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Topics - Steven

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1
Arctic sea ice / Does El Niño affect Arctic sea ice?
« on: August 10, 2019, 11:36:10 AM »
This topic pops up occasionally on other threads, e.g. here.  If anyone thinks there is a connection between ENSO (El Niño and La Niña) and Arctic sea ice, or wants to refute such claims, they can post it here.  I looked at this a few years ago but couldn't find any correlation. 



Some data for ENSO:

Oceanic Niño Index (ONI):
https://origin.cpc.ncep.noaa.gov/products/analysis_monitoring/ensostuff/ONI_v5.php

Multivariate ENSO index (MEI):
https://www.esrl.noaa.gov/psd/enso/mei/#data


(El Niño shown in red, La Niña in blue)

2
Policy and solutions / What type of transportation do you use?
« on: April 13, 2019, 08:57:06 PM »
Personally I use a bicycle for everyday activities (commuting, shopping etc).  Occasionally I take a train for longer distances.

3
Arctic sea ice / Poll: year-end JAXA extent ranking
« on: November 22, 2018, 06:03:27 PM »
There was a similar poll last year.  I'm curious if the currently relatively high extent affects people's expectations.

Note that the bins are overlapping.

Previous years' JAXA extent for 31 December:

rank  year     extent [million km2]
1       2017     11.90
2       2016     12.10
3       2010     12.19
4       2015     12.27
5       2013     12.34
6       2012     12.43
7       2014     12.47
8       2008     12.49
9       2009     12.54
10     2004     12.56
11     2006     12.58
12     2005     12.59
13     2007     12.66
14     2011     12.68
15     2003     12.94



Current conditions: extent is pretty high at the moment due to the early freezing of Hudson and Baffin Bay.  Hudson Bay shouldn't play a role for the year-end extent (as it's always frozen by the end of December), but perhaps it could suggest early freezing of Labrador Sea and Gulf of St. Lawrence.  On the Pacific side of the Arctic, sea surface temperatures in both the Bering and Okhotsk Sea seem to be pretty high for the time of year, which may delay the freeze in those regions.

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