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Messages - JayW

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1
Arctic sea ice / Re: What the Buoys are telling
« on: August 13, 2017, 09:37:21 AM »


Isn't it drifting south (and into shallower waters)?

Latest location (triangle)


Look closer. It might have been at one time, but it's not moving south lately.

Here's a gif of the last 3 days.  I'd make it longer, but only have these days saved.



2
Arctic sea ice / Re: What the Buoys are telling
« on: August 13, 2017, 04:16:25 AM »
I was looking at ITP95.  It appears to me that the buoy is heading north from looking at the drift track.  Doesn't that imply that warm, salty water is also moving north?  Or am I oversimplifying?


Edit: mainly below 100m

http://www.whoi.edu/page.do?pid=158516

3
Policy and solutions / Re: Cars, cars and more cars. And trucks, and....
« on: August 12, 2017, 12:56:47 PM »
I think the fact that Elon Musk has concerns about AI is telling.  Tesla's factory is heavily reliant on robots, I'm sure he has his finger squarely on the pulse. 

Perhaps I'm skeptical of the claims made by AI proponents, but it feels like this technology is being forced upon us without regard to the pitfalls.

I've been a Tesla supporter for a long time, still an, but I don't think self driving cars is necessarily a positive going forward.


Robots are not infallible.

Snippet
A robot at a Michigan factory for bumpers and trailer hitches went rogue, entered an area it was not supposed to be in and killed a human worker, according to a suit.

Wanda Holbrook was a technician at Ventra Ionia, west of Grand Rapids, before her skull was crushed by a machine in July 2015.

A federal suit filed by the 57-year-old’s widower last week said that she was working on one section when a robot from another area “took Wanda by surprise, entering the section she was working in.”

“Upon entering the section, the robot hit and crushed Wanda’s head between a hitch assembly it was attempting to place,” the court papers say.

http://www.nydailynews.com/news/national/suit-michigan-woman-killed-robot-defect-article-1.2997763

4
Arctic sea ice / Re: The 2017 melting season
« on: August 11, 2017, 11:40:04 PM »
August 8-11 high speed, 78 hours to cover the cyclone, I find I can see the ice better.
 Wrangel in the lower left.

Edit: added the "normal speed" I make them

Looks like three is a fair amount of ice being forced up against the Canadian archipelago and down into the M'Clure Strait.

http://feeder.gina.alaska.edu/npp-gina-alaska-truecolor-images

5
Arctic sea ice / Re: The 2017 melting season
« on: August 10, 2017, 03:38:50 AM »
A couple storm loops.  A fairly pronounced dry slot allows for decent sea ice viewing.

First attachment is a79 hour VIIRS loop.  Wrangel island in the lower left
http://feeder.gina.alaska.edu/npp-gina-alaska-truecolor-images?search%5Bfeeds%5D%5B5%5D=1&search%5Bsensors%5D%5B3%5D=1

Second attachment is a 46 hour AVHRR loop
http://weather.gc.ca/satellite/satellite_anim_e.html?sat=hrpt&area=dfo&type=nir

6
Arctic sea ice / Re: The 2017 melting season
« on: August 07, 2017, 11:58:23 AM »
I'll try again

80 hour loop. August 3-6

Not sure why the gif won't run, I'll use another method.


http://feeder.gina.alaska.edu


7
Arctic sea ice / Re: The 2017 melting season
« on: August 05, 2017, 11:26:06 AM »
July 31-Aug 4, high speed loop to allow the eye to see through the clouds.

Wrangel island in lower left, Beaufort lower right.

http://feeder.gina.alaska.edu

11
Arctic sea ice / Re: Home brew AMSR2 extent & area calculation
« on: July 30, 2017, 10:47:52 AM »
An illustration of what I mean by "rather late". Beaufort an neighbors.

Click to start.

The clouds are making the concentration appear to be near 100% north of Wrangel for 2017 in my opinion. This year also lacks that multi year ice that lingered near Wrangel.  Lots of "storminess" is progged in this area as well.    Not sure 2017 catches up to last year, but I think it's a possibility.


Let me add to the many thanks for your contributions Wip!

