Arctic Sea Ice : Forum

AGW in general => Consequences => Topic started by: Sigmetnow on April 06, 2016, 02:13:06 AM

Title: Health Effects of Climate Change
Post by: Sigmetnow on April 06, 2016, 02:13:06 AM
Studies increasingly show adverse health effects resulting from climate change.  The latest report is the White House climate study.

Deaths, Floods and Pestilence Cited in White House Climate Study
Quote
Deadly heat waves, worsening air quality, and the increasing spread of illnesses like Lyme disease and West Nile Virus could kill tens of thousands of Americans and leave scores more battling chronic disease over the next century, the White House warned in a report released Monday.

All Americans are vulnerable to climate change affecting their health and the risks are varied and severe, administration officials said Monday. Air pollution and longer allergy seasons will exacerbate asthma and other respiratory illnesses. The chances of food and waterborne illnesses will increase. Droughts and floods will become more frequent. And extreme weather events -- and their disruption to public services and health infrastructure -- will be more likely and more severe.

“This isn’t just about glaciers and polar bears, it’s about the health of our families and kids,” EPA administrator Gina McCarthy said in a briefing with reporters.
http://www.bloomberg.com/politics/articles/2016-04-04/deaths-floods-and-pestilence-cited-in-white-house-climate-study (http://www.bloomberg.com/politics/articles/2016-04-04/deaths-floods-and-pestilence-cited-in-white-house-climate-study)


Climate change threat to public health worse than polio, White House warns
Obama administration report details the diversity of risks and claims global warming is a far more challenging danger than polio virus in some cases
http://www.theguardian.com/environment/2016/apr/04/climate-change-public-health-threat-white-house-report (http://www.theguardian.com/environment/2016/apr/04/climate-change-public-health-threat-white-house-report)


Scroll down at this link for a synopsis and a link to the White House report itself.
https://www.whitehouse.gov/the-press-office/2016/04/04/fact-sheet-what-climate-change-means-your-health-and-family (https://www.whitehouse.gov/the-press-office/2016/04/04/fact-sheet-what-climate-change-means-your-health-and-family)
Title: Re: Health Effects of Climate Change
Post by: Sigmetnow on May 23, 2016, 01:58:15 AM
Quote
@ClimateNexus:  GRAPHIC: How #climate change, #pollution and air quality affect your health via @PublicHealth @ClimateNexus
https://twitter.com/climatenexus/status/734512438431911936
Title: Re: Health Effects of Climate Change
Post by: Sigmetnow on May 26, 2016, 02:54:12 PM
Health effects from the causes of climate change:

Scientists Just Discovered Exactly What Air Pollution Does To Your Arteries
Quote
Air pollution has been linked to heart disease for years, prompting concern as well as some skepticism, as the physiological steps showing a cause-and-effect have gone less understood. But now, a multi-year study has for the first time documented that air pollution thickens blood and hardens arteries, a condition that causes cardiovascular problems like heart attacks and strokes.
http://thinkprogress.org/climate/2016/05/24/3781243/how-air-pollution-causes-heart-disease/ (http://thinkprogress.org/climate/2016/05/24/3781243/how-air-pollution-causes-heart-disease/)
Title: Re: Health Effects of Climate Change
Post by: Sigmetnow on June 22, 2016, 02:08:25 PM
Climate change is bad for your kidneys
Thousands of people labouring in hot temperatures have been succumbing to a deadly kidney disease, and as the planet warms, the problem is likely to spread
Quote
A recent study found that hard work in the hot climate of the lowlands left workers dehydrated, putting such a heavy strain on their kidneys that it fatally damaged them. “When it’s extremely hot, the risk for kidney damage really begins to become evident,” said Richard Johnson of the University of Colorado, Denver.

Similar epidemics of kidney disease were also found in farm workers in other hot climates, in Sri Lanka, Egypt and Andhra Pradesh in India. And as global temperatures rise and heat waves become more intense, so the new type of kidney disease is increasing, according to the study published in the Clinical Journal of the American Society of Nephrology.
http://www.theguardian.com/news/2016/jun/20/claimate-change-bad-kidneys-weatherwatch (http://www.theguardian.com/news/2016/jun/20/claimate-change-bad-kidneys-weatherwatch)
Title: Re: Health Effects of Climate Change
Post by: Sigmetnow on July 14, 2016, 11:40:48 PM
The Climate Anxiety Doctor Is “In”
A Providence poet is taking to the park to counsel residents about their climate woes.
https://www.hakaimagazine.com/article-short/climate-anxiety-doctor (https://www.hakaimagazine.com/article-short/climate-anxiety-doctor)
Title: Re: Health Effects of Climate Change
Post by: Sigmetnow on July 25, 2016, 07:02:12 PM
Heat speak: challenges of the “silent killer”
Quote
Meteorological Twitter has been pretty quiet of late. In fact, the only real “hot-topic” cooking up is about heat—no surprise in the summer months. This subject is revisited every summer and it often has to do with criteria. What constitutes a heat advisory? How about an excessive heat warning? As the weather wise know, answers to those questions vary based on location. But there are some broader points to the heat narrative that inspire further discussion. Scientists always seem to want hard and fast rules—or certain thresholds. Does a certain ambient temperature need to be reached? Should it simply focus on heat index? How does time factor into the equation?
...
Josh: Is a heat advisory really needed? Maybe not for you or me… we know the drill… more water than usual, less outdoor exertion, lighter clothing. But there are outdoor workers in industries such as construction, landscaping and roofing. Owners and managers of these companies don’t slow down business just because the weather folks said it might be a good idea. The hard laborers in these forces may not readily receive weather message or even speak the language in which those messages are offered (see lightning fatalities). For those workers and others, the body can breakdown quickly in hot temperatures and the symptoms of heat related illness can appear suddenly. Annual and often repetitive advisories may serve as a reminder, a review of heat related illness every year, especially for those most susceptible. In addition to outdoor workers these messages must be reinforced to the elderly, the infirm, kids (their parents), pets and of course those without access to air conditioning.
https://thewxsocial.com/2016/07/22/heat-speak-challenges-of-the-silent-killer/
Title: Re: Health Effects of Climate Change
Post by: Sigmetnow on July 29, 2016, 02:24:25 AM
Russian officials blame thawed reindeer carcass in anthrax outbreak
Quote
Thirteen people have been hospitalized amid an outbreak of anthrax in western Siberia, the governor's office of the Yamalo-Nenets autonomous region reported Thursday. Experts with the Russian Ministry of Agriculture believe the cause of infection is the thawing of the frozen carcass of a reindeer that died 75 years ago.
...
The hospitalizations came after up to 1,200 reindeer died over the past month, which officials originally blamed on a heat wave in the region. Unusually high temperatures of up to 35 degrees Celsius (95 degrees Fahrenheit) recorded over the past month might have weakened the reindeer.

Now, laboratory tests have confirmed that the reindeer died of anthrax, Gov. Dmitry Kobylkin's office reported.
http://www.cnn.com/2016/07/28/health/anthrax-thawed-reindeer-siberia/index.html (http://www.cnn.com/2016/07/28/health/anthrax-thawed-reindeer-siberia/index.html)
Title: Re: Health Effects of Climate Change
Post by: Anne on July 30, 2016, 03:13:04 PM
40 people hospitalised now.
http://siberiantimes.com/other/others/news/n0691-40-now-hospitalised-after-anthrax-outbreak-in-yamal-more-than-half-are-children/ (http://siberiantimes.com/other/others/news/n0691-40-now-hospitalised-after-anthrax-outbreak-in-yamal-more-than-half-are-children/)
Title: Re: Health Effects of Climate Change
Post by: Sigmetnow on August 09, 2016, 12:55:04 AM
Olympic Athletes Challenged by New Opponent: Global Warming
Quote
Climate change warnings poignantly made during the Olympic Games opening ceremony on Friday are likely to resonate with athletes as they struggle to train and compete in Brazil’s tropical heat.

Marathon runners, swimmers, volleyball players and even soccer referees will succumb to extreme temperatures and lose concentration during the games, in some cases risking their lives to heatstroke, according to a report released Monday by Observatorio do Clima, a Brazilian civil society group.

“Because of warming, sport will never be the same again,” and fewer records than in previous games are likely to fall as a result, the report said.
http://www.bloomberg.com/news/articles/2016-08-08/olympic-records-won-t-come-easy-in-rio-because-of-climate-change (http://www.bloomberg.com/news/articles/2016-08-08/olympic-records-won-t-come-easy-in-rio-because-of-climate-change)
Title: Re: Health Effects of Climate Change
Post by: Sigmetnow on August 10, 2016, 09:55:31 PM
A Second Olympic pool has turned green
Quote
On Tuesday, when the diving pool at the Maria Lenk Aquatics Centre mysteriously changed colors, Olympic organizers and FINA -- swimming's international governing body -- offered competing explanations why.

On Wednesday, the water polo pool at the center also went green.

Swimming pools, in case anyone is unclear, are supposed to be a tranquil shade of azure.

So, what is going on?
There are now so many explanations.

A change in alkalinity:
Mario Andrada, the communication director for the Rio 2016 local organizing committee, says a sudden change in alkalinity is the culprit.

"We expect the color to be back to blue soon," Andrada said, adding there is "absolutely no risk to the athletes or anybody."

An algae bloom:
Nope, the green tone seen was due to a proliferation of algae, the organizing body said. The algae bloomed because of heat and lack of wind, it said.

Poor organization:
Nope, says, FINA, the blames lies with the organizers. FINA claims water tanks "ran out some of the chemicals used in the water treatment process." It made no mention of wind or heat.

It didn't take long for the Internet to offer up its own imaginative take on the green shade....
http://www.cnn.com/2016/08/10/sport/rio-olympics-second-green-pool-trnd/index.html (http://www.cnn.com/2016/08/10/sport/rio-olympics-second-green-pool-trnd/index.html)
Title: Re: Health Effects of Climate Change
Post by: ritter on August 10, 2016, 11:03:44 PM
Someone peed in the pool?  :o
Title: Re: Health Effects of Climate Change
Post by: Sigmetnow on August 11, 2016, 07:55:52 PM
SoCal hit with worst smog in years as hot, stagnant weather brings surge in hospital visits
Quote
Southern California is experiencing its worst smog in years this summer as heat and stagnant weather increase the number of bad air days and drive up ozone pollution to levels not seen since 2009.
...
Fine blamed the increase in smog on abnormally hot, stagnant weather, including some of the strongest, most persistent pollution-trapping inversion layers in years. It’s unlikely that increased emissions are to blame, he said, because of a wide variety of regulations that mandate increasingly cleaner cars, trucks and other vehicles.

Smoke from recent wildfires has also degraded air quality.
http://www.latimes.com/local/lanow/la-me-ln-summer-smog-20160805-snap-story.html (http://www.latimes.com/local/lanow/la-me-ln-summer-smog-20160805-snap-story.html)
Title: Re: Health Effects of Climate Change
Post by: MrVisible on August 12, 2016, 05:41:51 AM
A while back, I saw a paper that made a convincing case that  human cognition was affected negatively by carbon dioxide levels as low as 600 parts per million in the short term. (http://ehp.niehs.nih.gov/1104789/)

That got me wondering about the effects of carbon dioxide on human health in the long-term. Here's what I've been able to find.

Chronic respiratory carbon dioxide toxicity: a serious unapprehended health risk of climate change (https://www.scribd.com/document/320968292/Co-2-Toxicity)

 The effects of elevated carbon dioxide on our health (https://thesenecaeffect.wordpress.com/2015/09/14/the-effects-of-elevated-carbon-dioxide-on-our-health/)

 Chronic Exposure to Moderately Elevated CO2 during Long-Duration Space Flight (NASA) (https://ston.jsc.nasa.gov/collections/trs/_techrep/TP-2012-217358.pdf)

 Just how ‘Sapiens’ in the world of high CO2 concentrations? (http://www.skepticalscience.com/how-sapiens-in-the-world-of-high-co2-concentration.html)

Health effects of increase in concentration of carbon dioxide in the atmosphere (http://www.alfaintek.com/assets/files/D_S_Robertson.pdf)
Title: Re: Health Effects of Climate Change
Post by: budmantis on August 13, 2016, 08:49:50 AM
Good post Mr. Visible, thanks for the information. By the way, I really like your handle.
Title: Re: Health Effects of Climate Change
Post by: MrVisible on September 03, 2016, 11:12:34 PM
Two more outbreaks of anthrax hit northern Siberia due to thawing permafrost (http://"http://siberiantimes.com/other/others/features/f0253-deadly-anthrax-infection-spread-250-kilometres-in-15-days-due-to-mosquitoes/")

Quote
Crucially, the study also established that the infection started in thawed, contaminated soil, rather than emanating directly from decades-old poisoned reindeer carcasses or even human remains in graveyards, as was earlier believed.

This, in turn, means that controlling new outbreaks in a warming climate  is virtually impossible, other than by mass vaccinations of people and animals.

Title: Re: Health Effects of Climate Change
Post by: Sigmetnow on September 08, 2016, 06:23:52 PM
Labor Day 2050: How Global Warming Threatens Labor Productivity
Also, higher CO2 levels directly harm human cognition
By Dr. Joe Romm
Quote
Global warming is projected to have a serious negative impact on outdoor labor productivity this century. That impact could well exceed the “combined cost of all other projected economic losses” from climate change, as one expert has explained. Yet it has “never been included in economic models of future warming”!

At the same time, higher carbon dioxide (CO2) levels threaten indoor productivity, as I reported last year. The Harvard School of Public Health has found that CO2 has a direct and negative impact on human cognition and decision-making at CO2 levels that most Americans are routinely exposed to today.

Ironically, strong climate action would be a huge boost to productivity. Here’s what we know. ...
https://thinkprogress.org/global-warming-labor-productivity-5743fdfc7468
Title: Re: Health Effects of Climate Change
Post by: Shared Humanity on October 03, 2016, 03:22:55 PM
With blooms of blue green algae on the rise due to AGW, the health effects could be devastating.

http://www.cbsnews.com/news/algae-bloom-toxin-linked-to-alzheimers-and-other-neurodegenerative-diseases/ (http://www.cbsnews.com/news/algae-bloom-toxin-linked-to-alzheimers-and-other-neurodegenerative-diseases/)
Title: Re: Health Effects of Climate Change
Post by: Rippleillusion on October 09, 2016, 11:58:24 PM
First post! I wanted to weigh in on the health factors I've noticed the last couple of years.

In the summer of 2015, we were hit here in Southern BC by Smoke waves from surrounding fires. This past summer it's an algae bloom that has found its way into our seafood chain. We've had less rainfall events, meaning the air is smoggier here in the city. And most devastatingly of all, some people had to stop watering their lawns   ;D

Personally my biggest health effect(that I've noticed anyhow) has been emotional. If I don't distract myself significantly, its on my mind 24/7. I've had dreams about AGW. I drink and eat more. I'm less productive and driven. I know these are all choices and feeling sorry for oneself is not the answer, but these are very unique circumstances which I don't think anybody is emotionally prepared for.

Title: Re: Health Effects of Climate Change
Post by: oren on October 13, 2016, 08:19:46 AM
First post!

Welcome to the forum! The first posting is the hardest.
I also find that the main health effect of climate change (and many other long term trends) is depression  :(
Title: Re: Health Effects of Climate Change
Post by: Bruce Steele on October 13, 2016, 03:02:23 PM
Rippleillusion, It is depressing !  It is very hard to find someone to lend an ear but we are all here , so thanks for the honesty and keep on posting. I might add delusions of grandeur to the list of mental cracks that may actually be healthy at this point. So as you cut back on your personal carbon contribution , natural response in the face of all this , think about how you or a group you and your friends can get to zero fossil fuel carbon emissions . I have never meet anyone who didn't think zero was impossible but maybe to " dream as many as six impossible things before breakfast " is a sane response .
Title: Re: Health Effects of Climate Change
Post by: ritter on October 13, 2016, 05:43:19 PM
Personally my biggest health effect(that I've noticed anyhow) has been emotional. If I don't distract myself significantly, its on my mind 24/7. I've had dreams about AGW. I drink and eat more. I'm less productive and driven. I know these are all choices and feeling sorry for oneself is not the answer, but these are very unique circumstances which I don't think anybody is emotionally prepared for.

Welcome to the other side. Some of my colleges engaged in climate change and adaptation work call it the "awakening" or "rock bottom". Put the food and drink down. Go outside and get some exercise and enjoy nature where you find it. I find being outside and walking/riding/running/whatever the best distraction and being in better shape has never hurt anybody. Then get up and do something about it. Anything. The more there are of us working on a solution or adaptations to climate change, the better our chance of avoiding or reducing the most horrific consequences. It may not be possible to change our course at this late stage of the game, but I'll be damned if I don't try.  ;)
Title: Re: Health Effects of Climate Change
Post by: ritter on October 28, 2016, 07:52:11 PM
For those in the San Francisco Bay Areas, the health effects of climate change is a growing movement/concern. Here's a short conference if anyone is interested in attending.

Social Justice in Climate Change Adaptation: Beyond Sea Level Rise

https://www.eventbrite.com/e/social-justice-in-climate-change-adaptation-beyond-sea-level-rise-tickets-28697726673?ref=enivtefor001&invite=MTA5NzgxODEvbGluZGEuaGVsbGFuZEBjZHBoLmNhLmdvdi8w&utm_source=eb_email&utm_medium=email&utm_campaign=inviteformalv2&ref=enivtefor001&utm_term=attend (https://www.eventbrite.com/e/social-justice-in-climate-change-adaptation-beyond-sea-level-rise-tickets-28697726673?ref=enivtefor001&invite=MTA5NzgxODEvbGluZGEuaGVsbGFuZEBjZHBoLmNhLmdvdi8w&utm_source=eb_email&utm_medium=email&utm_campaign=inviteformalv2&ref=enivtefor001&utm_term=attend)

Quote
What are the disproportionate impacts of climate change on households most at risk, including people of color, with low incomes, or with disabilities? How can community leaders and agency staff work together to systematize social justice in climate resilience?

