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Messages - mati

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251
The rest / Re: Fukushima leak emergency: LIVE UPDATES
« on: October 22, 2013, 01:59:11 AM »
ritter, i'm pretty sure three cores melted out and 'escaped' china syndrome style within the first few weeks, and caused underground explosions like no earthquakes the locals had ever felt before, http://fukushima-diary.com/2012/01/fukushima-citizen-recent-earthquake-different/  so aquifer contamination is the least of my concerns, losing the pacific as a safe place to fish seems increasingly plausible. Not quite off topic,  http://www.theherald.com.au/story/1848433/the-ocean-is- broken/

Yes reactors 1-3 had a core meltdown, but no loss of containment.  The explosions were NOT underground but in the buildings covering the reactors (not containment buildings) where a build up of hydrogen caused a hydrogen explosion.  The amount of radioactivity let go by Fukushima and even Cherynoble have NO comparison to the vast amounts of radiation inflicted upon the Pacific and even ME by the atomospheric tests by various countries in the Pacific, and by the U.S. in Nevada (of all places) I'm sure i have many radiation nucliotides in my teeth due to all these tests.  The hysteria over Fukushima and Cherynobl is i think fueld by the press and fiction writers.  NO deaths by radiation at Fukushima, and only 100 or so in Cherynoble and they were the sacrifical lambs who went into the reactor to help seal it off.
look up Deaths per year in coal mining, or oil exploration etc... No i am not saying that radiation is not nasty, just that the safety features have worked welll in protecting people.

now you may say well what about the land?  true, but why are people living in Hiroshima and Nagasaki? what gives? 

I just think that people need to read more about radiation and what problems arise from it.  The horror stories about the results or radiation just do not follow...

252
The range of plants and animals in north america are slowly moving north:

1. Opposums have appeared in Ontario!
http://www.thestar.com/news/gta/2012/03/12/opossums_spreading_across_gta.html
2. Grey Jay populations in Algonquin Park declining as bird breeding range moves north
http://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2009/02/090225182833.htm
http://www.epa.gov/climatechange/science/indicators/society-eco/bird-ranges.html



253
Consequences / Re: Trends in China that impact emissions and AGW
« on: October 18, 2013, 06:52:57 PM »
This page from China on nuclear capacity is updated regularly:

http://www.world-nuclear.org/info/Country-Profiles/Countries-A-F/China--Nuclear-Power/

They do provide projections on the decrease in their reliance on coal electricty generation.



254
Science / Re: Possibly important paper regarding CH4
« on: October 12, 2013, 12:52:50 AM »
I ran across these 3 articles a few years ago.   They are still relevant:

http://www.geolsoc.org.uk/Geoscientist/Archive/June-2008/The-Proof-in-the-Puddingstone


255
Arctic background / arctic sea route ship accidents
« on: September 10, 2013, 04:52:26 AM »
A diesel tanker has been holed in the northern sea route.. what remediation does Russia have for a large oil leak in artic waters.....

http://barentsobserver.com/en/nature/2013/09/tanker-accident-northern-sea-route-09-09

256
Arctic sea ice / Re: The Cause of the Muted Melt of 2013
« on: August 12, 2013, 04:31:24 PM »
Shared Humanity,

I don't know where the single cell issue was being discussed, but I find that idea hard to believe.

I believe he was referring to Bill Langford presentation "Hadley Cell Expansion in Today's Climate and Paleoclimates" (April 28, 2011). I can't remember where exactly it was discussed in here, probably in ASIB (*).
Pdf here: http://www.fields.utoronto.ca/programs/scientific/10-11/biomathstat/Langford_W.pdf

I'm not making any implications here, only pointing it out. It's a fascinating(**) read and certainly warrants some attention. How big a role such a thing is playing in any one melt year is another matter.

EDIT:
(*) found it, it was in the "Second storm" post comments few weeks ago.
(**) understatement for me at least, reading that turned my stomach so bad I had to visit the toilet.