I attached AVHRR Imagery to show the clouds.
http://weather.gc.ca/satellite/satellite_anim_e.html?sat=hrpt&area=dfo&type=nir

12
Arctic sea ice / Re: Operation IceBridge - Arctic Spring 2017
« on: July 26, 2017, 11:30:29 AM »
saw an article on IceBridge with this image.  It does seem like melt ponds need large slabs of ice to form efficiently.

http://www.ibtimes.com/operation-icebridge-nasa-measuring-melting-arctic-sea-ice-plane-2569956


14
Arctic sea ice / Re: The 2017 melting season
« on: July 22, 2017, 04:10:40 PM »
The 22.0z ECMWF ensemble mean MSLP at hour 144 now has a bit of high pressure showing up in the Beaufort region.  Have to see if the holds run to run, could evolve into a bit of a dipole.  Especially if a -NAO/Greenland high develops.  Lots can change 6 days out.

https://www.tropicaltidbits.com/analysis/models/?model=ecmwf-ens&region=nhem&pkg=mslpa&runtime=2017072200&fh=144&xpos=0&ypos=133


15
Arctic sea ice / Re: The 2017 melting season
« on: July 22, 2017, 12:58:02 PM »
Do we actually know its raining or are we just going on GFS reanalysis? I would not trust the GFS to get the precipitation type right.

First attachment: AMSR2 thickness indicating a lot of wet surfaces.  I think one could interpret some of this as rain.

https://ads.nipr.ac.jp/vishop/#/monitor


Second attachment: ~40 hour AVHRR loop, well defined cyclone moving north of Wrangel.  I suspect there will be a stripe of snow laid down north of the track, rain to the south.  Looks like a potent little storm, but a quick mover.

http://weather.gc.ca/satellite/satellite_anim_e.html?sat=hrpt&area=dfo&type=nir

16
Arctic sea ice / Re: Home brew AMSR2 extent & area calculation
« on: July 21, 2017, 09:53:04 AM »
Looks "melty" according to this.
https://ads.nipr.ac.jp/vishop/#/monitor

17
Arctic sea ice / Re: Home brew AMSR2 extent & area calculation
« on: July 19, 2017, 10:33:55 AM »


That's what I have been saying. Normally the ice in the CAA would have been a backstop for compaction, now it becomes simply another escape route.

  The shape the ice is in, the whole Arctic will probably flush out like a giant toilet full of crushed ice.

Some toilets are quite powerful too.   :)


19
Arctic sea ice / Re: The 2017 melting season
« on: July 19, 2017, 09:35:29 AM »
dprog/dT has been to increase the strength of this cyclone according to the ECMWF, still 96+ hours away however.


http://www.tropicaltidbits.com/analysis/models/?model=ecmwf&region=nhem&pkg=z500_mslp&runtime=2017071900&fh=24&xpos=0&ypos=524

20
Arctic sea ice / Re: The 2017 melting season
« on: July 15, 2017, 11:09:48 AM »
WTF I keep having issues uploading attachments

I'll try again

July 10-14, Alaska at bottom center.
http://feeder.gina.alaska.edu/npp-gina-alaska-truecolor-images?search%5Bfeeds%5D%5B5%5D=1&search%5Bsensors%5D%5B3%5D=1

21
Arctic sea ice / Re: The 2017 melting season
« on: July 14, 2017, 12:10:34 AM »
July 10-13, 72 hours of mesmerizing swirls north of Utqiagvik.

Imagery courtesy of the University of Alaska.
http://feeder.gina.alaska.edu

22
Arctic sea ice / Re: The 2017 melting season
« on: July 10, 2017, 02:02:09 PM »
Off topic but permissible?
Mission Impossible?


ps: A clue regarding Arctic Ocean snowfall last winter to spring is Greenland, which accumulated snowfall about 100 gigatonne more than average and just about the maximum in DMI's 30 year record.

The anomaly is largely in the southeast corner, due to many north Atlantic cyclones in the early winter.  I find it a poor proxy for the Arctic in general.


23
Arctic sea ice / Re: The 2017 melting season
« on: July 08, 2017, 10:40:28 AM »
Pretty impressive 982mb storm cranking away.  Attachment 1

Attachment 2: July 3-7, 2017  wonder how much rain this is dropping.  It certainly dragged a bunch of Pacific air northward.

Imagery courtesy of the University of Alaska.
http://feeder.gina.alaska.edu/npp-gina-alaska-truecolor-images?search%5Bfeeds%5D%5B5%5D=1&search%5Bsensors%5D%5B3%5D=1

Attachment 3: ECMWF ensemble mean forecast valid for July 14.0z.  This almost looks like a wave 5 pattern to me, and shows multiple omega blocks, the most impressive in the bering strait region.  Run to run consistency has been improving in my humble option.
http://www.tropicaltidbits.com/analysis/models/?model=ecmwf-ens&region=nhem&pkg=z500a&runtime=2017070712&fh=144&xpos=0&ypos=144

Attachment 4: 1000mb vector winds for the past 30 days.  Mean flow has continued to be from Pacific side towards the Atlantic, but not the Fram side, more towards the Kara sea.

