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Messages - Sigmetnow

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13251
Consequences / Re: CA Drought Emergency Declared
« on: February 04, 2014, 09:02:50 PM »
Climate-change-denying Republicans say: forget the fish, just give us the water!

Quote
House Republicans from the region have taken to blaming ecosystem protection for limited irrigation flows. They are specifically targeting restoration efforts along the San Joaquin River, California’s second largest river, painting the drought as a divisive issue that can win them political points. In mid-January, Speaker of the House John Boehner (R-OH) visited the Central Valley to announce emergency drought legislation for the region that would increase water available for agriculture by reducing river flows.

“How you can favor fish over people is something people in my part of the world would never understand,” Boehner said, flanked by three Republican colleagues from the Central Valley — Rep. Devin Nunes of Tulare, Rep. Kevin McCarthy of Bakersfield and Rep. David Valadao of Hanford. Valadao said that while Congress cannot make it rain, they can provide relief from burdensome environmental regulations.

Nunes, who vehemently denies global warming, was also quick to call the drought a “man-made crisis.”
...
Famiglietti thinks the political challenges and battles ensue both because people don’t really understand all the complicated water needs of the state and, at some level, for political gain. “I think there’s some intentional political manipulation,” Famiglietti said. “And sometimes for the right reasons. A Congressperson might be interested in making sure that farmers in his or her region have water. At the same time, I hear many in Congress say that if water flows underneath the Golden Gate Bridge, that’s a waste, which just isn’t true.”
http://thinkprogress.org/climate/2014/02/04/3223571/california-drought-politics/

13252
Consequences / Re: Weird Weather and anecdotal stories about climate change
« on: February 04, 2014, 08:27:05 PM »
Winter rain, leading to ice (and avalanches) in Alaska.  Worst since the 1920's-1930's.

http://www.alaskadispatch.com/article/20140128/forget-snowfall-winter-rain-becoming-new-normal-alaska-and-arctic

13253
Consequences / Re: When and how bad?
« on: February 04, 2014, 05:43:32 PM »
JimD,
Thanks, I thought they had to mean something like that. 

13254
Consequences / Re: Weird Weather and anecdotal stories about climate change
« on: February 04, 2014, 05:41:05 PM »
Whoops.  :-[.   Still, way hot.   ::)

13255
Consequences / Re: Weird Weather and anecdotal stories about climate change
« on: February 04, 2014, 04:04:46 PM »
Just a thought:
If another similar extreme ice storm hasn't happened since 1998, one may have cause to wonder if the conditions that caused it were related to the conditions that caused 1998 to be the hottest year on record, globally....   

(Well, 1998 was the hottest, until 2013 apparently topped it, as of a few days ago:
http://www.reportingclimatescience.com/news-stories/article/reconstructed-data-ranks-2013-hotter-than-1998-el-nino-year.html )

13257
Consequences / Re: When and how bad?
« on: February 04, 2014, 02:55:33 PM »
This is crazy (bad) -- Pakistan's population is 182 million!
"Pakistan Has A Month’s Worth Of Water Left — And 5 Percent Of Its Tree Cover"

http://thinkprogress.org/climate/2014/02/03/3238781/deforestation-water-energy-pakistan/

13258
Policy and solutions / Re: Cars, cars and more cars. And trucks, and....
« on: February 04, 2014, 01:48:30 AM »
I have to assume that the designs have improved a bit since I was driving my Zenn around. I've heard that they figured out that they have to insulate the battery pack much more carefully.