Join grassroots leaders from the Resilient Communities Initiative (RCI), and key agency staff from the Office of Planning and Research (OPR), California Department of Public Health, and other agencies in the second joint policy workshop in a series that seeks to identify how communities most at-risk from climate change can move from input to leadership in resilience policies. The workshop will focus on systematizing and funding social justice in climate resilience planning.
Title: Re: Health Effects of Climate Change
Post by: Rippleillusion on November 05, 2016, 11:09:30 PM
Thank you to all for your kind welcome and golden advice! Like many here I do believe that logically, despite our circumstances it is wise to try to live life as fully engaged as possible. Pursuing songwriting/music with vigour (user name is my band name) and in conjunction with my current feelings about the near term future (my opinion being unavoidable NTHE). Being lucky enough to live in Vancouver, I also enjoy hiking, although the extent to which going out in the wild is a distraction for me is quite miniscule. I'm quite observant on the changes happening out there.

However I find that my greatest escape is simply coming on here and reading the brilliant comments. Those smart (and courageous) enough to continue to study the arctic even as it must be gutting for them. By those with creative solutions. You all inspire me and quite often keep me entertained and therefore sane, and able minded enough to continue to educate, protest, change my lifestyle, etc, even though in my heart I believe our condition is very much fatal. So thank you for that!

One thing I am doing is I'm keeping vigilant to detect any physical health consequences that may happen in my west coast habitat. First thing I really noticed was the summer of 2015 contained significant waves of wildfire smoke that choked the oxygen out of the air. This past summer we had an algae bloom that broke records and turned the water a slimy green. Surely that affected the health of our remaining coastal ecosystem. So far people haven't collectively noticed in any significant way. It's truly bizarre.
[/quote]

Welcome to the other side. Some of my colleges engaged in climate change and adaptation work call it the "awakening" or "rock bottom". Put the food and drink down. Go outside and get some exercise and enjoy nature where you find it. I find being outside and walking/riding/running/whatever the best distraction and being in better shape has never hurt anybody. Then get up and do something about it. Anything. The more there are of us working on a solution or adaptations to climate change, the better our chance of avoiding or reducing the most horrific consequences. It may not be possible to change our course at this late stage of the game, but I'll be damned if I don't try.  ;)
[/quote]
Title: Re: Health Effects of Climate Change
Post by: Sigmetnow on November 23, 2016, 07:01:55 PM
Four people are dead in Australia after a thunderstorm triggered thousands of asthma attacks
Quote
A scary confluence of hazards killed at least four people and sent thousands of people to emergency rooms in Australia on Monday night.

A strong thunderstorm rolled through Melbourne, which, in itself, may not have been all that remarkable. But the air was hot and dry before this cold front, and grass pollen was lying in wait for the slightest bit of moisture.

The Bureau of Meteorology ended up posting severe storm warnings for the entire state of Victoria as it plowed across southern Australia.

“The noise was unbelievable, it was truly unbelievable,” Melbourne resident Marie Clement told the Australian Broadcasting Corp. “The chairs were shooting past the family room window, the garden chairs — it was very frightening indeed.”

Chairs and shingles were the least of this storm’s threats, though. After it passed, people couldn’t breathe. The rain and wind combined with the pollen created a deadly situation that even affected people who don’t typically have respiratory issues.

Between 6 and 11 that night, there were about 2,000 calls to triple-zero — Australia’s version of 911 — which is nearly seven times the average number, the ABC reports.

The scene at hospitals was chaos, the ABC reported:
Hospitals were swamped with emergency patients, while firefighters and police were called on to help paramedics respond to thousands of calls after the conditions caused breathing problems for Victorians.
https://www.washingtonpost.com/news/capital-weather-gang/wp/2016/11/23/four-people-are-dead-in-australia-after-a-thunderstorm-caused-thousands-of-asthma-attacks/ (https://www.washingtonpost.com/news/capital-weather-gang/wp/2016/11/23/four-people-are-dead-in-australia-after-a-thunderstorm-caused-thousands-of-asthma-attacks/)
Title: Re: Health Effects of Climate Change
Post by: MrVisible on November 24, 2016, 01:16:42 AM
I did a little digging into thunderstorm asthma, and found this paper:

Asthma admissions and thunderstorms: a study of pollen, fungal spores, rainfall, and ozone (http://qjmed.oxfordjournals.org/content/94/8/429)

Quote
The effect is more marked in warmer weather, and is not explained by increases in grass pollen, total pollen or fungal spore counts, nor by an interaction between these and rainfall. There was an independent, positive association between ozone concentrations and asthma admissions.
Title: Re: Health Effects of Climate Change
Post by: Sigmetnow on April 18, 2017, 10:15:38 PM
Quote
Researchers currently classify the new form of chronic kidney disease as “climate-sensitive”, which means that climate is one ingredient contributing to the epidemic. As temperatures continue to rise, many such climate-sensitive diseases will become climate-driven, and monitoring and bringing attention to them will become even more crucial.
Climate change is turning dehydration into a deadly disease
http://www.independent.co.uk/news/science/climate-change-is-turning-dehydration-into-a-deadly-disease-a7680856.html (http://www.independent.co.uk/news/science/climate-change-is-turning-dehydration-into-a-deadly-disease-a7680856.html)
Title: Re: Health Effects of Climate Change
Post by: Archimid on April 23, 2017, 05:54:10 PM
'It’s going to hit the poorest people': Zika outbreak feared on the Texas border

https://www.theguardian.com/world/2017/apr/23/zika-outbreak-rio-grande-valley-texas-border-health (https://www.theguardian.com/world/2017/apr/23/zika-outbreak-rio-grande-valley-texas-border-health)

Quote
It is real enough, if not widespread: according to state health department statistics, 10 Zika cases have been documented in Texas this year and 320 in 2016 and 2015. About 250 women and children have shown evidence of infection reported to the federal Zika Pregnancy Registry.

Zika, and climate change driven mutations of both the mosquito and the virus scare the heck out of me.
Title: Re: Health Effects of Climate Change
Post by: Sigmetnow on May 09, 2017, 12:03:00 AM
Article takes a fairly extreme tone... but I'm posting it because it looks at many different aspects of the problem.

There are diseases hidden in ice, and they are waking up
Long-dormant bacteria and viruses, trapped in ice and permafrost for centuries, are reviving as Earth's climate warms
http://www.bbc.com/earth/story/20170504-there-are-diseases-hidden-in-ice-and-they-are-waking-up (http://www.bbc.com/earth/story/20170504-there-are-diseases-hidden-in-ice-and-they-are-waking-up)
Title: Re: Health Effects of Climate Change
Post by: Shared Humanity on May 09, 2017, 02:53:02 PM
Article takes a fairly extreme tone... but I'm posting it because it looks at many different aspects of the problem.

There are diseases hidden in ice, and they are waking up
Long-dormant bacteria and viruses, trapped in ice and permafrost for centuries, are reviving as Earth's climate warms
http://www.bbc.com/earth/story/20170504-there-are-diseases-hidden-in-ice-and-they-are-waking-up (http://www.bbc.com/earth/story/20170504-there-are-diseases-hidden-in-ice-and-they-are-waking-up)

"The Earth Strikes Back!"

In my darkest moods, I imagine (wish for?) a global pandemic that wipes out about 2/3 of us.
Title: Re: Health Effects of Climate Change
Post by: Sigmetnow on June 12, 2017, 07:02:25 PM
Dust Bowl-ification of U.S. Southwest leads to 8-fold jump in Valley Fever cases
As the region dries out, infections from inhaling soil-dwelling fungus see stunning jump.
Quote
The infection rate of Valley Fever in the Southwest United States has gone up a stunning 800 percent from 2000 to 2011, as dust storms have more than doubled.

New research directly links the rise in Valley Fever to the rise in dust storms, which in turn is driven by climate change. Valley Fever, which the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention calls “a fungal lung infection that can be devastating,” is caused by inhaling soil-dwelling fungus. When the soil dries out and turns to dust, the wind can make the fungus airborne....
https://thinkprogress.org/valley-fever-soars-climate-change-8b236cf4e9c9
Title: Re: Health Effects of Climate Change
Post by: Sigmetnow on July 13, 2017, 03:39:45 PM
Also referenced in the AGW > Science > 'climate porn' thread:
https://forum.arctic-sea-ice.net/index.php/topic,2101.msg120645.html#msg120645

Climate Change Is Giving Us 'Pre-Traumatic Stress'
Quote
Scientists on the front lines are speaking out about how their climate data drives despair, but these emotions may also be the most potent force for change.

On January 6, "rebel meteorologist" Eric Holthaus sent a series of 15 tweets describing how he was coping with feelings of despair in the face of climate change. Although he may not have realized it at the time, his tweets were further evidence for a growing body of research that shows that climate change has become a mental health issue, afflicting an increasing number of people with something that one researcher has called "pre-traumatic stress disorder."

"I'm starting my 11th year working on climate change, including the last 4 in daily journalism. Today I went to see a counselor about it," Holthaus's tweets began. "There are days where I literally can't work. I'll read a story & shut down for the rest of the day. We don't deserve this planet. There are (many) days when I think it would be better off without us."


The tweets continue to describe Holthaus's feelings of despair about how human-induced climate change is wiping out species that have been on earth for millions of years, as well as his general lack of hope now that the CEO of Exxon Mobil is the US secretary of state. Yet about halfway through the tweetstorm, Holthaus changes tone, saying that he doesn't feel alone in his feelings of despair. Indeed, he knows that others feel the same way and that this gives him hope insofar as it indicates people care.
...
https://motherboard.vice.com/en_us/article/vvzzam/climate-change-is-giving-us-pre-traumatic-stress
Title: Re: Health Effects of Climate Change
Post by: Archimid on July 16, 2017, 02:46:54 AM
More U.S. counties are finding Zika-carrying mosquitoes

http://www.dailyherald.com/entlife/20170715/more-us-counties-are-finding-zika-carrying-mosquitoes (http://www.dailyherald.com/entlife/20170715/more-us-counties-are-finding-zika-carrying-mosquitoes)

Quote
Two types of mosquitoes are the primary transmitters of Zika, dengue, yellow fever and chikungunya viruses. Based on updated data collected through 2016, research from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention found that 38 additional counties -- primarily in Texas but as far north as Illinois -- documented the presence of Aedes aegypti mosquitoes, Zika's main vector. That's an increase of 21 percent compared to an earlier 2016 survey.
Title: Re: Health Effects of Climate Change
Post by: Archimid on July 25, 2017, 06:33:14 PM
Scientists Can See Zika Coming by Tracking the Climate

https://www.scientificamerican.com/article/scientists-can-see-zika-coming-by-tracking-the-climate/ (https://www.scientificamerican.com/article/scientists-can-see-zika-coming-by-tracking-the-climate/)

Quote
From the ashes of a devastating Zika virus outbreak last year, scientists are piecing together how it happened, and they’re using climate variables to get ahead of the next pandemic.
Title: Re: Health Effects of Climate Change
Post by: Sigmetnow on July 27, 2017, 08:41:47 PM
Climate Change Is Killing Us Right Now
The most obvious effect of global warming is not a doomsday scenario. Extreme heat is happening today, and wreaking havoc on vulnerable bodies.
    By Emily Atkin. July 20, 2017
Quote
A young, fit U.S. soldier is marching in a Middle Eastern desert, under a blazing summer sun. He’s wearing insulated clothing and lugging more than 100 pounds of gear, and thus sweating profusely as his body attempts to regulate the heat. But it’s 108 degrees out and humid, too much for him bear. The brain is one of the first organs affected by heat, so his judgment becomes impaired; he does not recognize the severity of his situation. Just as his organs begin to fail, he passes out. His internal temperature is in excess of 106 degrees when he dies.

An elderly woman with cardiovascular disease is sitting alone in her Chicago apartment on the second day of a massive heatwave. She has an air conditioner, but she’s on a fixed income and can’t afford to turn it on again—or maybe it broke and she can’t afford to fix it. Either way, she attempts to sleep through the heat again, and her core temperature rises.  To cool off, her body’s response is to work the heart harder, pumping more blood to her skin. But the strain on her heart is too much; it triggers cardiac arrest, and she dies.

Such scenarios could surely happen today, if they haven’t already. But as the world warms due to climate change, they’ll become all too common in just a few decades—and that’s according to modest projections. ...
https://newrepublic.com/article/143899/climate-change-killing-us-right-now

Also posted in AGW > Science > "climate porn" thread.
Title: Re: Health Effects of Climate Change
Post by: wili on October 31, 2017, 11:50:03 AM
CC is [already] Bad for your Health

Quote
... “Climate change is happening, and it’s a health issue today for millions worldwide,” said Anthony Costello, a co-chairman of the commission that produced the report, called The Lancet Countdown.

...climate change is already affecting human health in serious ways, with harms “far worse than previously understood.” The report argues that the health professions have a responsibility “to communicate the threats and opportunities” of a phenomenon that is “central to human well-being.”

...human-caused global warming “threatens to undermine the past 50 years of gains in public health.” But the report also said that a comprehensive approach to slow the planet’s warming could be “the great health opportunity of the 21st century.”

...outdoor labor capacity in rural areas fell, on average, by 5.3 percent over the past 16 years because of heat stress and other conditions making work more difficult. That is a stunning loss of productivity, and directly attributable to global warming during a period when nine of the 10 of the hottest years on record were recorded.

Productivity fell 2 percent from 2015 to 2016 alone.

In 2015, the Lancet report says, an additional 175 million people over the age of 65 were exposed to heat waves, when compared with broad trends of the past 20 years.

... lower-income countries experience far greater economic loss as a proportion of their gross domestic product because of climate-related disasters when compared to higher-income countries.

...From 1990 to 2016, uninsured losses in low-income countries were equivalent to over 1.5 percent of their G.D.P.

...recent gains in combating the spread of these diseases [are] now being threatened by climate change.

The report shows that transmission of dengue fever by just two types of mosquito has increased 3 percent and 5.9 percent, since 1990, the result of a broad range of factors including climate change...

If the report contained just these findings, it would still be an alert to public health officials. But there are dozens of other examples that clearly show that climate change is no longer a distant, future threat.

It is here, now.

This is now a medical and public health fight, not just an environmental one.

https://www.nytimes.com/2017/10/30/opinion/climate-change-health-heat.html?action=click&pgtype=Homepage&clickSource=story-heading&module=opinion-c-col-left-region&region=opinion-c-col-left-region&WT.nav=opinion-c-col-left-region
Title: Re: Health Effects of Climate Change
Post by: Daniel B. on October 31, 2017, 03:07:45 PM
CC is [already] Bad for your Health

Quote
... “Climate change is happening, and it’s a health issue today for millions worldwide,” said Anthony Costello, a co-chairman of the commission that produced the report, called The Lancet Countdown.

...climate change is already affecting human health in serious ways, with harms “far worse than previously understood.” The report argues that the health professions have a responsibility “to communicate the threats and opportunities” of a phenomenon that is “central to human well-being.”

...human-caused global warming “threatens to undermine the past 50 years of gains in public health.” But the report also said that a comprehensive approach to slow the planet’s warming could be “the great health opportunity of the 21st century.”

...outdoor labor capacity in rural areas fell, on average, by 5.3 percent over the past 16 years because of heat stress and other conditions making work more difficult. That is a stunning loss of productivity, and directly attributable to global warming during a period when nine of the 10 of the hottest years on record were recorded.

Productivity fell 2 percent from 2015 to 2016 alone.

In 2015, the Lancet report says, an additional 175 million people over the age of 65 were exposed to heat waves, when compared with broad trends of the past 20 years.

... lower-income countries experience far greater economic loss as a proportion of their gross domestic product because of climate-related disasters when compared to higher-income countries.

...From 1990 to 2016, uninsured losses in low-income countries were equivalent to over 1.5 percent of their G.D.P.

...recent gains in combating the spread of these diseases [are] now being threatened by climate change.

The report shows that transmission of dengue fever by just two types of mosquito has increased 3 percent and 5.9 percent, since 1990, the result of a broad range of factors including climate change...

If the report contained just these findings, it would still be an alert to public health officials. But there are dozens of other examples that clearly show that climate change is no longer a distant, future threat.

It is here, now.

This is now a medical and public health fight, not just an environmental one.

https://www.nytimes.com/2017/10/30/opinion/climate-change-health-heat.html?action=click&pgtype=Homepage&clickSource=story-heading&module=opinion-c-col-left-region&region=opinion-c-col-left-region&WT.nav=opinion-c-col-left-region

The bigger question is whether these negative impacts will outweigh the benefits in the future.  The point at which the negatives start to outweigh the positives is quite contentious, but some claim that this will not occur until the temperature rise reaches 3C.  Prof Richard Tol calculates that climate change in the past century improved human welfare by 1.4 per cent of global economic output, and will continue to rise.  The benefits include fewer winter death, which outnumber summer death by more than 2:1.  Warmer temperatures reduce overall energy usage, as heating uses more energy overall than cooling.  But the greatest benefit has come from increased agricultural output attributed to longer growing seasons (reduced frosts and freezes), increased rainfall, and higher atmospheric carbon dioxide levels. 


http://www.ncpa.org/sub/dpd/index.php?Article_ID=23746
Title: Re: Health Effects of Climate Change
Post by: TerryM on October 31, 2017, 04:16:27 PM
Richard Tol is credited as "an adviser to the climate denial organization Global Warming Policy Foundation" according to the desmog blog:


https://www.desmogblog.com/richard-tol


Prominent GW deniars are seldom given much air time at this here.


Did you possibly lose you way while trying to get back to Anthony's site?


Terry

Title: Re: Health Effects of Climate Change
Post by: gerontocrat on October 31, 2017, 05:03:40 PM
Richard Tol is credited as "an adviser to the climate denial organization Global Warming Policy Foundation" according to the desmog blog:
https://www.desmogblog.com/richard-tol
Prominent GW deniars are seldom given much air time at this here.

Terry
See below for who Professor Tol is. I think desmog blog might have got it wrong, very wrong. Climate denier he is not. He is an economist
The phrase "knowing the price of everything and the value of nothing" springs to mind.
And he may be right in some ways if you start with the belief that unfettered economic growth is more important than the human suffering required to achieve it.. Up to very recently climate change has only scratched the surface of world economic growth. Only now are we seeing events that may have long-lasting fundamental impacts on individual societies. Even then an economist can legitimately claim that there are long-term economic benefits of major catastrophes. The Puerto Rico catastrophe may well be the event to accelerate renewable energy investment throughout the Caribbean. Some historians make a good case that the Black Death that took out one third of Europe's population made the space for the renaissance.

