Arctic Sea Ice : Forum

AGW in general => Consequences => Topic started by: Archimid on April 13, 2017, 05:44:09 PM

Title: Floods
Post by: Archimid on April 13, 2017, 05:44:09 PM
I did a search and couldn't find a floods topic in the consequences section. If there is one, my apologies.

That said:

How can Peru prepare to withstand more devastating floods and landslides?

https://www.theguardian.com/global-development-professionals-network/2017/apr/13/peru-prevent-floods-landslides-climate-change (https://www.theguardian.com/global-development-professionals-network/2017/apr/13/peru-prevent-floods-landslides-climate-change)

Extract:
Quote
More than 100 people have died, nearly 158,000 are displaced and 210,000 homes are damaged, according to Peru’s emergency operations centre. The country’s infrastructure took a big hit: 260 bridges collapsed and nearly 3,000km of roads are unusable, cutting off hundreds of villages and towns.
Title: Re: Floods
Post by: Archimid on April 13, 2017, 05:47:20 PM
Colombia landslides: Over 200 die in Putumayo floods

http://www.bbc.com/news/world-latin-america-39468575 (http://www.bbc.com/news/world-latin-america-39468575)

Extract:
Quote
Hours of heavy rains overnight caused rivers to burst their banks, flooding homes with mud in Putumayo province.
Title: Re: Floods
Post by: Archimid on April 13, 2017, 05:49:39 PM
Flooding Leaves Millions Without Water in Santiago, Chile

https://www.nytimes.com/2017/02/27/world/americas/santiago-chile-flooding-mudslides.html (https://www.nytimes.com/2017/02/27/world/americas/santiago-chile-flooding-mudslides.html)

Extract:
Quote
The mudslides and floods in turn contaminated the Maipo River, a main source of drinking water for much of Santiago and the surrounding metropolitan region. The water utility Aguas Andinas, whose plants draw from the river, suspended service on Sunday for about 1.5 million customers, affecting a total of about five million residents.
Title: Re: Floods
Post by: Neven on April 13, 2017, 05:56:40 PM
This used to go in the Weird Weather thread (http://forum.arctic-sea-ice.net/index.php/topic,323.0.html), but I see no harm in a thread of its own. So, thanks for opening, Archimid.
Title: Re: Floods
Post by: gerontocrat on April 13, 2017, 06:25:02 PM
New Zealand currently enjoying the tail end of cyclones Debbie and Cook.
Title: Re: Floods
Post by: DrTskoul on April 14, 2017, 12:10:58 AM
"Enjoying"   :o
Title: Re: Floods
Post by: Archimid on May 08, 2017, 01:02:15 PM
Historic Flooding Far From Over: Hundreds of Roads Closed and Vital Waterways Shut Down

https://weather.com/news/news/flooding-missouri-arkansas-illinois-midwest

Extract
Quote
Nine deaths have been blamed on flooding in several states across the Midwest and South.

Hundreds of other roads have also been closed by flooding.

Parts of the Mississippi and Missouri rivers are shut down.
Title: Re: Floods
Post by: TerryM on May 08, 2017, 03:15:07 PM
Big floods in Quebec. Sorry no link.
Terry
Title: Re: Floods
Post by: wili on May 08, 2017, 03:24:09 PM
Here ya go: http://abcnews.go.com/International/wireStory/floods-drive-1900-homes-canadas-quebec-47259298 (http://abcnews.go.com/International/wireStory/floods-drive-1900-homes-canadas-quebec-47259298)
Title: Re: Floods
Post by: TerryM on May 08, 2017, 10:04:52 PM
Thanks Wili


Where I'm at no more floods is the new norm. Spring flood here had been a yearly occurrence.
Ice would break up, form dams, and downtown was accessible by canoe or rowboat.


Today the river doesn't freeze over, There hasn't been a week in ten years that I haven't seen my grass, and millions of dollars worth of flood control infrastructure goes unused.


I spoke with an archaeologist who was working a Pre-Columbian site a few miles down the river close to the present riverbanks. It had never been flooded until settlers cleared the forests and drained the swamps. Perhaps, in this one instance we're returning the river to it's former state.


But at what a price.
Terry
Title: Re: Floods
Post by: ghoti on May 09, 2017, 05:28:05 AM
The Ottawa River is flooding extensively. It is clearly at record heights as evidenced by water over topping a retaining wall at the almost completed new hydro electric generating station built in Ottawa. Structures like that are designed for expected high water conditions and it wasn't sufficient. The red arrow in the photo points to where a wall should have been 5+ feet above the water level.

They used the excavator to pile fill to keep the water out and move the shoreline that was eroding back.
Title: Re: Floods
Post by: Archimid on May 09, 2017, 06:56:23 PM
Worst Canadian Flood in Decades Footage Compilation (May 8-9 2017)

https://youtu.be/Ic4M3dkXPlM
Title: Re: Floods
Post by: DrTskoul on May 12, 2017, 12:02:16 AM
The Injustice of Atlantic City’s Floods (http://reports.climatecentral.org/atlantic-city/sea-level-rise/)

Quote
New Jersey's working class are forgotten as federal government funds fixes for wealthier neighborhoods
Title: Re: Floods
Post by: Sigmetnow on May 12, 2017, 02:26:34 AM
Climate change -- and overbuilt levees, and land-use changes -- have led to multiple recent floods around St. Louis, Missouri.

Two catastrophic floods in less than two years wasn't just a case of bad luck
Quote
Residents of waterlogged communities along the Meramec River and other swollen area waterways have experienced something unusual for the region.

In a span of just 16 months, the people of cities like Eureka, Pacific and Valley Park have twice braced for and dealt with so-called “100-year” floods that have left damage, financial loss and heartache in their wake. Now, as the floodwater recedes in some communities, residents are left wondering how soon the next catastrophic flood will arrive.
...
http://www.stltoday.com/news/local/river-constriction-and-wetter-climate-leave-area-vulnerable-to-more/article_33e07bfa-16dd-575b-8e18-9a6e2a2eebd0.html (http://www.stltoday.com/news/local/river-constriction-and-wetter-climate-leave-area-vulnerable-to-more/article_33e07bfa-16dd-575b-8e18-9a6e2a2eebd0.html)
Title: Re: Floods
Post by: TerryM on May 12, 2017, 06:56:16 AM
Climate change -- and overbuilt levees, and land-use changes -- have led to multiple recent floods around St. Louis, Missouri.

Two catastrophic floods in less than two years wasn't just a case of bad luck
Quote
Residents of waterlogged communities along the Meramec River and other swollen area waterways have experienced something unusual for the region.

In a span of just 16 months, the people of cities like Eureka, Pacific and Valley Park have twice braced for and dealt with so-called “100-year” floods that have left damage, financial loss and heartache in their wake. Now, as the floodwater recedes in some communities, residents are left wondering how soon the next catastrophic flood will arrive.
...
http://www.stltoday.com/news/local/river-constriction-and-wetter-climate-leave-area-vulnerable-to-more/article_33e07bfa-16dd-575b-8e18-9a6e2a2eebd0.html (http://www.stltoday.com/news/local/river-constriction-and-wetter-climate-leave-area-vulnerable-to-more/article_33e07bfa-16dd-575b-8e18-9a6e2a2eebd0.html)


199 yrs ? 198 yrs? 198.4 yrs? Next month?
Damn, prognostication's hard - especially when it's about the future -
Terry
Title: Re: Floods
Post by: Sigmetnow on May 20, 2017, 05:17:08 PM
Bill McKibben:  So, at the moment, big and deadly floods underway in Jamaica, Haiti, DR, China, Indonesia, Thailand, Kenya. http://floodlist.com

https://twitter.com/billmckibben/status/865938710042378241 (https://twitter.com/billmckibben/status/865938710042378241)
Title: Re: Floods
Post by: Sigmetnow on May 20, 2017, 05:23:43 PM
Urban flood mitigation in Tokyo.

G-Cans Project, Tokyo – Japan’s $2.6 Billion Flood Tunnel
Quote
The Metropolitan Area Outer Underground Discharge system was built to handle flooding from monsoon-season typhoons, not storm surges from the ocean, and has been used over 70 times, says Takashi Komiyama, head of the pump station. He adds that the system has proven itself effective, reducing damage in terms of the number of homes and area flooded by two-thirds.
http://floodlist.com/protection/g-cans-project-tokyo-flood-tunnel (http://floodlist.com/protection/g-cans-project-tokyo-flood-tunnel)
Title: Re: Floods
Post by: Tor Bejnar on May 20, 2017, 05:49:04 PM
cross post:
So much for the seed vault being built for eternity...  :-\

Arctic stronghold of world’s seeds flooded after permafrost melts

https://www.theguardian.com/environment/2017/may/19/arctic-stronghold-of-worlds-seeds-flooded-after-permafrost-melts (https://www.theguardian.com/environment/2017/may/19/arctic-stronghold-of-worlds-seeds-flooded-after-permafrost-melts)

Abstract:
"It was designed as an impregnable deep-freeze to protect the world’s most precious seeds from any global disaster and ensure humanity’s food supply forever. But the Global Seed Vault, buried in a mountain deep inside the Arctic circle, has been breached after global warming produced extraordinary temperatures over the winter, sending meltwater gushing into the entrance tunnel.

The vault is on the Norwegian island of Spitsbergen and contains almost a million packets of seeds, each a variety of an important food crop. When it was opened in 2008, the deep permafrost through which the vault was sunk was expected to provide “failsafe” protection against “the challenge of natural or man-made disasters”.

But soaring temperatures in the Arctic at the end of the world’s hottest ever recorded year led to melting and heavy rain, when light snow should have been falling. “It was not in our plans to think that the permafrost would not be there and that it would experience extreme weather like that,” said Hege Njaa Aschim, from the Norwegian government, which owns the vault."
(https://forum.arctic-sea-ice.net/proxy.php?request=http%3A%2F%2Fforum.arctic-sea-ice.net%2Findex.php%3Faction%3Ddlattach%3Btopic%3D596.0%3Battach%3D45424%3Bimage&hash=2b62f2dd285d4dda8ca05252683182aa)
Title: Re: Floods
Post by: Sigmetnow on May 26, 2017, 08:13:40 PM
Why Rains and Flooding Are Plaguing America
- Weather pattern pumped moisture across U.S. throughout season
- Warmer Gulf of Mexico waters allowed storms to recharge
Quote
To understand why heavy rains and widespread flooding have plagued the U.S. this spring, go to the Pacific Ocean.

Last winter, a pool of cool water set up next to a warm patch across the northern Pacific, said Paul Pastelok, lead long range forecaster at AccuWeather Inc. in State College, Pennsylvania. “This led to an avenue for storms that came off the East Asian coast. Instead of dying out, they traveled along that avenue and maintained their strength.” It’s the same phenomenon that delivered a warm winter and ended California’s unprecedented drought....
https://www.bloomberg.com/news/articles/2017-05-26/a-hot-cold-patch-in-the-pacific-ocean-is-dumping-rain-on-america (https://www.bloomberg.com/news/articles/2017-05-26/a-hot-cold-patch-in-the-pacific-ocean-is-dumping-rain-on-america)
Title: Re: Floods
Post by: Archimid on May 29, 2017, 05:24:22 PM
How Rising Seas Drowned the Flood Insurance Program

http://www.climatecentral.org/news/how-rising-seas-drowned-the-flood-insurance-program-21484 (http://www.climatecentral.org/news/how-rising-seas-drowned-the-flood-insurance-program-21484)

Extract:
Quote
Recently, the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers pumped more than ten million cubic yards of sand from offshore dredges to widen Long Beach Island’s beaches and dunes – part of a Sisyphean-like effort to protect the island’s $15 billion of high-calorie real estate. But there is a problem. The sand keeps washing away. A series of storms over the last two years gouged the neatly groomed beaches, costing tens of millions in additional repairs. When all is said and done, the project will cost more than half a billion dollars, most of the money paid by U.S. taxpayers.
Title: Re: Floods
Post by: oren on May 29, 2017, 05:47:52 PM
Fighting against the sea in such a manner is sheer idiocy. At such costs, it is the very definition of unsustainable, especially given accelerating sea level rise. Sometimes you just have to cut your losses, the earlier the better.
Title: Re: Floods
Post by: Archimid on May 29, 2017, 06:43:13 PM
I agree. I think their experience tells them that this too shall pass, as it always have. They think they just have to ride the rough times and then things will get better.  In this case that experience is our worst enemy because with SLR and CC this is only going to get worse.
Title: Re: Floods
Post by: CalamityCountdown on May 29, 2017, 07:51:25 PM
At least for now, global sea level rise continues it's multi decade pattern of reverting to the trend of 3+ mm of rise per year. https://www.aviso.altimetry.fr/en/data/products/ocean-indicators-products/mean-sea-level.html (https://www.aviso.altimetry.fr/en/data/products/ocean-indicators-products/mean-sea-level.html)  After a big jump in late 2014 and 2015, there has been a decline in global sea level over the past two years. Will we get a bounce back year with an unusually large rise in sea level during the Trump administration, and a related increase in sunny day flooding?

Given how big a "nuisance" sunny day flooding is already, how severe will the problem become if we get a couple of years of abnormally large increases in sea level rise? How much deeper underwater will the National Flood Insurance Program (NFIP) get once sea level begins to rise again
Title: Re: Floods
Post by: Sigmetnow on May 30, 2017, 02:28:39 PM
Cyclone Mora: Bangladesh tries to evacuate one million
Quote
Bangladeshi authorities are trying to evacuate up to a million people before a powerful cyclone makes landfall.

Cyclone Mora is likely to hit the eastern coast early on Tuesday, the meteorological department said.

Port cities in the south-east have been asked to display the highest warning system known as "great danger level 10". Ports further west are on level 8.

The cyclone formed after heavy rains in Sri Lanka caused floods and landslides that killed at least 180 people.

The worst flooding in 14 years on the island has affected the lives of more than half a million people. More than 100 people remain missing....
http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/amp/40087344 (http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/amp/40087344)
Title: Re: Floods
Post by: Sigmetnow on May 30, 2017, 03:13:42 PM
"The monsoon rains are the the worst to hit Sri Lanka since 2003. They come after two months of drought, which had grown severe enough to warrant aid from the World Food Programme."

Sri Lanka floods: Battle to rescue stranded as death toll mounts
Quote
(CNN) Severe flooding brought on by monsoon rains across southwestern portions of Sri Lanka has resulted in the deaths of at least 169 people, according to the country's Ministry of Disaster Management.

As many as 112 people are still missing, and the death toll is expected to rise, as authorities battle to rescue those still stranded and warn of the possibility of crocodile attacks.

"It was only the next morning that troops arrived in boats, and took us to safe ground," Banakiyanage Gnanawathie, who lives in the badly hit town of Matara, told CNN by phone.

"I have never seen such floods though I have spent my entire lifetime in Matara. We have lost all our belongings and remain in the clothes we wore. I am still happy we escaped the floods and even the crocodiles," she said.

She said that they won't be able to return home for days.  "There is only a roof and building. We have lost everything else."

The heavy rain occurred over a very short period of time, leading to the displacement of 112,000 people, according to Pradeep Kodippily, spokesman for Sri Lanka's Disaster Management Center. Almost half a million people have been affected by the flooding.

The bout of severe weather has also triggered landslides throughout the country.

The southern coastal city of Galle has seen 223 millimeters (8.78 inches) of rainfall over the past 48 hours, and Ratnapura, further inland, has experienced 453 millimeters (17.8 inches) of rain over the same period.
...
https://amp.cnn.com/cnn/2017/05/28/asia/sri-lanka-floods/index.html
Title: Re: Floods
Post by: Sigmetnow on June 01, 2017, 03:55:50 AM
Brazil

“The Paraíba, Mundaú, Coruripe, San Miguel and Jacuípe rivers have all overflowed, according to official reports.  Rainfall totals over the last 7 days were 25% of normal annual averages and thought to be higher than the rainfall totals of the 2010 floods.”

Brazil – 7 Dead, Thousands Displaced After Floods and Landslides in North East
http://floodlist.com/america/brazil-floods-pernambuco-alagoas-may-2017 (http://floodlist.com/america/brazil-floods-pernambuco-alagoas-may-2017)
Title: Re: Floods
Post by: Sigmetnow on June 03, 2017, 04:39:21 PM
Deadly 600 mm (23.6 in) of rain within 11 hours floods Taiwan, shuts down nuclear plant
Quote
...
Brutal amounts of rainfall hit northern Taiwan today, June 2, 2017, killing at least 1 person, leaving 2 missing and injuring more than 20. Heavy rain toppled electricity pylon near New Taipei's Jinshan Nuclear Power Plant, resulting in the automatic shutdown of the plant.
...
https://watchers.news/2017/06/02/taiwan-flood-nuclear-plant-shut-down/
Title: Re: Floods
Post by: Sigmetnow on June 06, 2017, 03:57:55 AM
Australia:  "Local authorities failed to properly respond to last year's flood emergency in Tasmania's north-west, a report has found."