Does anyone have any more recent experience than mine in driving EVs in the cold (below 0 C)?

wili, here's a blog entry by a Wisconsin LEAF owner on winter driving:
http://sam-koblenski.blogspot.com/2013/08/a-year-and-half-with-nissan-leaf-part-3.html

13259
Policy and solutions / Re: Cars, cars and more cars. And trucks, and....
« on: February 04, 2014, 01:39:59 AM »
Elon Musk interview on his "historic" trip: two Tesla electric cars drove from Los Angeles to New York in 76 hours -- through the Midwest snow.  The gas-powered support vehicle was the one that broke down... :)

http://www.cbsnews.com/videos/elon-musk-calls-electric-car-cross-country-journey-important-historical-milestone/

13260
Glacier that sunk the Titanic speeds toward disaster!   :D

http://www.egu.eu/news/100/greenlands-fastest-glacier-reaches-record-speeds/

13261
Consequences / Re: Lake Effects
« on: February 04, 2014, 12:42:28 AM »
Dramatic decline in northern Alaska lake ice in the last 20 years.

http://thinkprogress.org/climate/2014/02/03/3238391/alaska-ice-retreat/

13262
Policy and solutions / Re: Cars, cars and more cars. And trucks, and....
« on: February 03, 2014, 02:34:34 PM »
In my experience, a major downside of electric vehicles is that they don't hold a charge very well when it is very cold, even if you don't turn on the heat in the car. This limits their usefulness in climates that get cold.
Yet, they are still quite popular in Norway.  "Three of the top ten best-selling vehicles in Norway are electric."
http://www.plugincars.com/norways-abundance-evs-puts-strain-public-charging-and-congestion-perks-129161.html

13263
Policy and solutions / Re: Cars, cars and more cars. And trucks, and....
« on: February 02, 2014, 05:05:05 PM »
Interesting calculation, via @PluginCarsNews:
Car buying choices: 2 acres supports 212 Tesla Model Ss from solar panels or 1 60 mpg car from biodiesel #GoElectric

http://www.abb-conversations.com/2013/11/what-abb-has-taught-me-about-genetic-modification/

13264
Consequences / Re: CA Drought Emergency Declared
« on: February 02, 2014, 03:31:57 PM »
California Department of Water Resources press release:
Quote
DWR Drops State Water Project Allocation to Zero, Seeks to Preserve Remaining Supplies
Severe Drought Leads to Worst-Ever Water Supply Outlook
...
Except for a small amount of carryover water from 2013, customers of the State Water Project (SWP) will get no deliveries in 2014 if current dry conditions persist and deliveries to agricultural districts with long-standing water rights in the Sacramento Valley may be cut 50 percent – the maximum permitted by contract – depending upon future snow survey results. It is important to note that almost all areas served by the SWP have other sources of water, such as groundwater, local reservoirs, and other supplies.
...
“It is our duty to give State Water Project customers a realistic understanding of how much water they will receive from the Project,” said Director Cowin. “Simply put, there’s not enough water in the system right now for customers to expect any water this season from the project.”
www.water.ca.gov/news/newsreleases/2014/013114prerss_conference.pdf

More analysis here from the LA Times:
http://touch.latimes.com/#section/-1/article/p2p-79120724/

13265
Policy and solutions / Re: Coal
« on: February 02, 2014, 03:08:00 PM »
JimD @115

The worldwide use of coal for energy because it's cheap seems logical, but it's backwards thinking.  Solar energy is becoming cheaper and cheaper, and new products use less and less energy.  The same way developing countries leapfrogged over landline telephones and went straight to cell phones, I think they'll increasingly skip coal plants and heavy transmission lines, and go directly to smaller solar or wind sources.

http://ecowatch.com/2014/01/13/wind-turbine-power-smartphone/

13266
Policy and solutions / Re: Cars, cars and more cars. And trucks, and....
« on: February 02, 2014, 02:54:26 PM »
The article is mostly concerned with revenue allocations but what struck me is that many assumptions about how much slack there was in US miles driven and that we could easily cut a lot of miles re likely overestimating what could be accomplished.  If US drivers are already driving 11% less than we thought it might be more difficult to keep reducing.  A lot of the easy cuts seem to already been made.

But from another perspective:  Americans often dismiss electric cars because they think the car's range won't get them where they need to go.  However, when they actually record how many miles they drive a day, it is often much less than they think it is.  That's one less barrier to switching from a gasoline-powered car to an EV!

13267
Consequences / Re: Climate change, the ocean, agriculture, and FOOD
« on: February 02, 2014, 02:34:17 PM »
Disturbing details about the overfishing of menhaden, a fish at the heart of the food system on both land and sea.