In conclusion, I think its gonna be a real tough week for the ESS/Chukchi/Beaufort.


24
Arctic sea ice / Re: The 2017 melting season
« on: July 03, 2017, 09:37:52 PM »
Here's a comparison of the last 4 12z ECMWF runs.  Just to see where the forecast is heading.  Valid for 12z on July 8.  So 5 days from now, so this will still change.

http://www.tropicaltidbits.com/analysis/models/?model=ecmwf&region=nhem&pkg=z500_mslp&runtime=2017070312&fh=120&xpos=0&ypos=269

25
Arctic sea ice / Re: The 2017 melting season
« on: July 01, 2017, 12:19:15 PM »
I broke this into 2 gifs to keep the resolution as high as possible. 4 days, approximately 104 hours.  Grrr, for some reason the first gif won't run at all. 2nd edit: got it working

First is the area around Utqiagvik (Barrow), Alaska, I like watching the swirls

Second is the southwest Beaufort.  The effects of a windy day can be seen.

Imagery courtesy of the University of Alaska at Fairbanks

http://feeder.gina.alaska.edu/npp-gina-alaska-truecolor-images?search%5Bfeeds%5D%5B5%5D=1&search%5Bsensors%5D%5B3%5D=1

26
Arctic sea ice / Re: The 2017 melting season
« on: July 01, 2017, 09:50:05 AM »
BIG pattern changes again folks!

Both the GFS and the ECMWF op runs depict a return to a cyclonic pattern again. And an intensive 977 hpa cyclone by D7... Well, the GFS ensemble hints the return to occur by D9 whic is far out in time. Let's wait for the ECMWF ensemble!

If this pattern change really unfolds, I'm pretty sure we'll dodge the bullet again this year. But the question is for how many more years we'll be able to dodge that bullet? It's unrealistic to believe that we'll have "good" ice years for another 10 years.

There's not a ton of stability in the modeling though.  Numerical weather prediction also has a tendency to phase systems as lead time grows.  We saw this recently when a 970s (even 960s) low was progged for the Arctic.  Instead, the energies remained separate and there were two smaller cyclones.  I believe the latest 1.0z ECMWF shows this, with two cyclones that interact in more of a "fujiwara" effect than a full blown phase.  Without run to run consistency, hard to determine what's "shifting", as the runs really begin to diverge at hour 120-144.

Also, the position of these lows also matters greatly, with growing open water in the ESS, Chukchi, and Beaufort, storms in these areas might be less than ice friendly.

http://www.tropicaltidbits.com/analysis/models/?model=ecmwf&region=nhem&pkg=z500_mslp&runtime=2017070100&fh=180&xpos=0&ypos=364

27
Arctic sea ice / Re: The 2017 melting season
« on: June 25, 2017, 03:37:53 PM »
81 hour loop June 21-24, Chukchi Sea on the NW Alaskan coast.
Look at all that blue ponding on the right hand side. Small wonder the NASIDC area cratered in the Beaufort/Chukchi.


Wide shot of the same time frame. I'll let others decide what's going on.  :)


28
Arctic sea ice / Re: The 2017 melting season
« on: June 25, 2017, 01:58:37 PM »
81 hour loop June 21-24, Chukchi Sea on the NW Alaskan coast.

Strong southwest winds, as evidenced by the appearance of gravity waves in the clouds, have this area on the move.

As always, imagery courtesy of the University of Alaska at Fairbanks.
http://feeder.gina.alaska.edu/npp-gina-alaska-truecolor-images

29
Arctic sea ice / Re: The 2017 melting season
« on: June 24, 2017, 09:25:17 AM »
From the Alaska ice desk

SEA ICE OUTLOOK FOR WESTERN AND ARCTIC ALASKAN COASTAL WATERS
NATIONAL WEATHER SERVICE ANCHORAGE ALASKA
240 PM AKDT THURSDAY 22 JUNE 2017

...JUNE 2017 MONTHLY SEA ICE OUTLOOK...

LOOKING AT THE BIG PICTURE...THE SEA ICE BREAK UP SEASON IS WELL
UNDERWAY AT RECORD PACE IN THE CHUKCHI SEA AND HAS BEGUN IN THE
EASTERN BEAUFORT SEA AS WELL. MOST OF THE REMAINING SEA ICE IN THE
ALASKA WATERS OF THE CHUKCHI SEA IS ALONG THE WEST COAST OF
ALASKA...GENERALLY FROM POINT LAY TO BARROW.