Tasmania flood report finds emergency response failures at Latrobe
http://www.abc.net.au/news/2017-06-05/report-finds-tasmania-latrobe-flood-response-failures/8589166 (http://www.abc.net.au/news/2017-06-05/report-finds-tasmania-latrobe-flood-response-failures/8589166)
Title: Re: Floods
Post by: Sigmetnow on June 07, 2017, 11:48:15 PM
Jim Cantore:  Tremendous tropical rains across south Florida in spots. Almost 15 inches (381mm) measured.
2 more days of rounds of rain possible. #FLwx
https://twitter.com/jimcantore/status/872189927047483392

"Sawgrass Mills Mall in South Florida (the biggest mall in the SE) is CLOSED today due to flooding. This is a big deal… #flwx"
https://twitter.com/reaganmatt/status/872445500460589059
Title: Re: Floods
Post by: jai mitchell on June 19, 2017, 06:55:04 PM
New Orleans is projected to receive ~250mm (10 inches) of rain over a 24 hour period in a few days  https://earth.nullschool.net/#2017/06/21/1800Z/wind/surface/level/overlay=precip_3hr/orthographic=-96.36,28.97,3000/loc=-89.773,30.504
Title: Re: Floods
Post by: Archimid on June 24, 2017, 02:54:36 PM
Not a flood, because California has the technology to contain the melt waer, but I imagine the same will happen in other places with less sound infrastructure.

12 billion gallons of water pour into Lake Tahoe amid this week's heat wave

http://www.sfgate.com/news/article/Lake-Tahoe-filling-up-snow-melt-run-off-Sierra-11242256.php (http://www.sfgate.com/news/article/Lake-Tahoe-filling-up-snow-melt-run-off-Sierra-11242256.php)

Quote
The process of the Sierra Nevada spring snow melt sped up this week as a heat wave brought triple-digit temperatures to parts of the Western United States. A thawing snowpack that's massive after a brutal winter fed rivers and reservoirs with high-flowing runoff. One place that saw a stunning impact from all the runoff is Lake Tahoe.  More than 12 billion gallons of water poured into the lake over the past week.
Title: Re: Floods
Post by: Sigmetnow on June 25, 2017, 04:18:28 PM
California's snowpack decreased from 164% of normal on June 13 -- to 121% of normal on June 23 (most recent reading).

http://cdec.water.ca.gov/cdecapp/snowapp/sweq.action (http://cdec.water.ca.gov/cdecapp/snowapp/sweq.action)
Title: Re: Floods
Post by: wili on June 26, 2017, 11:32:14 PM
http://news.cornell.edu/stories/2017/06/rising-seas-could-result-2-billion-refugees-2100 (http://news.cornell.edu/stories/2017/06/rising-seas-could-result-2-billion-refugees-2100)

2 billion refugees from SLR alone by 2100.

And like all such prognostications, it's probably quite conservative.
Title: Re: Floods
Post by: Sigmetnow on June 27, 2017, 01:40:40 AM
"A full 62% of all @NWS Flash Flood Warnings issued from last Tuesday-Friday fell outside the cone of #Cindy"

Maps/GIF at the link: https://twitter.com/michaelrlowry/status/879371332391235584
Title: Re: Floods
Post by: rboyd on June 27, 2017, 11:18:03 PM
UK Weather Forecast: Met Office Warns Of A Month Of Rain In Just A Day

"For the region taking in London and the south east, there could be up to 60mm of rain between now and Wednesday morning – that’s equivalent to almost the entire average rainfall for June (which is 56mm) for the same region."

http://www.huffingtonpost.co.uk/entry/uk-weather-forecast-met-office-warns-of-a-month-of-rain-in-just-a-day_uk_595262f1e4b05c37bb796768?utm_hp_ref=uk (http://www.huffingtonpost.co.uk/entry/uk-weather-forecast-met-office-warns-of-a-month-of-rain-in-just-a-day_uk_595262f1e4b05c37bb796768?utm_hp_ref=uk)
Title: Re: Floods
Post by: Darvince on July 08, 2017, 11:08:28 PM
http://news.cornell.edu/stories/2017/06/rising-seas-could-result-2-billion-refugees-2100 (http://news.cornell.edu/stories/2017/06/rising-seas-could-result-2-billion-refugees-2100)

2 billion refugees from SLR alone by 2100.

And like all such prognostications, it's probably quite conservative.
I don't think this one is conservative, because I don't think people will be stupid enough to move into places like Miami or Shanghai once SLR has accelerated to a sufficient level that everyone notices it. We'll just have to move all the people out of the low-lying areas rather than moving people who moved there out as well.

And I say "just" as if it's going to be an easy thing! Oh lordy!
Title: Re: Floods
Post by: wili on July 08, 2017, 11:32:23 PM
I'm glad you have such a high opinion of human collective intelligence. But if we are so smart, how did we get ourselves into this fix in the first place?  :o

I see little indication of this lack of stupidity so far, even among people who are otherwise quite smart... relatives of mine retired to a coastal property right on Chesapeake Bay; a beautiful spot, but one that, even if it is not inundated before they die, is likely to see a big loss of value and of insurability.

 And of course the vast majority are those who don't have resources to just up and move away from their sources of income.

The time to start relocating people from Miami and Shanghai (not to mention entire regions/provinces such as Jiangsu) was probably about a decade ago, but no such plans are underway anywhere in the world as far as I know, though some island nations are asking for climate refugee status, pleas that are, so far, falling on deaf ears. Miami, of course, is in a state where you get fired from the state government for even using the words 'global warming' in public. Soooo, not there's plenty of stupid to go around, apparently.

And yeah, none of this is going to be remotely easy, and the longer we put off looking at these things squarely, the harder it is going to be.
Title: Re: Floods
Post by: oren on July 09, 2017, 10:22:35 AM
So many collective resources could be saved just by stopping new building activities in low-lying areas, and letting the paid-for buildings and infrastructure live out their useful life. But the human race doesn't work that way.
As a sidenote, the issue is not "just" relocating the people. All those buildings underwater will be a major problem of pollution and shipping hazards (assuming civilization still functions at that time). Dismantling them properly would be a major resource drain, though I highly doubt anyone would bother.
Title: Re: Floods
Post by: rboyd on July 09, 2017, 08:56:50 PM
All those nuclear reactors at sea level, with all that radioactive waste - even after they are shut down. Like Turkey Point in Florida and many others on the US coasts:

As Sea Levels Rise, Are Coastal Nuclear Plants Ready?

http://news.nationalgeographic.com/energy/2015/12/151215-as-sea-levels-rise-are-coastal-nuclear-plants-ready/ (http://news.nationalgeographic.com/energy/2015/12/151215-as-sea-levels-rise-are-coastal-nuclear-plants-ready/)




Title: Re: Floods
Post by: Sigmetnow on August 06, 2017, 03:08:23 PM
New Orleans, part of Jefferson swamped in near-8-inch deluge
Quote
Heavy rains nearing 8 inches in some spots caused widespread flooding Saturday (Aug. 5) that swamped numerous vehicles and some businesses throughout much of New Orleans and parts of Jefferson Parish.

The areas affected including parts of the city where residents said they had not experienced this type of flooding until recently, including Mid-City, the 7th Ward and parts of Gentilly. In some spots, the water reached more than 3 feet. In Gentilly, the Peoples Avenue Canal may have been temporarily overtopped, the city said, but there were no breaches.
Quote
Cedric Grant, executive director of the Sewerage and Water Board, said that the city's pump system had been fully operational throughout the downpour but was straining to keep up. The agency said the city's pump system is designed to handle one inch of rain in the first hour and a half-inch of rain every hour after that. He told WVUE Fox 8 News that the system was overwhelmed.
http://www.nola.com/weather/index.ssf/2017/08/flooding_new_orleans_saturday.html (http://www.nola.com/weather/index.ssf/2017/08/flooding_new_orleans_saturday.html)
Title: Re: Floods
Post by: Castaldo on August 10, 2017, 09:36:47 AM
The Ottawa River is flooding extensively. It is clearly at record heights as evidenced by water over topping a retaining wall at the almost completed new hydro electric generating station built in Ottawa. Structures like that are designed for expected high water conditions and it wasn't sufficient. The red arrow in the photo points to where a wall should have been 5+ feet above the water level.

They used the excavator to pile fill to keep the water out and move the shoreline that was eroding back.

Smart, looks like it worked pretty good.
Title: Re: Floods
Post by: wili on August 14, 2017, 06:12:24 PM
 https://www.washingtonpost.com/news/worldviews/wp/2017/08/14/hundreds-buried-alive-in-massive-sierra-leone-mudslides-and-floods/?hpid=hp_hp-more-top-stories_wv-sierraleone-11am%3Ahomepage%2Fstory&utm_term=.40c4f782585a (https://www.washingtonpost.com/news/worldviews/wp/2017/08/14/hundreds-buried-alive-in-massive-sierra-leone-mudslides-and-floods/?hpid=hp_hp-more-top-stories_wv-sierraleone-11am%3Ahomepage%2Fstory&utm_term=.40c4f782585a)

Hundreds buried alive in massive Sierra Leone mudslides and floods

!!!
Title: Re: Floods
Post by: Forest Dweller on August 15, 2017, 04:47:02 PM
Sierra Leone death toll 300+ now and 600 missing they are reporting here.
Indeed !!!
The reason given is...well i always loved the simplicity of this little cartoon here.
Title: Re: Floods
Post by: gerontocrat on August 16, 2017, 02:07:18 PM
South Asia Floods. About 250 dead

http://www.aljazeera.com/indepth/inpictures/2017/08/deadly-floods-hit-south-asian-states-170816080459925.html (http://www.aljazeera.com/indepth/inpictures/2017/08/deadly-floods-hit-south-asian-states-170816080459925.html)

Half the deaths were in Nepal plus other landslides in Himalayan Foothills of India.
Was there not an awful lot of snow in the Himalayas last winter? Can't have helped when an extra strong monsoon arrived.
Title: Re: Floods
Post by: Sigmetnow on August 19, 2017, 04:30:59 PM
U.S.:  Federal Flood Insurance Rebuilds Homes Over and Over, Trapping Residents in Flood-Prone Areas, Report Says
Quote
"The National Flood Insurance Program was designed to help Americans recover from flood disasters, but it can also unintentionally trap homeowners who would prefer to move somewhere safer," the NRDC said on its website. "Instead of moving out of harm’s way, many policyholders find themselves rebuilding their homes again and again."
https://weather.com/amp/science/environment/news/flood-insurance-building-residents-trapped.html
Title: Re: Floods
Post by: Sigmetnow on August 22, 2017, 03:27:15 PM
Torrential rains cause historic flooding, strand residents in southern Kansas City
http://www.kansascity.com/weather/article168573032.html (http://www.kansascity.com/weather/article168573032.html)

NWS Kansas City:
Quote
Official rain measurements from the last month:
Johnson CO Exec Arpt 19.89
Lees Summit Arpt 21.66
NWS Office-Pleasant Hill 18.78
Quote
Average rainfall for the last month in the KC Metro is around 4"...so those totals we just sent out are 4-5 times normal for the period.
https://twitter.com/nwskansascity/status/899980243095756802 (https://twitter.com/nwskansascity/status/899980243095756802)
Title: Re: Floods
Post by: solartim27 on August 22, 2017, 05:59:57 PM
I don't think this one is conservative, because I don't think people will be stupid enough to move into places like Miami or Shanghai once SLR has accelerated to a sufficient level that everyone notices it. We'll just have to move all the people out of the low-lying areas rather than moving people who moved there out as well.

Apologies for the late reply, but plenty of people are noticing.  I would like to see the owner occupancy stats for the Miami area, as in how high is the market propped by speculative investors and money launderers.
https://climatecrocks.com/2017/08/15/another-dress-rehearsal-for-a-drowned-miami/ (https://climatecrocks.com/2017/08/15/another-dress-rehearsal-for-a-drowned-miami/)
https://climatecrocks.com/2017/07/31/in-florida-as-seas-rise-many-still-dont-believe-their-lying-eyes/ (https://climatecrocks.com/2017/07/31/in-florida-as-seas-rise-many-still-dont-believe-their-lying-eyes/)

And just a great video here, showing new elevated construction on a sewage flooded street, where pumps will never be installed (at 6:30 minutes in, but watch the whole thing)
https://www.yaleclimateconnections.org/2016/12/as-seas-rise-miami-development-continues-unabated/ (https://www.yaleclimateconnections.org/2016/12/as-seas-rise-miami-development-continues-unabated/)

Then there's the denial of flood claims because your first floor business is now a 'basement'
http://www.miamiherald.com/news/local/community/miami-dade/miami-beach/article115264938.html (http://www.miamiherald.com/news/local/community/miami-dade/miami-beach/article115264938.html)

(Edit: https://www.census.gov/quickfacts/fact/table/miamidadecountyflorida,US/PST045216 (https://www.census.gov/quickfacts/fact/table/miamidadecountyflorida,US/PST045216) shows 54% owner occupied versus 64% national rate, for 2011 - 2015)
Title: Re: Floods
Post by: Sigmetnow on August 28, 2017, 08:55:34 PM
Flooding from Hurricane Harvey has so far affected about a quarter of the Texas population, or 6.8 million people in 18 counties.

Rescuers pluck hundreds from rising floodwaters in Houston
http://abcnews.go.com/amp/US/wireStory/rescuers-pluck-hundreds-rising-floodwaters-houston-49461841 (http://abcnews.go.com/amp/US/wireStory/rescuers-pluck-hundreds-rising-floodwaters-houston-49461841)
Title: Re: Floods
Post by: Sigmetnow on August 29, 2017, 02:52:29 AM
Advice from a Hurricane Harvey flood victim.
Also:  if the water in your home is nearing your electrical sockets, turn off the power to the house, if you can do it without standing in water yourself.

Edit:  And turn off any gas supply!

https://twitter.com/saracress/status/901979432570806272
Title: Re: Floods
Post by: Sigmetnow on August 29, 2017, 06:42:27 PM
"Mumbai, city of 18 million, 'brought to its knees' today by epic flooding--10x usual monsoon rain"
https://twitter.com/billmckibben/status/902547463910842368 (https://twitter.com/billmckibben/status/902547463910842368)


With Ten Times the Usual Rain, Mumbai Heads Towards Imminent Flood
According to the weathermen, this could be the worst rain since July 2005, when the city was devastated by floods.
http://www.news18.com/amp/news/india/with-ten-times-the-usual-rain-mumbai-heads-towards-imminent-flood-1504367.html (http://www.news18.com/amp/news/india/with-ten-times-the-usual-rain-mumbai-heads-towards-imminent-flood-1504367.html)
Title: Re: Floods
Post by: AbruptSLR on August 31, 2017, 05:33:18 PM
The linked Scribbler article discusses how currently 42 million people in South Asia are being negatively impacted by flooding:

Title: "Half a World Away From Harvey, Global Warming Fueled Deluges Now Impact 42 Million People"

https://robertscribbler.com/2017/08/30/half-a-world-away-from-harvey-global-warming-fueled-deluges-now-impact-42-million-people/

Extract: "Rising sea surface temperatures in South Asia led to more moisture in the atmosphere, providing this year’s monsoon with its ammunition for torrential rainfall. — The Pacific Standard
While flooding is common in the region, climate change has spurred dramatic weather patterns, greatly exacerbating the damage. As sea temperatures warm, moisture increases, a dynamic also at play in the record-setting rainfall in Texas. — Think Progress"
Title: Re: Floods
Post by: Sigmetnow on September 01, 2017, 01:38:49 PM
A third of Bangladesh under water as flood devastation widens
Quote
As the world's media trains its sights on the tragic events in Texas and Louisiana, another water-driven catastrophe is unfolding in villages like Beraberi throughout Bangladesh and parts of Nepal and India.

There, the International Federation of Red Cross and Red Crescent Societies (IFRC) estimates that at least 1,200 have died and more than 41 million people have been affected by monsoon rains and severe flooding as of June this year. The rains are now moving northwest towards Pakistan, where more devastation is expected.

At its peak on August 11, almost a week's worth of average monsoon rainfall was dumped across parts of Bangladesh in the space of one day, according to the country's Meteorological Department, forcing villagers throughout northern areas to grab what few possessions they could carry and flee their homes in search of higher ground.

And still the rains keep coming. In Bangladesh alone, floods have so far claimed the lives of 142 people, and impacted over 8.5 million.
https://amp.cnn.com/cnn/2017/09/01/asia/bangladesh-south-asia-floods/index.html
Title: Re: Floods
Post by: Sigmetnow on September 02, 2017, 06:10:25 PM
Over 100 000 flee their homes after heavy rains, flooding in Nigeria
Quote
... Benue state, which is heavily reliant on its agricultural sector, has suffered repeated floods in recent years, caused by heavy rains and the opening of dams in neighbouring Cameroon.

In 2012, Nigeria suffered disastrous floods across 30 of its 36 states. Hundreds of people died, and some two million people were left homeless.
http://www.news24.com/Africa/News/over-100-000-flee-their-homes-after-heavy-rains-flooding-in-nigeria-20170901 (http://www.news24.com/Africa/News/over-100-000-flee-their-homes-after-heavy-rains-flooding-in-nigeria-20170901)
Title: Re: Floods
Post by: Sigmetnow on September 19, 2017, 09:53:52 PM
Have you 'seen' the onset/return of the Indian monsoon? Viz based on a 36y dataset on #Google #EarthEngine. Also see https://mobile.twitter.com/birdcountindia/status/909746515681226752

https://twitter.com/mdmadhusudan/status/909970111582187520
GIF of typical progession of seasonal monsoon rains at the links.
Title: Re: Floods
Post by: bligh8 on September 27, 2017, 04:07:55 AM
18 Major Flood Events Have Hit Texas, Louisiana, Oklahoma, Arkansas Since March 2015
 August 16 2016 01:45 PM EDTweather.com
By Jon Erdman
Harvey Pushed Down Parts of Texas
00:38
Harvey Pushed Down Parts of Texas
The weight of Hurricane Harvey's flood water was so great that it actually sank the crust on which it sat in some parts of southeastern Texas, according to a NASA earthquake scientist.
At a Glance
A corridor from Texas and Louisiana to Missouri has been hammered with major flood events since spring 2015.
The billion-dollar Louisiana flood is just the latest such event.
A massive flood swamped parts of southern and eastern Louisiana in August 2016, the latest in a string of more than a dozen flood events that have affected parts of Texas, Oklahoma, Louisiana, Arkansas and Missouri since March 2015.