Quote
Millions of pounds of menhaden are fished from the Atlantic Ocean and the Gulf of Mexico by a single company based in Houston, Texas, with a benign-sounding name: Omega Protein. The company’s profits derive largely from a process called “reduction,” which involves cooking, grinding, and chemically separating menhaden’s fat from its protein and micronutrients. These component parts become chemical inputs in aquaculture, industrial livestock, and vegetable growing. The oil- and protein-rich meal becomes animal feed. The micronutrients become crop fertilizer.
...
Omega Protein’s “blue chip” customer base for animal feed and human supplements includes Whole Foods, Nestlé Purina, Iams, Land O’Lakes, ADM, Swanson Health Products, Cargill, Del Monte, Science Diet, Smart Balance, and the Vitamin Shoppe.
...
The menhaden population has declined nearly 90 percent from the time when humans first began harvesting menhaden from Atlantic coastal and estuarine waters.
...
In 2012, a panel of marine experts known as the Lenfest Forage Fish Task Force estimated that the value of leaving forage fish in the ocean as a food source for predators was $11 billion: twice as much as the $5.6 billion generated by removing species like menhaden from the ocean and pressing them into fish meal pellets (Pikitch et al, 2012).

http://limn.it/the-fish-at-the-heart-of-the-food-system/

13268
Consequences / Re: Lake Effects
« on: January 28, 2014, 09:28:42 PM »
Shrinking Lake Michigan deprives islands of waterfront and tourism.

http://thinkprogress.org/climate/2014/01/28/3193301/climate-change-draining-great-lakes/

13269
Consequences / Re: CA Drought Emergency Declared
« on: January 23, 2014, 02:52:58 PM »
From CNN, another casualty of the California drought: domestic horses.  The views of parched landscape are heartbreaking as well.


13270
Consequences / Re: CA Drought Emergency Declared
« on: January 19, 2014, 05:26:57 PM »
JimD, JackTaylor, thank you for the info and links.

Seems like we are fixated on small bits of visible, external bleeding, when the most damage is happening internally.

13271
Consequences / Re: CA Drought Emergency Declared
« on: January 19, 2014, 02:17:49 PM »
Question:  when municipalities (or whoever) require, say, a "20% reduction" in water use, how is that calculated?  Do they take 20% off an average volume as everyone's new target? Or is it individualized to each user's prior water use -- which would hurt the already-frugal user more than someone who is usually wasteful.

Thanks.

13272
Consequences / Re: Lake Effects
« on: January 16, 2014, 12:42:13 AM »
@NWSSacramento: See the latest update on the major reservoirs of California.
Map with reservoir data.
http://t.co/YxPCvrhG6l

13273
Consequences / Re: Climate change, the ocean, agriculture, and FOOD
« on: January 15, 2014, 06:07:55 PM »
Bogotá study: small farmers selling at local markets are much more adaptable to CC than farmers selling through an intermediary.

Quote
Abstract
Small farmers who supply the city of Bogotá with food are facing many challenges that are jeopardizing their livelihoods and by extension, the food security of Colombia’s capital. We expect future changes in climatic conditions to exacerbate the plight of the small farmers and this is expected to compromise Bogota’s food security even further. This paper specifically seeks to assess the impact of climate change (CC) on the livelihoods of smallholders who supply Bogota with most of its food. In our multidisciplinary methodology, we translated the exposure to CC into direct impact on crops and assessed sensitivity and adaptive capacity using the sustainable rural livelihoods framework. The results show that rainfall (by average of 100 mm) and temperature (by average of 2.1 °C) will increase over the study area, while the future climate suitability of the most important crops such as mango (Mangifera indica), papaya (Carica papaya), corn (Zea mays) and plantain (Musa balbisiana) shows a decrease of 19 % to 47 % climate suitability by the year 2050. The assessment of sensitivity and adaptive capacity demonstrates that farmers participating in a farmers’ market, initiated by several local and international non-governmental organizations (NGOs), are less vulnerable to CC than farmers who sell through intermediaries. Those farmers selling directly to consumers in the farmers’ market have a higher adaptive capacity (3 on a scale of 3) in social and financial capital than those selling to intermediaries with less adaptive capacity (1 on a scale of 3). In light of the reduction in overall climatic suitability of some of the major crops and the change of geographic location of suitability for others, there are likely to be serious threats for Bogotá’s food security, the ecological landscape around the city, and farmers’ livelihoods. We further conclude that unless proper adaptation measures are implemented, the geographical shift in climate suitability may also force farmers to shift their crops to higher elevations including remaining forests and páramos (the Colombian alpine tundra ecosystems), which may be threatened in the near future.
http://link.springer.com/article/10.1007%2Fs11027-012-9432-0