As Stalin said "one man's death is a tragedy, one million is just a statistic".

http://www.sussex.ac.uk/profiles/289812

Prof Richard Tol
Post:   Professor of Economics (Economics), University of Sussex, England.
Location:   JUBILEE BUILDING JUB-281
Email:   R.Tol@sussex.ac.uk
Personal homepage:   Tol_Richard

Telephone numbers
Internal:   7282
UK:   01273 877282
International:   +44 1273 877282

Research expertise:
Climate change, Climate economics, Economics, Energy, Energy economics, Environment, Environmental economics, Scientometrics, tourism
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Biography
Richard S.J. Tol is a Professor at the Department of Economics, University of Sussex and the Professor of the Economics of Climate Change, Institute for Environmental Studies and Department of Spatial Economics, Vrije Universiteit, Amsterdam, the Netherlands. He is a member of the Academia Europaea.

Previously, he was a Research Professor at the Economic and Social Research Institute, Dublin, the Michael Otto Professor of Sustainability and Global Change at Hamburg University and an Adjunct Professor, Department of Engineering and Public Policy, Carnegie Mellon University, Pittsburgh, PA, USA. He has had visiting appointments at the Canadian Centre for Climate Research, University of Victoria, British Colombia, at the Centre for Social and Economic Research on the Global Environment, University College London, and at the Princeton Environmental Institute and the Department of Economics, Princeton University.

Richard received an M.Sc. in econometrics (1992) and a Ph.D. in economics (1997) from the Vrije Universiteit Amsterdam. He is ranked among the top 150 economists in the world, and has over 200 publications in learned journals (with 100+ co-authors), one book, three edited volumes, and many minor publications.

He specialises in the economics of energy, environment, and climate, and is interested in tourism and scientometrics.

Role
Professor of Economics
Community and Business
Richard is an editor for Energy Economics. He is advisor and referee of national and international policy and research. He is an author (contributing, lead, principal and convening) of Working Groups I, II and III of the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change, shared winner of the Nobel Peace Prize for 2007; an author and editor of the UNEP Handbook on Methods for Climate Change Impact Assessment and Adaptation Strategies; a GTAP Research Fellow. He is actively involved in the European Climate Forum, the European Forum on Integrated Environmental Assessment, and the Energy Modeling Forum.

Title: Re: Health Effects of Climate Change
Post by: Shared Humanity on October 31, 2017, 06:27:45 PM

The bigger question is whether these negative impacts will outweigh the benefits in the future.  The point at which the negatives start to outweigh the positives is quite contentious, but some claim that this will not occur until the temperature rise reaches 3C.  Prof Richard Tol calculates that climate change in the past century improved human welfare by 1.4 per cent of global economic output, and will continue to rise.  The benefits include fewer winter death, which outnumber summer death by more than 2:1.  Warmer temperatures reduce overall energy usage, as heating uses more energy overall than cooling.  But the greatest benefit has come from increased agricultural output attributed to longer growing seasons (reduced frosts and freezes), increased rainfall, and higher atmospheric carbon dioxide levels. 


http://www.ncpa.org/sub/dpd/index.php?Article_ID=23746

Excerpt taken from Article titled "Why Climate Change is Good for the World" penned by Matt Ridley and printed in The Spectator (U.K.), October 19, 2013.

The article ends with this statement....

"So we are doing real harm now to impede a change that will produce net benefits for 70 years."

It is becoming tedious to scroll past this crap.
Title: Re: Health Effects of Climate Change
Post by: Daniel B. on October 31, 2017, 06:35:24 PM
Since Terry's article mentioned productivity as well as health effects, so reporting on the economic growth seemed appropriate.  Focusing on one aspect of the change, while ignoring the bigger picture seems rather narrow-minded or possibly, self-serving.  Sure, heat-related deaths have increased.  But at the same time, cold-related deaths have subsided.  That is similar to those railing against vaccines, because of the few negative results, while ignoring the decrease in mortality from the disease itself.  The popular meme these days seems to be to portray anyone who says anything good about the changing climate as being a denier.  I thought that type of groupthink ended after 1984 came and went.
Title: Re: Health Effects of Climate Change
Post by: ghoti on October 31, 2017, 06:47:05 PM
In fact Richard Tol is a very well known denier of the concensus and the impacts of global warming. Some of this is covered by an old article by Dana Nuccitelli:

https://www.theguardian.com/environment/climate-consensus-97-per-cent/2014/jun/05/contrarians-accidentally-confirm-global-warming-consensus (https://www.theguardian.com/environment/climate-consensus-97-per-cent/2014/jun/05/contrarians-accidentally-confirm-global-warming-consensus)
Title: Re: Health Effects of Climate Change
Post by: TerryM on October 31, 2017, 07:34:51 PM
Since Terry's article mentioned productivity as well as health effects, so reporting on the economic growth seemed appropriate.  Focusing on one aspect of the change, while ignoring the bigger picture seems rather narrow-minded or possibly, self-serving.  Sure, heat-related deaths have increased.  But at the same time, cold-related deaths have subsided.  That is similar to those railing against vaccines, because of the few negative results, while ignoring the decrease in mortality from the disease itself.  The popular meme these days seems to be to portray anyone who says anything good about the changing climate as being a denier.  I thought that type of groupthink ended after 1984 came and went.


That's certainly a meme that I subscribe to.


BTW
Orwell was an optimist.


Terry
Title: Re: Health Effects of Climate Change
Post by: Daniel B. on October 31, 2017, 08:05:00 PM
Since Terry's article mentioned productivity as well as health effects, so reporting on the economic growth seemed appropriate.  Focusing on one aspect of the change, while ignoring the bigger picture seems rather narrow-minded or possibly, self-serving.  Sure, heat-related deaths have increased.  But at the same time, cold-related deaths have subsided.  That is similar to those railing against vaccines, because of the few negative results, while ignoring the decrease in mortality from the disease itself.  The popular meme these days seems to be to portray anyone who says anything good about the changing climate as being a denier.  I thought that type of groupthink ended after 1984 came and went.


That's certainly a meme that I subscribe to.


BTW
Orwell was an optimist.


Terry

I guess we just differ on that.  I will not deny anything just because it is good or bad, preferring to be realist.
Title: Re: Health Effects of Climate Change
Post by: TerryM on October 31, 2017, 10:11:41 PM
Realists acknowledge that climate change is already a disaster.
You are not a realist but a denier who refuses to admit to being the same.
Your viewpoint is shared by <.03 climate scientists, and far fewer on this site.
Terry
Title: Re: Health Effects of Climate Change
Post by: Daniel B. on October 31, 2017, 10:36:19 PM
Realists acknowledge that climate change is already a disaster.
You are not a realist but a denier who refuses to admit to being the same.
Your viewpoint is shared by <.03 climate scientists, and far fewer on this site.
Terry

Exaggerating the statistics does not help your claim.  Most scientists share my views.  But science is not determined by opinion, but by research and data.  Currently, the research is incomplete, resulting in large uncertainties.  Hence the climate sensitivity range is 1 - 4.5.

If it is already a disaster, then why are we not witnessing any of the catastrophes today.  Rather, the pessimists all claim that they will occur sometime in the future - usually the year 2100.  The real pessimists claim that they will occur in the next 5-10 years, and must revise their timeframe every decade.  How many claims of an ice-free Arctic summer by a certain year have already passed without occurrence?  The pessimists claimed that we would be ice-free earlier this decade.  The realists say in about 50 years.  I still side with the realists.
Title: Re: Health Effects of Climate Change
Post by: Paddy on October 31, 2017, 10:37:11 PM
It's really not looking likely that there would be a net decrease in mortality from climate change. Warmer winters don't necessarily save all that many lives, hotter summers definitely take them, and that's before you factor in the economics to the complexity. https://www.carbonbrief.org/explainer-will-rising-temperatures-mean-more-lives-are-saved-than-lost

And when we factor in the economics, I note this individual is talking up the loss of permafrost. Permafrost loss may make some land potentially farmable for a single short growing season, but the benefit from that is likely to be far outweighed by the loss of infrastructure built on permafrost and the disruption to agriculture from climate changing everywhere else in the world.
Title: Re: Health Effects of Climate Change
Post by: Daniel B. on November 01, 2017, 12:06:03 AM
It's really not looking likely that there would be a net decrease in mortality from climate change. Warmer winters don't necessarily save all that many lives, hotter summers definitely take them, and that's before you factor in the economics to the complexity. https://www.carbonbrief.org/explainer-will-rising-temperatures-mean-more-lives-are-saved-than-lost

And when we factor in the economics, I note this individual is talking up the loss of permafrost. Permafrost loss may make some land potentially farmable for a single short growing season, but the benefit from that is likely to be far outweighed by the loss of infrastructure built on permafrost and the disruption to agriculture from climate changing everywhere else in the world.

Interesting that you say that when your link referenced the decrease in winter mortality with rising temperatures.  Also, summertime temperatures are rising very little compared to wintertime, so a comparison of equal rises is not valid.  But the link is correct in that I should have said 20x more cold weather deaths.  That was just a typo. 

I could not find anything about permafrost being turned into farmland.  Most of the agricultural gains recently have come from current farms.
Title: Re: Health Effects of Climate Change
Post by: TerryM on November 01, 2017, 12:09:36 AM
It's really not looking likely that there would be a net decrease in mortality from climate change. Warmer winters don't necessarily save all that many lives, hotter summers definitely take them, and that's before you factor in the economics to the complexity. https://www.carbonbrief.org/explainer-will-rising-temperatures-mean-more-lives-are-saved-than-lost (https://www.carbonbrief.org/explainer-will-rising-temperatures-mean-more-lives-are-saved-than-lost)

And when we factor in the economics, I note this individual is talking up the loss of permafrost. Permafrost loss may make some land potentially farmable for a single short growing season, but the benefit from that is likely to be far outweighed by the loss of infrastructure built on permafrost and the disruption to agriculture from climate changing everywhere else in the world.


I'm amazed by the cohesiveness of the two of you.
You won't mind if I answer as if replying to but one poster, I hope.


Since I didn't exaggerate my "statistic", and you replied with nonsense that has nothing to do with our previous exchange, I must assume you are a troll.


Look no further than Puerto Rico to witness just one of the disasters that deniers like yourself have caused by slowing acceptance of disastrous Global Warming we're already experiencing. If we had listened to Hansen's warnings all those decades ago, the Ocean might not be at today's temperatures, some of the Polar Ice would not have melted away, perhaps we'd have more glaciers expanding.


< 0.03 climate scientist agree with you, and many of them previously argued that smoking was a healthy pastime. Light up a Camel and inhale deeply, it may alleviate the loneliness.


Terry
Title: Re: Health Effects of Climate Change
Post by: Shared Humanity on November 01, 2017, 12:20:12 AM
Terry...

Neither are worth the energy.
Title: Re: Health Effects of Climate Change
Post by: TerryM on November 01, 2017, 01:34:07 AM
Terry...

Neither are worth the energy.


Ramen!
Another regular alerted me to them and had wondered about the effect on casuals that might drop by. Something to amuse myself with when the brain is asleep, but the eyes won't stay shut.


Terry
Title: Re: Health Effects of Climate Change
Post by: Daniel B. on November 01, 2017, 02:03:57 AM
It's really not looking likely that there would be a net decrease in mortality from climate change. Warmer winters don't necessarily save all that many lives, hotter summers definitely take them, and that's before you factor in the economics to the complexity. https://www.carbonbrief.org/explainer-will-rising-temperatures-mean-more-lives-are-saved-than-lost (https://www.carbonbrief.org/explainer-will-rising-temperatures-mean-more-lives-are-saved-than-lost)

And when we factor in the economics, I note this individual is talking up the loss of permafrost. Permafrost loss may make some land potentially farmable for a single short growing season, but the benefit from that is likely to be far outweighed by the loss of infrastructure built on permafrost and the disruption to agriculture from climate changing everywhere else in the world.


I'm amazed by the cohesiveness of the two of you.
You won't mind if I answer as if replying to but one poster, I hope.


Since I didn't exaggerate my "statistic", and you replied with nonsense that has nothing to do with our previous exchange, I must assume you are a troll.


Look no further than Puerto Rico to witness just one of the disasters that deniers like yourself have caused by slowing acceptance of disastrous Global Warming we're already experiencing. If we had listened to Hansen's warnings all those decades ago, the Ocean might not be at today's temperatures, some of the Polar Ice would not have melted away, perhaps we'd have more glaciers expanding.


< 0.03 climate scientist agree with you, and many of them previously argued that smoking was a healthy pastime. Light up a Camel and inhale deeply, it may alleviate the loneliness.


Terry

Actually, most scientist do agree with me that the earth has warmed, and that most warming has occurred over the coldest realms (high latitudes, winter, and nighttime).  Very little warming has occurred over the warmest realms.  Indeed, summer daytime highs are little changed.  Most also agree that mankind has contributed, although there exists much disagree as to the extent.

You seem to be unaware that Puerta Rico is frequently ravaged by hurricanes.  Same with Florida.  Globally, this season is not unusual.  In fact, this year is running about 5% below the average accumulated cyclone energy.  This is not a disaster, but nature at its norm.
Title: Re: Health Effects of Climate Change
Post by: aperson on November 01, 2017, 02:48:38 AM
In fact, this year is running about 5% below the average accumulated cyclone energy.  This is not a disaster, but nature at its norm.

Why do you care about global ACE instead of per-basin? Of course a Nina season would have a lower overall ACE due to the associated weakening of WPAC formation. On per-basin ACE, the Atlantic is currently 7th highest and the formation of one more tropical cyclone in this basin would likely push it to 4th, 3rd, or possibly higher if it is major intensity.

If it wasn't clear that you were trying to cherry-pick spurious pointless claims before that statement, it's extremely clear now. You're making a claim that should be plainly obvious to anyone who understands ENSO dynamics and their effects on TC formation. It should also be plainly obvious to anyone who understands these things that the 2017 Atlantic season has been *extremely* unusual. Are the .03 of meteorologists you follow Joe Bastardi and uhh... Joe Bastardi?
Title: Re: Health Effects of Climate Change
Post by: AbruptSLR on November 01, 2017, 03:22:59 AM
As wili already noted, the signal of the impact of climate change on health is coming into focus:

Title: "How Climate Change Is Already Affecting Health, Spreading Disease"

http://www.npr.org/sections/goatsandsoda/2017/10/31/561041342/scientists-from-around-the-world-report-on-health-effects-from-climate-change

Extract: "In other words, climate's connection to health is extraordinarily complicated.

Now international team of scientists has taken a step toward untangling this problem on a global scale.

"All of the work we present is pretty tricky," says Dr. Nick Watts, at University College London, who led the study. "I don't think any of us would ever say that this has been easy."

Around the world, people have experienced an average increase in temperature about 1.5 degrees Fahrenheit, and the study — published Monday in The Lancet journal — finds several signs that even this small amount of warming threatens the health of hundreds of millions of people each year.

First, the number of vulnerable people exposed to heat waves has surged worldwide, the study finds."
Title: Re: Health Effects of Climate Change
Post by: Daniel B. on November 01, 2017, 03:32:35 AM
In fact, this year is running about 5% below the average accumulated cyclone energy.  This is not a disaster, but nature at its norm.

Why do you care about global ACE instead of per-basin? Of course a Nina season would have a lower overall ACE due to the associated weakening of WPAC formation. On per-basin ACE, the Atlantic is currently 7th highest and the formation of one more tropical cyclone in this basin would likely push it to 4th, 3rd, or possibly higher if it is major intensity.

If it wasn't clear that you were trying to cherry-pick spurious pointless claims before that statement, it's extremely clear now. You're making a claim that should be plainly obvious to anyone who understands ENSO dynamics and their effects on TC formation. It should also be plainly obvious to anyone who understands these things that the 2017 Atlantic season has been *extremely* unusual. Are the .03 of meteorologists you follow Joe Bastardi and uhh... Joe Bastardi?

Yes, of course La Niña years result in higher Atlantic tropical activity.  That is just one more indications that this season is rather average.  And you are right, this should be plainly obvious to everyone here.  At least it is obvious to most meteorologists, regardless of you follow.
Title: Re: Health Effects of Climate Change
Post by: Daniel B. on November 01, 2017, 03:50:14 AM
FYI, cherry-picking refers to selectively choosing a smaller portion of a dataset (i.e. Atlantic basin), instead of using the entire dataset (global), usually to make a spurious point which differs from the overall data.  On any given day, one could find some place that is experiencing unusually warm or cool temperatures.  To use this to support one’s personal view, while ignoring other data is also cherry-picking.  Weather swings wildly over the short term.  Long term trends are what is important.
Title: Re: Health Effects of Climate Change
Post by: aperson on November 01, 2017, 03:54:23 AM
Yes, of course La Niña years result in higher Atlantic tropical activity.  That is just one more indications that this season is rather average.  And you are right, this should be plainly obvious to everyone here.  At least it is obvious to most meteorologists, regardless of you follow.

This season was anomalous in terms of where hurricanes reached major strength. In particular, Irma and Maria reached category 5 farther eastward than any other hurricanes in the Atlantic record. The location where Ophelia reached major hurricane strength is an extreme outlier.

Both changes in intensity and trajectory for the Atlantic basin were anomalous in ways that have been predicted by a warming climate. In particular, this year should serve as a warning to Europe, as 2012 should have served as a warning for the Northeastern US.

I would consider a widening latitude of tropical cyclone incidence as well as an increase in intensity to be a net minus for anthropogenic health. Stack one more thing to your endless nebulous weighting of "good" vs "bad" while we increase temperature and variance.
Title: Re: Health Effects of Climate Change
Post by: Coffee Drinker on November 01, 2017, 04:03:59 AM
Warning to Europe?
Sorry, but death from hurricanes (and climate change) has zero statistical effect on overall health and mortally of a population. Especially in Europe.

The impact of climate on health is so minimal compared to general pollution, pesticides, fast food, smoking and unhealthy lifestyle in general.
Title: Re: Health Effects of Climate Change
Post by: Paddy on November 01, 2017, 07:13:00 AM
There's some high grade trolling going on in this thread.