The most recent event from a swath of up to 31 inches of rain in just two days' time flooded tens of thousands of homes, led to at least 20,000 rescues and also triggered significant flooding in parts of southeast Missouri and southern Illinois.

(RECAPS: Record Rain, Flooding in Louisiana | Likely a Billion-Dollar Disaster)


Rankings of wettest 12-month periods on record ending August 14, 2016 in the southern U.S. A ranking of "2" means it was the second wettest August 15 - August 14 period on record.
(Southeast Regional Climate Center)
Over a 12-month period ending Aug. 14, 2016, Baton Rouge, Louisiana (98.83 inches), and Bergstrom Airport near Austin, Texas (67.86 inches) had their wettest Aug. 15-Aug. 14 12-month period on record, according to the Southeast Regional Climate Center.

The six-month period from March-August 2015 was record wet in parts of Oklahoma.

Only a flash drought kicking in late in the summer in parts of Texas, Louisiana and Arkansas kept it from ranking similar wet in those locations during that same time.

An analysis by FEMA and NOAA/NCEI from 1996-2013 found parts of Texas northeastward through Arkansas and Missouri average one to five flood events yearly.

In just under 18 months, however, the number, extremity and widespread nature of flood events has been incredible in this region.

Here are some of the most notable flood events that have swamped this area since March 2015. Some are more localized, some more widespread.

Mid-Late March 2015
March 12: Streets closed, cars stalled in high water in Shreveport and Bossier City, Louisiana.
March 21: Stalled front lead to training storms near the Texas, southwest Louisiana coast. Numerous cars stalled in high water in Jefferson County, Texas.
April 16-18, 2015
Wall collapsed at recreation building at Sam Houston State University in Huntsville, Texas.
At least 65 homes flooded in Houston.
FULL RECAP

Flood damage to the Recreational Sports Center at Sam Houston State University in Huntsville, Texas, on April 16, 2015.
(Sam Houston State University)
Late April 2015
Roads washed out near Rio Vista, Texas.
Water several feet deep in downtown Waxahachie, Texas, businesses.
Water rescues in San Antonio metro.
Epic May 2015
May 6-7: Record wet May day in Oklahoma City; DeWitt, Nebraska evacuated, flooded.
May 18: Water 10-12 feet deep in San Angelo. Airport closed.
Record, catastrophic flood of Blanco River at Wimberley, Texas May 24.
Considered worst flooding, by some, in Houston on May 25-26 since Allison.
May 28: Homes flooded in Shallowater, Texas and UMC hospital flooded in Lubbock.
May 29: Water rescues in parts of Dallas-Ft. Worth metroplex.
Wettest month on record in Texas and Oklahoma.
FULL RECAP
Tropical Storm Bill: June 2015
At least one location in eight states saw four inches or more rainfall from Bill, including Arkansas, Illinois, Indiana, Louisiana, Missouri, Ohio, Oklahoma and Texas.
Severe flooding in Ardmore, Oklahoma.
Record river flooding on Washita River at Dickson, Oklahoma, West Mustang Creek near Ganado, Texas, the Lavaca River near Edna, Texas, and the James River near Springfield, Missouri.
FULL RECAP

Water pours over Turner Falls and floods the park below on Thursday, June 18, 2015, in Davis, Oklahoma.
(Steve Sisney/The Oklahoman via AP)
Early July 2015
July 7: Wettest day on record in Abilene, Texas (8.26 inches). Major flooding, water rescues throughout the city and also in San Angelo, Texas.
Roaring Fork State Park near Cassville, Missouri, flooded.
July 8: Flooding prompted evacuations in Muskogee, Oklahoma.
Flooding also stretched into parts of Kentucky and Indiana.
FULL RECAP

Cars swept into a pile by flooding in Branson, Missouri, on July 7, 2015.
(Sierra Dobson)
August 31, 2015
One to four feet of water inundated much of Brownsville, Texas.
Numerous vehicles and dozens of properties were flooded.
October 8-9, 2015
Deadly flash flooding swamps Eagle Pass, Texas.
Two were killed, 60 left homeless.
The city reported 90 water rescues ongoing at one time during the flood.
Patricia's Ghost: October 21-25, 2015
Leftover upper-level energy and moisture from eastern Pacific Hurricane Patricia contributed to massive flooding in much of Texas and parts of Louisiana, Oklahoma, Arkansas, and Mississippi.
Over 20 inches of rain swamped Corsicana, Texas, inundating a stretch of Interstate 45.
Over 100 roads damaged or washed out in Navarro County, Texas.
Flash flooding also in Austin and Houston.
Fourth wettest calendar day on record in New Orleans (8.67 inches on October 25).
RECAPS: Weather Roundup | Impacts

A sampling of total rainfall reports from Tuesday, October 20, 2015 through Monday October 26, 2015.
Halloween Deluge
Second wettest calendar day on record in Austin, Texas. Flooding prompted the tower at Austin-Bergstrom Int'l Airport to close. Nearly 600 homes flooded in Travis County.
The Blanco River flooded both San Marcos and Wimberley, Texas, just five months after the destructive Memorial Day flood.
Interstate 45 was once again flooded near Corsicana, Texas.
Lake Mexia, Texas, rose to 4 feet above normal pool, prompting evacuations.
Parts of the Houston metro picked up over 12 inches of rain.
At least 20 homes were flooded in Grant Parish, Louisiana.
RECAPS: Weather Stats | Impacts
November 2015
Yet again, water rescues on Interstate 45 in Navarro County, Texas on November 6.
November 17: Water rescues in Nacogdoches, Texas; washouts in Hudson and Pollock, Texas, high water in a North Shreveport neighborhood; washouts in Sharp County, Arkansas.
November 27: More flooding in north Texas, including the Dallas-Ft. Worth metro, Johnson County, Texas; Major flooding on Trinity River at Dallas.
Wettest November on record in Arkansas; second wettest November in Oklahoma.
RECAP: Late November South Flood

Selected rainfall totals at regularly reporting observation sites from 6 a.m. CST Wednesday, Nov. 25 to 6 p.m. CST Sunday, Nov. 29, 2015.
December Mississippi River Flood
Record flood crests in Okahoma, Missouri, and Illinois, including along the Mississippi River in Cape Girardeau, Missouri.
24-mile stretch of Interstate 44 closed due to flooding southwest of St. Louis.
Bonnet Carre Spillway activated to divert excess Mississippi River water away from New Orleans.
FULL RECAP

Before/after images of Interstate 44 flooded in Valley Park, Missouri, in December 2015.
(AP Photo/Jeff Roberson and Google Earth)
March 2016 Flooding in Arkansas, Louisiana, Mississippi, Tennessee, Texas
The top rainfall total from this multi-day heavy rain event March 8-11 was just shy of 27 inches south-southeast of Monroe, Louisiana. The official airport reporting station in Monroe picked up 20.66 inches of rain.
A least nine locations saw record crests on various rivers and bayous.
The Sabine River at Deweyville, Texas, crested at 33.24 feet on March 15, topping the unofficial May 1884 record of 32.2 feet, due to previous record releases from Toledo Bend Reservoir well upstream. At those levels, the town of Deweyville was isolated, with numerous homes flooded and widespread, catastrophic flooding.
RECAPS: Weather Notables | Extreme Weather Pattern

Rainfall is estimated from March 7-12, 2016. The heaviest totals, generally in excess of 6 inches, fell in the areas shaded in yellow. River/areal flood warnings on March 12, 2016 shown by green polygons.
April 2016 Houston "Tax Day" Flood
10-20 inches of rain over the north and west sides of the Houston metro, not far from where the May 2016 heavy rain swath was.
Over 6 inches of rain in parts of Kansas, Louisiana, Nebraska and Oklahoma.
April 18: Second wettest calendar day on record for any official Houston area reporting station (9.92 inches at Bush Intercontinental Airport).
Also, second wettest April day on record in Shreveport just over a month after their epic March flood.
Major flooding on the Colorado River at Columbus, the Navidad River at Sublime, Spring Creek near Spring, and Cypress Creek near Cypress.
RECAPS: Weather Notables | Impacts
Late April 2016 Deadly Palestine, Texas, Flash Flood
Just under 8 inches of rain triggered deadly flash flooding in Palestine, Texas, on April 29.
Five family members were swept away by floodwaters and drowned. Water reportedly reached the roof top of the home.
Two vehicles in Lake Charles, Louisiana were swept away, and several cars were submerged on Interstate 49 near Carencro, Louisiana. Water reportedly entered homes in that area, as well.
Water rescues were also performed in Lewisville, Arkansas, and homes in Gin City, Arkansas, took on water.
RECAP: Impacts

48-hour estimated rainfall ending 7 a.m. CT, Saturday, April 30, 2016 (contours) and reports of flooding (blue icons) April 29-30, 2016.
May 16, 2016: Corpus Christi, Texas
Locally over a foot of rain triggered flash flooding early on May 16.
Numerous water rescues were performed.
Water was reportedly over the roofs of cars on the city's southeast side.
Residents of Ingleside had to be rescued from their homes.
RECAP: Impacts, Photos
Late May-Early June 2016 Flood Siege
A parade of thunderstorm clusters across central and southeast Texas on May 26-27 laid down a swath of 10-20 inches of rain from just southeast of the city of Austin to the far northern suburbs of Houston.
An observer east of Brenham, Texas, measured an incredible 20.50 inches of rain on May 27, alone, the wettest day on record, there dating to 1897.
Austin-Bergstrom Airport picked up 8.79 inches of rain the previous day, their second wettest calendar day dating to 1942. Amazingly, their wettest day was just about seven months prior, when 12.49 inches of rain on October 30, 2015 prompted the airport tower to close.
The Brazos River at Richmond (near Rosenberg) crested on June 2, 4.4 feet above its previous record set on Oct. 21, 1994.
Several locations in the far northern suburbs of Houston flooded in April and again in late May 2016.
Some rivers in southeast Texas, including Spring Creek, the San Jacinto, and Trinity Rivers, also flooded one year ago almost to the day of this late May/early June flood. In most of these cases, flood crests topped those from May 2015.
Nine soldiers stationed at Ft. Hood, Texas, were killed when their truck was washed away by flooding during a training exercise.
RECAPS: Weather Notables | Impacts, Photos

Before (May 4, 2013) and after (May 28, 2016) Landsat 8 imagery of the flooded Brazos River Valley west of Monaville, Texas.
(NASA Earth Observatory)
Jonathan Erdman is a senior meteorologist at weather.com and has been an incurable weather geek since a tornado narrowly missed his childhood home in Wisconsin at age 7.

 
 

 

MORE ON WEATHER.COM: Louisiana Flood of August 2016 (PHOTOS)


1 / 350
Daniel Stover, 17, moves a boat of personal belongings from a friend's home flooded home in Sorrento, La., Saturday, Aug. 20, 2016. Louisiana continues to dig itself out from devastating floods, with search parties going door to door looking for survivors or bodies trapped by flooding.

click on picture to see flood results
Title: Re: Floods
Post by: Sigmetnow on September 27, 2017, 02:58:02 PM
Flood planning -- or lack thereof -- for Washington, D.C.

“When the big storm hits D.C., the resulting disaster may not kill as many as Katrina, or flood as much physical real estate as Harvey, but the toll it takes on American institutions will be unfathomable. The storm will paralyze many of the agencies that operate and defend the nation, raising the specter of national-security threats.”

What Happens When a Superstorm Hits D.C.?
A major hurricane could paralyze the government and jeopardize national security. Why is the capital so unprepared?
http://www.rollingstone.com/politics/news/what-happens-when-a-superstorm-hits-dc-w504341 (http://www.rollingstone.com/politics/news/what-happens-when-a-superstorm-hits-dc-w504341)
Title: Re: Floods
Post by: Sigmetnow on September 27, 2017, 07:18:19 PM
What would an entirely flood-proof city look like?

The wetter the better. From sponge cities in China to ‘berms with benefits’ in New Jersey and floating container classrooms in the slums of Dhaka, we look at a range of projects that treat storm water as a resource rather than a hazard
https://www.theguardian.com/cities/2017/sep/25/what-flood-proof-city-china-dhaka-houston#img-1 (https://www.theguardian.com/cities/2017/sep/25/what-flood-proof-city-china-dhaka-houston#img-1)
Title: Re: Floods
Post by: AbruptSLR on September 30, 2017, 07:20:12 PM
The linked reference uses New Orleans as a 'canary in a coal mine' to evaluate coastal flooding risk associated with deep uncertainties from abrupt ice mass loss from the WAIS, and they find that for the next fifty years the biggest risks come from increased storm surge from more frequent strong hurricanes (see Hansen's 'Storms of My Grandchildren'); however, this research does not evaluate the risks of flooding from increased hurricane rainfall such as occurred during Hurricane Harvey:

Tony E. Wong & Klaus Keller (20 September 2017), "Deep Uncertainty Surrounding Coastal Flood Risk Projections: A Case Study for New Orleans", Earth's Future, DOI: 10.1002/2017EF000607

http://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/10.1002/2017EF000607/abstract (http://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/10.1002/2017EF000607/abstract)

Abstract: "Future sea-level rise drives severe risks for many coastal communities. Strategies to manage these risks hinge on a sound characterization of the uncertainties. For example, recent studies suggest that large fractions of the Antarctic ice sheet (AIS) may rapidly disintegrate in response to rising global temperatures, leading to potentially several meters of sea-level rise during the next few centuries. It is deeply uncertain, for example, whether such an AIS disintegration will be triggered, how much this would increase sea-level rise, whether extreme storm surges intensify in a warming climate, or which emissions pathway future societies will choose. Here, we assess the impacts of these deep uncertainties on projected flooding probabilities for a levee ring in New Orleans, Louisiana. We use 18 scenarios, presenting probabilistic projections within each one, to sample key deeply uncertain future projections of sea-level rise, radiative forcing pathways, storm surge characterization, and contributions from rapid AIS mass loss. The implications of these deep uncertainties for projected flood risk are thus characterized by a set of 18 probability distribution functions. We use a global sensitivity analysis to assess which mechanisms contribute to uncertainty in projected flood risk over the course of a 50-year design life. In line with previous work, we find that the uncertain storm surge drives the most substantial risk, followed by general AIS dynamics, in our simple model for future flood risk for New Orleans."
Title: Re: Floods
Post by: sidd on October 12, 2017, 10:51:00 PM
FEMA seriously behind on revising floodplain maps:

"The Federal Emergency Management Agency has delayed decisions on flood zone determinations — in some cases by two years or more — and currently has more than 240 mapping projects on hold, the department's inspector general warned in a report dated Sept. 27.

As a result, only 42 percent of FEMA’s flood risk database is currently up to date, meaning more than half of the country’s flood map miles need to be revised, the review found. The agency’s stated goal is to have 80 percent of its flood maps current."

Some of the reasons are  political: homeowners shriek a lot when the floodplain is revised to include their own house ... on the other hand the insurance industry has clout and wants to raise flood risk insurance premiums if they are to stay in the market.

http://thehill.com/video/354564-in-aftermath-of-hurricanes-femas-slow-flood-mapping-leaves-homeowners-vulnerable (http://thehill.com/video/354564-in-aftermath-of-hurricanes-femas-slow-flood-mapping-leaves-homeowners-vulnerable)

sidd
Title: Re: Floods
Post by: Alexander555 on October 14, 2017, 06:30:43 AM
https://watchers.news/2017/10/13/costa-rica-floods-500000-without-drinking-water/
Title: Re: Floods
Post by: Alexander555 on October 27, 2017, 06:21:54 PM
4,9 feet of hail in 15 minutes

https://watchers.news/2017/10/27/extreme-hail-accumulations-in-cordoba-argentina/
Title: Re: Floods
Post by: Alexander555 on November 04, 2017, 12:25:24 PM
https://watchers.news/2017/11/04/deadly-monsoon-rains-hit-chennai-74-of-average-seasonal-rain-in-8-days/
Title: Re: Floods
Post by: Sigmetnow on November 26, 2017, 06:54:49 PM
Washington state, U.S.:  Communities along the Skagit River are seeing this week the highest levels of flooding since 2006, according to the National Weather Service.

Skagit River flooding causes evacuations, road closures
Quote
What the Northwest River Forecast Center initially forecast Tuesday as minor flooding became major flooding throughout the county on Thanksgiving.  National Weather Service hydrologist Brent Bower said the agency is reviewing its model to figure out why the flooding was higher than anticipated.

It’s possible that rain and snowmelt combined, leading to a larger event.  “Rain on snow is not going to be the cause of a flood, but the snowmelt we get can contribute,” Bower said.