13274
Consequences / Re: Lake Effects
« on: January 14, 2014, 02:48:12 PM »
Not exactly a lake, but water-supply related:  Plant in California turns sewage into potable water.  Then (mostly for psychological reasons) pumps it underground.

Quote
Today, the [Orange County water] district's Groundwater Replenishment System processes 70 million gallons of treated wastewater into pure, potable water every day, which is enough to meet the needs of about 600,000 people. The water is used to replenish the district's aquifer, thus limiting the need to rely on more expensive and unreliable imported water from Northern California and the Colorado River.

http://t.nbcnews.com/science/parched-southwest-reclaimed-sewage-water-could-be-welcome-relief-2D11915652

13275
Consequences / Re: Lake Effects
« on: January 03, 2014, 10:04:10 PM »

13276
Consequences / Re: Lake Effects
« on: January 03, 2014, 08:25:32 PM »
Sacramento, California water supply becoming critically low.

Quote
Much of the tension in the Sacramento region involves managing the water that remains in Folsom Lake. Storage in the reservoir dropped below 200,000 acre-feet last week – 20 percent of its capacity – a historic low for December. Because about 500,000 people in Folsom, Fair Oaks, Roseville and other communities depend on that stored water, the U.S. Bureau of Reclamation on Jan. 1 plans to reduce water releases from the dam into the American River.

http://www.sacbee.com/2013/12/29/6032646/drought-brings-water-rationing.html?storylink=lingospot_related_articles#storylink=cpy

13277
Policy and solutions / Re: Why some still "DENY" and others "FAIL TO ACT"
« on: December 29, 2013, 09:39:16 PM »
JimD,
We need a catchy, all-encompassing slogan for climate change action.  Something everyone can repeat, even if they don't really know what it means.  Something as simple as: "Carbon Kills!"

13278
Consequences / Re: Climate change, the ocean, agriculture, and FOOD
« on: December 29, 2013, 09:26:42 PM »
More on the California drought:

Quote
In the run-up to the holidays, few noticed a rather horrifying number California water managers released last week: 5%.

That’s the percentage of requested water the California State Water Project (SWP), the largest manmade distribution system in the US, expects to deliver in 2014. The SWP supplies water to two-thirds of the state’s 38 million residents and 750,000 acres of farmland.


http://qz.com/161935/california-faces-a-catastrophic-drought-next-year/

13279
Consequences / Re: Dahr Jamail, The Climate Change Scorecard
« on: December 29, 2013, 09:01:16 PM »
I appreciate the corrections/clarifications to the information in the article. 

In a sad sense, the details seem less and less important.  We're on a bus, speeding toward the edge of a cliff.  It's dusty, so we can't see precisely how far ahead the ledge is.  But we know it's out there, and still we haven't applied the brakes, or let off the gas -- we continue to speed up, globally emitting more carbon every year.  There have been plenty of warning signs: mass species extinctions, glacier retreat, arctic sea ice loss.  But we've been so busy texting, we haven't paid attention.  That bump we just felt (Hurricane Sandy, Australia heat, Eurasian flooding) could be the front wheels of the bus going over the edge of the cliff.  At this point, we may simply be debating the dimensions of the canyon.