EDIT: But for those interested in more serious forecasts, the World Health Organisation reckon that climate change will cause an additional 250000 deaths a year between 2030 and 2050. Small potatoes compared to the millions of deaths a year attributable to smoking, air pollution, or obesity, but not negligible either. http://www.who.int/mediacentre/factsheets/fs266/en/
Title: Re: Health Effects of Climate Change
Post by: Daniel B. on November 01, 2017, 06:28:46 PM
The effects are indeed minimal compared to other, more serious issues.  My big concern is the amount of money and attention given to this issue and the expense of these other problems. 
Title: Re: Health Effects of Climate Change
Post by: longwalks1 on November 01, 2017, 07:33:11 PM
  From Daniel B.
Quote
Sure, heat-related deaths have increased.  But at the same time, cold-related deaths have subsided.  That is similar to those railing against vaccines, because of the few negative results, while ignoring the decrease in mortality from the disease itself. 

As Neven counseled me once months ago,, "You posted that every 3 months you hide comments from one person to stay calm, you should do that for   "**"."  Done.   

There is a blog out there that is called "Not Even Wrong"   That snippet is beyond facile. 
Title: Re: Health Effects of Climate Change
Post by: Paddy on November 01, 2017, 09:28:46 PM
The effects are indeed minimal compared to other, more serious issues.  My big concern is the amount of money and attention given to this issue and the expense of these other problems.

The problem is that climate change is a long term, growing and accelerating issue that threatens the very land we live on. Humanity can doubtless survive by retreating from rising seas, building to withstand more powerful hurricanes, altering the crops used to fit changing climatic conditions etc, but the rate of the necessary retreat from our coasts and the history they contain over the coming decades and centuries will be determined to a large extent by the patterns of consumption of today.

What other issues do you see as being in competition, however?
Title: Re: Health Effects of Climate Change
Post by: Daniel B. on November 02, 2017, 02:49:18 AM
The effects are indeed minimal compared to other, more serious issues.  My big concern is the amount of money and attention given to this issue and the expense of these other problems.

The problem is that climate change is a long term, growing and accelerating issue that threatens the very land we live on. Humanity can doubtless survive by retreating from rising seas, building to withstand more powerful hurricanes, altering the crops used to fit changing climatic conditions etc, but the rate of the necessary retreat from our coasts and the history they contain over the coming decades and centuries will be determined to a large extent by the patterns of consumption of today.

What other issues do you see as being in competition, however?

Probably the biggest issue is land destruction.  This is occurring much more rapidly, has greater influences on biodiversity (including pushing many species to the brink of extinction), and is irreversible, compared to climate change, which will revert back to its natural state, if atmospheric levels were to fall back.  Pollution is a distant second, but still much more dire.  These are both long term issues and growing issues.
Title: Re: Health Effects of Climate Change
Post by: Paddy on November 02, 2017, 09:19:01 AM
Addressing these issues doesn't tend to be in conflict with addressing climate change, however. For instance, if you cut down on fossil fuel use, or work on reforestation, you help to address all three. About the only notable exception was when diesel was touted as climate-friendly, and that's in the past now. Sustainability covers many issues, but climate change is clearly one of the big ones.
Title: Re: Health Effects of Climate Change
Post by: Shared Humanity on November 02, 2017, 04:53:58 PM
Kidney disease on the rise due to climate change.

http://www.bbc.com/earth/story/20170418-climate-change-is-turning-dehydration-into-a-deadly-disease
Title: Re: Health Effects of Climate Change
Post by: Shared Humanity on November 02, 2017, 04:58:55 PM
Mosquito borne diseases on the rise due to climate change.

https://www.scientificamerican.com/article/mosquito-borne-diseases-on-the-uptick-thanks-to-global-warming/
Title: Re: Health Effects of Climate Change
Post by: Shared Humanity on November 02, 2017, 05:02:12 PM
World Health Organization determines that changes in infectious disease transmission patterns are a likely major consequence of climate change. WHO concludes that more research is needed to learn more about the underlying complex causal relationships, and apply this information to the prediction of future impacts, using more complete, better validated, integrated, models.

http://www.who.int/globalchange/summary/en/index5.html
Title: Re: Health Effects of Climate Change
Post by: Shared Humanity on November 02, 2017, 05:04:59 PM
Climate change plays role in spread of Zika virus in South, Central and North America.

http://www.climatecentral.org/news/scientists-tease-out-climate-role-zika-spread-20582
Title: Re: Health Effects of Climate Change
Post by: Shared Humanity on November 02, 2017, 05:21:07 PM
WHO

Quantitative risk assessment
of the effects of climate change
on selected causes of death,
2030s and 2050s


http://apps.who.int/iris/bitstream/10665/134014/1/9789241507691_eng.pdf

"Compared  with  a  future  without  climate  change,  the  following  additional  deaths  are projected  for  the  year  2030:  38  000  due  to  heat  exposure  in  elderly  people,  48  000 due  to  diarrhoea,  60  000  due  to  malaria,  and  95  000  due  to  childhood  undernutrition.  The   World Health Organization (WHO) projects a dramatic decline in child mortality, and this is  reflected  in  declining  climate  change  impacts  from  child  malnutrition  and  diarrhoeal  disease  between  2030  and  2050.  On  the  other  hand,  by  the  2050s,  deaths  related  to  heat  exposure  (over  100  000  per  year)  are  projected  to  increase.  Impacts  are  greatest  under a  low economic growth scenario because of higher rates of mortality projected in low- and middle-income countries. By 2050, impacts of climate change on mortality are projected to be greatest in south Asia. These results indicate that climate change will have a significant impact on child health by the 2030s. Under a base case socioeconomic scenario, we estimate approximately 250 000 additional deaths  due  to  climate  change  per  year  between  2030  and  2050.  These  numbers  do  not  represent a prediction of the overall impacts of climate change on health, since we could not quantify several important causal pathways."

Title: Re: Health Effects of Climate Change
Post by: Shared Humanity on November 02, 2017, 05:30:56 PM
Estimates range from 20,000 to 70,000 killed during 2003 European heat wave.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/2003_European_heat_wave

Extreme heat could kill 150,000 per year in Europe by 2100.

http://www.aljazeera.com/news/2017/08/european-heatwave-deaths-skyrocket-climate-study-170804234140485.html

Deaths from heatwaves were projected to increase by 5,400 percent, coastal foods by 3,780 percent, wildfires by 138 percent, river floods by 54 percent and windstorms by 20 percent.

Deaths from cold waves will decline by about 98 percent, said the team, which is not "sufficient to compensate for the other increases"...

...For the purposes of the study, the team assumed a rate of greenhouse gas emissions from burning coal, oil and gas that put the world on track for average global warming of three degrees Celsius by 2100 from 1990 levels.

The Paris Agreement, concluded by 195 nations in 2015, seeks to limit warming to under two degrees from levels before the Industrial Revolution, when fossil fuel burning kicked off.

The researchers also made no provision for additional measures being taken to boost human resilience to weather disasters.

In a comment on the study, Jae Young Lee and Ho Kim of the Seoul National University wrote its projections "could be overestimated".

Title: Re: Health Effects of Climate Change
Post by: Shared Humanity on November 02, 2017, 05:39:50 PM
Harvests in U.S. to suffer from climate change.

https://phys.org/news/2017-01-harvests-climate.html
Title: Re: Health Effects of Climate Change
Post by: Daniel B. on November 02, 2017, 06:12:07 PM
Yet, studies show that cold weather kills significantly more.  This study, published in the Lancet medical journal, found that between 1985 and 2012, cold weather was responsible for 7.3% of all deaths, while heat was responsible for 0.4%.

https://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2015/05/150520193831.htm
Title: Re: Health Effects of Climate Change
Post by: Shared Humanity on November 02, 2017, 07:00:05 PM
Climate change expected to increase the incidence of toxic algal blooms.

https://www.epa.gov/nutrientpollution/climate-change-and-harmful-algal-blooms

https://www.nature.com/news/climate-change-is-making-algal-blooms-worse-1.21884

http://pubs.acs.org/doi/abs/10.1021/acs.est.7b01498
Title: Re: Health Effects of Climate Change
Post by: Shared Humanity on November 02, 2017, 07:12:06 PM
A good overview of the potential health impacts of climate change.

https://19january2017snapshot.epa.gov/climate-impacts/climate-impacts-human-health_.html

One interesting impact on health mentioned in the above article is the impact that severe weather events and other catastrophes have on the mental health of the victims.

http://www.latimes.com/local/california/la-me-ln-fires-mental-health-20171023-story.html

http://articles.latimes.com/2009/sep/06/local/me-fire-mental6
Title: Re: Health Effects of Climate Change
Post by: Shared Humanity on November 02, 2017, 07:20:19 PM
Hurricane Harvey to have long term mental health consequences.

http://fortune.com/2017/09/06/hurricane-harvey-health-risks/

"In the long term, the primary public health concern is the mental health of the affected populations, such as Post-Traumatic Stress Disorder (PTSD), chronic depression and anxiety, and addiction. Mental health issues are often underreported in the immediate aftermath because such symptoms are typically not expressed for weeks, if not months, after a traumatic event.

In the case of Katrina, studies showed that 30% to 50% of all Katrina survivors suffered from PTSD. Note that a study conducted by Columbia University found that 36% of Katrina-affected children showed serious emotional disturbances. In the case of Hurricane Sandy, over 20% of residents reported PTSD, 33% reported depression, and 46% reported anxiety. When groups were compared by the degree of exposure to the hurricane, the higher-exposed group showed 30% more PTSD than the less-exposed group."
Title: Re: Health Effects of Climate Change
Post by: Shared Humanity on November 02, 2017, 08:29:32 PM
While scientists cannot point to any specific storm or wildfire and say that it is the result of global warming, they do say that the severity of storms, droughts, heat waves etc. will increase due to global warming.

An extensive study of the health effects of Katrina on low income residents of New Orleans uncovered serious, long term impacts on health.

https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3276074/
Title: Re: Health Effects of Climate Change
Post by: wili on November 02, 2017, 09:00:26 PM
DB is just repeatedly spewing long-debunked standard denialist memes. (I thought we discouraged such trollish behavior on this forum, at least).

See: https://www.skepticalscience.com/global-warming-positives-negatives.htm

Climate myth # 3 "It's not bad"

What the science says: Negative impacts of global warming on agriculture, health & environment far outweigh any positives.

...
Quote
Health

Warmer winters would mean fewer deaths, particularly among vulnerable groups like the aged. However, the same groups are also vulnerable to additional heat, and deaths attributable to heatwaves are expected to be approximately five times as great as winter deaths prevented. It is widely believed that warmer climes will encourage migration of disease-bearing insects like mosquitoes and malaria is already appearing in places it hasn’t been seen before.
Title: Re: Health Effects of Climate Change
Post by: Shared Humanity on November 02, 2017, 09:09:20 PM
DB is just repeatedly spewing long-debunked standard denialist memes. (I thought we discouraged such trollish behavior on this forum, at least).

See: https://www.skepticalscience.com/global-warming-positives-negatives.htm


Yep. Put him on ignore yesterday because I got tired of reading his bullshit. Decided instead to provide health related impact research for visitors who want to understand some of the health related effects of climate change.
Title: Re: Health Effects of Climate Change
Post by: Daniel B. on November 02, 2017, 09:11:36 PM
DB is just repeatedly spewing long-debunked standard denialist memes. (I thought we discouraged such trollish behavior on this forum, at least).

See: https://www.skepticalscience.com/global-warming-positives-negatives.htm

Climate myth # 3 "It's not bad"

What the science says: Negative impacts of global warming on agriculture, health & environment far outweigh any positives.

...
Quote
Health

Warmer winters would mean fewer deaths, particularly among vulnerable groups like the aged. However, the same groups are also vulnerable to additional heat, and deaths attributable to heatwaves are expected to be approximately five times as great as winter deaths prevented. It is widely believed that warmer climes will encourage migration of disease-bearing insects like mosquitoes and malaria is already appearing in places it hasn’t been seen before.

I can see you are really scraping the bottom of the barrel when you have to resort to quotes from John and Dana’s website.  I guess I read it on the internet, so it must be true is alive and well here.  You can deny the research from well-respected scientists, and established journals all you like, but it will not change the truth.  This seems to popular among the extremists in any area; they turn a blind eye and deaf ear to anything and anyone that does not conform to their personal beliefs.  The other common theme is to refer to this research as performed by ill-informed alarmists or deniers.  I guess it is just circular reasoning, and the more people you can coerce, the bigger the circle.  Good luck with that.
Title: Re: Health Effects of Climate Change
Post by: ghoti on November 02, 2017, 11:51:22 PM
The "decrease in winter death" is also an artifact of including the millions of deaths as a result of the Spanish Flu pandemic of 1918. There is no significant decreasing slope to the line of winter mortality when that isn't included.
Title: Re: Health Effects of Climate Change
Post by: wili on November 03, 2017, 12:05:40 AM
Disparaging a science site to avoid the truth...another well worn denialist ploy.

Keep at it. With every post you are further proving my point.
Title: Re: Health Effects of Climate Change
Post by: Daniel B. on November 03, 2017, 02:28:53 AM
Disparaging a science site to avoid the truth...another well worn denialist ploy.

Keep at it. With every post you are further proving my point.

I see you are proving mine.
Title: Re: Health Effects of Climate Change
Post by: Daniel B. on November 03, 2017, 01:06:21 PM
Since Terry's article mentioned productivity as well as health effects, so reporting on the economic growth seemed appropriate.  Focusing on one aspect of the change, while ignoring the bigger picture seems rather narrow-minded or possibly, self-serving.  Sure, heat-related deaths have increased.  But at the same time, cold-related deaths have subsided.  That is similar to those railing against vaccines, because of the few negative results, while ignoring the decrease in mortality from the disease itself.  The popular meme these days seems to be to portray anyone who says anything good about the changing climate as being a denier.  I thought that type of groupthink ended after 1984 came and went.


That's certainly a meme that I subscribe to.


BTW
Orwell was an optimist.


Terry

You seem to belong to the crowd here that is rather nostalgic to a past idyllic climate Eden, which never existed.  They firmly believe that all change is inherently bad, and resist change vehemently.  They believe that recent climate events are a new creation, which never occurred in the past, or if they did, are much worse today, even though the evidence is not so.  Then they link to websites which excel in exaggeration, in vain attempts to sway the uninformed (many do not even try to hide the fact that they do this).  Lastly, as you stated, any research or data which is presented that opposes this viewpoint is called BS, and the scientists reporting this is referred to as a denier.  It looks as if this is a self-acclamation, as those belonging to this group appear to be the true deniers.  True scientists do not seek evidence which supports their own premises only, and ignore the rest.  Rather, they evaluate all the evidence, and come to conclusions based thereon.  Scientists today seem to fighting against this group of activists, which tries to "debunk" their research through sleight of hand or cherry-picked data.  Amazing how certain beliefs can be "proven" based on limited data, carefully chosen from the whole dataset, or by the inclusion of a certain outlying event.  I actually thought this site was more scientific than that.
Title: Re: Health Effects of Climate Change
Post by: Shared Humanity on November 03, 2017, 02:12:51 PM
Rising temperatures present risks to the health of workers in a variety of industries and impact productivity.

https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4202759/
Title: Re: Health Effects of Climate Change
Post by: Shared Humanity on November 03, 2017, 02:16:55 PM
Rising temperatures due to climate change and the increased frequency and intensity of associated "heat waves can exceed the physiological adaptive capacity of vulnerable population groups. Individuals over the age of 60 years are consistently the most vulnerable, with 82%–92% of excess mortality occurring in this group. Risks for heat-related illness or injuries are compounded for people with obesity, cardiovascular disease, respiratory disease and diabetes mellitus. These conditions decrease the body’s ability to adapt to changes in environmental conditions..."

https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC2900329/
Title: Re: Health Effects of Climate Change
Post by: Shared Humanity on November 03, 2017, 02:23:19 PM
Rise in heat waves tied to kidney disease ‘epidemics’

https://www.reuters.com/article/us-health-heatwaves-kidney-disease/rise-in-heat-waves-tied-to-kidney-disease-epidemics-idUSKCN0Y22H4
Title: Re: Health Effects of Climate Change
Post by: Shared Humanity on November 03, 2017, 02:30:43 PM
AGW linked to widespread infestations of trolls on websites designed to keep public informed.

Beginning as a nuisance and remaining hidden from officials, the rapidly increasing incidence of troll infestations has now been declared a public health crisis by the CDC in Atlanta.

"Infestations can be highly resistant to efforts to eradicate them, as pernicious as a colony of blood engorged bed bugs." an official at CDC said. "Our studies suggest the most effective method to address the issue is to remove their source of food."

Stop feeding the trolls!
Title: Re: Health Effects of Climate Change
Post by: wili on November 03, 2017, 08:56:07 PM
"I actually thought this site was more scientific than that."

LOL. You are the least scientific poster on here!

And the lambasting the entire site on baseless charges, you've hit a new low here, even for a soulless troll.
Title: Re: Health Effects of Climate Change
Post by: Sigmetnow on November 12, 2017, 04:42:18 PM
27 Ways a Heat Wave Can Kill You — A Dire Warning for a Warming Planet
New research in health and climate change suggests people are more susceptible to heat-related death than once thought. ‘It’s not just the elderly. It’s everybody.'
Quote
In reviewing the literature, Mora and his colleagues identified five heat-induced physiological mechanisms, including inadequate blood flow to organs and toxic cells, and seven organs—brain, heart, lung, kidneys, liver, intestines and pancreas—that those mechanisms can impact. They then found medical evidence that 27 heat-induced interactions are possible. ...
https://insideclimatenews.org/news/10112017/heat-wave-deaths-climate-change-misdiagnosed-health-lancet
Title: Re: Health Effects of Climate Change
Post by: gerontocrat on November 17, 2017, 03:33:03 PM
It is official at the EPA (and elsewhere) - air pollution is good for you.

https://www.theguardian.com/environment/2017/nov/16/modern-air-is-too-clean-the-rise-of-air-pollution-denial

" 'Modern air is too clean': the rise of air pollution denial
US sceptics are questioning the science behind air pollution and mortality, a trend that is starting to appear in countries where the air is much more toxic.

Despite report after report linking air pollution to deterioration of the lungs, heart and brain, Prof Robert Phalen believes the air is “too clean” for children.

After all, everybody needs a bit of immune-system-boosting dirt in their lungs.

“Modern air is a little too clean for optimum health,” he told the American Association for the Advancement of Science (AAAS), one of the world’s largest scientific societies, in 2012.