Following heavy rain early in the week, Wednesday brought record warm temperatures that reached 68 degrees in Seattle and Bellingham.  “There was at least a 36-hour period that was warmer than normal, maybe the warmest ever,” Bower said.  That may have melted some low elevation snow. ...
https://www.goskagit.com/news/skagit-river-flooding-causes-evacuations-road-closures/article_dd41574e-24a3-5be7-80c6-d42d275b1c02.html
Title: Re: Floods
Post by: Sigmetnow on December 23, 2017, 05:29:48 PM
Phillippines:

“Many people were swept to the sea as flood waters quickly rose due to the high tide,” Manuel Luis Ochotorena, a disaster agency official, said. “They never heeded the warnings. They thought it was a weak storm but it dumped more rains.”

https://www.reuters.com/article/us-asia-storm-philippines/more-than-100-dead-in-philippine-mudslides-flooding-officials-idUSKBN1EH05A
Title: Re: Floods
Post by: Paddy on December 24, 2017, 12:30:28 AM
Phillippines:

“Many people were swept to the sea as flood waters quickly rose due to the high tide,” Manuel Luis Ochotorena, a disaster agency official, said. “They never heeded the warnings. They thought it was a weak storm but it dumped more rains.”

https://www.reuters.com/article/us-asia-storm-philippines/more-than-100-dead-in-philippine-mudslides-flooding-officials-idUSKBN1EH05A

The death toll is now over 180, with 160 more people missing https://www.theguardian.com/world/2017/dec/23/dozens-killed-in-philippine-mudslides-and-floods-as-storm-hits
Title: Re: Floods
Post by: Bruce Steele on January 09, 2018, 04:57:10 PM
With the first rains following the Thomas fire, 2-5 inches overnight, there are debris flows in Montecito.
Three mansions where swept off their footings , several people were caught in the mud and needed rescue , and a natural gas line broke resulting in a couple houses burned. These are problems to be expected in the aftermath of California wildfires . We need the rain and these issues will repeat until something green sprouts on the hillsides.

https://www.noozhawk.com/article/flash_flood_warnings_issued_for_thomas_whittier_and_alamo_burn_areas
Title: Re: Floods
Post by: Sigmetnow on January 09, 2018, 05:10:11 PM
"In some spots, fire burned with such extreme intensity that it incinerated all vegetation and 'cooked' the soil underneath.  It's those really high-intensity burn patches, plus those occurring on steep slopes, that will have the greatest potential for debris flows and flash flooding."

AFTER AN EPIC FIRE, SOUTHERN CALIFORNIA IS NOW FACING AN EPIC FLOOD
Mudslides, waterspouts, and flash flooding are expected in already hard-hit areas.
https://psmag.com/environment/southern-california-is-now-facing-an-epic-flood
Title: Re: Floods
Post by: Bruce Steele on January 09, 2018, 09:01:59 PM
From the pictures on the local T.V. news Montecito took a very big economic hit last night. The Montecito Inn took several feet of water from a debris flow. For anyone who has been there the Montecito Inn is downtown , right by the 101 freeway. The 101 is just a mess. There were areas where five to six feet of mud flows and debris sweep through residences and businesses.
 The evacuation notices for Montecito weren't as successful as the fire evacuations had been. There have been five fatalities and there may be more.
 There aren't more storms in the immediate forecast, the low is currently sitting directly over S.B. and moving off to the Southeast. Tomorrow will be nice but this is going to take days to clear the debris off the highway and from city streets. I am calling billions$  in damages . This is just the start of the rain season and there is the very real possibility this can happen again over the next month.
https://mobile.twitter.com/TheEllenShow/status/950807626509574144?ref_src=twsrc%5Egoogle%7Ctwcamp%5Eserp%7Ctwgr%5Etweet
Title: Re: Floods
Post by: Sigmetnow on January 09, 2018, 09:39:04 PM
At least 5 dead as heavy rains trigger flooding, mudflows and freeway closures across Southern California
http://www.latimes.com/local/lanow/la-me-ln-rainfall-mudflow-20180109-story.html
Article includes video.
Title: Re: Floods
Post by: Sigmetnow on January 10, 2018, 04:13:09 AM
Unbelievable devastation... this is a drive westbound on Olive Mill Rd from Hot Springs in #Montecito. The lake at the end is the 101 [highway]. #Ventura
https://twitter.com/GadiNBC/status/950904876539588608
Video at the link.
Title: Re: Floods
Post by: Sigmetnow on January 10, 2018, 04:53:36 PM
Repeated wildfires taught Californians to heed fire evacuation orders. But the acceptance isn’t there yet for floods. 

The county initially ordered 7,000 residents to evacuate and urged another 23,000 to do so voluntarily, but only 10 to 15 percent complied with mandatory orders.

California mudslide death toll up to 15 as rescues continue
http://www.nasdaq.com/article/california-mudslide-death-toll-up-to-15-as-rescues-continue-20180110-00631
Title: Re: Floods
Post by: Tor Bejnar on January 10, 2018, 07:37:18 PM
I wonder how many of the deaths occurred in evacuation zones.  I read somewhere that the heaviest rains weren't where they were expected.
Title: Re: Floods
Post by: TerryM on January 10, 2018, 08:09:04 PM
From the pictures on the local T.V. news Montecito took a very big economic hit last night. The Montecito Inn took several feet of water from a debris flow. For anyone who has been there the Montecito Inn is downtown , right by the 101 freeway. The 101 is just a mess. There were areas where five to six feet of mud flows and debris sweep through residences and businesses.
 The evacuation notices for Montecito weren't as successful as the fire evacuations had been. There have been five fatalities and there may be more.
 There aren't more storms in the immediate forecast, the low is currently sitting directly over S.B. and moving off to the Southeast. Tomorrow will be nice but this is going to take days to clear the debris off the highway and from city streets. I am calling billions$  in damages . This is just the start of the rain season and there is the very real possibility this can happen again over the next month.
https://mobile.twitter.com/TheEllenShow/status/950807626509574144?ref_src=twsrc%5Egoogle%7Ctwcamp%5Eserp%7Ctwgr%5Etweet (https://mobile.twitter.com/TheEllenShow/status/950807626509574144?ref_src=twsrc%5Egoogle%7Ctwcamp%5Eserp%7Ctwgr%5Etweet)
For the life of me I can't recall Montecito, but the video's show devastation.
I suppose LA north traffic is now limited to I-5, the most boring drive on the planet.


Until something sets some deep roots we're going to see mud slides every time it rains.


Stay safe
Terry
Title: Re: Floods
Post by: Bruce Steele on January 10, 2018, 08:41:34 PM
There isn't information on where the mortalities occurred. Voluntary and mandatory evacuations covered the vast majority of the flooded parts of Montecito and the vast majority of residents ignored warnings.
 The rain total was only slightly over two inches in Montecito. We sometimes will get 9 inches in a 24 hour period. The rain that occurred on the hills was totally expected.The problem was there haven't been any rains to get anything green started on the hills.
The fire burned extremely hot and burnt into the soil. Soil doesn't absorb water when it is in this condition.
 These flooding issues will repeat when we get the next slug of rain. The next time the evacuation orders go out they will be complied with. Same thing with warnings about climate change. After we are deep in trouble people will react but probably they won't react in ways adequate to meet the challenge.
Montecito will rebuild. They will rebuild in the same flood corridors that were just washed out. The real estate is just too valuable . Same thing with climate disasters. We will rebuild, the disasters will just repeat. When the money runs out we will get responses commensurate to the threats. Move away from the threats, downsize, grown your own food, become self sufficient. Last thing on the minds of Montecito residents. 
Title: Re: Floods
Post by: aperson on January 10, 2018, 09:09:57 PM
I can't imagine NWS and EMS whiffed on evac notices for this one. The threat was obvious and well modeled several days out.
Title: Re: Floods
Post by: Tor Bejnar on January 10, 2018, 09:45:03 PM
"Move away from the threats, ... grown your own food, ... "
What, and get my nails dirty?   :D

"Voluntary and mandatory evacuations covered the vast majority of the flooded parts of Montecito"
Thanks for this info.
Title: Re: Floods
Post by: gerontocrat on January 10, 2018, 10:34:12 PM
"Move away from the threats, ... grown your own food, ... "
What, and get my nails dirty?   :D

"Voluntary and mandatory evacuations covered the vast majority of the flooded parts of Montecito"
Thanks for this info.
There are 7,000 (?) people in Montecito, mostly very well-off, rich, or humungously rich. Suddenly living the California dream has turned into a nightmare - twice.

Neighbours have lost their lives and mega-dwellings, many have inches or feet of mud and boulders on their manicured lawns (including Oprah). They may have to leave their homes for months or forever.

They have influence in both Democratic and Republican parties. It could make a difference on the environment agenda, or perhaps not.

We will see.
Title: Re: Floods
Post by: Bruce Steele on January 11, 2018, 02:59:45 AM
I think the single most important point getting little attention is that the hills above Montecito haven't burned in a hundred years. There are parts of the city that were built in flood plains and nobody seemed to realize the risks. Anyone who looks at the rounded boulders that are scattered around town can tell these are stream rounded. The mountains have delivered these boulders for hundreds of thousands of years. We just got the combination of fire and rain that triggers debris flows. This doesn't qualify as climate change, it's just a lack of planning and some tough luck. Stupidity will be when they reissue the building permits to repeat the dumb ass planning that allowed this nonsense in the first place. Clue to planners, bad s... happens when you ignor the obvious.
There are plenty of parallels with other issues like rising CO2 levels. Ignor and repeat until the wheels come off.
Title: Re: Floods
Post by: Bernard on January 11, 2018, 12:10:47 PM
I looked for geological background and map of the Santa Barbara region. A good overview can be found at https://pubs.er.usgs.gov/publication/sim3001.
Mentions the seismic risks, of course, and this :
"In addition, numerous Quaternary landslide deposits along the steep southern flank of the Santa Ynez Mountains indicate the potential for continued slope failures and mass movements in developed areas."
The boulders mentioned by Bruce certainly come from those. Very heterogeneous material, easily put into movement.
Title: Re: Floods
Post by: gerontocrat on January 11, 2018, 02:20:42 PM
I disagree with Bruce Steele that climate change had nothing to do with the mudslides in SoCal.

Yes,the geology is set up for landslips.
Yes, urban planning ignores nature.
And yes, a combination of drought with fires followed by a dump of rain was a fatal combination.

But - climate change has lead to a great lengthening of the wildfire season, i.e. the chances of misadventure have increased.
Title: Re: Floods
Post by: Bruce Steele on January 11, 2018, 03:03:59 PM
It was just dumb luck that the hills above Montecito hadn't burned in such a long time. Most of the rest of the Santa Ynez mountains have had multiple fires over that time period. I think if you were to look back over the last few thousand years you would see many extended droughts in the Southwestern U.S. Any extended drought is going to increase the risk of wildfires and even drought years can produce 2-4 inch rain events. So the debris flows could have been triggered by the same conditions that caused this event had the hills burned fifty years ago rather than last month. Ventura and Santa Barbara counties are 7 or 8 years into a drought that could extend much futher. Yes the extra heat of global warming contributes to faster desiccation of plant life and yes December fires seem anomalous but a Sept. fire and zero rains until January would result in the same preconditions that resulted in the debris flows.
 The fact that people ignored the risks is what caused the lost of life, the property damage was inevitable due to bad planning. Here is a link to warnings that went out before the minor rain event.
Maps on the link clearly show the creeks that carried the debris flows.

  https://www.edhat.com/news/map-released-of-flood-and-debris-flow-areas

Title: Re: Floods
Post by: Daniel B. on January 11, 2018, 04:30:30 PM
I tend to agree with Bruce Steele.  Poor urban planning appears to have been a bigger influence on the mudslides.  Additionally, a lack of fire, not lengthened fire season has been a bigger factor.
Title: Re: Floods
Post by: Sigmetnow on January 13, 2018, 07:36:22 PM
“Slider” comparison photos; maps.

Before and after the mudslides in Montecito, California
https://www.washingtonpost.com/graphics/2018/national/montecito-before-after/
Title: Re: Floods
Post by: Sigmetnow on January 15, 2018, 01:03:19 AM
Mud, darkness and destruction turned Montecito into death trap
Quote
The realization that houses might simply vanish didn’t start to set in until a 30-foot tree trunk barreled by.

Trina Grokenberger stared out the upstairs window of her white Colonial house Tuesday morning, as a river raged through her front yard.

It was 3:58 a.m.

“Dave!” she called to her husband. “We can’t leave now, right? That’s all trees coming down the driveway.”

Their white Land Rover was parked below, with the suitcase they had packed.

They knew they were in a voluntary evacuation zone and that officials had warned of possible flooding and debris flows. In December they left for five days under a mandatory evacuation during the Thomas fire. Now the word “voluntary” had given them a false sense of comfort.
...
http://www.latimes.com/local/california/la-me-montecito-mudslides-20180114-story.html
Title: Re: Floods
Post by: oren on January 15, 2018, 08:54:55 AM
Horrifying.
Title: Re: Floods
Post by: Sigmetnow on January 27, 2018, 06:08:13 PM
 Happening now.

Paris is on high alert as the River Seine continued to surge even higher after non-stop rain in the French capital
Quote
The Seine is expected to hit a peak of six metres over the weekend with riverside households and businesses readying themselves should the river fully burst its banks.

Continuous, heavy rainfall in the city has led the Seine and Marne rivers to rise and approach record level, while rats are being flushed out of sewers in many parts of the capital.

Videos posted online have shown giant rodents scampering through the streets and climbing into rubbish bins and one French photographer captured a group of rats scurrying around outside Notre Dame cathedral. ...
https://www.standard.co.uk/news/world/paris-floods-french-capital-remains-on-alert-as-river-seine-surges-even-higher-a3751171.html
Title: Re: Floods
Post by: Sigmetnow on January 28, 2018, 04:16:30 PM
Paris floods as the river Seine overflows and engulfs riverside walkways
Quote
Ms Hidalgo said waters were expected to peak in the city on Saturday (local time), adding the flood was less significant than that in 2016, which was described as some of the worst flooding in a century.

"Currently we are at 5.71 metres and we should peak between 5.8 and 6 metres maximum," she said.

"The water levels in 2016 reached 6.10 metres, so a little less considerable but nevertheless very impacting, particularly for economic activities linked to the river."

Ms Hidalgo said the situation was being monitored and would continue to worry about the situation into next week as more rainfall is expected.
http://www.abc.net.au/news/2018-01-28/heavy-rain-causes-floods-in-paris/9368320
Title: Re: Floods
Post by: Alexander555 on February 04, 2018, 04:25:49 PM
https://watchers.news/2018/02/04/massive-floods-hit-argentina-as-pilcomayo-river-reaches-record-highs/
Title: Re: Floods
Post by: Alexander555 on February 07, 2018, 11:28:01 AM
https://watchers.news/2018/02/06/deadly-floods-and-landslides-hit-indonesia-after-extreme-rainfall/
Title: Re: Floods
Post by: Alexander555 on February 20, 2018, 06:59:09 PM
https://watchers.news/2018/02/20/broome-hit-by-two-years-worth-of-rain-in-two-months-western-australia/
Title: Re: Floods
Post by: Alexander555 on February 21, 2018, 06:03:33 PM
And plenty more to come. And this is going to get much worse in the next years.

https://watchers.news/2018/02/21/widespread-flooding-hits-us-south-and-midwest-excessive-rain-continues/
Title: Re: Floods
Post by: sidd on February 21, 2018, 08:51:31 PM
Ohio river flooding Cinci (and other places) again.

https://www.cincinnati.com/story/news/2018/02/20/24-floodgates-protect-cincinnati-and-northern-kentucky-these-5-currently-closed/356089002/


Lots of snow melted recently in that watershed.

sidd
Title: Re: Floods
Post by: Sigmetnow on February 24, 2018, 04:34:46 PM
Queensland weather: Heavy rain eases across south-east, disaster package announced
Quote
Some drenched Brisbane suburbs exceeded the average monthly rainfall for February in just 24 hours, BOM forecaster David Crock said.

"The average in February is just shy of 160mm so some suburbs have gotten very close to their average in a day and Brisbane after today will have well over the monthly average in terms of rainfall," he said.

Many areas of the Gold Coast recorded heavy downpours, with Lower Springbrook recording 204mm since 9:00am yesterday, 164mm falling at the Gold Coast seaway and 156mm at Molendinar.
...
In the Gold Coast hinterland, Little Nerang Dam — which recorded falls of 181mm — was spilling water on Saturday morning, prompting Seqwater to warn about hazards downstream.
...
A state and federal government disaster package will be set up for central Queensland communities pounded by storms earlier this week, with the damage bill potentially reaching $1 million. ...
http://www.abc.net.au/news/2018-02-24/qld-weather-more-rain-on-the-way/9480108
Title: Re: Floods
Post by: sidd on March 05, 2018, 07:03:05 AM
Wing et al. have a paper analysing flood risk in the US lower 48. Apparently 41 million are at risk rather than 13 million in current FEMA estimates.

"Our data show that the total US population exposed to serious flooding is 2.6–3.1 times higher than previous estimates, and that nearly 41 million Americans live within the 1% annual exceedance probability floodplain (compared to only 13 million when calculated using FEMA flood maps)."

"The analysis shows that 40.8 million people (13.3% of the population) are currently exposed to a 1 in 100 year (1% annual exceedance probability) fluvial or pluvial flood in the CONUS, which translates to a GDP exposure of $2.9 trillion (15.3% of total GDP)."

"This analysis indicates that previous estimates capture roughly one-third of the exposure identified in our 1 in 100 year floodplain."

doi: 10.1088/1748-9326/aaac65

Open access. Read all about it.

sidd

Title: Re: Floods
Post by: Shared Humanity on March 05, 2018, 09:39:16 PM
1 in 100 year flood plain!!!

