which directly produces weaponry and equipment for the military.

How pervasive is the loss of such capacity? In September 2018, the Department of Defense released findings of its analysis into its supply chain. The results highlighted how fragile our ability to supply our own military has become.

The report listed dozens of militarily significant items and inputs with only one or two domestic producers, or even none at all. Many production facilities are owned by companies that are financially vulnerable and at high risk of being shut down. Some of the risk comes from limited production capability. Mortar tubes, for example, are made on just one production line, and some Marine aircraft parts are made by just one company—one which recently filed for bankruptcy."

41
Policy and solutions / LEGAL ADAPTATION TO CLIMATE DISASTER
« on: June 30, 2019, 11:23:53 PM »
pdf:  http://columbiaclimatelaw.com/files/2016/09/6-Gerrard-formatted-embedded.pdf

Legal rec for white roofs, AC usage, and occupational guidelines.
From LittleRock Law Review.

"In  the  occupational  setting,  OSHA  should  establish  formal  binding
standards  for  heat  exposure  and  relief, not  just  guidelines,  and  it  should conduct  frequent  inspections  to  ensure  compliance. 
For  outdoor  workers, precautions similar to those adopted by the United States Armed Forces and California should be required."

42
Policy and solutions / Re: Aviation
« on: June 29, 2019, 11:20:50 PM »
forgot to add the pdf link for the microwave cavity homework, should also look for "EmDrive".

http://web.mit.edu/22.09/ClassHandouts/Charged%20Particle%20Accel/CHAP12.PDF

43
Consequences / Re: Floods
« on: June 29, 2019, 11:10:14 PM »
Siberian flooding ongoing

https://www.irk.ru/

44
Science / Re: The Science of Aerosols
« on: June 29, 2019, 11:07:43 PM »
Hot off the new EarthArXiv

Large uncertainty in volcanic aerosol radiative forcing derived from ice cores

https://eartharxiv.org/mbtg8/

"Currently, reconstructions of pre-20th century volcanic forcing are derived from sulfate concentrations measured in polar ice cores, predominantly using a relationship between average ice sheet sulfate deposition and stratospheric sulfate aerosol based on a single explosive eruption - the 1991 eruption of Mt. Pinatubo. Here we derive volcanic radiative forcing from ice-core-records using a perturbed parameter ensemble of aerosol-climate model simulations of explosive eruptions, which enables the uncertainty to be estimated. We find that a very wide range of eruptions with different sulfur dioxide emissions, eruption latitudes, emission altitudes and in different seasons produce ice-sheet sulfate deposition consistent with ice-core-derived values for eruptions during the last 2500 years. Consequently, we find a large uncertainty in the volcanic forcing, suggesting uncertainties on the global mean temperature response of more than 1C for several past explosive eruptions, which has not been previously accounted for."

45
should have a scenario where we try geo-engineering , and it works !

then the permafrost meltout happens, and the methane kills all the hydroxyls, and creates permanent noctilucent cloud cover, stopping most sunlight from getting to the ground, ice age starts, and hello glaciers.


46
Policy and solutions / Re: Aviation
« on: June 29, 2019, 08:45:24 PM »
The Navy’s Patented Hybrid Underwater Aerospace Craft

https://www.thedrive.com/the-war-zone/28729/docs-show-navy-got-ufo-patent-granted-by-warning-of-similar-chinese-tech-advances


"Pais is named as the inventor on four separate patents for which the U.S. Navy is the assignee: a curiously-shaped “High Frequency Gravitational Wave Generator;” a room temperature superconductor; an electromagnetic ‘force field’ generator that could deflect asteroids; and, perhaps the strangest of all, one titled “Craft Using An Inertial Mass Reduction Device.” While all are pretty outlandish-sounding, the latter is the one that the Chief Technical Officer of the Naval Aviation Enterprise personally vouched for in a letter to the USPTO, claiming the Chinese are already developing similar capabilities."

https://patents.google.com/?inventor=Salvatore+Pais&oq=inventor:(Salvatore+Pais)

 Craft using an inertial mass reduction device

A craft using an inertial mass reduction device comprises of an inner resonant cavity wall, an outer resonant cavity, and microwave emitters. The electrically charged outer resonant cavity wall and the electrically insulated inner resonant cavity wall form a resonant cavity. The microwave emitters

47
A new study suggests people stop gathering evidence earlier when the data supports their desired conclusion than when it supports the conclusion they wish was false.