13280
Policy and solutions / Re: Cars, cars and more cars. And trucks, and....
« on: December 27, 2013, 07:17:10 PM »
Because EVs are still evolving, it would be good to encourage rental of new cars.  This would make more people likely to switch to newer/better cars as they are developed, and provide a good supply of used EVs for that market.

13281
Policy and solutions / Re: Is the Earth F**cked??
« on: December 27, 2013, 04:31:29 AM »
Wili @16,

The US President, Secretary of State Kerry, and many members of Congress know what to do -- the problem is that they can't do anything with the current Congress.  But the tide is turning.  By the 2014 or 2016 elections, the Tea Party will either have seen the climate light, or they will be trounced at the polls.  (See: recent Virginia elections.).  People are starting to demand action, and that groundswell will grow.

In World War II, we switched manufacturing plants over to bombs and airplanes, and employed new (women!) workers almost overnight -- unthinkable, before we actually did it.  We blacked out the East Coast at night, and rationed food and gasoline.  We can make radical changes and sacrifice.  We just need to find the national will. 

13282
Policy and solutions / Re: Is the Earth F**cked??
« on: December 26, 2013, 04:12:39 PM »
And if we’re switching things up economically, consider this: 
Quote
activists have secured a vote in Switzerland on an audacious proposal: providing a basic monthly income of about $2,800 U.S. dollars to each adult in the country.

Quote
What is a universal basic income, and why are we hearing more about it now?

The proposals that are floating around the world vary a lot. But the basic idea is, no matter what you do, if you’re a resident — or in some cases, a citizen — you get a certain amount of money each month. And it’s completely unconditional: If you’re rich you get it, if you’re poor you get. If you’re a good person you get it, if you’re a bad person you get it. And it does not depend on you doing anything other than making whatever effort is involved to collect the money. It’s been a topic of discussion for several decades. Why is it happening right now? I think it’s obvious that it’s a reaction to the high level of economic inequality that we’ve seen. Most European countries haven’t had big increases in inequality at the same scale that we [in the U.S.] have, [but] some of them have had much more than they’re used to.

http://www.salon.com/2013/10/11/rather_than_savage_cuts_switzerland_considers_star_trek_economics/

13283
Policy and solutions / Re: Is the Earth F**cked??
« on: December 25, 2013, 08:29:13 PM »
And this, from "A Climate Truth-Tellers Honor Roll of 2013" by Wen Stephenson (emphasis his):

Quote
With his colleague Alice Bows, a climate mitigation expert at the Tyndall Centre, Anderson points out that we have lost so much time to political stalling and weak climate policies—all while global consumption (and emissions) ballooned—that we are now facing cuts so drastic that they challenge the fundamental logic of prioritising GDP growth above all else….

what Anderson and Bows are really saying is that there is still time to avoid catastrophic warming, but not within the rules of capitalism as they are currently constructed. Which may be the best argument we have ever had for changing those rules.


Anderson and Bows, Klein notes, have “laid down something of a gauntlet” for fellow scientists, essentially arguing, as Klein puts it, that “in order to appear reasonable within neoliberal economic circles, scientists have been dramatically soft-peddling the implications of their research.” She quotes Anderson, who wrote this past August:

Perhaps at the time of the 1992 Earth Summit, or even at the turn of the millennium, 2°C levels of mitigation could have been achieved through significant evolutionary changes within the political and economic hegemony. But climate change is a cumulative issue! Now, in 2013, we in high-emitting (post-)industrial nations face a very different prospect. Our ongoing and collective carbon profligacy has squandered any opportunity for the ‘evolutionary change’ afforded by our earlier (and larger) 2°C carbon budget. Today, after two decades of bluff and lies, the remaining 2°C budget demands revolutionary change to the political and economic hegemony” [his emphasis].

http://www.commondreams.org/view/2013/12/24-4

13284
Policy and solutions / Re: Is the Earth F**cked??
« on: December 25, 2013, 08:18:25 PM »
Der Spiegel has a good article about thinking outside the box, economically speaking.