Hell. Houston has been hit with three 500 year flood events in the past 3 years!
Title: Re: Floods
Post by: Tor Bejnar on March 06, 2018, 12:56:29 AM
Isn't everything bigger in Texas? :o ::) :P ;D
Title: Re: Floods
Post by: Sigmetnow on March 08, 2018, 08:47:44 PM
Four-minute video on the flood risk paper at the link.  The total amount at risk in 100-year floodplains is equal to 1/3 of U.S. GDP.

Quote
28 million Americans live in flood zones and don't know it, study finds
About 41 million Americans, roughly a tenth of the U.S. population, live in a 100-year floodplain, which is three times hire than the government estimates, a new study finds. The authors explain why the government maps are inadequate and how billions of dollars in property are at risk.

One big problem is that FEMA maps tend to ignore smaller streams running through populated areas, Wing said.
https://www.houstonchronicle.com/news/houston-texas/houston/amp/28-million-Americans-live-in-flood-zones-and-12732279.php
Title: Re: Floods
Post by: Sigmetnow on March 08, 2018, 10:10:08 PM
“Quietly: The Mississippi River is currently at one of the highest levels in history.
A huge diversion dam just opened in Louisiana today to take pressure of New Orleans levees.”
   https://mobile.twitter.com/ericholthaus/status/971827037148246017

Video: Bonnet Carre Spillway opens to ease flooding concerns along Mississippi River
Quote
For the fourth time since 2008, federal officials are opening the Bonnet Carre Spillway, sending cold, fresh Mississippi River water tumbling into the normally brackish Lake Pontchartrain.

This year's opening is starting small — beginning at 10 a.m. Thursday — with only eight of the spillway's 350 gates likely to be opened. More will follow as the volume of water flowing down the river increases over the next few days.

The release of water into the lake reduces pressure on the river levees in the New Orleans area.

The freshwater plume flowing into the lake will slowly push out the brackish water that normally is found in the estuary, according to John Lopez, of the Lake Pontchartrain Basin Foundation.

"After about two weeks, the whole lake will be river water," he said of the plumes, which are often visible in satellite photos. The water will bring with it some freshwater fish species, including freshwater catfish, he added.

One unwanted species that has not set up residence in the lake during past openings is invasive carp, and Lopez is hopeful that that will stay true in 2018.

"I am sure there will be some carp coming through the structure itself," he said. But as the lake's brackish water returns, it likely will make conditions hostile to carp survival, he said. One worry, though, is that the carp may settle in the freshwater bayous and rivers that flow into Lake Pontchartrain and Lake Maurepas, he said. ...
http://www.theadvocate.com/new_orleans/news/environment/article_fd800716-224e-11e8-8de5-cf14694699c4.html
Title: Re: Floods
Post by: Sigmetnow on March 10, 2018, 08:51:25 PM
Forget flood maps.  If you live anywhere in Florida, you need flood insurance, says Roy Wright, who oversees the Federal Emergency Management Agency’s National Flood Insurance Program,

America’s flood insurance chief has a message for all Floridians: You’re at risk
http://www.miamiherald.com/news/weather/hurricane/article203631769.html
Title: Re: Floods
Post by: Shared Humanity on March 11, 2018, 12:44:41 AM
Forget flood insurance.  If you live anywhere in Florida, you need to move. ;) ;)
Title: Re: Floods
Post by: Sigmetnow on March 17, 2018, 06:40:58 PM
TAMING THE MIGHTY MISSISSIPPI
A picaresque tour of infrastructure reveals a struggle for control all along America’s great river, full of questions about what it once was, doubts about what it will become and who will pay for any of it. https://www.washingtonpost.com/graphics/2018/national/mississippi-river-infrastructure/
Title: Re: Floods
Post by: Alexander555 on March 18, 2018, 02:44:27 PM
https://watchers.news/2018/03/18/widespread-floods-hit-kenya-at-least-19-killed-and-scores-injured/
Title: Re: Floods
Post by: Alexander555 on March 20, 2018, 07:10:34 PM
That's a flood.

https://watchers.news/2018/03/20/very-intense-storm-turns-streets-of-belo-horizonte-into-raging-rivers-brazil/
Title: Re: Floods
Post by: Sigmetnow on March 22, 2018, 02:02:52 PM
U.S.:

“Buried in the craziness of the Trump news cycle is the fact that the National Flood Insurance Program expires on Friday.
My forthcoming @PSJ_Editor article on NFIP explains the fraught politics of this important but troubled policy:”  https://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/10.1111/psj.12189

     https://twitter.com/LoganRStrother/status/976511345351774208
Title: Re: Floods
Post by: Sigmetnow on March 25, 2018, 05:13:19 PM
Houston, Texas

Canyon Gate’s dilemma lays bare a defining feature of coastal life in a time of climate change: Many of the neighborhoods where we already live should never have been built in the first place, and doubling down on reconstruction could make the consequences of the next disaster much more severe. But doubling down is what speculators do, and — at least in the short term — they are profiting from their efforts.

Houston Speculators Make a Fast Buck From Storm’s Misery
A new economy has arisen in the suburbs of Houston battered by storms: the buying and selling of flooded homes.
https://www.nytimes.com/2018/03/23/us/flooding-canyon-gate-hurricane-harvey.html
Title: Re: Floods
Post by: Sigmetnow on March 25, 2018, 09:22:27 PM
National Flood Insurance Is Underwater Because of Outdated Science
The FEMA program will continue to be financially unviable until it uses the latest research to help fix its broken system
Quote
The National Flood Insurance Program, which covers some 5.2 million property holders in the U.S., was slated to get a badly needed overhaul today. The Senate’s task—which includes hammering out reforms that address the changing math of flood risk—has already been pushed back three times since November. Yet lawmakers still have not compromised on how to fix a broken system, so a reauthorization of the NFIP will almost certainly be punted again, to July 31.
...
From Wahl’s perspective, “the biggest gap is the fact that FEMA’s maps do not connect inland flooding and coastal flooding,” he says. “FEMA creates a flat map from the river side of things and a flat map from the storm surge side of things, and they just overlay them, which assumes that these two things are completely independent. But most tropical storms bring a lot of rain and storm surges. We understand why these events happen simultaneously, but what we haven’t done is include that information into risk assessments,” Wahl notes.  ...
https://www.scientificamerican.com/article/national-flood-insurance-is-underwater-because-of-outdated-science/
Title: Re: Floods
Post by: Sigmetnow on March 26, 2018, 07:52:51 PM
Good idea.  Then a 500-year flood event won’t be quite as bad....  :-\

Underground Tunnels Proposed For Houston Flooding
Quote
The flood control district in the Houston area is considering a proposal to build massive underground tunnels to drain floodwaters from bayous across the county.

Harris County Flood Control District officials said the idea could be a bold answer following Hurricane Harvey to dramatically improve Houston’s defenses against deadly floods.

The Houston Chronicle reports that the project could cost several billion dollars and take several years to complete. It would build a network of deep tunnels to carry water from several of Houston’s waterways, so that they’d be able to keep a 100-year storm event within their banks.

Republican Rep. John Culberson of Houston said this project could be partially funded by Federal Emergency Management Agency hazard mitigation grants.

Commissioners will vote Tuesday, March 27, on whether to pursue a feasibility study to assess the tunnel proposal.
https://www.houstonpublicmedia.org/articles/news/2018/03/26/275258/underground-tunnels-proposed-for-houston-flooding/
Title: Re: Floods
Post by: Shared Humanity on March 27, 2018, 12:09:13 AM
Deep tunnels can help but it's gonna take a lot longer than several years to construct anything of consequence. Chicago began construction on a deep tunnel project in 1972. It is projected to be completed in 2029.

http://www.chicagobusiness.com/article/20140113/NEWS02/140119934/fed-settlement-deep-tunnel-to-be-done-by-2029

While the project has helped tremendously, it has not eliminated flooding.
Title: Re: Floods
Post by: Alexander555 on April 01, 2018, 09:33:01 PM
https://watchers.news/2018/04/01/china-is-building-massive-weather-modification-system-to-make-more-rain/
Title: Re: Floods
Post by: Sigmetnow on April 11, 2018, 08:44:18 PM
Gigantic water tunnels won’t save Houston from the next Harvey
Quote
Last month, Harris county officials approved more than $100,000 to study the tunnels project, which would cost billions of dollars and take years to construct. The idea has the support of the city’s Republican member of Congress and his Democratic challenger. Elon Musk also quickly chimed in his enthusiasm on behalf of his tunnel-drilling company, because of course he did. https://www.chron.com/news/politics/houston/article/Will-Elon-Musk-save-Houston-12781470.php
Quote
This philosophical clash — build tunnels or plan a careful retreat — is perhaps the first major skirmish pitting climate adaptation against climate mitigation in a major U.S. city. The outcome could set the tone for decades to come. Knowing what we know about human nature and denial, a Texas-sized arms race against the sky feels all but inevitable. ...
https://grist.org/article/gigantic-water-tunnels-wont-save-houston-from-the-next-harvey/
Title: Re: Floods
Post by: gerontocrat on April 11, 2018, 10:54:47 PM
Below is a table from Bloomberg of the 20 richest zip codes.
I wonder how many are at risk of flooding.

Title: Re: Floods
Post by: Sigmetnow on April 16, 2018, 01:04:56 AM
Hawaii.  Two feet = over 600mm.

“Unbelievable rainfall totals since midnight on Kauai’s north shore. Rain rates up to 4” [100 mm] per hour still underway per @NWSHonolulu “

“Incredible pictures coming out of Kauai’s north shore after more than two feet of rain has caused historic flooding instagram.com/p/BhmWqGAAXgH/ “
https://twitter.com/passantino/status/985640750300844032

“Radar estimated storm totals since Friday are well over two feet and it’s still coming down. Everything beyond Princeville is cut off per NWS”
More images at the link.

Edit:  update:
Kauai getting pounded again with heavy rain after Hanalei got over 27” [685mm] of rain yesterday. Life threatening flooding ongoing. #hiwx
https://twitter.com/Wxmanms1/status/985663111964319745
Radar GIF at the link.
Title: Re: Floods
Post by: Sigmetnow on April 16, 2018, 01:26:13 AM
Hawaii

“JUST IN: The second largest food pantry in the state is closed indefinitely after its warehouse was filled with two-feet of flood water. @HawaiiNewsNow ”
https://twitter.com/AllysonBlairTV/status/985649135163359232
Brief video at the link.


Edit:
Kauai has seen over two feet of rain in the last day.
Take a look at the damage here: http://www.hawaiinewsnow.com/global/slideshow.asp
#HINews #HNN


Title: Re: Floods
Post by: Sleepy on April 16, 2018, 08:22:24 AM
So, Houston is looking at building tunnels, my two brain cells stopped fighting for a while...
The same Houston with a huge population boom this century, that also brought a lot of people from New Orleans after Katrina, which also contributed to building stuff in the wrong places, dispite the threat from warmer ocean waters, that then lead to three huge floodings in 18 months, including a self sustaining Harvey? The remedy for warmer oceans, stronger storms and rising sea levels is to build tunnels?

A sudden flash of memory; an interview with Tilman Fertitta from last year. Snipping out the part that my brain still can't translate.
Title: Re: Floods
Post by: Sigmetnow on April 16, 2018, 04:02:13 PM
So, Houston is looking at building tunnels...

Tokyo built them.  Adaptation is an option.

The Underground Wonder of Tokyo
https://japangasm.wordpress.com/2012/01/12/the-underground-wonder-of-tokyo/
Title: Re: Floods
Post by: Sigmetnow on April 16, 2018, 04:15:34 PM
“Excluding tropical cyclones, individual billion-dollar flooding events in the U.S. have added up to $39 billion in losses since 2010 ...”
https://twitter.com/ClimateCentral/status/985793698763104256
Image below.

Heavy Rainfall Trends Across the U.S.
http://www.climatecentral.org/gallery/graphics/heavy-rainfall-trends-us
Title: Re: Floods
Post by: Sigmetnow on April 16, 2018, 04:17:28 PM
Hawai’i:

“#hanalei #kauai ”
https://twitter.com/madys0nscully/status/985713142352068609
Brief video of flood damage at the link.

“Try explaining 30" of rain on Kauai with houses washed away, and this for [Honolulu]. Good luck with that! #hiwx ”
   https://twitter.com/firebomb56/status/985710855730774018
First image below.

“According to this report, underestimated by about 25 percent! ”
https://twitter.com/hbergSteve/status/985736936252952576
Second image below.

Title: Re: Floods
Post by: Sleepy on April 17, 2018, 07:01:15 AM
So, Houston is looking at building tunnels...

Tokyo built them.  Adaptation is an option.

The Underground Wonder of Tokyo
https://japangasm.wordpress.com/2012/01/12/the-underground-wonder-of-tokyo/
Yeah, those are famous. 59 pillars of 500 tons of reinforced concrete each, four 14,000 hp turbines to send the water into a river. Total amount of concrete and emissions? Who knows.
Japan har less than 3 sq km per 1,000 people, the US over ten times more space.
Adaptation is not mitigation.
Title: Re: Floods
Post by: Alexander555 on April 18, 2018, 07:17:45 PM
https://watchers.news/2018/04/18/massive-flood-hits-martinique-after-250-mm-9-8-in-of-rain-in-6-hours/
Title: Re: Floods
Post by: Alexander555 on April 18, 2018, 07:18:26 PM
https://watchers.news/2018/04/18/14-killed-after-severe-floods-hit-dar-es-salaam-tanzania/
Title: Re: Floods
Post by: Red on April 21, 2018, 11:11:41 AM


USA – Snowmelt Flooding in Montana Prompts State of Emergency

Snowmelt has triggered flooding in parts of northern Montana, prompting Governor Steve Bullock to declare…
Colombia – 2 Dead After Month’s Worth of Rain in 2 Hours Hits Cali, Valle Del Cauca

18 APRIL, 2018 0 COMMENT
Martinique – Severe Flooding After 250mm of Rain in 6 Hours

18 APRIL, 2018 0 COMMENT
Kenya – Thousands Displaced as Flooding Continues

18 APRIL, 2018 0 COMMENT
Updated: Tanzania – 9 Dead as Flooding Hits Dar Es Salaam
http://floodlist.com
Title: Re: Floods
Post by: sidd on April 23, 2018, 11:22:23 PM
Is that Storm Desmond thing from 2015 ?

sidd
Title: Re: Floods
Post by: Sigmetnow on April 24, 2018, 05:12:38 PM
Is that Storm Desmond thing from 2015 ?

sidd

Oops!  Deleted.  Thanks.
Title: Re: Floods
Post by: Sigmetnow on April 25, 2018, 12:59:07 PM
You can add “Dealing with displaced crustaceans” to the list of Complications of Flooding.

...
https://twitter.com/narpic/status/988223466360000512
Images below.
Title: Re: Floods
Post by: Sigmetnow on April 27, 2018, 12:18:45 AM
THE OTHER BIG ONE

California’s next megaflood would be worse than eight Hurricane Katrinas
Quote
Worse than the 1906 earthquake. Worse than eight Hurricane Katrinas. Worse than every wildfire in California history, combined. The world’s first trillion-dollar natural disaster.

A wintertime megaflood in California could turn out to be the worst natural disaster in U.S. history by far, and we are making it much more likely, according to an alarming study published this week in Nature Climate Change.

The odds are good that such a flood will happen in the next 40 years, the study says. By the end of the century, it’s a near certainty. (And then another one hits, and another — three such storms are possible by 2100). By juicing the atmosphere, extreme West Coast rainstorms will happen at five times their historical rate, if humanity continues on roughly a business-as-usual path, the new research predicts. ...
https://grist.org/article/californias-next-megaflood-would-be-worse-than-eight-hurricane-katrinas/
Title: Re: Floods
Post by: Archimid on May 03, 2018, 01:11:43 PM
New Brunswick floods: ‘This could get very uncomfortable,’ officials warn

http://www.ckom.com/2018/05/02/new-brunswick-floods-this-could-get-very-uncomfortable-officials-warn/

Quote
“We’re very concerned that the flooding will be unprecedented beyond even the 2008 and 1973 floods,” Clifford said in an interview. “So we’ve issued a recommended evacuation … The evidence suggests that this is going to be worse (flooding) and longer.”
Title: Re: Floods
Post by: Sigmetnow on May 05, 2018, 03:50:52 PM
“RAW VIDEO: See the massive sinkhole — six stories deep, two football fields long — that opened underneath a New Zealand farm. A volcanologist says it may have been growing underground for up to 100 years before recent heavy rain opened it up.  https://cbsloc.al/2Idx4Tu  “
https://twitter.com/CBSLA/status/992496999458099200
Title: Re: Floods
Post by: SteveMDFP on May 05, 2018, 04:04:01 PM
“RAW VIDEO: See the massive sinkhole — six stories deep, two football fields long — that opened underneath a New Zealand farm. A volcanologist says it may have been growing underground for up to 100 years before recent heavy rain opened it up.  https://cbsloc.al/2Idx4Tu  “
https://twitter.com/CBSLA/status/992496999458099200

Sinkhole de Mayo


(from a twitster)
Title: Re: Floods
Post by: Alexander555 on May 06, 2018, 02:04:20 PM
https://watchers.news/2018/05/06/severe-flash-flood-hits-ankara-described-as-disaster-like-never-before-turkey/
Title: Re: Floods
Post by: Sigmetnow on May 08, 2018, 03:36:29 PM
Above-average temperatures and extremely high snowpacks lead to flooding; predictions of one-in-100-year streamflow rates for rivers near several British Columbia communities, including Kelowna, Spences Bridge, Houston and Smithers.