https://phys.org/news/2019-06-people-bias.html

"Our research suggests that people start with an assumption that their favored conclusion is more likely true and weight each piece of evidence supporting it more than evidence opposing it. Because of that, people will find no need to gather additional information that could have revealed their conclusion to be false. They will stop the investigation as soon as the jury tilts in their favor"

Evidence accumulation is biased by motivation: A computational account

https://journals.plos.org/ploscompbiol/article?id=10.1371/journal.pcbi.1007089

"People tend to gather information before making judgments. As information is often unlimited a decision has to be made as to when the data is sufficient to reach a conclusion. Here, we show that the decision to stop gathering data is influenced by whether the data points towards the desired conclusion. Importantly, we characterize the factors that generate this behaviour using a valence-dependent evidence accumulation model. In a sequential sampling task participants sampled less evidence before reaching a desirable than undesirable conclusion. Despite being incentivized for accuracy, participants’judgments were biased towards believing they were in a desirable state. Fitting the data to an evidence accumulation model revealed this behavior was due both to the starting point and rate of evidence accumulation being biased towards desirable beliefs. Our results show that evidence accumulation is altered by what people want to believe and provide an account for how this modulation is generated."


48
Permafrost / Re: Arctic Methane Release
« on: June 27, 2019, 11:12:28 PM »
Just wanted to point out again, that the Ridiculously Resilient Ridge, the Four Corners stationary high, and the Iceland blocking high, are all pretty weird phenom.

The Four Corners high has not reappeared since the huge methane leaks from N New Mex/ S. Colorado have been imaged and possibly addressed.

If those stationary highs are indeed from leaks of methane to atmo, then it is likely that methane truly is making it to surface of ocean in large quantities.

edit: (As the Four Corners leak, was the largest in the Cont US.)

http://weatherwest.com/archives/5982


49
Permafrost / Re: Arctic Methane Release
« on: June 27, 2019, 11:00:05 PM »
xpost from carbon capture:

It appears that injecting regular air content nitrogen into methane hydrates, along with CO2, creates a slow moving wave of carbon diox hydrates, releasing the methane to be captured.

"shows that injecting air and carbon dioxide into methane ice deposits buried beneath the Gulf of Mexico could unlock vast natural gas energy resources while helping fight climate change by trapping the carbon dioxide underground.

https://phys.org/news/2019-06-natural-gas-carbon-dioxide.html

Nitrogen-Driven Chromatographic Separation During Gas Injection into Hydrate-Bearing Sediments, Water Resources Research (2019). DOI: 10.1029/2018WR023414

pdf:
https://agupubs.onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/pdf/10.1029/2018WR023414

"In the paper, the authors showed that a process in which one type of molecule trapped in hydrate is exchanged for another (called guest molecule exchange) is a two-stage process and not a single, simultaneous process, as it was previously thought to be.

First, nitrogen breaks down the methane hydrate. Second, the carbon dioxide crystalizes into a slow-moving wave of carbon dioxide hydrate behind the escaping methane gas.

The computer simulations indicate that the process can be repeated with increasing concentrations of carbon dioxide until the reservoir becomes saturated. The authors said that unlike some methods of carbon storage, this provides a ready incentive for industry to begin storing carbon dioxide, a major driver of climate change."

50
Policy and solutions / Re: Carbon Capture and Storage (CCS)
« on: June 27, 2019, 10:52:49 PM »
shows that injecting air and carbon dioxide into methane ice deposits buried beneath the Gulf of Mexico could unlock vast natural gas energy resources while helping fight climate change by trapping the carbon dioxide underground.

https://phys.org/news/2019-06-natural-gas-carbon-dioxide.html

Nitrogen-Driven Chromatographic Separation During Gas Injection into Hydrate-Bearing Sediments, Water Resources Research (2019). DOI: 10.1029/2018WR023414

"In the paper, the authors showed that a process in which one type of molecule trapped in hydrate is exchanged for another (called guest molecule exchange) is a two-stage process and not a single, simultaneous process, as it was previously thought to be.

First, nitrogen breaks down the methane hydrate. Second, the carbon dioxide crystalizes into a slow-moving wave of carbon dioxide hydrate behind the escaping methane gas.

The computer simulations indicate that the process can be repeated with increasing concentrations of carbon dioxide until the reservoir becomes saturated. The authors said that unlike some methods of carbon storage, this provides a ready incentive for industry to begin storing carbon dioxide, a major driver of climate change."

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