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Topics - Revillo

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Developers Corner / Daily Extent, Area and Volume Data
« on: May 27, 2016, 08:42:29 AM »
I'm interested in making some interactive visualizations that simultaneously include daily (Arctic) area, extent and volume figures for as far back as they're available.

So far I've found NSIDC extent values 1979-2014:
ftp://sidads.colorado.edu/DATASETS/NOAA/G02135/north/daily/data/NH_seaice_extent_final.csv

And PIOMAS daily volume 1979-2016 here:
http://psc.apl.uw.edu/research/projects/arctic-sea-ice-volume-anomaly/data/

I can't seem to find the IJIS data for area/extent, or another area dataset. I understand that these datasets aren't perfectly intercompatible but I'd like to get the rough idea across. Does anyone happn to have all this data in a format that's ready to go or know where I can find it? Thanks!

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Arctic sea ice / Arctic Sea Ice and the Keeling CO2 curve?
« on: September 12, 2013, 10:09:40 PM »
Annual fluctuations in the Keeling Curve (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Keeling_Curve) are officially attributed to photosynthetic cycles among the Northern Hemisphere's vegetation. Apparently the evidence for this is that fluctuations are more pronounced on the Northern Hemisphere than in the South.

I'm not a scientist, but something about this has been bothering me every time I read it in the literature. Would you really expect to see such even sinusoidal CO2 releases from seasonal plants?

Evidence suggests that these cycles in the CO2 curve have also gotten larger, leading some scientists to conclude that vegetation is increasing in the northern hemisphere, which I find absurd given all of the deforestation, floods, forest fires, droughts etc.

What if these annual fluctuations are really the result of Arctic Sea Ice melting? The loss of ice cover means a greater interface between air and sea, in which CO2 molecules can be absorbed by the oceans. This would coincide with a recent study stating that ocean acidification is most pronounced in Arctic waters.

Before I try to defend this any further, it would be nice to hear from an expert, so I thought I'd ask here. Thanks!


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