High snowpack could fuel historic river flows in B.C.
http://vancouversun.com/news/local-news/high-snowpack-will-fuel-historic-river-flows
Title: Re: Floods
Post by: Sigmetnow on May 11, 2018, 03:11:21 AM
Hobart floods: Havoc as wild weather floods city and Tasmania’s South East
http://www.themercury.com.au/news/tasmania/havoc-as-wild-weather-floods-hobart-and-tasmanias-south-east/news-story/7707f3fc8e3bd16a7752f172e4879c9a

#BREAKING: Flooding now impacting some UTAS Sandy Bay buildings. This video is from the Engineering building @togatus_
https://twitter.com/montebovill/status/994569597096378368
Raw video at the link.
Title: Re: Floods
Post by: Susan Anderson on May 11, 2018, 05:33:04 PM
East African floods on Earth Observatory: https://earthobservatory.nasa.gov/NaturalHazards/view.php?id=92130&src=nha (https://earthobservatory.nasa.gov/NaturalHazards/view.php?id=92130&src=nha)
Title: Re: Floods
Post by: Sigmetnow on May 14, 2018, 10:06:02 PM
Houston examines Flood Tunnels in San Antonio, Austin, and Chicago as it considers building its own system after the disastrous flooding of Hurricane Harvey.

What Houston Is Learning About Underground Tunnels To Mitigate Flooding
https://www.houstonpublicmedia.org/articles/news/in-depth/2018/05/12/284919/what-houston-is-learning-about-flood-tunnels-in-other-cities/
Title: Re: Floods
Post by: Sigmetnow on May 15, 2018, 05:32:17 PM
Dam failure in Kenya after heavy rains.

A privately–owned embankment dam located near the township of Solai, Nakuru County, in Kenya's Rift Valley burst amid heavy rains on 9 May 2018, killing at least 48 people.
The dam was one of seven belonging to Mansukul Patel on the private property of his 1,400-hectare (3,500-acre) commercial rose farm and business, Solai Roses.
https://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/Patel_Dam_failure
Title: Re: Floods
Post by: Shared Humanity on May 15, 2018, 05:35:38 PM
Houston examines Flood Tunnels in San Antonio, Austin, and Chicago as it considers building its own system after the disastrous flooding of Hurricane Harvey.

What Houston Is Learning About Underground Tunnels To Mitigate Flooding
https://www.houstonpublicmedia.org/articles/news/in-depth/2018/05/12/284919/what-houston-is-learning-about-flood-tunnels-in-other-cities/

The deep tunnel project in Chicago, under construction for the last 40 years, has dramatically reduced flooding and protects the river and lake from dumping contaminated waters.
Title: Re: Floods
Post by: HapHazard on May 16, 2018, 10:45:25 PM
What sucks right now: dealing with flooding here in BC while already being very worried about wildfire season.

I need a break from this!
Title: Re: Floods
Post by: Sigmetnow on May 20, 2018, 12:05:31 AM
The Midwest Is Getting Drenched, And It’s Causing Big Problems
Quote
...
All this rain doesn’t just mean bigger floods, it also means more unpredictable floods. According to Eric Waage, the director of emergency management in Hennepin County, Minnesota, flooding in the state used to come primarily in early spring, when snow from the preceding winter melts and rivers rise. This kind of flooding from snowmelt can be dramatic, but the time between when the precipitation falls as snow and when it melts and pours into rivers as water allows for some advance planning (more snow in the winter means more water later). Recently, however, the state has had to worry more about flash flooding because intense rainstorms can arise with little or no warning. “It’s getting weird,” said Waage.

During one 2016 storm that resulted in parts of Minnesota qualifying for federal disaster assistance, concentrated storm bands over populated areas dropped nearly 10 inches of rain in just a few hours. Even away from any creeks or rivers, water coursed through neighborhoods and into basements. Flash flooding like this “can catch you off guard,” Waage said, making it harder to warn people or make preparations.

Municipalities try to prepare for emergencies like these ahead of time, and they rely on precipitation estimates to know what to plan for. Erin Wenz, a Minneapolis-based engineer, uses precipitation models to help municipalities decide where and how to build while taking into account the possibility of extreme precipitation. “We need to change people’s expectations of what is normal,” she said. ...
https://fivethirtyeight.com/features/the-midwest-is-getting-drenched-and-its-causing-big-problems/amp/
Title: Re: Floods
Post by: Sigmetnow on May 28, 2018, 12:43:29 AM
Ellicott City, Maryland.  Mid-Atlantic U.S.  The 2016 storm was a ‘1 in 1,000 years’ event.

“This #flooding in #ellicottcity is WORSE than 2016! #mxwx #mdflood ”
https://twitter.com/JustinWeather/status/1000863875796013057
Image below.

Flooding Slams Ellicott City, Baltimore Region; Water Rescues Reported
https://weather.com/news/news/2018-05-27-maryland-flooding-baltimore-ellicott-city
Article with video.
Title: Re: Floods
Post by: Sigmetnow on May 28, 2018, 01:14:06 AM
And now:
“Weather station in WeatherUnderground network reporting 115mm/ 4.5 inches of rain at Elliott City so far.”
https://twitter.com/browndutx/status/1000870241415696385

“Anyone who is outside around Ellicott City should find higher ground NOW. Another round of rain is coming in.”
https://twitter.com/capitalweather/status/1000867149039194112
Radar GIF at the link.


Note: this is over 750 miles / 1,200 km from the Gulf coast.  This is separate from Subtropical Storm Alberto.  (But essentially the same tropical air mass.)
Title: Re: Floods
Post by: Shared Humanity on May 28, 2018, 01:23:12 AM
Ellicott City, Maryland.  Mid-Atlantic U.S.  The 2016 storm was a ‘1 in 1,000 years’ event.

“This #flooding in #ellicottcity is WORSE than 2016! #mxwx #mdflood ”
https://twitter.com/JustinWeather/status/1000863875796013057
Image below.

Flooding Slams Ellicott City, Baltimore Region; Water Rescues Reported
https://weather.com/news/news/2018-05-27-maryland-flooding-baltimore-ellicott-city
Article with video.

One of the comments on twitter...

cheryl kirby@kirbyfamily6 34m34 minutes ago
More
Replying to @JustinWeather
This awful. @HoCoGov should have fixed the issue two years ago.
Title: Re: Floods
Post by: Sigmetnow on May 28, 2018, 01:41:37 AM
It gets worse.  Accumulation 9.2 inches (233 mm).

Title: Re: Floods
Post by: Sigmetnow on May 28, 2018, 02:00:37 AM
Approximately 5 miles downstream from Ellicott City, MD.

“The last report from the USGS gauge at Patapsco River near Elkridge at Patapsco Valley State Park indicated that the all-time record high stage has been broken and that the river rose 17.88 feet in ~2 hours.  https://t.co/s4rKqyQRuT  https://t.co/LrBgLieh1J
 #mdwx #flooding ”
https://twitter.com/Accu_Jesse/status/1000878477204246528
Image below.
Title: Re: Floods
Post by: SteveMDFP on May 28, 2018, 02:25:54 AM
Damn.  Ellicott City is just a few miles from me.  The 2016 flood was traumatic for the town and people I know.  Odd that I'd read about today's episode here.
Personally, just a really rainy day here.
Geography is destiny, I guess.
Title: Re: Floods
Post by: Susan Anderson on May 28, 2018, 03:45:10 AM
Subtropical Alberto is ramping up. I call these storms the "little engine that could" because of their wide-spread influence (thousands of miles, like the flywheel of a machine):
https://www.wunderground.com/cat6/alberto-taking-tropical-characteristics-warnings-along-ne-gulf-coast (https://www.wunderground.com/cat6/alberto-taking-tropical-characteristics-warnings-along-ne-gulf-coast)
Title: Re: Floods
Post by: pikaia on May 28, 2018, 08:12:09 AM
Ellicott City.

(https://forum.arctic-sea-ice.net/proxy.php?request=http%3A%2F%2Fi.dailymail.co.uk%2Fi%2Fnewpix%2F2018%2F05%2F28%2F04%2F4CB0C0E900000578-5777789-image-a-39_1527477550434.jpg&hash=36b520185074dbd5d1c488cfe9a03889)
Title: Re: Floods
Post by: Alexander555 on May 28, 2018, 08:30:57 AM
https://twitter.com/twitter/statuses/1000865293248458753
Title: Re: Floods
Post by: Susan Anderson on May 28, 2018, 04:39:05 PM
It's a little odd to "like" something so awful, but thanks for posting the information.

Ongoing, it looks to me like the damage from Alberto is going to be widespread.
Title: Re: Floods
Post by: gerontocrat on May 28, 2018, 05:50:51 PM
Ongoing, it looks to me like the damage from Alberto is going to be widespread.
From nhc.noaa.gov
Title: Re: Floods
Post by: SteveMDFP on May 28, 2018, 06:04:04 PM
Ellicott City.

(https://forum.arctic-sea-ice.net/proxy.php?request=http%3A%2F%2Fi.dailymail.co.uk%2Fi%2Fnewpix%2F2018%2F05%2F28%2F04%2F4CB0C0E900000578-5777789-image-a-39_1527477550434.jpg&hash=36b520185074dbd5d1c488cfe9a03889)

That's six miles from me.  In my neighborhood, not so much as a fallen branch.
Geography is destiny.
Similar destruction happened 2 years ago, same exact neighborhood devastated.
Historically, it's happened a couple of times in the 20th century.
Just last week, I vaguely recall a news story about some kind of proposed plan for flood mitigation  in that area. 
The climate, and subsequent weather events, is changing faster than our governmental bodies can react.
I wonder if that charming, quaint neighborhood might need to be converted to park land.  Pity.
Title: Re: Floods
Post by: SteveMDFP on May 28, 2018, 07:43:23 PM
The Ellicott City flood produced more than property damage, one person swept away:

Man missing after Ellicott City flooding, reported National Guard member and Air Force vet
http://wjla.com/news/local/national-guard-member-and-air-force-veteran-missing-after-ellicott-city-flooding (http://wjla.com/news/local/national-guard-member-and-air-force-veteran-missing-after-ellicott-city-flooding)

I believe 2 or 3 were swept away with the flash flood 2 years ago.

You don't expect to go this way when you visit an urban neighborhood of shops and restaurants.
Title: Re: Floods
Post by: Susan Anderson on May 28, 2018, 08:02:51 PM
For the bigger picture in the western hemisphere, here:
http://rammb-slider.cira.colostate.edu/?sat=goes-16 (http://rammb-slider.cira.colostate.edu/?sat=goes-16)
Title: Re: Floods
Post by: Sigmetnow on May 28, 2018, 09:30:29 PM
Severe flooding in the UK, as well.  Also, heat.
Quote
A man in his 80s died after his car was submerged in flood-waters amid a deluge of rain across the West Midlands.  Rescuers had to swim 50m to reach the motorist, whose vehicle was "completely underwater" in Walsall.

In Birmingham, more than a month's rainfall hit parts of the city in an hour on Sunday. Areas of Northamptonshire were also flooded.

Weather warnings have been issued for Monday, while the South East could see the hottest day of the year so far.
...
In Birmingham, one major route in the city was rendered impassable by water up to 5ft (1.5m) deep.
The Met Office said a site at Winterbourne, in Edgbaston, recorded 58mm of rainfall in just one hour on Sunday afternoon, and 81mm in a 12-hour period.  The monthly average for the West Midlands region in May is 55mm, Mr Snell said.

But he said the torrential rain had been "very localised", pointing out that another site 10 miles away at Coleshill recorded just 3mm of rain in 12 hours. ...
http://www.bbc.com/news/uk-england-birmingham-44275045
Title: Re: Floods
Post by: wili on May 29, 2018, 09:53:31 PM
https://robertscribbler.com/2018/05/29/how-climate-change-contributed-to-ellicott-citys-back-to-back-historic-flood-events/

How Climate Change Contributed to Ellicott City’s Back-to-Back Historic Flood Events
Title: Re: Floods
Post by: Sigmetnow on May 29, 2018, 10:05:03 PM
Ellicott City: An old downtown in a new flood plain.

The Maryland Flooding Is a Warning: The Danger Is Rain, and We’re Making It Worse
Quote
Ellicott City isn’t some post-war boomtown built inside a reservoir or a vacation community playing chicken with the ocean waves. It’s a 250-year-old river town, and like many river towns, it’s known flooding, chiefly from the rising waters of the Patapsco, the river at the foot of town that drains into Baltimore Harbor.

But these past two storms—as well as September 2011 flooding from Tropical Storm Lee—have worked differently. Instead of the water rising from the river at the base of the town, it’s come roaring in down two tiny tributaries, the Tiber and the Hudson, which merge just before entering the Patapsco. According to a Baltimore Sun investigation, prior to 2011, it had been 60 years since runoff on the Tiber stream produced a flash flood. Now it has happened three times in seven years.

It’s a reminder that heavy rain, rather than rising seas, may be the earliest severe consequence of climate change. We’ve prepared for it in the worst way possible. ...
https://slate.com/news-and-politics/2018/05/ellicott-city-maryland-flooding-climate-change-is-coming-as-rain.html
Title: Re: Floods
Post by: SteveMDFP on June 02, 2018, 06:43:30 PM
Many here read about the intense, fatal flooding of Ellicott City recently.  This is a neighboring town from me.
Here's an article that goes into some depth about the history and current planning for the next steps for the quaint, charming town center:
(https://forum.arctic-sea-ice.net/proxy.php?request=http%3A%2F%2FMaking+Ellicott+City+safer+would+cost+tens+of+millions+%E2%80%94+and+it+still+might+flood.+Should+the+town+be+rebuilt%3F&hash=ef3056d724ecaef2c14b34573c0dbf58)
http://www.baltimoresun.com/news/maryland/investigations/bs-md-ellicott-city-flood-next-steps-20180531-story.html (http://www.baltimoresun.com/news/maryland/investigations/bs-md-ellicott-city-flood-next-steps-20180531-story.html)

Preventing a repetition of this small disaster is, of course, the focus.  All of the options are unattractive and very expensive.
We might consider this a case study of what innumerable towns, cities, and ports will face as sea level rise accelerates in the coming century.
Title: Re: Floods
Post by: Gray-Wolf on June 02, 2018, 08:01:06 PM

Preventing a repetition of this small disaster is, of course, the focus.  All of the options are unattractive and very expensive.
We might consider this a case study of what innumerable towns, cities, and ports will face as sea level rise accelerates in the coming century.

Our Valley suffered similar over the last decade. The problem was always there with the River suffering flooding over the centuries but the last 40 years had seen repeated schemes go in to alleviate the problem. Still the floods came and beat previous 'record' levels.

The last major ( Boxing Day 2015) has lead to investment and a level of schemes fit for at least 50 years of increasing rainfall totals.

Sadly the towns down river have not seen such investment so when our works are done our floods will just pass faster to the next town which , until now, have been spared from flooding by the Flooding of our towns.

As you move down river the towns get larger.

Sadly the monies will just not be there for them to also see the kind of investment we have received.


Title: Re: Floods
Post by: Sigmetnow on June 03, 2018, 03:36:51 PM
Wondering if The Boring Company and its faster and cheaper tunnel boring machine could became a solution of choice for addressing increased flood event risk in locations with the appropriate geography.

Saving flood runoff underground, for later treatment and usage, might also be desirable in some places.
Title: Re: Floods
Post by: Shared Humanity on June 03, 2018, 05:14:35 PM
Wondering if The Boring Company and its faster and cheaper tunnel boring machine could became a solution of choice for addressing increased flood event risk in locations with the appropriate geography.

Saving flood runoff underground, for later treatment and usage, might also be desirable in some places.

Improvements in boring technology will dramatically reduce the costs of deep tunnel projects for the capture, sequester and later treatment of flood waters. That being said, deep tunnel projects are useful for regional flooding issues. The Baltimore metro region would need to address flooding using this approach. In Chicago, MWRD has shifted its focus from "How big a pipe and how deep a hole?" to area wide micro approaches that look at enhancing small area watersheds and community efforts as small as water gardens in backyards. The idea is to prevent heavy rainfalls from ever reaching rivers and streams.
Title: Re: Floods
Post by: be cause on June 03, 2018, 06:36:31 PM
this forum is suffering from Elongation .. b.c.
Title: Re: Floods
Post by: Sigmetnow on June 03, 2018, 08:58:00 PM
Too bad this isn’t happening on a day Congress is in session.  Not that that would make a diference....

“Washington, DC is experiencing heavy rain this Sunday. Details on the rain and #flood risk here: (link: http://bit.ly/2Hh8r3s) l
 https://twitter.com/weatheroptics/status/1003338361044656128

“Just sheets of water cascading down on NW DC right now ”
https://twitter.com/mateagold/status/1003334763728572417
Image below; video clip at the link.