AS WE LOOK FARTHER INTO BREAKUP SEASON...THE EARLY BREAKUP THROUGH
MUCH OF THE CHUKCHI SEA THIS SEASON AND A LACK OF SIGNIFICANT MULTI-
YEAR ICE IN THE SOUTHERN BEAUFORT SEA AND NORTHERN CHUKCHI SEA MAY
HAVE A LARGE IMPACT ON BREAKUP IN THE BEAUFORT SEA IN THE NEXT
COUPLE MONTHS...POSSIBLY RESULTING IN EARLIER BREAKUP THAN IN RECENT
YEARS.

DETAILED INFORMATION CAN BE FOUND IN EACH PERTINENT SECTION BELOW.

http://tgftp.nws.noaa.gov/data/raw/fz/fzak30.pafc.ico.afc.txt

30
Arctic sea ice / Re: The 2017 melting season
« on: June 23, 2017, 05:48:43 PM »

Right, and like I said, you get these big swings for temperature because of night and day. But SLP doesn't fluctuate that much because of the difference between night and day, right?

It's not a day or night thing I'm referring, it's what happens weather-wise between frames. 

For instance, let's say there's a forecast for a 980mb low at hour 72, and at hour 96 it's also 980mb.  That doesn't necessarily mean our started 980 the whole time, it could have dropped into the 960s and then risen back to that 980.  Or, it may have weakened and then dropped back to 980.

There's also the nature of the storm.  It's fairly prolonged.  It's a large upper level system that's gobbling up shortwave energy to sustain itself.  These shortwaves rotate into the large scale circulation, and drive the surface low pressure, often multiple low pressures.  It looks like one prolonged low, which it is in the upper atmosphere more or less, but surface lows keep redeveloping, strengthen, fill, transfer energy and weaken, and repeat..

It's difficult to time these waves, so a difference of 12 hours can mean the pressure has risen or fallen quite substantially.

Hope that makes sense.

@Crocodile23

Thanks, I'll check that out.

31
Arctic sea ice / Re: The 2017 melting season
« on: June 23, 2017, 01:51:08 PM »
@Neven

He's referring to the fact that free ECMWF access only allows one frame at 24 hour intervals.  So the 0z runs only show what's happening at 0z each day, the 12z shows only what's happening at 12z.  Without the in between frames, comparing 0z to 12z runs from free sites is problematic, as the time stamps are 12 hours apart. 

32
Arctic sea ice / Re: The 2017 melting season
« on: June 22, 2017, 12:46:54 PM »
Storms (excluding tropical cyclones) generally have warm and cold sectors, unfortunately, it looks like most of the Arctic has been put in the warm sector.


33
Arctic sea ice / Re: The 2017 melting season
« on: June 21, 2017, 09:47:21 AM »
First attachment is June 14-20, of the Beaufort.

Second attachment is the ECMWF forecast for the next week.  After a prolonged period of easterly winds, they are progged to swing around from the west for a week or so.  With the Beaufort gyre not looking that prominent, it may slow even further, and I wodidn't be surprised to see Beaufort extent tick up as sea ice is blown into the open water.

Suomi VIIRS imagery from the puffin feeder site at the University of Alaska
http://feeder.gina.alaska.edu/npp-gina-alaska-truecolor-images?page=4&search%5Bfeeds%5D%5B5%5D=1&search%5Bsensors%5D%5B3%5D=1

ECMWF images courtesy of Levi Cowan and tropical tidbits
http://www.tropicaltidbits.com/analysis/models/?model=ecmwf&region=ak&pkg=T850&runtime=2017062100&fh=0&xpos=0&ypos=38

34
Arctic sea ice / Re: The 2017 melting season
« on: June 21, 2017, 01:27:08 AM »
I don't expect much of a SIE drop for JAXA, but looking at the big picture, things are going down quality wise. 17th-19th. The illusory thick ice is all but gone now.

Threre is also the ascending pass which always looks a little different.


35
Arctic sea ice / Re: The 2017 melting season
« on: June 18, 2017, 11:05:49 AM »
I was surprised to see the 925mb reanalysis temperatures for the first half of June.  Doesn't really look so cool.