“My most important role in science is causing trouble and controversy,” he added.

Now the director of the air pollution health effects laboratory at the University of California, Irvine, is set to be appointed as a scientific adviser by Donald Trump’s Environmental Protection Agency (EPA). ".

And so it goes on.
Title: Re: Health Effects of Climate Change
Post by: Sigmetnow on December 22, 2017, 04:13:33 PM
Humidity may prove breaking point for some areas as temperatures rise, says study
From US south to China, heat stress could exceed human endurance
Quote
Climate scientists say that killer heat waves will become increasingly prevalent in many regions as climate warms. However, most projections leave out a major factor that could worsen things: humidity, which can greatly magnify the effects of heat alone. Now, a new global study projects that in coming decades the effects of high humidity in many areas will dramatically increase. At times, they may surpass humans' ability to work or, in some cases, even survive. Health and economies would suffer, especially in regions where people work outside and have little access to air conditioning. Potentially affected regions include large swaths of the already muggy southeastern United States, the Amazon, western and central Africa, southern areas of the Mideast and Arabian peninsula, northern India and eastern China.

"The conditions we're talking about basically never occur now--people in most places have never experienced them," said lead author Ethan Coffel, a graduate student at Columbia University's Lamont-Doherty Earth Observatory. "But they're projected to occur close to the end of the century." The study will appears this week in the journal Environmental Research Letters. ...
https://www.eurekalert.org/pub_releases/2017-12/teia-hmp122017.php


“From an Indian perspective, this is utterly frightening.
1/ This will happen in the Indo-Gangetic belt, with most dependant on agriculture, and thus the whims of weather ”
https://twitter.com/ankitbhardy/status/944207421060276225
Brief Twitter thread at link.
Title: Re: Health Effects of Climate Change
Post by: Sigmetnow on January 11, 2018, 03:06:32 AM
Alaska releases first detailed report on negative health impacts of climate change
Quote
On Monday, the state Division of Public Health released the first comprehensive report about the adverse health impacts climate change could have on Alaskans.

The sweeping list of potential health implications include the introduction of new diseases; an increase in accidents; an increase in anxiety and depression; a worsening allergy season; and increasingly dangerous hunting and harvesting conditions limiting subsistence activity.

State health officials say the 77-page report is meant to raise awareness of how climate change could impact public health in a state where, over the past century, the air and water temperatures have warmed faster than the rest of the country. ...
https://www.adn.com/alaska-news/health/2018/01/08/alaska-releases-first-statewide-report-on-negative-health-impacts-of-climate-change/
Title: Re: Health Effects of Climate Change
Post by: CDN_dude on January 18, 2018, 02:51:16 AM
Contra the EPA's claim that unclean air is good for you, an important new study finds that elevated CO2 levels have a direct negative effect on human cognition.

https://thinkprogress.org/exclusive-elevated-co2-levels-directly-affect-human-cognition-new-harvard-study-shows-2748e7378941/

This is of particular concern since Co2 levels inside buildings are highly elevated compared to outside. Furthermore, the threshold at which impacts start to occur is unknown but may be as low as 600ppm! A figure we are on track to achieve everywhere in the world by the end of the century.
Title: Re: Health Effects of Climate Change
Post by: Daniel B. on January 18, 2018, 04:25:11 PM
Contra the EPA's claim that unclean air is good for you, an important new study finds that elevated CO2 levels have a direct negative effect on human cognition.

https://thinkprogress.org/exclusive-elevated-co2-levels-directly-affect-human-cognition-new-harvard-study-shows-2748e7378941/

This is of particular concern since Co2 levels inside buildings are highly elevated compared to outside. Furthermore, the threshold at which impacts start to occur is unknown but may be as low as 600ppm! A figure we are on track to achieve everywhere in the world by the end of the century.

This has been known by occupation groups, such as OSHA.  The limit for an 8-hour day is still 5000 ppm, but other groups recommend 1000 ppm for living areas.  Concentrations under that have not shown any detrimental health effects.  As concentrations rise about 1000 ppm, brain activity starts to slow, but does not show significant slowing until 2500 ppm.
Title: Re: Health Effects of Climate Change
Post by: MrVisible on January 19, 2018, 02:08:14 AM
The studies that established the 5000ppm threshold (http://archive.rubicon-foundation.org/xmlui/handle/123456789/3861) for an 8-hour day were conducted on US Navy sailors back in the 1970s, and they specifically state that they don't apply to vulnerable populations.

Quote
The recommended desirability of increasing the allowable limits for daily exposure to carbon dioxide is based upon the recognition that work in any unusual atmospheric environment requires normal health and the absence of active medical conditions which would be exaggerated by the work and the environment. By appropriate selection of normal individuals fo work in atmospheres containing CO2, effects can be expected to be minimal and acceptable.

By 2100 we're looking at 1000ppm of CO2 in our atmosphere. For our entire history as a species, we've been at 280ppm or less.

So, my point is... Can human babies gestate and develop healthily in an atmosphere with three times the normal quantity of CO2?

I haven't found any research on the effects of CO2 on people, but there's a lot of evidence accumulating that points to the fact that child health is already being affected by climate change in a variety of ways.

Negative birth outcomes linked to air pollution exposure early in pregnancy, study finds (https://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2017/07/170727102907.htm)

Climate change and the potential effects on maternal and pregnancy outcomes: an assessment of the most vulnerable – the mother, fetus, and newborn child (https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3595418/)

Air pollution linked to increased mental illness in children  (https://www.theguardian.com/environment/2016/jun/13/air-pollution-linked-to-increased-mental-illness-in-children)

Danger in the air: How air pollution can affect brain development in young children (https://www.unicef.org/environment/files/Danger_in_the_Air.pdf)

Global Warming May Harm Children for Life (https://www.technologyreview.com/s/609629/global-warming-may-harm-children-for-life/)

Whether we survive as a species isn't going to depend on how healthy adult sailors can deal with CO2 on the job. It's going to depend on how well infants can gestate and develop in the atmosphere we're creating.

It seems to me like it'd be worth doing some multigenerational lab rat experiments to see what we're going to be up against.
Title: Re: Health Effects of Climate Change
Post by: Daniel B. on January 19, 2018, 05:58:53 PM
By 2100 we're looking at 1000ppm of CO2 in our atmosphere. For our entire history as a species, we've been at 280ppm or less.

Not sure how you are arriving at the figure.  From 1980-2010, the atmospheric CO2 level increase 50 ppm.  Even accounting for an upward rise from that trend (and no mitigating efforts), the maximum value we would reach by 2100 is 600 ppm.  No detrimental health effects have been documented at the level.
Title: Re: Health Effects of Climate Change
Post by: MrVisible on January 19, 2018, 06:15:51 PM
I'm going by the IPCC projections. (http://www.ipcc-data.org/observ/ddc_co2.html)

Do you have research showing that exposure to CO2 levels no lower than 600ppm, and considerably higher most of the time, does no harm whatsoever to infants and gestating fetuses? Because that would be what I'm looking for here. It'd be very reassuring.

We actually don't know what will happen when we're immersed in high concentrations of CO2 every single day from the time we're conceived. Don't you think we might want to do some research to find out for sure?
Title: Re: Health Effects of Climate Change
Post by: Daniel B. on January 19, 2018, 07:09:05 PM
I'm going by the IPCC projections. (http://www.ipcc-data.org/observ/ddc_co2.html)

Do you have research showing that exposure to CO2 levels no lower than 600ppm, and considerably higher most of the time, does no harm whatsoever to infants and gestating fetuses? Because that would be what I'm looking for here. It'd be very reassuring.

We actually don't know what will happen when we're immersed in high concentrations of CO2 every single day from the time we're conceived. Don't you think we might want to do some research to find out for sure?

There is very little documentation at the lower levels.  The following is a good guide to the health effects of intermediate concentrations (1 - 5%).  No noticeable effects have been observed at concentrations below 1%, except for a slightly increase respiratory rate.  The only negative implications for infants is the greater potential for body heat loss.  Oftentimes, the indoor concentration can exceed 1%, so going outdoors (even at concentrations of 600 ppm) really is a breath of fresh air.

http://citeseerx.ist.psu.edu/viewdoc/download?doi=10.1.1.464.2827&rep=rep1&type=pdf
Title: Re: Health Effects of Climate Change
Post by: MrVisible on January 20, 2018, 01:07:39 AM
Quote
No noticeable effects have been observed at concentrations below 1%, except for a slightly increase respiratory rate.

That's not true.

Is CO2 an Indoor Pollutant? Direct Effects of Low-to-Moderate CO2 Concentrations on Human Decision-Making Performance (https://ehp.niehs.nih.gov/1104789/)

Quote
Relative to 600 ppm, at 1,000 ppm CO2, moderate and statistically significant decrements occurred in six of nine scales of decision-making performance. At 2,500 ppm, large and statistically significant reductions occurred in seven scales of decision-making performance (raw score ratios, 0.06–0.56), but performance on the focused activity scale increased.

While the paper you posted is a good overview of the field from 2003, a lot has changed since then.

This podcast (https://ashesashes.org/blog/episode-07-last-gasp) sums the issue up well, and there's a huge list of citations included.



Title: Re: Health Effects of Climate Change
Post by: Daniel B. on January 20, 2018, 02:43:55 PM
Quote
No noticeable effects have been observed at concentrations below 1%, except for a slightly increase respiratory rate.

That's not true.

Is CO2 an Indoor Pollutant? Direct Effects of Low-to-Moderate CO2 Concentrations on Human Decision-Making Performance (https://ehp.niehs.nih.gov/1104789/)

Quote
Relative to 600 ppm, at 1,000 ppm CO2, moderate and statistically significant decrements occurred in six of nine scales of decision-making performance. At 2,500 ppm, large and statistically significant reductions occurred in seven scales of decision-making performance (raw score ratios, 0.06–0.56), but performance on the focused activity scale increased.

While the paper you posted is a good overview of the field from 2003, a lot has changed since then.

This podcast (https://ashesashes.org/blog/episode-07-last-gasp) sums the issue up well, and there's a huge list of citations included.

You are saying the same thing.  That health effects are noticeable at 1000 ppm, but not at 600!
Title: Re: Health Effects of Climate Change
Post by: oren on January 20, 2018, 03:08:53 PM
By 2100 we're looking at 1000ppm of CO2 in our atmosphere. For our entire history as a species, we've been at 280ppm or less.
Not sure how you are arriving at the figure.  From 1980-2010, the atmospheric CO2 level increase 50 ppm.  Even accounting for an upward rise from that trend (and no mitigating efforts), the maximum value we would reach by 2100 is 600 ppm.  No detrimental health effects have been documented at the level.
You may have missed the acceleration of the annual increase in CO2. 600 ppm is more like a minimum, if the acceleration stops and the rate of increase remains at 2.25-2.5 ppm/year.
But human population is growing, affluence is growing in parallel, and this is how the IPCC got to >900 ppm by the year 2100 in RCP 8.5 - the non-mitigation scenario. Not to mention natural positive feedbacks that could kick in (or perhaps have already kicked in). So it's not as clear-cut as you claim it to be.
(https://img.washingtonpost.com/news/energy-environment/wp-content/uploads/sites/43/2017/03/Graphic-Annual-Mean-Growth-of-CO2-at-MaunaLoa_Credit_NOAA-700x495-Landscape.png)
(https://www.climatechangeinaustralia.gov.au/media/ccia/2.1.6/cms_page_media/278/emissions-concentration-rcp.gif)
Title: Re: Health Effects of Climate Change
Post by: gerontocrat on January 20, 2018, 04:40:43 PM
CO2 ppm is not likely to reach 1,000 ppm at any time , as the human world and it's economy would fall to bits well before then.

I once - about 30 years ago - did a model on population and existing death rates in a very, very bad place on the planet. The model predicted that there would be no adults alive within 20 years - it was wrong - reductio ad adsurdum and all that..

Title: Re: Health Effects of Climate Change
Post by: Sleepy on January 20, 2018, 05:12:00 PM
Sorry if any of these has been posted before. They probably have...

McDonalds is good for you, makes you big, fat and tired.
Plants seems to be on a junk food diet as well.
Soil warming enhances the hidden shift of elemental stoichiometry by elevated CO2 in wheat.
https://www.nature.com/articles/srep23313 (https://www.nature.com/articles/srep23313)
Quote
Increase in atmospheric CO2 concentration ([CO2]) and associated soil warming along with global climate change are expected to have large impacts on grain mineral nutrition in wheat. The effects of CO2 elevation (700 μmol l−1) and soil warming (+2.4 °C) on K, Ca and Mg concentrations in the xylem sap and their partitioning in different organs of wheat plant during grain filling were investigated. Results showed that the combination of elevated [CO2] and soil warming improved wheat grain yield, but decreased plant K, Ca and Mg accumulation and their concentrations in the leaves, stems, roots and grains. The reduced grain mineral concentration was attributed to the lowered mineral uptake as exemplified by both the decreased stomatal conductance and mineral concentration in the xylem sap. These findings suggest that future higher atmospheric [CO2] and warmer soil conditions may decrease the dietary availability of minerals from wheat crops. Breeding wheat cultivars possessing higher ability of mineral uptake at reduced xylem flux in exposure to climate change should be a target.

Found that one while searching searching for this:
Hidden shift of the ionome of plants exposed to elevated CO2 depletes minerals at the base of human nutrition.
https://elifesciences.org/articles/02245 (https://elifesciences.org/articles/02245)
Quote
Mineral malnutrition stemming from undiversified plant-based diets is a top global challenge. In C3 plants (e.g., rice, wheat), elevated concentrations of atmospheric carbon dioxide (eCO2) reduce protein and nitrogen concentrations, and can increase the total non-structural carbohydrates (TNC; mainly starch, sugars). However, contradictory findings have obscured the effect of eCO2 on the ionome—the mineral and trace-element composition—of plants. Consequently, CO2-induced shifts in plant quality have been ignored in the estimation of the impact of global change on humans. This study shows that eCO2 reduces the overall mineral concentrations (−8%, 95% confidence interval: −9.1 to −6.9, p<0.00001) and increases TNC:minerals > carbon:minerals in C3 plants. The meta-analysis of 7761 observations, including 2264 observations at state of the art FACE centers, covers 130 species/cultivars. The attained statistical power reveals that the shift is systemic and global. Its potential to exacerbate the prevalence of ‘hidden hunger’ and obesity is discussed.
Adding fig2 from the last one.
Title: Re: Health Effects of Climate Change
Post by: Daniel B. on January 20, 2018, 08:33:33 PM
By 2100 we're looking at 1000ppm of CO2 in our atmosphere. For our entire history as a species, we've been at 280ppm or less.
Not sure how you are arriving at the figure.  From 1980-2010, the atmospheric CO2 level increase 50 ppm.  Even accounting for an upward rise from that trend (and no mitigating efforts), the maximum value we would reach by 2100 is 600 ppm.  No detrimental health effects have been documented at the level.

You may have missed the acceleration of the annual increase in CO2. 600 ppm is more like a minimum, if the acceleration stops and the rate of increase remains at 2.25-2.5 ppm/year.
But human population is growing, affluence is growing in parallel, and this is how the IPCC got to >900 ppm by the year 2100 in RCP 8.5 - the non-mitigation scenario. Not to mention natural positive feedbacks that could kick in (or perhaps have already kicked in). So it's not as clear-cut as you claim it to be.
(https://img.washingtonpost.com/news/energy-environment/wp-content/uploads/sites/43/2017/03/Graphic-Annual-Mean-Growth-of-CO2-at-MaunaLoa_Credit_NOAA-700x495-Landscape.png)
(https://www.climatechangeinaustralia.gov.au/media/ccia/2.1.6/cms_page_media/278/emissions-concentration-rcp.gif)

Yes, we will reach that level, using the worst-case, least likely scenario.  Population cannot continue to rise exponentially.  Hence, the most likely value is around 600 ppm, provides no significant mitigation occurs.  Personsally, I do not believe this will continue, as future generations are likely to take greater action.
Title: Re: Health Effects of Climate Change
Post by: MrVisible on January 21, 2018, 12:07:29 AM
Quote
Yes, we will reach that level, using the worst-case, least likely scenario.  Population cannot continue to rise exponentially.  Hence, the most likely value is around 600 ppm, provides no significant mitigation occurs.  Personsally, I do not believe this will continue, as future generations are likely to take greater action.

While your vague reassurances are vaguely reassuring, I'd much prefer seeing actual research on the subject. Given that the survival of the species is at stake.

We're not sure if healthy infants can be gestated and raised in the atmosphere as it will be in 2100.

Maybe we should put some effort into finding out, given the importance of the issue.

Title: Re: Health Effects of Climate Change
Post by: Daniel B. on January 21, 2018, 12:27:24 AM
Quote
Yes, we will reach that level, using the worst-case, least likely scenario.  Population cannot continue to rise exponentially.  Hence, the most likely value is around 600 ppm, provides no significant mitigation occurs.  Personsally, I do not believe this will continue, as future generations are likely to take greater action.

While your vague reassurances are vaguely reassuring, I'd much prefer seeing actual research on the subject. Given that the survival of the species is at stake.

We're not sure if healthy infants can be gestated and raised in the atmosphere as it will be in 2100.

Maybe we should put some effort into finding out, given the importance of the issue.

That would be nice, but it may be impossible.  It is difficult to measure the effects of someone living in an environment that does not exist today.  Past research has shown the effects of moving from one level to another, but cannot simulate assimilation.  This is different than elevation effects, which can be measured for both effects.  We do not know how the body will acclimate I the long run.
Title: Re: Health Effects of Climate Change
Post by: MrVisible on January 21, 2018, 03:09:18 AM
Multigenerational lab rat experiments would seem to be a good start. I'm sure professional biologists and pediatric pulmonologists would be able to suggest a wide range of experiments which would help to figure out how resilient we are to the conditions we're creating.

It seems like it's important enough to know whether we're able to survive the atmosphere we're creating that we might not want to just give up before we've even started looking into it.
Title: Re: Health Effects of Climate Change
Post by: Shared Humanity on January 22, 2018, 04:04:18 AM
Multigenerational lab rat experiments would seem to be a good start. I'm sure professional biologists and pediatric pulmonologists would be able to suggest a wide range of experiments which would help to figure out how resilient we are to the conditions we're creating.