“NEW: Flood warning in the District, S Mont Co, central & E Fairfax co. NWS: "Stream gauges indicate Cameron Run near Alexandria, Rock Creek in the northwest District of Columbia, and Sligo Creek near Takoma Park may being flooding soon." More info: (link: https://wapo.st/2kLp3I5)”
 https://twitter.com/capitalweather/status/1003350156341841920
Map below.
Title: Re: Floods
Post by: Sigmetnow on June 03, 2018, 10:02:35 PM
Maryland, U.S.
“Just plotted the 15 catastrophic floods in #EllicottCity...”
https://twitter.com/adapt2climate/status/1001203384408395776
Image below.
Title: Re: Floods
Post by: Sigmetnow on June 06, 2018, 06:06:11 PM
U.S. monthly climate report.

Quote
Buried in this month's NOAA climate report:

"More than a quarter of the coastal locations tied or broke their individual records for high tide flood days."

The whole short report is worth a read—a snapshot of what climate change looks like in the U.S.:

https://www.ncei.noaa.gov/news/national-climate-201805
https://twitter.com/EricHolthaus/status/1004389182809214978
Title: Re: Floods
Post by: aperson on June 07, 2018, 04:22:43 AM
The Harris County Flood Control District report on Harvey was published today. It is available at https://www.hcfcd.org/hurricane-harvey/. I highly recommend reading it, it is a wild ride.

Selected Quotes:
Quote
60,049 residents were rescued by government resources across all portions of Harris County, most of them from their homes with 32,000-34,000 staying in 65 temporary shelters. Tens of thousands of additional residents were rescued by local civilian resources and help that arrived from around Texas and surrounding states.

...

It is estimated that over 300,000 vehicles were flooded across Harris County many of which were at homes, parking garages, and dealership lots.

Quote
Dr. John Nielson-Gammon examined the largest rainfall events ever recorded in
United States history and compared against Hurricane Harvey for durations of 48, 72, and 120
hours and in spatial coverage of 1,000, 2,000, 5,000, 10,000, 20,000, and 50,000 square miles.
Harvey exceeded the previous records in all of the 18 different combinations except one. The
most astounding statistic is that for the 120 hour duration over 10,000 square miles, Harvey
exceeded the previous record from June 1899 by 13.33 inches or 62%.

Quote
Of the 154,170 homes flooded, 48,850 were within the 1% (100-yr) floodplain, 34,970 within the .2% (500-yr) floodplain, and 70,370 were outside of the 1% (100-yr) and .2% (500-yr) floodplains. Of the 154,170 homes flooded, 105,340 or 68% were outside the 1% (100-yr) floodplain.

...

64% of the homes flooded did not have a flood insurance policy in effect.
Title: Re: Floods
Post by: Sigmetnow on June 07, 2018, 04:25:06 PM
One thing I will always remember about Hurricane Harvey is those astounding forecast maps of unbelievable amounts of rain... and people saying, “No, that can’t be right.  Don’t panic.“  I think we know better, now. One hopes we will prepare better, and act better, next time.
Title: Re: Floods
Post by: Shared Humanity on June 07, 2018, 10:17:53 PM
How do you better prepare for 50 inches of rain?
Title: Re: Floods
Post by: aperson on June 07, 2018, 10:37:07 PM
How do you better prepare for 50 inches of rain?

Not by building more houses in the 100 and 500 yr floodplains, that's for sure.

http://swamplot.com/piles-of-fill-dirt-now-giving-rise-to-lovett-homes-77-lot-neighborhood-in-white-oak-bayou-floodplain/2018-06-05/

http://swamplot.com/where-another-new-subdivision-will-slot-into-the-white-oak-floodplain-east-of-t-c-jester/2018-06-06/


Developers need a boot on the head to stop them from doing this sort of stupid shit. Unfortunately instead we just have crap like NFIP ready to bail out homeowners at a moment's notice so developers can wash, rinse, and repeat the development cycle while municipal government continues to rake in property taxes.
Title: Re: Floods
Post by: Clare on June 08, 2018, 01:34:52 AM
This image is from last week, I was shocked. Slash is the rubbish left from when an area has been logged. It is meant to be cleaned up! We are looking at increasing forestry to reduce our CO2 footprint.  :(
The rainfall that caused this flooding wasn't extreme extreme, but so many of the problems were caused by these logs.
(https://forum.arctic-sea-ice.net/proxy.php?request=http%3A%2F%2F&hash=35d7d5d7526c9897dfb55501e320295a)

In the article linked below you can see the beach. :'(
https://www.radionz.co.nz/news/national/358981/tougher-rules-needed-to-stop-logging-debris-environmentalist
This is not the first time slash has caused serious problems north of where I live.

Title: Re: Floods
Post by: Sigmetnow on June 09, 2018, 12:58:22 AM
How do you better prepare for 50 inches of rain?

Not building in floodplains, sure.  But I was thinking more along the lines of continuing “psychological readiness” — getting people to think about, and make preparations ahead of time, for what they would do in such an emergency.

And, more orderly and aggressive evacuation plans (like highway contraflow), that start days earlier, instead of the mayor not giving an evacuation order because “surely it won’t be that bad,” and because the last time mass evacuation was tried, thousands of people became stranded and stuck on the highway.
Title: Re: Floods
Post by: Sleepy on June 09, 2018, 07:19:46 AM
Hmm, psychological readiness, like in Gothenburg were they recently kicked off the next "big dig". 8km's of rail with 6km's worth of tunnels, in clay, much like Boston.
https://www.svt.se/nyheter/lokalt/vast/forsta-spadtaget-for-vastlanken (https://www.svt.se/nyheter/lokalt/vast/forsta-spadtaget-for-vastlanken)
(https://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/4/4d/Vastlanken_train_tunnel_in_Gothenburg_Sweden_map_based_on_OpenStreetMaps.png)
All of that will at best be an island in the future.

Or the new submerged tunnel below Göta Älv that's beeing built right now, Marieholmstunneln.
https://youtu.be/JC4mRIgwXU0

Gothenburg already have older tunnels of course but none of that magnitude, not even comparable in projected costs.
(https://image.ibb.co/cjx5k8/vlgraf.png)
Real costs might approach Boston's.

They also have plans for levies of course, both inland and upstream at Göta Älv and out towards the ocean in two locations. All based on IPCC's 90cm's worth of sea level rise towards the next century.
(https://forum.arctic-sea-ice.net/proxy.php?request=http%3A%2F%2Fwww.melica.se%2Fsites%2Fdefault%2Ffiles%2Fbilder%2Finvallning.jpg&hash=aded62406620ffcea74b016c53668e48)
Then there's also a problem with projected increased precipitation, Mölndalsån is already prone for flooding and has flooded many times in the past.

It doesn't really matter from wich perspective you look at these projects, environmentally, climate wise or even engineering wise, they are plain ignorant and stupid. There are alternatives in Gothenburg. But we also have our Tillman Fertitta's here too:
https://forum.arctic-sea-ice.net/index.php/topic,1951.msg150361.html#msg150361 (https://forum.arctic-sea-ice.net/index.php/topic,1951.msg150361.html#msg150361)

Image below from central Gothenburg during storm Gudrun, in 2005. Forgotten by now.
Title: Re: Floods
Post by: Tor Bejnar on June 11, 2018, 07:45:21 PM
For those who are interested, visit the website  http://floodlist.com/

For example, recent articled titled
Title: Re: Floods
Post by: Martin Gisser on June 11, 2018, 10:09:08 PM
All based on IPCC's 90cm's worth of sea level rise towards the next century.
Wow! What has become of the Swedes? This is American level stupidity.
Title: Re: Floods
Post by: Clare on June 12, 2018, 06:57:47 AM
A week later & yet more flooding in NZ, and much of it  in the same areas as last weeks. Weather system coming south to us from the tropics, MOST unusual for this time of year - winter! Live feed here with short video clips:
https://www.tvnz.co.nz/one-news/new-zealand/raw-gisborne-bop-east-coast-north-island-hammered-torrential-rain-and-high-winds

Refer to my earlier story, that storm damaged 61 bridges & caused an estimated $10M in damage in the Tolaga Bay/Easy coast region alone.

Not quite as bad where I live a bit farther south, seemed the perfect day for it = we went to the movies!
Clare
Title: Re: Floods
Post by: Sleepy on June 12, 2018, 08:44:54 AM
All based on IPCC's 90cm's worth of sea level rise towards the next century.
Wow! What has become of the Swedes? This is American level stupidity.
Yep, I've called it (us) the 51st state for a long time, Martin.
Don't want to drift into politics here but only 3% of males here sympathize with MP (our green party) and 1/3 support the SD (Sweden Democrats) today, which is rather telling. Workers are leaving S (Social Democrats) for SD. Also, 40 organizations made this call yesterday.
https://www.aftonbladet.se/debatt/a/G1bdOV (https://www.aftonbladet.se/debatt/a/G1bdOV)

Quote
Climate change, conflicts and the threats to democracy are some of the many examples of global development issues that the parties in Sweden must actively work with.

I might be overly preoccupied with Gothenburg but I grew up there, that place will be an island beach house in the future. None of these tunnels they are building today will be operational by then. I saw when they built the Götatunnel (which is a lot smaller), original budget was 2.1 billion and ended up around 3.7. These digs for Västlänken with be much, much wider. In clay with increased pressure from below. This won't be easy.
Title: Re: Floods
Post by: gerontocrat on June 12, 2018, 01:32:28 PM

I might be overly preoccupied with Gothenburg but I grew up there, that place will be an island beach house in the future. None of these tunnels they are building today will be operational by then. I saw when they built the Götatunnel (which is a lot smaller), original budget was 2.1 billion and ended up around 3.7. These digs for Västlänken with be much, much wider. In clay with increased pressure from below. This won't be easy.

"Göteborg - the Venice of Scandinavia".

Tourist Information Website 2050
Title: Re: Floods
Post by: Sleepy on June 12, 2018, 04:22:09 PM
 :)
That information won't come from the Tourist centre at Nordstaden, in case of a catastrophic collapse of the WAIS.
Title: Re: Floods
Post by: Sigmetnow on June 21, 2018, 12:34:39 AM
U.S.:  severe Texas coastal flooding from an unnamed “tropical disturbance”

Heavy Rain in South Texas Could Bring More Flooding Before Tropical Disturbance Washes Out
Quote
Heavy rainfall in south Texas Wednesday morning caused major flooding that has submerged vehicles and structures, forced evacuations and led to numerous water rescues.

The National Weather Service (NWS) had issued two flash flood emergencies in south Texas following 6-14 inches [355 mm] of rainfall early this week. More rainfall is possible through early Thursday.
...
Storm Reports
The heavy rain has caused roads to crumble in McAllen, the location of the first flash flood emergency. Some communities in McAllen and surrounding communities, including Weslaco, have seen 4-8 inches of rain. Weslaco picked up more than 11 inches of rain. ...
https://weather.com/forecast/regional/news/2018-06-18-texas-tropical-moisture-heavy-rain-drought-relief-flood-threat
Title: Re: Floods
Post by: Sigmetnow on June 21, 2018, 11:38:09 PM
U.S.:  Rain continues to flood Texas.

“McAllen shattered rainfall records Thursday morning with an estimated 10 inches of rain since 4 a.m., according to the National Weather Service”

Gov. Abbott issues disaster declaration for severe flooding across South Texas
https://www.mysanantonio.com/news/local/article/Corpus-Christi-gets-triple-normal-rainfall-for-13013910.php
Title: Re: Floods
Post by: gerontocrat on July 07, 2018, 11:34:14 AM
https://www.theguardian.com/world/2018/jul/07/heavy-rain-floods-and-landslide-leave-more-than-a-dozen-dead-and-50-missing-in-japan

Heavy rain, floods and landslide leave 15 dead and 50 missing in Japan
Although Japan is among the most modernised of Asian nations, rural areas are hit hard by the rainy season each year, often resulting in casualties and heavy damage.
Title: Re: Floods
Post by: Sigmetnow on July 07, 2018, 04:51:58 PM
A bit more on the floods in Japan:

38 Dead, Nearly 50 Still Missing After Torrential Downpours in Japan
https://weather.com/news/news/2018-07-07-deadly-floods-southwestern-japan-okayama

Also, a 5.9 magnitude earthquake struck off the coast from Tokyo about three hours ago (about 500 km/300 miles from Okayama).  Early reports said buildings shook, but no significant damage was reported.
Title: Re: Floods
Post by: Sigmetnow on July 08, 2018, 12:39:46 AM
“This is a record high rainfall which we never experienced.”

Update:
Japan Reels From Heavy Rains; Dozens Killed and Millions Evacuated
Quote
TOKYO — Record torrential rains across western and central Japan unleashed flooding and landslides in several residential areas, killing dozens and triggering weather warnings in four districts of the country.

By Saturday evening, at least 51 people were dead and 48 were missing, according to the public broadcaster NHK. More than one million people in 18 districts had been ordered to evacuate their homes and 3.5 million had been urged to leave.

The Japan Meteorological Agency reported on Saturday that rainfall in many of the affected areas had reached record levels — with some areas reporting rain two or three times as high as the monthly average for all of July over just five days. ...
https://www.nytimes.com/2018/07/07/world/asia/japan-rain-landslides.html
Title: Re: Floods
Post by: ReverendMilkbone on July 08, 2018, 06:59:38 AM
"44 inches of rain fell on Yanasa in Umaji village, Kochi prefecture, on Shikoku, in only three days - that's double the total amount that usually falls in the whole of July."

Sounds like Harvey's twin in the Pacific...

https://www.standard.co.uk/news/world/hundreds-of-thousands-of-people-forced-to-flee-their-homes-as-two-months-worth-of-rain-falls-in-a3881386.html

Title: Re: Floods
Post by: Sigmetnow on July 09, 2018, 12:47:41 AM
Japan flood update.  Yikes!

Flooding and landslides in Japan leave at least 85 dead
Quote
Dozens of people have been killed and 2 million forced to flee their homes after record rains pounded southwest Japan, triggering widespread flooding and deadly landslides.

Authorities said that 85 people are dead, 6 are in critical condition and at least 58 are missing, according to Japanese broadcaster NHK.

"The record rainfalls in various parts of the country have caused rivers to burst their banks, and triggered large scale floods and landslides in several areas," Cabinet Secretary Yoshihide Suga said Sunday.
...
At least 4 million people have been advised to evacuate surrounding areas. Government officials are warning people in affected areas they are at risk for landslides, flooding, wind gusts and other extreme weather conditions.
https://amp.cnn.com/cnn/2018/07/08/world/japan-flooding/index.html
Title: Re: Floods
Post by: ReverendMilkbone on July 09, 2018, 01:05:10 AM
Are 40+" rain evens becoming the norm? 

Harvey in Aug '17 ~50"

Kauai in Apr '18 ~50"

Southern Japan Jul '18 ~44"

Have there been any others recently?  I believe Australia has seen some "Biblical" flooding in recent years, but nothing this bad.
Title: Re: Floods
Post by: Tor Bejnar on July 10, 2018, 06:41:05 PM
Update (BBC):  Japan floods: 155 killed after torrential rain and landslides (https://www.bbc.com/news/world-asia-44775627)
Quote
...
It is the highest death toll caused by rainfall that Japan has seen in more than three decades.

Rescuers are now digging through mud and rubble in a race to find survivors, as dozens are still missing.

About two million people have been evacuated from the region after rivers burst their banks.
...
Title: Re: Floods
Post by: Tor Bejnar on July 12, 2018, 05:23:42 PM
Another day, another sad update for Japan.  This one from Dave Petley's AGU Landslide Blog

 (https://blogs.agu.org/landslideblog/)... the disastrous landslides in Japan this week (https://blogs.agu.org/landslideblog/2018/07/12/japan-1/)

Quote
Over the last few days Japan has suffered from record levels of rainfall, triggering large numbers of landslides.  In total at least 200 people have been killed in flood and landslide events.
...
At least 47 sections of expressway have been damaged by the landslides.

This is without doubt the most significant landslide event of 2018 to date. 
...
Images at the link above.

And from Weather Underground (https://www.wunderground.com/cat6/More-175-Killed-Japans-Deadliest-Flooding-36-Years):
Quote
... deadliest weather disaster since 322 people were killed in floods and landslides across western Japan in July 1982.
Title: Re: Floods
Post by: Susan Anderson on July 12, 2018, 09:00:11 PM
@Tor Bejnar: Thanks (if thanks are in order for bad news) for the updates on Japan. Horrifying stuff.

I looked in at my old favorite EarthObservatory - https://earthobservatory.nasa.gov/ (https://earthobservatory.nasa.gov/) - which has recently been redesigned, to see if there are images there. As is always the case, it will take me a while to enjoy the "improvement" which no doubt it is. Couldn't find grid view of the images, but here is one on the flooding from last week: https://earthobservatory.nasa.gov/images/92397/severe-rainfall-and-flooding-in-japan (https://earthobservatory.nasa.gov/images/92397/severe-rainfall-and-flooding-in-japan)

Proceeding in potpourri style, Typhoon Maria: https://earthobservatory.nasa.gov/images/92409/powerful-typhoon-heads-for-china (https://earthobservatory.nasa.gov/images/92409/powerful-typhoon-heads-for-china)

and hail in North Dakota: https://earthobservatory.nasa.gov/images/92401/hail-cuts-swaths-of-damage-across-south-dakota (https://earthobservatory.nasa.gov/images/92401/hail-cuts-swaths-of-damage-across-south-dakota)
Title: Re: Floods
Post by: Sigmetnow on July 22, 2018, 04:23:32 PM
Washington, DC area.
“At least 2.85 inches of rain for DC today. 2.79 inches on the 17th as well. First time on record (since 1871) that we've had more than one day with 2.75"+ [70mm] of rain in July.
DC started July with zero inches through the 16th, driest start to the month on record. @capitalweather”
https://twitter.com/islivingston/status/1020824764418576389

“Dulles [airport] has picked up 3.86 inches [98mm] of rain thru 8p, including 1.11 inches last hour.
This is now the wettest July day on record there, surpassing 3.71 inches on the 11th in 2013. Likely becoming a top 10 wettest day in any month there. @capitalweather”
https://twitter.com/islivingston/status/1020821987902488577
Data-image at the link.