I'll also add the surface. (Second attachment)

36
Arctic sea ice / Re: Stupid Questions :o
« on: June 18, 2017, 10:42:33 AM »
Another question...

What determines the initial conditions for models like the GFS in the arctic?  Is it driven by the buoys? Satellite measurements? I'm wondering if the input data could be wrong because there are so few reliable stations in the arctic.

Initial conditions are largely based on radiosondes launched on weather balloons.  They are launched over North America and the Caribbean, twice a day at 0z and 12z. Not sure if this is the method used in other parts of the world.

 Satellite data and airplane observations also get fed in.  Occasionally, specialized planes fly to specific areas and drop radiosondes, the hurricane hunters.  NOAA will occasionally send them on winter reconnaissance missions for high impact events.  But generally they are used to investigate typical cyclones.

 The initial conditions are extremely important, and I think you are right to say that poor data collection over arctic madness forecasting there a challenge.

There's a saying in regards to initial conditions in numerical weather models, garbage in, garbage out.

37
Arctic sea ice / Re: The 2017 melting season
« on: June 18, 2017, 10:17:52 AM »
Snowcover really only affects the lowest level of the atmosphere (below 925mb) warm air advection is a very powerful force. 

Fresh snow and old crusty snow also have very different effects.  As a snowpack sits and eventually "ripens", it's ability to cool the air above it diminishes.  This past spring I saw temps above 80°F with a snowpack.

I agree that the lingering snow is a symptom of cooler than *normal* temps, but I don't buy that the remaining snowcover can affect temperatures other than very locally, especially when sparse.

Just my opinion, and I'm drawing on my experiences with snow melt where I live.  (I recorded about 3.5 meters of snow at my home this past winter, it's a snowy area)

The snow at the shores of the ESS appears to have been hit hard this last week. This was the biggest patch of snow I saw, so I focused on that.

https://worldview.earthdata.nasa.gov/?p=arctic&l=VIIRS_SNPP_CorrectedReflectance_BandsM11-I2-I1,VIIRS_SNPP_CorrectedReflectance_BandsM3-I3-M11,VIIRS_SNPP_CorrectedReflectance_TrueColor(hidden),MODIS_Aqua_CorrectedReflectance_TrueColor(hidden),MODIS_Terra_CorrectedReflectance_TrueColor,Reference_Labels,Reference_Features(hidden),Coastlines&t=2017-06-18&z=3&v=-1916703.9510083084,508228.11354981665,985071.6241453581,3738044.730323253&r=11.6656

38
Arctic sea ice / Re: The 2017 melting season
« on: June 18, 2017, 02:11:23 AM »

First attachment is a (edit: SUOMI VIIRS) 40 hour loop of the area north of Alaska  It's not the headliner storm, but you can see a cyclone spin up ponder the southern Beaufort Sea, and move east to west.  It also appears to darken the sea ice as it moves across in the "landcover" band.  My humble opinion is that this is wet from rain.

The dark spot is also apparent on the various MODIS bands

Second attachment is a comparison of the blue (7-2-1), purple (2-6-1), red (3-6-7), and "naturalcolor" bands from MODIS

I don't think it's a cloud, but I also cannot definitively rule that out entirely.

All imagery comes courtesy of the University of Alaska at Fairbanks.
http://feeder.gina.alaska.edu

39
Arctic sea ice / Re: Arctic Image of the Day
« on: June 16, 2017, 02:07:28 AM »
I was looking at this image because of the interesting colors in the Bering Strait.   But then noticed the contrails in the lower left corner.

http://feeder.gina.alaska.edu/npp-gina-alaska-truecolor-images/2017_06_15_14_38_jd166

40
Arctic sea ice / Re: The 2017 melting season
« on: June 14, 2017, 09:47:56 AM »
One week loop of June 6-13, Alaska at bottom center.

Imagery courtesy of the University of Alaska at Fairbanks

http://feeder.gina.alaska.edu

41
Arctic sea ice / Re: The 2017 melting season
« on: June 14, 2017, 01:49:45 AM »
@JayW
Not only do you see the fast ice breaking off, but look at all the smaller floes getting pushed out to open water to be melted sooner.

I'm no expert, but I feel like surface water (melt ponds)+ sunlight  = melting ice

Open water + strong winds (storms) = destruction of ice

I make the distinction because I feel like they are different ways of melting sea ice.

I'm not sure what is worse for ice, melt ponds or open water. I guess it depends on what type of weather is affecting what type of sea ice.   