It seems like it's important enough to know whether we're able to survive the atmosphere we're creating that we might not want to just give up before we've even started looking into it.

We could just wait around and find out that way.
Title: Re: Health Effects of Climate Change
Post by: Archimid on January 22, 2018, 05:02:23 PM
We could just wait around and find out that way.

That's what the rest of the animal kingdom is doing, so why shouldn't we. That would be the 100%  natural and organic approach. Ignore the dangers and just keep consuming and reproducing like there is no tomorrow./s
Title: Re: Health Effects of Climate Change
Post by: Sigmetnow on January 24, 2018, 06:21:42 PM
Multi-part article on the effects of air pollution in locations around the world.  Not specifically climate change related, but it addresses many of the same themes we discuss here: cars, bikes, urban pollution, etc.

92% of people globally live in places with dangerous levels of air pollution.
Here are some of the stories
Quote
Every year, millions of people die as a result of air pollution-related illnesses. According to the World Health Organization, 11.6 percent of all deaths worldwide are associated with air pollution, making it almost as deadly as tobacco.


Edit:  the link!  https://www.huffingtonpost.com/feature/killer-air
Title: Re: Health Effects of Climate Change
Post by: Paddy on January 25, 2018, 11:21:44 AM
@Sigmetnow,

Where's the link to the article?
Title: Re: Health Effects of Climate Change
Post by: Sigmetnow on January 25, 2018, 03:51:44 PM
@Sigmetnow,

Where's the link to the article?


Oops!  Here it is:  https://www.huffingtonpost.com/feature/killer-air
Title: Re: Health Effects of Climate Change
Post by: Sigmetnow on February 10, 2018, 02:37:24 PM
Flu Weather: It's Not the Cold, It's the Humidity
Quote
Laboratory and epidemiological studies increasingly agree that the flu is transmitted more readily when the [Relative Humidity] RH is low. At higher RH, the virus appears to be less stable, and the small virus-bearing droplets sent into the air by a cough seem more likely to attract water vapor and fall out of the air before infecting someone else. There’s also evidence that the flu grows more readily in the upper respiratory tract when it’s dry.

Experts agree that the atmosphere is not the main factor driving a flu outbreak. Instead, weather is more of a precondition that can leave the door open for flu to spread more easily. The moisture effect may not be large, but it’s robust and significant...
...
“We don’t have the airtight evidence that a humidifier reduces your chance of getting sick, but we know that dryness is bad for you,” Barreca told me. Low relative humidity can dry out your nasal passages, making you more vulnerable to the flu virus and other bugs. Dehydration can also stress your cardiovascular system, noted Barreca. And there’s the greater likelihood that the flu virus will survive its trek from one person to another. Very high humidity can be a problem in itself, raising the risk of mold and other issues, but a midrange relative humidity of around 40% to 60% appears to be a sweet spot for overall health. ..
https://www.wunderground.com/cat6/flu-weather-its-not-cold-its-humidity

Title: Re: Health Effects of Climate Change
Post by: Sigmetnow on April 23, 2018, 12:32:14 AM
CLIMATE CHANGE IS CAUSING A DANGEROUS UPTICK IN CASES OF LYME DISEASE
Ticks that carry the pathogenic bacteria can now survive in environments where they previously would've frozen to death, resulting in an increased risk of infection.
https://psmag.com/environment/global-warming-increases-instances-of-lyme
Title: Re: Health Effects of Climate Change
Post by: TerryM on April 23, 2018, 09:14:41 AM
CLIMATE CHANGE IS CAUSING A DANGEROUS UPTICK IN CASES OF LYME DISEASE
Ticks that carry the pathogenic bacteria can now survive in environments where they previously would've frozen to death, resulting in an increased risk of infection.
https://psmag.com/environment/global-warming-increases-instances-of-lyme (https://psmag.com/environment/global-warming-increases-instances-of-lyme)
A nurse had commented on this last week, with the hope that this year's long and relatively cold winter would bring relief in the coming summer.
Terry
Title: Re: Health Effects of Climate Change
Post by: Shared Humanity on April 23, 2018, 11:25:31 PM
I had Lyme disease...the worst thing I have ever had and that includes cancer...right side of my face was paralyzed for almost 6 months...have severe arthritis in my hip where the bite was.

I still go to Wisconsin where I contracted it but bathe in insecticide before taking hikes.
Title: Re: Health Effects of Climate Change
Post by: Sigmetnow on May 02, 2018, 12:05:44 AM
Ultimate irony:  the Lone Star tick causes an allergy to one of the Lone Star state’s prize industries — beef.  Infected hosts who eat red meat can experience violent reactions bad enough to require hospitalization.

As you read this, millions of tiny, black-and-brown-legged creatures are beginning to reawaken after laying dormant underneath layers of last year’s leaf cover.

Ticking Meatmares
Lone Star ticks — which now live from Texas to Maine — hunt in packs and spread an allergy to beef and pork. Thanks to climate change, they're spreading.
Quote
Blacklegged ticks behave in relatively predictable ways — they hang out in leafy undergrowth, arms and legs outstretched in case a hapless animal or humans passes by.

…one of the tick’s favorite hosts, the white-tailed deer. Deer can travel several miles in the days or even weeks it takes for lone stars feed on them, eventually dropping the ticks a long way from where they first picked them up. Reforestation efforts in the eastern U.S. that began in the 20th century, coupled with a slump in hunting, have led to an explosion in white-tail deer populations. The growth of suburbs means there are plenty of people pressed up against these wooded areas. …
https://grist.org/article/lone-star-ticks-are-a-carnivores-nightmare-and-theyre-just-waking-up/


Diseases Spread By Insects Have More Than Tripled, CDC Says
Quote
In the United States, diseases spread by mosquito, flea and tick bites tripled from 2004 to 2016, federal health officials say in a new report. During that time, there were more than 640,000 cases of vector-borne diseases. …
http://time.com/5259751/diseases-mosquitoes-ticks-lyme-disease/
Title: Re: Health Effects of Climate Change
Post by: Shared Humanity on May 02, 2018, 06:48:12 PM
So the spread of blacklegged ticks would be a negative feedback as infected people will reduce there consumption of meat.

https://www.nbcnews.com/better/diet-fitness/vegan-eating-would-slash-cut-food-s-global-warming-emissions-n542886

"When it comes to climate change, following dietary recommendations would cut food-related emissions by 29 percent, adopting vegetarian diets would cut them by 63 percent and vegan diets by 70 percent."
Title: Re: Health Effects of Climate Change
Post by: Sigmetnow on May 03, 2018, 01:29:34 AM
So the spread of blacklegged ticks would be a negative feedback as infected people will reduce there consumption of meat.

https://www.nbcnews.com/better/diet-fitness/vegan-eating-would-slash-cut-food-s-global-warming-emissions-n542886

"When it comes to climate change, following dietary recommendations would cut food-related emissions by 29 percent, adopting vegetarian diets would cut them by 63 percent and vegan diets by 70 percent."

Well, it’s the Lone Star tick that causes the meat allergy, but yes, climate change may indirectly be leading to a slight decrease in meat consumption, which would decrease CO2 emissions. (Related discussion in the Becoming Vegan thread.)
Title: Re: Health Effects of Climate Change
Post by: Forest Dweller on June 02, 2018, 08:16:05 AM
Hay fever on the rise...https://qz.com/766386/climate-change-hay-fever-seasonal-allergies-europe/

Old article but yeah, i should have read that 2 years ago because i since have the allergy it seems.
And it had me fooled thinking about flu, pollution or whatever.
So i focused on healthy diet and spending more time outdoors doing research only to see it get worse and worse haha  :P
Now, this climate change health victim keeps an eye on the pollen readings for sure.
Along with the heatwaves and sun giving me allergic reactions on the skin already, it is a pain in the ass...hope it rains all summer.
Title: Re: Health Effects of Climate Change
Post by: Sigmetnow on July 14, 2018, 12:21:12 AM
Preparing for the health impacts of a fiery future
Quote
Consider this: last year’s wildfires in Northern California produced the highest levels of pollution ever recorded in the area. In just two days, those fires produced as much pollution as all the state’s cars do in a year.

Wildfire smoke is laden with particulate matter, which triggers asthma, worsens lung and heart disease, and is linked to premature births and low birth weight babies.

And, as fires incinerate everything in their path — including plastics, paints and pesticides — they release toxins into the environment. In Sonoma County last year, for example, melted plastic pipes may have contaminated drinking water with benzene.

The health impacts of wildfire travel long distances: smoke from last year’s Northern California wildfires was detected more than 500 miles away in Mexico. In 2002, smoke from fires in Quebec drifted down the U.S. East Coast, causing a nearly 50 percent increase in hospital admissions for respiratory disease. ...
https://www.sbsun.com/2018/07/10/preparing-for-the-health-impacts-of-a-fiery-future/
Title: Re: Health Effects of Climate Change
Post by: Sigmetnow on July 18, 2018, 02:03:53 PM
U.S.:  Heat Wave Safety: 130 Groups Call for Protections for Farm, Construction Workers
As outdoor workers labor in extreme temperatures, they are vulnerable to heat-related illnesses that can be fatal. Climate change raises the risks.
Quote
Parts of the country are expecting another round of searing, potentially record-shattering heat in the coming days, and many farm and construction workers will be out in it—with no federal heat stress standards directing their employers to offer them water, rest or shade.

Despite recommendations going back more than 40 years, the federal government has repeatedly failed to set a heat stress standard for American workers.

On Tuesday, the consumer advocacy group Public Citizen, along with United Farm Workers Foundation and Farmworker Justice, joined more than 130 public health and environmental groups in submitting a petition to the Occupational Safety and Health Administration calling for the agency to require employers to protect their workers from heat by imposing mandatory rest breaks, hydration and access to shade or cooled spaces, among other measures.

"This is a public health issue. This is a justice issue. The people who feed us, who feed America, deserve strong protections from the effects of climate change," said Jeannie Economos, a project coordinator with the Farmworker Association of Florida. "We're calling on OSHA not to delay anymore."

As global warming continues, extreme heat is expected to become more common, and the plight of outdoor workers will get more extreme along with the weather, making stronger standards more critical.  From 1992 to 2016, heat killed 783 workers in the U.S. and seriously injured nearly 70,000, according to the group's new analysis of working conditions in high temperatures.

Those numbers, the report said, understate the total. In 2011, Public Citizen petitioned the agency for a heat stress standard, and in response, OSHA acknowledged that heat-induced "deaths are most likely underreported, and therefore the true mortality rate is likely higher."

Farmworker advocacy groups have noted that migrant workers are especially reluctant to insist on breaks or water, and that illnesses and deaths from heat are likely underestimated because undocumented workers fear retaliation or deportation. ...
https://insideclimatenews.org/news/17072018/heat-wave-workplace-safety-illness-stress-climate-change-construction-farm-workers-osha
Title: Re: Health Effects of Climate Change
Post by: jacksmith4tx on July 18, 2018, 03:17:59 PM
"Algae Bloom - Why Is It So Dangerous?"
https://www.acsh.org/news/2018/07/16/floridas-deadly-algae-bloom-why-it-so-dangerous-13188

Good info on the various types of bacteria that makeup algae blooms.
Quote
Here are three neurotoxins produced by blue-green algae. They all operate by different mechanisms and are all quite deadly central nervous system poisons.
1. Anatoxin-a, which also goes by the rather disquieting name of Very Fast Death Factor (VFDF), was the first cyanotoxin to be isolated and identified in 1972. Despite its very simple chemical structure, it packs quite a punch. VFDF is a powerful neurotoxin because it binds very tightly - more so than the natural neurotransmitter acetylcholine - to the nicotinic acetylcholine receptor in the neural synapse. Symptoms of toxicity include:
    Loss of muscle coordination
    Muscle tremors
    Convulsions
    Paralysis
    Respiratory distress
Death from respiratory failure typically occurs within 2-7 minutes.

2.     Lyngbyatoxin-a is a chemical defense weapon produced by certain strains of cyanobacteria to prevent it from being eaten by fish. Its toxicity is very different from that of anatoxin-a:
    A potent skin irritant and a vesicant (causes blisters). It causes "seaweed dermatitis".
    Severe gastrointestinal damage when consumed, which can be fatal.
    It is both a carcinogen and tumor promoter.

3. Saxitoxin (1) is also known as Paralytic Shellfish Poison (PSP).
Transmembrane proteins can be thought of as gates; when the gate is closed ions cannot enter or exit cells and when it is open they can. This flux of sodium and potassium ions into and out of cells - it can be thought of as a molecular switch -  is a fundamental mechanism that regulates nerve function. So not surprisingly when this mechanism is perturbed very bad things happen. This is reflected in some of the symptoms of PSP:
    Tingling
    Vomiting
    Diarrhea
    Abdominal cramps
    Headache
    Dizziness,
    Muscle weakness
    Disorientation
    Memory loss
    Loss of coordination

And in serious cases:
    Seizures
    Unstable blood pressure
    Paralysis
    Difficulty breathing,
    Coma
    Death

Bon Appetit!
Title: Re: Health Effects of Climate Change
Post by: Forest Dweller on July 18, 2018, 09:25:13 PM
Blue-green algae, aka Cyanobacteria are being seen more than ever in Holland.
It's not a new thing, but the scale is.
Mostly dogs get sick as they are always jumping in the water or encouraged to by their owners.
People are jumping into unhealthy waters more as well due to the heatwave.
The pollution gets them hospitalized as well.
The air is very bad as well, still more complaints about pollen/pollution including myself.
Title: Re: Health Effects of Climate Change
Post by: Archimid on July 19, 2018, 03:17:38 AM
Japan Heat Wave Kills at Least 12 Just Days After Deadly Floods

https://weather.com/safety/heat/news/2018-07-18-japan-deadly-heat-wave

Quote
At least 12 people died and as many as 10,000 were hospitalized during an ongoing heat wave in Japan.
Temperatures have soared as high as 105 degrees as the dangerous heat persisted.
The sweltering heat has impacted some of the same areas as last week's deadly flood.

I don't know where else to put it. Perhaps we need a "Heatwaves" Thread.
Title: Re: Health Effects of Climate Change
Post by: TerryM on July 19, 2018, 08:27:30 PM
In South Western Ontario I've been observing far fewer flying insects, fewer birds, and large increases in blue green algae.
I'd noted the problems with insects and birds in previous years, but this is the first year I'd noticed the algae. Lake Erie at Port Dover is clear but many of the ponds and small lakes just to the north are completely matted over.
I've put just over a thousand miles on a new vehicle without needing to wash any bugs off the windshield. :-\


Terry
Title: Re: Health Effects of Climate Change
Post by: Forest Dweller on July 19, 2018, 08:57:58 PM
Papers in Holland report today that ticks causing Lyme disease are not affecting us due to the drought, they need to move deeper in the leaf layers to avoid drought themselves it seems.
Snakes such as Natrix natrix however are being seen a lot more, even in people's houses.
A lot of Dutch people don't know there are snakes here and freak out seeing one.
Wasps are said to be doing well.
Spiders are also seen more in houses...now that is scary!
Hedgehog sanctuary is reporting twice the normal amount of hedgehogs in trouble being brought.
They ask people to not do so and leave them alone because species like that are just more visible scrounging around.
My camera trap this week appears to confirm that, a fat hedgehog:
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=5XkjmSwQvvc
I very rarely see them myself or recorded on cam.
Filmed a polecat as well for the first time ever in the same location:
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=exgSRUYpb2s

I did use bait(apple, peanut butter, jam) which seems to attract them looking for scarce food.
Vegetation is dead and therefore other food sources, i would normally expect to film mostly foxes.
Overall my impression is pretty grim for nature.
Hunting, poaching, industrial activity is a known problem but this drought on top of it seems bad if we don't cherry pick sightings like this...i see very little evidence of anything doing well.
Food will be very scarce this winter i fear.
Title: Re: Health Effects of Climate Change
Post by: Forest Dweller on July 19, 2018, 09:14:11 PM
In South Western Ontario I've been observing far fewer flying insects, fewer birds, and large increases in blue green algae.
I'd noted the problems with insects and birds in previous years, but this is the first year I'd noticed the algae. Lake Erie at Port Dover is clear but many of the ponds and small lakes just to the north are completely matted over.
I've put just over a thousand miles on a new vehicle without needing to wash any bugs off the windshield. :-\




Terry

Awww Terry!

It is your consumption of vehicles that wipes out insects and makes this planet less liveable lol!
I'm just yanking your chain, don't get upset please.
It's true, i see very few insects as well here.
Mostly industrial humans who can't handle the heat..rows in the street.
I saw the armada of council vehicles coming by pretending to mow the dead grass 3 x in a row.
I saw the poisons being spread again.
That astonished me most as they kill the rare daisies or dandelions even trying to feed the insects...what insects?
Peace bro
Title: Re: Health Effects of Climate Change
Post by: TerryM on July 20, 2018, 01:00:27 AM
Very nice videos!!


I had a camera with that feature many years ago, but the resolution was terrible. I did however catch the kid next door using and abusing my pool while we were gone for the weekend. >:(


The loss of insects here is beginning to freak me out - can't be good for whatever future lies ahead.
Terry
Title: Re: Health Effects of Climate Change
Post by: Sigmetnow on July 20, 2018, 01:10:51 AM
Japan Heat Wave Kills at Least 12 Just Days After Deadly Floods

https://weather.com/safety/heat/news/2018-07-18-japan-deadly-heat-wave

Quote
At least 12 people died and as many as 10,000 were hospitalized during an ongoing heat wave in Japan.
Temperatures have soared as high as 105 degrees as the dangerous heat persisted.
The sweltering heat has impacted some of the same areas as last week's deadly flood.

I don't know where else to put it. Perhaps we need a "Heatwaves" Thread.

I agree!  Feel free to re-post here:  https://forum.arctic-sea-ice.net/index.php/topic,2352.0.html
Title: Re: Health Effects of Climate Change
Post by: Forest Dweller on July 20, 2018, 09:44:12 AM
Very nice videos!!