That was one scary read.  I wonder how close we are to the tipping point of switching to one hadley cell.  If that occurs it has implications for the ice melt at the poles......

257
Arctic background / Re: Polar Shipping Routes
« on: August 06, 2013, 12:29:30 AM »
actual ships requesting passage:

http://asmp.morflot.ru/en/razresheniya/


258
Arctic background / Re: Polar Shipping Routes
« on: August 06, 2013, 12:27:26 AM »
Shipping through the melting Arctic looks to be increasing fivefold this summer compared to 2012. 270 vessels have so far received permits to sail along the Northern Sea Route which connects East Asia to Europe via the waters off of Russia’s northern coast.


http://barentsobserver.com/en/arctic/2013/07/towards-commercial-breakthrough-northern-sea-route-30-07

259
Consequences / Re: Weird Weather
« on: June 05, 2013, 03:44:45 AM »
hehe it was 4 C last night here in Central Ontario Canada (around lat 45 degrees)
200 km to the north in Timmins they had snow... in JUNE...
I have yet to put my plants out due to frost warnings.
total opposite from last year

260
Policy and solutions / Re: Coal
« on: June 05, 2013, 03:29:01 AM »
China is moving agressively into nuclear power for electrical generation, as well as adding solar and wind to the mix... 

http://www.world-nuclear.org/info/Country-Profiles/Countries-A-F/China--Nuclear-Power/


262
Consequences / Re: When and how bad?
« on: May 23, 2013, 07:57:05 PM »


In the U.S. there is one institution that has completely embraced the idea of AGW and this is the U.S. military. They have been working on military strategies to deal with the anticipated societal collapse caused by this warming. They have published reports arguing that global warming is the largest threat to security in the world. (These are easy to find if you'd like to read them.) They have enlisted some of our premier researchers to provide the knowledge to understand the regional effects that will occur (not an easy task and fraught with uncertainty) so they can prepare for them.

Of course, there is a possibility these military types are just alarmists.

Heres a DOD  report

http://www.fas.org/irp/agency/dod/dsb/climate.pdf

263
Arctic sea ice / Re: Effect of snow cover on thickness of arctic ice
« on: March 27, 2013, 05:00:59 PM »
I did find a research project at University of Alaska, but the results are not yet in:

http://seaice.alaska.edu/gi/projects/snow


264
Arctic sea ice / Re: Effect of snow cover on thickness of arctic ice
« on: March 19, 2013, 01:27:44 AM »
Thanks, this is what i have seen so far in the research.
Declining snow cover attached to declining ice extent because less ice to sit on means less snow cover.  That seems to be what most research is about.
What would be interesting is to see if the amount of snow on the ice that is present at the time measurement is increasing or decreasing.
If it is increasing, one would expect more insulation, and less ice depth for the current ice present.
Not sure if i had my thoughts expressed well... LOL im just a computer scientist, not an expert here.
But i have practical experience in this area :)

265
Arctic sea ice / Re: Effect of snow cover on thickness of arctic ice
« on: March 17, 2013, 06:31:06 PM »
I did find some raw data, but i'm not very good at working out trends etc.  unfort this data only goes up to 2008:

http://neptune.gsfc.nasa.gov/csb/index.php?section=53

267
Arctic sea ice / Effect of snow cover on thickness of arctic ice
« on: March 17, 2013, 05:08:39 PM »
A posting on another thread led me to wonder if the later open sea in the arctic has led to a deeper snow cover on the ice, leading to thinner ice formation during the winter.

Here is the latest snow depth:

http://www.weatheroffice.gc.ca/data/analysis/352_100.gif

I know from experience on lake nipissing that when there is low snow cover (as it was this year) trucks and cars are out on the ice earlier and the ice is thicker and takes longer to melt out.

268
Consequences / Caves point to thawing of Siberia
« on: February 23, 2013, 04:17:44 PM »
Just a 1.5 C increase in temperature will  have significant thawing effects in Siberia

http://www.ox.ac.uk/media/news_releases_for_journalists/130221.html

 :(

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