42
Arctic sea ice / Re: The 2017 melting season
« on: June 14, 2017, 01:05:03 AM »
Good view yesterday of Alaska looking into the beaufort. Still some snow cover on the extreme northern coast. Assuming it melts out this week that will still be a good week or two later than many recent years. Lakes and ponds on the land are likely to stay frozen for several days yet which can only be a good thing as it modifies air masses moving over them.

That large crack in the fast ice is located close to Utqiagvik and might become visible in the webcam there as open water if  the crack widens or if additional fissures open up.

There she goes.

57 hour loop

Imagery courtesy of the University of Alaska at Fairbanks
http://feeder.gina.alaska.edu/npp-gina-alaska-truecolor-images

43
Arctic sea ice / Re: The 2017 melting season
« on: June 10, 2017, 02:31:01 PM »
Jaxa sea ice thickness image has and is showing a big lump of very thick ice at the pacific end of the CAB. From whence it came?

Artifact.

In my opinion, these thickness algorithms over thickens ice significantly when winds are compacting it.

First attachment is June 1-9 jaxa thickness

Second attachment is vector wind anomalies from June 1-7, I couldn't plot the last two days, but I assure that strong easterly winds are present over North Alaska and the surrounding seas.

44
Arctic sea ice / Re: Arctic Image of the Day
« on: June 10, 2017, 02:00:59 PM »
..., the white lines against a dark backround I find puzzling. ....
Just a guess (never been there  :) ) Grey/dark is sea ice flooded with meltwater from the river. White lines are ridges in the ice, still covered with snow?

My guess is the white lines are thicker ice in these estuary like channels.  The dark is low lying land that has become wet.  Since the ice in the channels is thicker it hasn't melted but surrounded with melt water, which extend like fingers onto the seaice.

I compared with a day in July last year.



45
Arctic sea ice / Re: The 2017 melting season
« on: June 08, 2017, 11:19:30 AM »
Another try at this.

81 hour loop of the Southern Chukchi.  Thought that discoloration moving north from the Bering Strait was interesting, algae?

Imagery courtesy of the University of Alaska at Fairbanks.
http://feeder.gina.alaska.edu

46
Arctic sea ice / Re: The 2017 melting season
« on: June 06, 2017, 09:48:15 AM »
108 hour loop of the Beaufort Sea.  You can see the clockwise flow of high pressure setting up over the last couple days, and in my opinion, some gyrating which should be encouraged according to the weather forecasts.  Not to mention relatively clear skies allowing for better viewing.

Imagery courtesy of the University of Alaska at Fairbanks.

http://feeder.gina.alaska.edu

47
Arctic sea ice / Re: The 2017 melting season
« on: June 04, 2017, 11:04:24 AM »
Latest model runs seems more ice friendly with a more cyclonic weather impact later in the runs. While bad it might not be a complete disaster for the ice.

Perhaps the deterministic runs, but outside of 5 days it is largely a roll of the dice in the Arctic.  ECMWF ensembles look rough, and is the only model to even slightly trust beyond 120 hours.

 http://www.tropicaltidbits.com/analysis/models/?model=ecmwf-ens&region=nhem&pkg=T850aMean&runtime=2017060400&fh=192&xpos=0&ypos=404

48
Arctic sea ice / Re: The 2017 melting season
« on: June 01, 2017, 02:42:34 AM »
57 hour loop of Amundsen gulf. 

Very nice animation! I'm trying to get an idea of the scale by matching it up with a map. I can't figure out exactly where it is in Amundsen Gulf. Is it near Investigator Island?

I believe that scene is somewhere between 4-500km wide.  Banks island is at the top center.  And you can see the area in the far right in the animation I posted in #1658

49
Arctic sea ice / Re: The 2017 melting season
« on: June 01, 2017, 12:47:48 AM »
Whole month of May, Pacific side, in about 5 seconds.

imagery courtesy of the University of Alaska at Fairbanks

http://feeder.gina.alaska.edu/npp-gina-alaska-truecolor-images?search%5Bfeeds%5D%5B5%5D=1&search%5Bsensors%5D%5B3%5D=1

50
Arctic sea ice / Re: The 2017 melting season
« on: May 31, 2017, 10:53:21 PM »
57 hour loop of Amundsen gulf.  Lots of interesting motion that doesn't look wind driven (much of which is, however).  Breaking up further as well.


Imagery courtesy of the University of Alaska at Fairbanks.

http://feeder.gina.alaska.edu/npp-gina-alaska-truecolor-images?search%5Bfeeds%5D%5B5%5D=1&search%5Bsensors%5D%5B3%5D=1

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