I had a camera with that feature many years ago, but the resolution was terrible. I did however catch the kid next door using and abusing my pool while we were gone for the weekend. >:(


The loss of insects here is beginning to freak me out - can't be good for whatever future lies ahead.
Terry

Ha ha Terry, that's funny...damn kids!
These gadgets have gotten a lot better yes.
I do film people as well doing stuff they aren't supposed to be doing...most places where i would like to record wildlife i can't because of theft or vandalism.
They are over rated anyway and miss most species even in a safe place.
They shouldn't be used exclusively when doing inventory like happens more and more these days.
Tracking and local knowledge provides far more information.
I'm no entomologist but i do notice a thing or two about insects as well of course.

Tthe difference between the city area and surrounding nature areas is striking, nothing left in the city at all where until recently it was always bees, moths, butterflies etc.

in the nature areas very very few remain as well, seen a butterfly or two and a few grasshoppers.
Bee/wasp/hornet species are gone it seems, i only see the fat bumblebee type.
I'm used to finding nests dug out by honey buzzard, badgers or other martens but not seen that either this year.
It's worth noting that the famous German study that reported 75% insect loss was done in a nature reserve, so it's worse elsewhere.
A similar Dutch report shortly after concluded a loss of 67%.
So called "invasive" plant such as wild cherry are being massively attacked and poisoned but entomologists have finally understood that they are a crucial species for at least 56 types of insect.
I could have told them that!
I foraged the cherries for years by shaking the trees out on a tarp and then leave it laying around for all the bugs to crawl away before packing up.
I won't be doing that this year, what little cherry trees remain are bone dry anyway.
This meddling with vegetation is a big contributor to insect loss i believe.
A species such as wild cherry is actually not a new invasive species, but one that was introduced and applauded in the 16th century...of course insects and other wildlife would have adapted to a great food source.

The use of poison has to be a major factor, in agriculture of course but that is pretty well known.
It's everywhere though, nature management organisations do it while believing they can recreate the vegetation of centuries ago amidst a climate crisis.
So areas are logged, poisoned, replanted with beech or similar trees that really don't have much chance while the food chain is interrupted more and more.
When the fences are removed and i have a look, i see voles and mice with no flight response, literally trying to crawl on my shoes and falling over dead...small wonder we lose the insects too.
People themselves poison everything, hunters do as well, schools, offices...all poisoning and adding more concrete of course.
People are asked to report "invasive" plants in their backyard...city will come and poison it for you!
Never mind resistance developing, public health, climate adaptation...urbanization, industrialization first.

What i did find in pretty astonishing numbers are the wood ant nests which were officially down to a single nest.
I don't take that as a sign of their success either though, just a lack of fieldwork.
Nobody here but me and one or two others still doing fieldwork.
One guy studying fungi, another studying bats...that's about it.
Both reporting severe loss as well.
And my research is paralyzed by the heat and allergies...just hiding in my house at the moment.
The entire ecosystem is probably going down just as the insects are.
Title: Re: Health Effects of Climate Change
Post by: Sigmetnow on July 22, 2018, 04:33:27 PM
Nov 2017:

Climate Connection: Unraveling the Surprising Ecology of Dust
As droughts intensify and development expands, the amount of dust blowing around the earth is increasing, affecting everything from mountain snowmelt to the spread of disease. Scientists are just beginning to understand the complex dynamics of dust in a warming world.
Quote
Although the issue is poorly studied, it’s clear that dust dynamics are shifting in two main ways. Humans are the main cause of an increasing amount of dust in the atmosphere. As farming, grazing, and other development in places such as the Horn of Africa or the U.S. Southwest spread deeper into arid regions, vegetation is destroyed, exposing the soil to wind erosion. In addition, increasing drought due to a warming climate is a major cause of the dust problem, as it kills vegetation and uncaps the soil, allowing it to become windborne.

This has both positive and negative effects. More dust, for example, means more nutrients and minerals, such as iron, are being transported long distances, which stimulates the growth of oceanic plankton — an essential link in the marine food chain. But increasing quantities of dust could cause serious problems for parts of the world, from decreased water flow in some mountain regions to increased human exposure to dust-borne pathogens, a growing health concern. ...
https://e360.yale.edu/features/climate-connection-unraveling-the-surprising-ecology-of-dust

Mentioned:  Valley Fever, Kawasaki disease, meningitis, dust storms
Title: Re: Health Effects of Climate Change
Post by: SteveMDFP on August 20, 2018, 08:44:56 PM
Ebola epidemics don't arise directly from climate change (as far as I know) but as humans intrude on wildlife habitats, such "zoonoses" may become more common.  There's a brand new and rather worrisome epidemic right now:

WHO Expects Ebola To Spread In Congo In Areas Too Dangerous To Send Workers
https://www.npr.org/2018/08/17/639486376/who-expects-ebola-to-spread-in-congo-in-areas-too-dangerous-to-send-workers (https://www.npr.org/2018/08/17/639486376/who-expects-ebola-to-spread-in-congo-in-areas-too-dangerous-to-send-workers)

"security concerns in the Democratic Republic of the Congo's North Kivu region were preventing aid workers from reaching certain areas — and leaving open the possibility of the Ebola virus spreading. . . At least 1,500 people could be exposed to the virus. . ."
Title: Re: Health Effects of Climate Change
Post by: Sigmetnow on August 22, 2018, 07:37:39 PM
Today in the Anthropocene, the weather service informs us of the proper type of respirator to wear so that we can literally be able to breathe because of record-breaking wildfires producing a continent-sized plume of smoke.
H/t Eric Holthaus

Quote
NWS (@NWS)
8/21/18, 11:48 AM
Is your area impacted by wildfire smoke? Surgical and dusk masks will NOT protect you.
Choose a mask called a “particulate respirator” that has the word “NIOSH” and either “N95” or “P100” printed on it. More info here from @CAPublicHealth: http://www.bepreparedcalifornia.ca.gov/documents/protect%20your%20lungs%20respirator.pdf
https://twitter.com/nws/status/1031931135817867264
Image below.
Title: Re: Health Effects of Climate Change
Post by: vox_mundi on December 03, 2018, 04:57:29 PM
Why the World Is Becoming More Allergic to Food
https://www.bbc.com/news/health-46302780

Quote
Around the world, children are far more likely than ever before to develop food allergies.

The rise in allergies in recent decades has been particularly noticeable in the West. Food allergy now affects about 7% of children in the UK and 9% of those in Australia, for example. Across Europe, 2% of adults have food allergies.

The frequency of food allergy has increased over the past 30 years, particularly in industrialised societies. Exactly how great the increase is depends on the food and where the patient lives.

For example, there was a five-fold increase in peanut allergies in the UK between 1995 and 2016. Australia has the highest rate of confirmed food allergy. One study found 9% of Australian one-year-olds had an egg allergy, while 3% were allergic to peanuts.

It is thought that allergies and increased sensitivity to foods are probably environmental, and related to Western lifestyles.

We know there are lower rates of allergies in developing countries. They are also more likely to occur in urban rather than rural areas.

Factors may include pollution, dietary changes and less exposure to microbes, which change how our immune systems respond.

------------------------

Extreme Allergies and Climate Change
http://www.aafa.org/extreme-allergies-and-climate-change/

Quote
In 2010, AAFA and the National Wildlife Federation created a report (http://www.aafa.org/media/1634/extreme-allergies-global-warming-report-2010.pdf) about the impact of climate change on Americans with asthma and allergies. This report talks about how climate change will affect pollen, mold and poison ivy. More pollen, mold and poison ivy can increase the risks for asthma and allergy attacks. Climate change can also make air pollution worse.

Between 1995 and 2011, warmer temperatures in the U.S. have caused the pollen season to be 11 to 27 days longer. These warmer temperatures create more pollen in the air, stronger airborne allergens and more allergy symptoms.

(https://instituteatgoldengate.org/sites/default/files/inline-images/Climateand%20HealthInfographic.jpg)
http://www.aafa.org/climate-and-health/
https://www.ucsusa.org/global_warming/science_and_impacts/impacts/climate-and-allergies.html
Title: Re: Health Effects of Climate Change
Post by: Cid_Yama on December 09, 2018, 01:11:04 AM
Health effects of increase in concentration of carbon dioxide in the atmosphere
Quote
The lowest value at which the atmospheric concentration of carbon dioxide could be stabilized by reduction of additions made by human activity (fossil fuel-burning, etc.) is estimated as 550 ppm. To achieve this, severe limitations are required on the latter activities. The most often quoted desirable/attainable stable concentration is 750 ppm. This concentration level is not related in any way to health considerations and is above the estimated dangerous level of 426 ppm. The value is also above the 600 ppm level, which results in the ‘stuffy room’ conditions described above. At the very least, 600 ppm of carbon dioxide in the atmosphere will be unpleasant and there will be no readily available means of reversing the changes giving rise to the above symptoms. Such a situation is unlikely to be tolerable for a lifetime by humans (and other mammals with the possible exception of seals) without deterioration in general health along with serious curtailing of physical activity presently taken as normal.
It is likely that when the concentration of carbon dioxide in the atmosphere reaches 426 ppm in less than two generations from the present date(2005), the health of at least some sections of the world population will deteriorate, including those of the developed nations. It is also obvious that if the extremes of conditions described above come to pass, then the biosphere and humankind are seriously threatened.
link (http://www.alfaintek.com/assets/files/D_S_Robertson.pdf)


Obviously we will hit that threshold far earlier, since we are already at 410 ppm and people are already exhibiting signs of Metabolic Syndrome.


The Stress of Global Warming on Human Health: pH Homeostasis
Quote
Significantly, earlier human studies have shown that chronic exposure to CO2 at moderate inspired concentrations alters pH homeostasis, and fosters body CO2 storage at the expense of buffers protein and phosphates in lean body mass, as does higher atmospheric CO2 concentration in the terrestrial biosphere. Increased CO2 stores matching lower bone mineralization characterizes Osteoporosis, a major public health problem whose risks for osteopenia, and non-spine fractures are significantly higher for people with higher percentage of body fat. Increased CO2 storage is present also in obstructive sleep apnea, a prevalent disorder characterized by gradual elevations of the partial pressure of CO2 in the arterial blood, associated with major nocturnal hemoglobin desaturation, higher HbO2 affinity, and repetitive episodes of partial or complete upper airway obstruction. Most individuals with obstructive sleep apnea have metabolic syndrome, term describing the clustering of abdominal obesity with other risk factors for atherosclerotic-cardiovascular disease (ACVD) which show abnormal intracellular ion profile in red blood cells, and sustained cortisol levels as does chronic exposure to increased ambient CO2. Studies suggest that moderately increased endogenous CO2 may oxidize erythrocytes, and promote their suicidal death (eryptosis) which, by fostering the release of pro-inflammatory cytokines throughout systemic circulation, activates hormonal stress response, and results in increased CO2 stores, abdominal fat accumulation, and Metabolic Syndrome. Ominously, Global Warming is an unbearable stress for ecosystems and their member species, just as this cluster of ACVD risk factors is for human health. This review focuses on Metabolic Syndrome and pH homeostasis, the linkage between breathing and feeding via CO2 economy, to disclose the Stress of global Warming on human health.

Earlier human studies have shown that chronic, continuous exposure to CO2 at 0.5-3% inspired concentrations for more than one month alters pH homeostasis and raises body CO2 storage [15,16,17], as does higher atmospheric CO2 concentration in the terrestrial biosphere. Mostly during CO2 exposure, ion profile changes in red blood cells (RBCs); hemoglobin-O2(HbO2) affinity increases with RBCs oxidation; the adrenal cortical response is activated, as measured by increased blood corticosteroid level and lymphopenia; and the partial pressure of CO2 in the arterial blood (PaCO2) rises as CO2 is stored as HCO3- in the extracellular fluid (ECF), and as CO3-2 in bone, at the expense of buffer protein and phosphate in the lean body mass (LBM) [15,16,17]. Continuous CO2 inhalation is commonly thought to be tolerated at 3% inspired concentrations for at least one month, and 4% inspired concentrations for over a week. The effects produced seem reversible, decrements in performance or in normal physical activity may not happen at these concentrations [18].

Thus, it should be noted not only that CO2 levels in poorly ventilated spaces can be found even higher than this range of 3-4%, but also that humans may be chronically exposed to intermittent, not continuous CO2 inhalation, a condition that by inducing mildly increased endogenous CO2 may cause pathological adaptations. In fact, studies show that because of the greater concentration of buffer base, acclimatization to CO2 results in desensitization of dyspnea and in changes of set point for central respiratory controllers such that, on return to “outdoor” air breathing, ventilation may decline below control values even in individuals intermittently exposed to CO2 increase for 13 hours per day [15,19]. Furthermore, chronic exposure to intermittent, mild ambient CO2 increase results also in changes of set point for central feeding controllers which may lead to obesity. In fact, it has been shown that during chronic inhalation of CO2 at 1.5% inspired concentration for more than one month, food intake decreases significantly, by ~30%, but body weight does not change [17]. On return to “normal” air breathing, food intake rises and body weight is gained [20]. Actually, stress is a well known inducing factor of both transient and chronic loss of appetite or overeating [21].

Inhaled CO2 induces the same physiological effects as does metabolically produced CO2, the key chemical messenger gas in the linking of respiration, systemic circulation, and local vascular response, to body’metabolic demands both at rest and exercise [18]. Increased CO2 needs to be removed as quickly as possible because its lowering of blood pH can denature enzymes. A major portion of the physicochemical defenses of neutrality by the buffer systems of the whole body takes place in muscle and bone [24]. Protein from muscle can be released to bind with acids in the blood. This can contribute to LBM loss. Calcium and phosphorus in bones can bind to acidic substances to neutralize them, thereby contributing to bone mineral loss. Suggestively, greater CO2 stores matching reduced bone mineralization characterizes Osteoporosis, a major public health problem whose risks for osteopenia, and non-spine fractures have been shown to be significantly higher for people with higher percentage of body fat [25]. Increased CO2 storage is present also in obstructive sleep apnea (OSA), a prevalent disorder characterized by gradual PaCO2 elevations, associated with major nocturnal hemoglobin desaturation, higher HbO2 affinity, and repetitive episodes of partial or complete upper airway obstruction [26]. Most individuals with OSA have metabolic syndrome (MetS), a common, condition consisting of a constellation of metabolic risk factors for atherosclerosis and cardiovascular disease (ACVD) associated with abdominal obesity, namely, increased plasma glucose values, higher blood pressure levels, higher triglycerides levels, and lower high-density lipoprotein cholesterol (HDL-C) levels [27]. The MetS presents abnormal intracellular ion profile in RBCs, and sustained cortisol levels [28,29] as does exposure to CO2 at 1.5% inspired concentrations for more than one month [17,30].

As stated, CO2 acclimatization to chronic exposure to CO2 at 1.5% inspired concentration results in greater concentrations of buffer base, with the consequent reduction of minute volume ventilation, forced vital capacity, and PaO2 [15]. Beyond that, food intake rises, and body weight is gained, on return to “normal” air breathing [20], as compared to exposure to moderately increased ambient CO2 in which lower (~30%) food intake, without body weight changes, matches increased ventilation [17]. Accordingly, adaptations to chronic exposure to intermittent, mildly increased ambient CO2 may result in lower O2 uptake, reduced metabolic rate, and excess feeding, as it occurs in MetS. Food intake may rise because mildly increased endogenous CO2 enhances the expression of TNF-α and IL-6, which further glucocorticoids release, with consequent higher expression of the oroxigenic NPY. Hence, CO2 does not only determine the need for alveolar ventilation, but it is also the “stress” ruler of both transient and chronic overeating or loss of appetite [21], to normalize/oppose pH changes.

With moderately increased endogenous CO2, as soon as RBCs oxidation threatens pH homeostasis, TNF-α may induce the coincident appearance of MetS ACVD risk factors [97] to restore the lost balance. In essence, TNF-α inhibits auto-phosphorylation of tyrosine residues of insulin receptors and promotes serine phosphorylation of insulin receptor substrate-1; this, in turn, triggers serine phosphorylation of insulin receptors in adipocytes, prevents the normal tyrosine phosphorylation, and interferes with transduction of the insulin signal. Hence, insulin resistance results in Akt (protein-kinase-B) inhibition and subsequent
inhibition of NO-synthase (NOS) [97]. Accordingly, TNF-α promotes adaptations such as insulin resistance-hyperglycemia, NOS inhibition, reoccurrence of glycolysis, and decreased O2 uptake whose joined effects overall reduce RBCs oxidation and maintain blood O2 release. Inflammation is, indeed, a fundamental survival mechanism but it is dangerous when its transient, physiological adaptations are converted to a long-lasting, pathological state. Potential causes for steady CRH activation and glucocorticoids release include environmental stresses, which as explained, result in higher HbO2 affinity and mildly increased endogenous CO2 [23]. Ominously, as atmospheric CO2 increases, Global Warming may threaten human health. Thus, the following reviews the mechanism through which intermittent exposure to mildly increased ambient CO2 may lead to MetS and/or osteoporosis.

Overall, during exposure to mildly raised ambient CO2 levels, slow adaptive processes in electrolyte exchange and pH regulation results in higher PaCO2 due to reduction in forced vital capacity. Presumably, food intake decreases much to reduce PaCO2, and body weight does not change [17] due to the water retention required to hydrate and store the inhaled CO2 as ECF HCO3-, and as bone CO3-2. Basically, with CO2 acclimatization, compensatory processes for respiratory acidosis result in metabolic alkalosis [107] which, on return to “normal” air breathing, constantly triggers glucocorticoids release. In fact, with abdominal accumulation, a lower compliance of the respiratory system causes the decline of forced vital capacity, minute volume ventilation, and PaO2 [15], with ensuing chronic lactate accumulation. This, by raising HbO2 affinity, results in higher PaCO2[49], and RBCs oxidation with TNF-α and IL-6 release from phagocytic cells. Besides, the relentless LBM loss coupled to the body fat gain arisen during exposure to CO2 implies not only that HbO2 affinity rises, and O2 release falls because the loss of body phosphate impairs 2-3DPG synthesis [53], but also that adipocytes release TNF-α and IL-6. Presumably, on return to normal air breathing, food intake rises, and insulin resistance persists until an ampler number of adipocytes release enough leptin which lowers bone formation and food intake without respiratory depression. In few words, with chronic exposure to intermittent, mildly increased CO2, body buffers loss sets a vicious cycle in which the more CO2 is inhaled and stored, the more food is eaten to raise PaCO2, foster ventilation, and save pH homeostasis.
With time, however, steady activation of the stress response leads to the loss of bone and muscle which, due to parallel abdominal fat accumulation, causes shallow, rapid breathing (not conscious tachypnea), turns up the set point for central feeding controllers, and induces overeating with its chronic pathological consequences, namely, MetS and osteoporosis.