First, it describes the Vikings as leaving Greenland because their livestock couldn't survive, when they couldn't conceive of eating fish....  Similarly, we have to conceive of eating insects for protein and give up eating beef and pork, if not all animal flesh, to keep what grains we are able to grow for feeding us.


And here's a new twist on capitalism:

Quote
'Economy for the Common Good'

This means we need a method of searching for new strategies that can't be coopted by the sleek, but unfortunately destructive, principle of capitalism. Imagine, for example, what might happen if a large number of businesses make the improvement of the common good -- instead of an increase in their profits -- the goal of their commercial efforts.

There are in fact already more than 1,400 companies, if small ones, in German-speaking countries that have made a commitment to the concept of the "economy for the common good," an idea developed a few years ago by Christian Felber, the Austrian co-founder of Attac. Around one third of these companies have annual balance statements to show it.

In the medium term, the "economy for the common good" movement aims to make such accounting legally binding. The principle is that the more common-good "points" a business achieves, the more legal benefits it should enjoy. For example, companies with a positive common-good balance could benefit from lower taxes, obtain loans from national banks at lower interest rates and be given priority in public purchasing and the awarding of contracts. This reversal of the existing incentive system would serve to make products and services that are produced and traded fairly, and are environmentally sustainable, cheaper than ethically problematic products and nondurable, disposable items.

The appeal of this approach lies in the fact that -- as with the many energy and consumption cooperatives, ethical banks, swapping platforms and venues for giving things away that have sprung up in recent years -- there is no longer a reason to generate additional surplus, once enough has already been produced. This counters capitalism's logic of valuation far more effectively than any sort of symbolic act, because such experiments in alternative economic practices intervene directly in the economic metabolism. Rather than continuing to generate more and more arguments, they generate new facts."

http://www.spiegel.de/international/world/warsaw-climate-conference-shows-capitalism-root-of-climate-failure-a-937453.html#ref=rss

13285
Policy and solutions / Re: Cars, cars and more cars. And trucks, and....
« on: December 25, 2013, 07:55:35 PM »
There should be big legal & tax incentives for car-sharing.  And for turning in an old gas-powered car, or down-sizing -- I am reminded of the "cash for clunkers" program that happened a while back.

13286
Policy and solutions / Re: Cars, cars and more cars. And trucks, and....
« on: December 25, 2013, 04:11:42 PM »
ExxonMobile recently tweeted this:

"GHG emissions related to energy use are projected to plateau by 2030"
and:
"The US is likely to use slightly less energy in total & about 20% less energy per person by 2040"

They have a "quiz" on their website ( exxonmobil.com/quiz ) with questions like:
"The energy concentrated in one gallon of gasoline is also enough to keep your smartphone running for how many days?"

 ::)

13287
Policy and solutions / Re: Cars, cars and more cars. And trucks, and....
« on: December 25, 2013, 02:07:38 PM »
It's time for radical ideas, so here's one:

The government decrees the new car fleet must be 90% pure-electric by 2020.  Companies can trade points, so GM can pay all-electric Tesla  (which can then ramp up its sales) during the time GM lags behind the curve.  Eliminate dealer contracts that keep out small car makers like Tesla, but keep safety standards.  (NHTSA just reaffirmed the Tesla Model S to be the safest car ever!)

Gas stations must provide charging outlets.  By the end of 2014, there must be at least two 110V plugs for each gas pump (in parking area away from the pumps).  High-use stations must provide quick-chargers.  Charging cost will be regulated much like gas prices are today.  Charging networks will not require their own card to access a charger.  Businesses must provide (shareable) charging outlets for their employees.

Most people drive less than 40 miles/day, which today's electric vehicles (EV's) can easily handle.  More EV sales will mean more higher-mileage cars come on the market, for less cost.

Will long trips by car take longer to accomplish with EV's?  You bet.  Travelers can spend the charge time eating and playing with their smart phones -- we've gotten really good at that.  Maybe we'll even start to exercise while we charge the car.  Maybe we'll decide we'd rather communicate by Skype, instead of making the trip -- also a winner.  Or (gasp) take the bus, or the train.  It's time to embrace the laziness, or change your life!
Air travel will add an increasing carbon fee.  (The EU suggested start price was only $2/person*trip, for heaven's sake.)