Chronic exposure to CO2 at 0.5-3% inspired concentrations alters pH homeostasis and fosters body CO2 storage in humans [15,16, 17], as does increased atmospheric CO2 in the terrestrial biosphere. Increased CO2 stores in bone are present in osteoporosis, whose risks for osteopenia, and non-spine fractures have been shown to be significantly higher for subjects with higher percentage body fat, independent of body weight [25]. Fat accumulation and increased CO2 stores characterize also MetS which, despite lifestyle changes and the use of pharmacologic approaches to lower plasma cholesterol levels, continues to be, and it is expected to become the major cause of disability and death in the world by 2020 [108]. So far, it seems undeniable that pH homeostasis, the linkage between breathing and feeding via CO2 economy, discloses the stress of Global Warming on human health.
link (https://www.researchgate.net/publication/259791549_Zappulla_D_The_CO2_Hypothesis_--_The_Stress_of_Global_Warming_on_Human_Health_pH_Homeostasis_the_Linkage_between_Breathing_and_Feeding_via_CO2_Economy_In_Sethi_R_Ed_Air_Pollution_Sources_Prevention_an)
Title: Re: Health Effects of Climate Change
Post by: Cid_Yama on December 09, 2018, 01:32:14 AM
Chronic Respiratory Carbon Dioxide Toxicity: a serious unapprehended health risk of climate change
Quote
The earth’s atmosphere has already reached CO2 levels that are outside the range breathed by humans throughout their evolution. As well, in earlier pre-primate epochs, elevated atmospheric CO2 has been found to be a cause of mass extinction events (Knoll et al. 1996)

Despite significant documentation of health issues due to CO2 in indoor environments, there is minimal awareness in the community. For spacecraft and submarines there are practical considerations that influence the recommended safe levels. Initial safe limits for the International Space Station were partly decided by engineering requirements (Cronyn et al. 2012) and submarine limits were balanced by the ability to surface and renew air quality. It seems that there has been little concern about low-level toxicity of CO2 because we have always had the back-up of an ambient atmosphere with low levels of CO2.

As mentioned previously the body compensates for high levels of CO2, through a combination of increased breathing, blood pH buffering, kidney and bone adaptations depending on the length of continuous exposure, until we can resume breathing lower levels of CO2.

One author suggests that blood pH would be reduced to dangerous levels, if there were no physiological compensation, at CO2 levels as low as about 430 ppm (Robertson 2006) implying that compensation would occur at this level. Ambient conditions may already be dangerously close to CO2 levels that will induce continuous body compensation. Moreover, there is strong evidence that, with chronic activity, compensation mechanisms can produce serious health issues such as kidney calcification and bone loss.

It is conceivable that these problems might appear at much lower levels of CO2 if compensation persisted for a much longer periods, for example living a whole lifetime in an elevated CO2 atmosphere of a climate changed future. In the final paper of the US Navy CO2 research program, Schaefer (1982) indicated that this issue had “become the concern of the Department of Energy and other US government agencies” although it appears to have been largely forgotten (or classified) since.

If allowed to persist, problems such as kidney calcification could lead to renal failure. In the extreme case lifespans could become shorter than the time required to reach reproductive age. This could threaten the viability of human and animal species without interventions such as the creation of artificial living environments.

The human species is already impaired in indoor environments and this is likely to get worse as rising outdoor levels of CO2 contribute to increased indoor concentrations. Furthermore, the incidence and prevalence of human kidney calcification (i.e. stones) is increasing globally with the rate highest for males (Romero et al. 2010). Although this may not be related, it is possible that rising office levels of CO2 is a contributing cause. As well there is evidence that CO2 toxicity contributes to a range of serious health issues including cancer, neurological diseases and sleep disorders, and is being experienced by individuals at the current ambient levels which are now 40% higher than pre-industrial levels. It seems likely that CO2 toxicity related to human-induced climate change is already having an unrecognised impact on population health.

From the evidence presented here, there appears to be current health impacts of rising CO2 levels and a significant risk of serious health issues arising in the human population at some time in this century.

 This means that most humans could at this time be experiencing persistent body compensation for acidosis effects resulting in serious health problems. The risk for human and animal population health in the near-future is extremely high and should be communicated since global awareness of this issue may enable a change in CO2 emission activities.
link (https://www.researchgate.net/publication/311844520_Carbon_dioxide_toxicity_and_climate_change_a_serious_unapprehended_risk_for_human_health)


Title: Re: Health Effects of Climate Change
Post by: vox_mundi on December 09, 2018, 04:14:10 AM
High concentration of CO2 reduces man's intellectual abilities

https://www.skepticalscience.com/how-sapiens-in-the-world-of-high-co2-concentration.html

(https://static.skepticalscience.com/pics/BloodPh-vs-CO2ppm-20141029.png)
Changes in blood acidity level (pH coefficient) as  a function of CO2 concentration in the air we breathe (expressed in number of CO2 molecules per million - ppm). Increase of CO2 concentration in the atmosphere from 280 ppm in the preindustrial era to the current approximately 400 ppm reduces pH of our blood by 0.1 (which is equivalent to acidity increase by 30%).

(https://static.skepticalscience.com/pics/Impact-of-CO2-on-Human-Decision-Making-Performance-20141029.png)
The effect of CO2 concentration on peoples' decision abilities

(https://static.skepticalscience.com/pics/IQ-distribution-normal-minus5p-20141029.png)

Gradually, to the known effects of carbon dioxide emissions – like climate warming and ocean acidification – we will be forced to add impairment of our higher mental functions. Faced with the rising complex problems of our civilization, requiring the ability to analyze complex information, undertake initiatives and strategic planning - we place ourselves at a profound disadvantage, perhaps at a literally dysfunctional level.

Lowering IQ by 5 points, from the average of 100 to 95 – seemingly a small change – will cause a 40% rise in the number of people mentally handicapped and 60% decrease of the highly talented group. We need our intelligence and we should do our best to protect it. 
Title: Re: Health Effects of Climate Change
Post by: Shared Humanity on December 09, 2018, 03:06:43 PM
Jesus Christ guys! You're scaring the shit out of me. I'm now researching on how to maintain a proper ph balance.

https://www.chatelaine.com/health/diet/how-to-become-more-alkaline-and-less-acidic/
Title: Re: Health Effects of Climate Change
Post by: Cid_Yama on December 09, 2018, 10:38:05 PM
If you want to supplement your Alkaline reserves, take a daily multivitamin with Calcium, Magnesium, and Potassium.

Drinking Alkaline water over an extended period can alkalize you digestive track creating serious health problems and provide another gateway for disease.

If you want to use it occasionally for hydration purposes, it's cheaper to just add baking soda to your tap water.

Spring water is slightly more alkaline that tap water in places without hard water, and unlikely to cause the problems you would incur with more alkalized water for daily use.

If you have hard water, your tap water is already alkalized.

And, of course, eat your vegetables.

But, the real problem we face is the continuous chronic compensation that happens within our bodies with the higher atmospheric CO2 levels.  The body's reaction to the acidosis.  Not just the exhaustion of alkaline reserves.       
Title: Re: Health Effects of Climate Change
Post by: Cid_Yama on December 10, 2018, 12:03:55 AM
To remove CO2 from a room.

In a room with a humidifier, place some red devil lye (sodium hydroxide) in an open Tupperware.  That's it.  The lye will remove the CO2 from the air.  Do not use glass or metal containers as the Lye will react with it.

This is a simplified version of what was used on the Apollo spacecraft.

Remember to remove any plants from the room, as they will die. 
Title: Re: Health Effects of Climate Change
Post by: bbr2314 on December 10, 2018, 10:55:22 AM
To remove CO2 from a room.

In a room with a humidifier, place some red devil lye (sodium hydroxide) in an open Tupperware.  That's it.  The lye will remove the CO2 from the air.  Do not use glass or metal containers as the Lye will react with it.

This is a simplified version of what was used on the Apollo spacecraft.

Remember to remove any plants from the room, as they will die.
Maybe it is better to just have lots of plants? I have 20+ orchids in my normal room of occupancy and tons of flowers (and a saltwater aquarium with reef flora and fauna to boot). I'm sure an extra fig tree or two would help even more but I think flowers and greenery are beneficial regardless. Why would you ever want to be in a room without flora or fauna when merely including them could help lower CO2 levels to well below background states?
Title: Re: Health Effects of Climate Change
Post by: Klondike Kat on December 10, 2018, 05:26:52 PM
To remove CO2 from a room.

In a room with a humidifier, place some red devil lye (sodium hydroxide) in an open Tupperware.  That's it.  The lye will remove the CO2 from the air.  Do not use glass or metal containers as the Lye will react with it.

This is a simplified version of what was used on the Apollo spacecraft.

Remember to remove any plants from the room, as they will die.
Maybe it is better to just have lots of plants? I have 20+ orchids in my normal room of occupancy and tons of flowers (and a saltwater aquarium with reef flora and fauna to boot). I'm sure an extra fig tree or two would help even more but I think flowers and greenery are beneficial regardless. Why would you ever want to be in a room without flora or fauna when merely including them could help lower CO2 levels to well below background states?

Plants are much better, and have the added benefit of removing many indoor pollutants.
Title: Re: Health Effects of Climate Change
Post by: vox_mundi on December 19, 2018, 09:45:24 PM
Air Pollution May Be Making Us Less Intelligent
https://phys.org/news/2018-12-air-pollution-intelligent.html

Quote
Not only is air pollution bad for our lungs and heart, it turns out it could actually be making us less intelligent, too. A recent study (https://www.pnas.org/content/115/37/9193) found that in elderly people living in China, long-term exposure to air pollution may hinder cognitive performance (things like our ability to pay attention, to recall past knowledge and generate new information) in verbal and maths tests. As people age, the link between air pollution and their mental decline becomes stronger. The study also found men and less educated people were especially at risk, though the reason why is currently unknown.

In animals, mice exposed to urban air pollution for four months showed reduced brain function and inflammatory responses in major brain regions. This meant the brain tissues changed in response to the harmful stimuli produced by the pollution.

Postmortem brain samples from people exposed to high levels of air pollution while living in Mexico City and Manchester, UK, displayed the typical signs of Alzheimer's disease. These included clumps of abnormal protein fragments (plaques) between nerve cells, inflammation, and an abundance of metal-rich nanoparticles (including iron, copper, nickel, platinum, and cobalt) in the brain.

The metal-rich nanoparticles found in these brain samples are similar to those found everywhere in urban air pollution, which form from burning oil and other fuel, and wear in engines and brakes. These toxic nanoparticles are often associated with other hazardous compounds, including polyaromatic hydrocarbons that occur naturally in fossil fuels, and can cause kidney and liver damage, and cancer.

Repeatedly inhaling nanoparticles found in air pollution may have a number of negative effects on the brain, including chronic inflammation of the brain's nerve cells. When we inhale air pollution, it may activate the brain's immune cells, the microglia. Breathing air pollution may constantly activate the killing response in immune cells, which can allow dangerous molecules, known as reactive oxygen species, to form more often. High levels of these molecules could cause cell damage and cell death.

The presence of iron found in air pollution may speed up this process. Iron-rich (magnetite) nanoparticles are directly associated with plaques in the brain. Magnetite nanoparticles can also increase the toxicity of the abnormal proteins found at the centre of the plaques. Postmortem analysis of brains from Alzheimer's and Parkinson's disease patients shows that microglial activation is common in these neurodegenerative diseases.

(https://i1.wp.com/blogforarizona.net/wp-content/uploads/2014/11/China-Air-Pollution.JPEG-0a93f.jpg)
Title: Re: Health Effects of Climate Change
Post by: Sigmetnow on February 12, 2019, 06:19:37 PM
Australia

Lonely, unfit and hooked on air-conditioning - is this the summer of the future?
Quote
“People in social housing can’t put in an air-conditioning unit or install a ceiling fan. They would literally lie on the floor in the coolest part of the house and not move for hours," Crabtree says.

“We heard from people who, on a hot day, can’t get out of the house because they don’t have transport options that are affordable and cool."

Blast-furnace ambient temperatures also turn people off physical exercise.

“If it’s just too hot and a walk to the bus stop is too far and the bus stop has no shade, people will stop walking. It's very much impacting how much people are walking or bicycling," Crabtree says.

Aside from the obvious health implications of less physical activity, researchers are also concerned about the "mental health effects of feeling trapped in your house and unable to do anything about it". ...
https://www.smh.com.au/politics/federal/lonely-unfit-and-hooked-on-air-conditioning-is-this-the-summer-of-the-future-20190208-p50whm.html
Title: Re: Health Effects of Climate Change
Post by: Shared Humanity on February 12, 2019, 06:26:28 PM
Australia

Lonely, unfit and hooked on air-conditioning - is this the summer of the future?
Quote
“People in social housing can’t put in an air-conditioning unit or install a ceiling fan. They would literally lie on the floor in the coolest part of the house and not move for hours," Crabtree says.

“We heard from people who, on a hot day, can’t get out of the house because they don’t have transport options that are affordable and cool."

Blast-furnace ambient temperatures also turn people off physical exercise.

“If it’s just too hot and a walk to the bus stop is too far and the bus stop has no shade, people will stop walking. It's very much impacting how much people are walking or bicycling," Crabtree says.

Aside from the obvious health implications of less physical activity, researchers are also concerned about the "mental health effects of feeling trapped in your house and unable to do anything about it". ...
https://www.smh.com.au/politics/federal/lonely-unfit-and-hooked-on-air-conditioning-is-this-the-summer-of-the-future-20190208-p50whm.html

Built Shade will be a growth industry for all of our cities. I'm not talking about shaded bus shelters. I'm talking about massive block long shades in an attempt to address the urban heat island effect in a warming world.

Think this...

https://www.pinterest.com/jingertapia/shade-structures/

...but on steroids.
Title: Re: Health Effects of Climate Change
Post by: vox_mundi on February 12, 2019, 06:48:31 PM
Quote
... Built Shade will be a growth industry for all of our cities. ... 

Once upon a time - before the Great Heat - they would be called trees and forests.
Title: Re: Health Effects of Climate Change
Post by: Sigmetnow on April 02, 2019, 02:42:49 AM
How Climate Change Is Affecting Residents' Health In Miami
Quote
For years, that discussion had been dominated by the impacts of rising sea levels. Now, the state's medical community is sounding the alarm about the health risks associated with rising temperatures. Whether it's a longer allergy season, air quality issues or mosquito-borne illnesses, heat is already making people sicker, they say, and the nearly 60 percent of Miami residents who live paycheck to paycheck could be the most in danger.
https://www.npr.org/2019/03/30/706941118/in-florida-doctors-see-climate-change-hurting-their-most-vulnerable-patients
Title: Re: Health Effects of Climate Change
Post by: bbr2314 on April 07, 2019, 01:23:28 AM
Well this is fairly terrifying

https://www.nytimes.com/2019/04/06/health/drug-resistant-candida-auris.html
Title: Re: Health Effects of Climate Change
Post by: Tom_Mazanec on April 15, 2019, 10:25:26 PM
Well this is fairly terrifying

https://www.nytimes.com/2019/04/06/health/drug-resistant-candida-auris.html

So is the article linked at the end.
Title: Re: Health Effects of Climate Change
Post by: gerontocrat on April 15, 2019, 11:28:37 PM
Well this is fairly terrifying

https://www.nytimes.com/2019/04/06/health/drug-resistant-candida-auris.html

So is the article linked at the end.
And this.. it is about the UK but perhaps the US of A is the market leader - America First!!

But warnings about the consequences of the overuse of antibiotics on humans and animals have been given for at least a decade. Until recently, Governments, Big Pharma and Agro-Industry have ignored these warnings. Your lot-fed beef and pork are stuffed full of antibiotics not a s treatment for illness but as a precaution against illness.

So it is now safer to have major surgery on your kitchen table than in the best of hospitals due to the risk of post-operational infections resistant to treatment.

Quote
Antimicrobial resistance poses ‘catastrophic threat’, says Chief Medical Officer
Antibiotic Action supports comments made by England’s  Chief Medical Officer, Professor Dame Sally Davies in the second volume of her annual report published today.   She issues stark warnings about the catastrophe we face if we do not immeidately address the threat of antimicrobial resistance.

The CMO said we could routinely see deaths from minor surgery within 20 years if new antibiotics are not discovered – highlighting the immediate and imminement threats that  antimicrobial resistance poses. She has called for politicians to act now, and for global action to be taken.

Her report mirrors calls made by Antibiotic Action– a UK led global initiative funded by BSAC – insisting the “discovery void” is addressed – few new antibiotics have been developed in the past two decades despite a new infectious disease being discovered every year for the past 30 years.  The report highlights how our amoury of antibiotics is nearly empty at a time when diseases are evolving and becoming more resistance to existing drugs.  In speaking of her report Professor Dame Sally Davies said:

“Antimicrobial resistance poses a catastrophic threat. If we don’t act now, any one of us could go into hospital in 20 years for minor surgery and die because of an ordinary infection that can’t be treated by antibiotics. And routine operations like hip replacements or organ transplants could be deadly because of the risk of infection.

“That’s why governments and organisations across the world, including the World Health Organization and G8, need to take this seriously.

“This is not just about government action. We need to encourage more innovation in the development of antibiotics – over the past two decades there has been a discovery void around antibiotics, meaning diseases have evolved faster than the drugs to treat them.

“In some areas, like cutting rates of drug resistant MRSA, the NHS is already making good progress so it’s important that we use that knowledge across the system and I hope my recommendations will prompt people to do that.”
Title: Re: Health Effects of Climate Change
Post by: Tom_Mazanec on April 16, 2019, 12:48:21 PM
gerontocrat, it has been warned for a lot more than a decade. I once read a "Golden Age" scifi story where explorers went to Venus to get antibiotics from the fungus jungles and swamps of the planet, because overuse of antibiotics had made all terrestrial ones useless.
Title: Re: Health Effects of Climate Change
Post by: Tom_Mazanec on April 17, 2019, 05:30:20 AM
As a former hay fever sufferer...
Pollenpcalypse:
https://www.nytimes.com/2019/04/11/us/extreme-pollen-north-carolina.html