Existing gasoline vehicles will pay a carbon fee with annual registration, which will increase each year.  Commercial vehicles (including vans) will have (tax?) incentives applied to help increase EV usage and further development of large electric vehicles.  Businesses have to figure out how they can work around the limitations of EV's, too.

What have I missed?  Tractor-trailers and farm machinery will take a bit longer to change over.  But hey, we could make this happen!

13288
Policy and solutions / Re: Cars, cars and more cars. And trucks, and....
« on: December 25, 2013, 03:49:15 AM »
Not sure of the source of this data, but it says 1 of 25 new car sales in the US in 2013 was an electric or hybrid vehicle:

http://blog.opower.com/2013/12/10-energy-numbers-to-remember-from-2013/

13289
Policy and solutions / Re: Coal
« on: December 25, 2013, 03:22:10 AM »
Global user ends all use of coal!    ;)

Santa Claus declares:
"Beginning this Christmas, bad boys and girls will receive lame Christmas gifts like toothbrushes and underwear instead of coal. And not the fun kind with cute cartoon characters."

http://www.citywatchla.com/8br-hidden/6166-santa-s-dreaming-of-a-green-christmas

13290
Consequences / Dahr Jamail, The Climate Change Scorecard
« on: December 25, 2013, 02:50:03 AM »
Dahr Jamail, The Climate Change Scorecard

http://www.tomdispatch.com/post/175785/tomgram%3A_dahr_jamail%2C_the_climate_change_scorecard/#more

"November 2013: The International Energy Agency predicts a 3.5C increase by 2035."

"Fifty-five million years ago, a five degree Celsius rise in average global temperatures seems to have occurred in just 13 years ."

 "While the human body is potentially capable of handling a six to nine degree Celsius rise in the planetary temperature, the crops and habitat we use for food production are not."

“The long-term sea level that corresponds to current CO2 concentration is about 23 meters above today’s levels, and the temperatures will be 6 degrees C or more higher. These estimates are based on real long-term climate records, not on models.”

"There is nothing that can be agreed in 2015 that would be consistent with the 2 degrees...  The only way that a 2015 agreement can achieve a 2-degree goal is to shut down the whole global economy."


Not exactly the Christmas Eve message I was hoping for, but we have what we have.

13291
Consequences / Re: Weird Weather and anecdotal stories about climate change
« on: December 24, 2013, 02:37:00 AM »
Tweet from Department of Atmospheric and Oceanic Sciences at the University of Wisconsin-Madison.
12/23/13, 5:49 PM
Currently 15 degrees in Anchorage, Alaska, 31 at McMurdo Station, Antarctica, and 1 degree in Madison, Wisconsin.

13292
Consequences / Re: Weird Weather and anecdotal stories about climate change
« on: December 23, 2013, 06:44:57 PM »
No snow in Siberia!  Much-above-average warmth across Russia (and the arctic) over the past 30 days.

http://siberiantimes.com/ecology/casestudy/features/no-snow-in-siberia-locals-marvel-and-worry-at-the-snow-shortage/


13293
Policy and solutions / Re: Coal
« on: September 22, 2013, 06:12:21 PM »
Bloomberg New Energy Finance suggests coal’s days are numbered -- although that number could be quite large....  A good summary of anti-coal factors, from August.

http://about.bnef.com/blog/caldecott-will-old-king-coal-continue-to-be-a-merry-old-soul/

13294
Policy and solutions / Re: Coal
« on: September 20, 2013, 05:27:50 PM »
I like what I'm seeing -- coal becoming less and less favorable.

The EPA took a step today towards getting the US weaned off coal.
http://www.nbcnews.com/business/u-s-epa-sets-first-ever-curbs-power-plant-pollution-4B11211140

A recent government auction for a coal lease in Wyoming garnered only one bid -- the lowest top bid in 15 years -- and so low it was rejected.
http://thinkprogress.org/climate/2013/09/19/2653151/coal-lease-lowest-bid/

Even the TVA (historically and heavily dependent on Appalachian Mountain coal) is proposing scrapping its oldest and dirtiest coal plants and finishing its planned nuclear plants -- all while avoiding a scheduled rate increase and cutting industrial rates by 30%.
http://www.timesfreepress.com/news/2013/sep/13/investors-challenge-tva-budget-plan/

In Australia, a $7 billion coal mine was cancelled due to low global demand.
http://tcktcktck.org/2013/09/7-billion-australian-coal-mine-canceled-citing-low-demand/57156

While China is banning new coal power plants in three major industrial regions:
http://tcktcktck.org/2013/09/china-announces-ban-new-coal-power-three-areas/56933

China will also try to reduce pollution through public shaming of its dirtiest cities.
http://thinkprogress.org/climate/2013/09/19/2647481/china-fight-pollution-public-shaming/

13295
OK, I'll try this using http.

PNG file selected, but it's not showing under Preview.

And I've added the jpg version -- still not showing under Preview.

But -- is showing up when posted!  Hunh.

13296
I just now tried to upload a PNG image with my "NASA_ICE Q&A tweet" post, and the attachment was just ignored (in Preview).  I saved the image as JPG and tried again, same results.  (Using https:)

13297
For those of you on Twitter, NASA scientists will be having a question-and-answer session on “All Things Frozen” at 2pm Eastern (US) Daylight Time on Wednesday, September 4, 2013.  Use an #askclimate hashtag.

(For those of you not on Twitter, it’s easy to join -- you just need to give your name, your e-mail address, and pick a username.  Twitter will suggest some accounts you might like to follow to get you started.  You’ll need to follow @NASA_ICE for the the Q&A.)      twitter.com

You can ask questions during the session by replying to any “tweet” (message of up to 140 characters) from @NASA_ICE. Include the hashtag ID “#askclimate” (without the quote marks) in your tweet to be sure they see it during the session.

13298
Arctic sea ice / Re: Operation IceBridge - Arctic Spring 2013
« on: September 01, 2013, 01:23:21 AM »
For those of you on Twitter, NASA scientists will be having a question-and-answer session on “All Things Frozen” at 2pm Eastern (US) Daylight Time on Wednesday, September 4, 2013.  Use an #askclimate hashtag.

(For those of you not on Twitter, it’s easy to join -- you just need to give your name, your e-mail address, and pick a username.  Twitter will suggest some accounts you might like to follow to get you started.  You’ll need to follow @NASA_ICE for the the Q&A.)      twitter.com

You can ask questions during the session by replying to any “tweet” (message of up to 140 characters) from @NASA_ICE. Include the hashtag ID “#askclimate” (without the quote marks) in your tweet to be sure they see it during the session.

13299
Policy and solutions / Re: Why some still "DENY" and others "FAIL TO ACT"
« on: September 01, 2013, 12:47:56 AM »
Denial in Russia

The Moscow Times writes about President Vladimir Putin’s visit to the flood-ravaged Khabarovsk region.  Rains there in July and August surpassed the annual average and created the worst flood in more than a century. 

Although the article is titled “Ecologists Link Far East Floods to Global Warming,” a popular opinion appears to be: “needs more study”.  The government is said to “favor business over environment.” 

So, do they believe the floods are tied to global warming?  Perhaps the most alarmist statement of the article came from Svetlana Ageyeva, head of the meteorological center in the Khabarovsk region, who said,  "I would not laugh at those who say such things."

http://www.themoscowtimes.com/business/article/ecologists-link-far-east-floods-to-global-warming/485273.html

13300
Consequences / Re: Places becoming less livable
« on: August 31, 2013, 11:55:51 PM »
Huffington Post lists 14 U.S. cities that could be devastated over the next century due to rising tides.  (Yes, Miami is #1 in this list.)

http://www.huffingtonpost.com/2013/08/26/global-warming-flooding_n_3799019.html


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