“740p: Flash flood warning S and SW of Beltway. 3-4” of rain have fallen & another 1-3” poss. Please use caution.”
https://mobile.twitter.com/capitalweather/status/1020816043072245760
Radar loop at the link.

“5.51” [140mm] of rain now in Oakton, VA. We still have a few more hours before the rain finally subsides. ...”
https://twitter.com/DCAreaWx/status/1020833562671681537
Data-image at the link.
Title: Re: Floods
Post by: Sigmetnow on July 22, 2018, 06:34:39 PM
More on the mid-Atlantic US flooding.  Jet stream flow will persist through the week.

“Extreme amounts of #rain fell from an unusual July coastal low pressure  system.  Widespread amounts of 2-6" fell with several reports of over 7" & as much as 9.11" [231mm] in Storck (Stafford Co.), VA.”
https://twitter.com/NWSMARFC/status/1020996157730967558

More Flash Flooding Possible in the East This Week as Tropical Moisture Fuels Heavy Rainfall
https://weather.com/amp/forecast/regional/news/2018-07-18-wet-eastern-weather-pattern-late-july.html
Title: Re: Floods
Post by: jacksmith4tx on July 22, 2018, 08:03:51 PM
More on the mid-Atlantic US flooding.  Jet stream flow will persist through the week.

“Extreme amounts of #rain fell from an unusual July coastal low pressure  system.  Widespread amounts of 2-6" fell with several reports of over 7" & as much as 9.11" [231mm] in Storck (Stafford Co.), VA.”

More Flash Flooding Possible in the East This Week as Tropical Moisture Fuels Heavy Rainfall

Dr. Jennifer Francis, a name many here are familiar with, has been researching this jet stream/arctic interaction for years. She covers the topic of meandering jet streams and links it to pressure gradient changes due to arctic amplification and climate change. I know this was written to explain winter anomalies you can easily replace 'snow' with 'rain' and the theory still seems robust.
http://arctic-news.blogspot.com/2018/02/is-warming-in-arctic-behind-this-years-crazy-winter-weather.html

I think these high pressure atmospheric ridges are what really stresses the biosphere more than just high temperatures.
Title: Re: Floods
Post by: jacksmith4tx on July 24, 2018, 08:39:05 PM
"Hundreds Of People Missing After Dam Collapses In Laos"
https://www.npr.org/2018/07/24/631770020/hundreds-of-people-missing-after-dam-collapses-in-laos

The full scale of the disaster isn't yet known.

The state news agency KPL reports that the collapse released 5 billion cubic meters of water.
The flash flooding happened Monday night, according to the state-sponsored Vientiane Times newspaper, which says a "saddle dam" was overcome at a reservoir for a power plant — part of an ongoing project to construct a series of hydroelectric dams in southern Laos.

"Some seven villages home to about 1,300 families and over 6,000 people were under water," the newspaper reports, citing the Attapeu Planning and Investment Department's director, Soulichanh Phonkeo.
Title: Re: Floods
Post by: Tor Bejnar on July 26, 2018, 05:55:50 PM
San Antonio Digging Out (http://www.dchieftain.com/news/san-antonio-digging-out/article_09ed4c54-8aa8-11e8-8596-430375a4d866.html)
Storm causes flooding, knocks out power, in the village of San Antonio, New Mexico (not to be confused with the very large city of San Antonio, Texas).  (San Antonio, NM (http://cityofdust.blogspot.com/2013/11/the-roots-of-paris-hilton-san-antonio.html), by the way, is where Conrad Hilton of Hilton Hotels was raised (grandfather of socialite Paris Hilton) [Further aside: my very first home (as an infant) was the Hilton House (https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/August_Holver_Hilton_House) in nearby Socorro, NM where Conrad and his mother lived so he could go to high school]).

Quote
Thunderstorms swept through Socorro County Sunday night and Monday morning causing a power outage to the Magdalena, Hop Canyon and Water Canyon areas, and buried much of San Antonio in up to two feet of mud. Or more, depending on where you look.

Highway 1 between Luis Lopez and San Antonio was largely impassable early Monday due to water, mud, rocks and debris from the overflow of Walnut Creek arroyo. Highway 380 was likewise mud-packed between east of the railroad tracks and Interstate 25. Crews were out Monday morning clearing mud and debris from Interstate 25 exit ramps.

The torrential wind and rain started at about 10:30 p.m. Sunday, Janice Argabright of the Owl Bar and Café said. “It began picking up after that,” she said.

The force of water flowing down from the Chupadera Mountains through San Antonio also dislocated a section of tracks of the Burlington-Northern Santa Fe Railroad north and south of the Highway 380crossing.

The Owl was spared of the worst of the flash flood, but mud around the Crane Café was two feet deep or more, and Bobby Olguin of the Buckhorn was working with employees shoveling mud from around the parking lot Monday morning. Olguin said he hoped to reopen today.

The San Antonio Crane café on Pino Street lost a walk-in cooler when rushing waters picked it off the ground in back of the restaurant and carried it down the street and through a fence where it came to rest against the Catholic Church on Highway 1. The Crane’s large propane tank took a similar route. A water stain on the south side of the restaurant indicates splashing waves reached as high as 10 feet through the neighborhood.
...
[image from El Defensor Chieftain (Socorro) newspaper]
Title: Re: Floods
Post by: Tor Bejnar on July 26, 2018, 06:06:38 PM
From Albuquerque's KOB-TV: July 17, 2018
 (https://www.kob.com/new-mexico-news/san-antonios-owl-bar-and-cafe-remains-closed-after-flood/4992576/)
Quote
SAN ANTONIO, N.M. - The renowned Owl Bar and Café in San Antonio, New Mexico is closed as they clean up after a powerful rainstorm and flood.

Employees at the cafe have spent the past two days pulling up carpet and clearing mud.

The internal flood damage wasn't overwhelming, however, there is still a lot that needs to happen before the bar and café can reopen.
...
So the flooding was 10 days ago...
Title: Re: Floods
Post by: Sigmetnow on July 28, 2018, 01:18:30 AM
Washington, DC and Baltimore Maryland area.

Capital Weather Gang on Twitter: "6:55 pm: A look at the radar estimates in and around Baltimore. This is what was a risk around DC. Plenty of 2-3”+ totals this evening over a short period causing some big problems. https://t.co/xoRBvjvoKb “
https://mobile.twitter.com/capitalweather/status/1022978765356507137
Image at the link.

NWS DC/Baltimore on Twitter: "607pm: Stream gauge on Maidens Choice Run near Westgate appears to have risen 13 feet in 26 minutes."
https://mobile.twitter.com/NWS_BaltWash/status/1022967136606736384
Title: Re: Floods
Post by: Shared Humanity on July 28, 2018, 01:28:37 PM
DC needs to get 50 inches of rain in 4 days like Houston did with a few Congress Critters and Senators drowning in their limos with their mistresses. That ought to get their attention.
Title: Re: Floods
Post by: Sigmetnow on August 08, 2018, 05:51:00 PM
Need to update emergency signs:  Use stairs instead of elevator in floods, as well as fires!

https://twitter.com/misener680news/status/1027155084512124928
Title: Re: Floods
Post by: Sigmetnow on August 09, 2018, 09:48:06 PM
Destructive Flood Risk in U.S. West Could Triple if Climate Change Left Unchecked
Rocky Mountain and Sierra Nevada communities are at risk from rapidly rising rivers, as ‘rain-on-snow’ flash floods become more frequent under climate change.
Quote
The research provides a grim analysis of a particularly destructive kind of extreme weather event called a "rain-on-snow" flood. Common in mountain regions—and increasing as temperatures rise—these events happen when heavy rains fall on top of deep snowpack, melting it and triggering intense floods.

California's Sierra Nevada Mountains, the Rocky Mountains west of Denver and parts of the Canadian Rockies are especially vulnerable, according to the research published Monday in Nature Climate Change.
...
Every Drop of Water Matters
These floods not only destroy property and crops, they wreak havoc for Western water managers, whose job it is to capture and store enough water for cities, ranchers and farmers to use during the dry summer. If the snowpack melts unexpectedly during a major rain-on-snow event—overwhelming dams and other infrastructure—then water supplies are lost.
...
Avalanches Are Changing, Too
In addition to projected increase in flooding, rain-on-snow events in the Colorado Rocky Mountains are creating unusual avalanches, according to Brian Lazar, a snow scientist with the Colorado Avalanche Information Center.

"Some of the patterns that we've been seeing and relied on for decades to forecast avalanche danger have been changing," he said. "Even in colder climates, we're seeing more rain on snow, more onset of avalanche in mid-winter and more frequent rain-on-snow events at higher elevations.  "We may see things we haven't observed in the historical record," he said.

In Switzerland, rain-on-snow events are unleashing whole new types of avalanches, made not just of snow, said Perry Barthelt, a researcher with the Swiss Federal Institute for Forest, Snow and Landscape Research.

"We're starting to see cascading processes, snow avalanches turning into debris flows, ice avalanches turning into rock avalanches," he said. "We're getting flow types that you can't define to one particular category."  Switzerland is currently revising all its avalanche hazard maps with new climate data to reflect the changing risks.

"Snow is a very interesting material because it exists near its melting point. A small change in temperature has a tremendous influence on the mechanical properties of snow," Barthelt said.  "What we suspect is that we're going to see more of these mixed avalanche types. They are very difficult to predict, and to know how far into the valley they will go."
https://insideclimatenews.org/news/06082018/global-warming-climate-change-floods-california-oroville-dam-scientists
Title: Re: Floods
Post by: Sigmetnow on August 13, 2018, 02:20:22 PM
CNN (@CNN).  8/12/18, 10:00 PM
These cars were swept off a dealership lot in Little Falls, New Jersey, after rain showers and thunderstorms caused flooding in the area
https://twitter.com/cnn/status/1028823694230151168
45-second vid: cars floating down river and jamming up by a bridge

North Jersey flooding is worst since [Hurricane] Floyd, says Little Falls mayor
https://www.northjersey.com/story/weather/2018/08/12/little-falls-mayor-flooding-worst-since-floyd/971326002/
Title: Re: Floods
Post by: Sigmetnow on August 13, 2018, 11:15:33 PM
Stalled weather pattern has caused major flooding in northeast U.S. three times over the past three weeks.  Another two to three inches of rain is forecast in some areas for tonight.

Quote
The National Weather Service in State College said there were numerous reports of 6 inches [150mm] of rain or more in Schuylkill and Columbia counties.

Meteorologist Aaron Tyburski said the latest downpours followed weeks of a stalled weather pattern that is drawing moisture from the Atlantic Ocean, hitting some communities repeatedly.

"It's been quite a rough go for them over the past three weeks," Tyburski said.
https://www.usnews.com/news/best-states/pennsylvania/articles/2018-08-13/heavy-rains-cause-flooding-prompt-water-rescues

Weather Underground on Twitter: "TONIGHT on #WUTV we're watching the dangerous flood threat in the Northeast. We're also watching the rain across the Plains - helpful for drought, but will we have flooding instead? ...”
https://twitter.com/wunderground/status/1029062944301232128

Justin Michaels on Twitter: "WATCH: Inside one of the homes on Spring Street in #Tremont, PA. This is the third flood in three weeks, and people here say this was the worst as they try to figure out what to do next in this working class community. ...”
https://mobile.twitter.com/jmichaelsnews/status/1029077232113868808
Title: Re: Floods
Post by: Sigmetnow on August 15, 2018, 01:59:00 PM
Flash flooding emergency in New York, Pennsylvania.  “Another round of storms for the third day in a row.”

Dozens of disaster declarations and states of emergency are in effect across New York, New Jersey and Pennsylvania after heavy rain and historic flooding. Floodwaters destroyed hundreds of homes.
https://www.cbsnews.com/video/flash-flooding-emergency-in-new-york-pennsylvania/
Title: Re: Floods
Post by: bligh8 on August 17, 2018, 04:37:17 AM
N.J. weather update: Nearly 8 inches of rain pounds N.J., flooding roads, creating a waterspout

"As of early Monday afternoon, a whopping 7.83 inches of rain was reported in Brick, where township officials declared a state of emergency. Nearly 5.6 inches of rain was reported in Howell Township and almost 5 inches was registered in Wall Township.
Heavy flooding was reported along a three-block section of Spring Lake, and several flooded roads were closed in Neptune Township, emergency management officials noted on social media.
In Sea Girt, numerous roads were flooded and closed to traffic Monday morning, and some traffic signals were out, according to the weather service.

There are some video's posted within the link....The third video posted by the brick township police dept. is of a flooded age restricted community.  My mom use to live there & I know many folks that still live there, most have no reason to have flood insurance and frankly, although nice, is a poorer area to live.

I sat on my back porch watching this unfold and just about when I thought it could not possibly rain harder.....it did.

https://www.nj.com/weather/index.ssf/2018/08/nj_weather_heavy_rain_flash_flooding_waterspout.html

Edit: Where I live in Monmouth County it rained 6 inches in about 4 hrs.

 "...6 inches" Which is about 2inches more than Stormy got.  Credit...hush money
Title: Re: Floods
Post by: TerryM on August 17, 2018, 06:13:40 AM
JH Christ, that's too much water!


Stay safe
Terry
Title: Re: Floods
Post by: be cause on August 17, 2018, 11:49:49 AM
.. meanwhile in Kerala India .. hundreds dead and hundreds of thousands (at least) homeless with more monsoon rain to come .. All major state and local national roads impassable . Ongoing flash flooding and mudslides suggest final death toll will be much higher . Worst flooding in over 100 years .. b.c.
Title: Re: Floods
Post by: bligh8 on August 17, 2018, 01:05:18 PM
JH Christ, that's too much water!


Stay safe
Terry

Thanks Terry
Fair Winds
bligh
Title: Re: Floods
Post by: Ktb on August 17, 2018, 09:14:51 PM
.. meanwhile in Kerala India .. hundreds dead and hundreds of thousands (at least) homeless with more monsoon rain to come .. All major state and local national roads impassable . Ongoing flash flooding and mudslides suggest final death toll will be much higher . Worst flooding in over 100 years .. b.c.


Most recent and up to date link for those interested

https://www.theguardian.com/world/2018/aug/17/kerala-floods-death-toll-rescue-effort-india
Title: Re: Floods
Post by: Sigmetnow on August 17, 2018, 09:39:46 PM
More on the India Monsoon flooding/weather.

India Flooding Death Toll Doubles Again in Kerala State; More Than 320 Killed
Quote
More than 320 people have died in the last nine days in floods triggered by intense monsoon rainfall in the southern Indian state of Kerala, the latest tragic flooding event in what has been a devastating season for the country.  Officials told the Associated Press that the floods have left more than 220,000 people homeless over the course of several months. Schools and Cochin International Airport – one of the country's busiest – have been closed because of the disaster.  Many of the victims were killed in mudslides triggered by the heavy rainfall, according to BBC.com.

"We're witnessing something that has never happened before in the history of Kerala," Chief Minister Pinarayi Vijayan told the media. "Almost all dams are now opened. Most of our water treatment plants are submerged, motors are damaged."

Other officials have said this is Kerala's worst flooding since 1924, when more than 11 feet of rain fell during the monsoon and flooded much of the state, India Today reported. India's met department said the state has received nearly 7 feet of rain since June 1, all of which has been attributed to the monsoon season, the report added.

The state is trending some 30 percent above average, and forecasters fear Kerala will approach the 1924 rainfall total before the monsoon season ends in September, India Today also said. With more rain expected, India's met department placed the entire state under a red alert, and state officials held emergency meetings with Prime Minister Narendra Modi late Wednesday night, according to Al Jazeera.

"There are heavy rains every year, but the city has never been flooded so badly," district official Mini Eldho, who left her home in the city of Cochin and fled to a relief camp, told BBC.com.  Since the monsoon season began, more than 1,000 people have died in flooding and mudslides across India.  Kerala state, located in southern India, is home to some 35 million people.
https://weather.com/amp/news/news/2018-08-16-india-monsoon-rains-flooding-kerala.html
Title: Re: Floods
Post by: sidd on August 17, 2018, 10:32:18 PM
Kerala is a beautiful land. High rates of literacy, fine marijuana, and the local hooch (arack, made from coconut milk) is surprisingly palatable. Matriarchal society, and a communist state government.

The one saving grace here is that the people are natural watermen, the land has many rivers, and children grow up as much in the water as out. Even so the death toll is quite horrific.

sidd
Title: Re: Floods
Post by: be cause on August 18, 2018, 01:13:22 AM
horrific scenes in Kerala .. latest update .. 930 dead , 300,000 homeless . b.c.
Title: Re: Floods
Post by: sidd on August 18, 2018, 07:03:59 AM
To fill in some detail, kerala is a sliver of the south west deccan peninsula facing the arabian sea. There is a ridge five to eight thousand feet parallel to the coast, against which the monsoon hurls itself yearly. Heavy rain is familiar, what set this event apart was the duration.

I forgot to mention, among its many other admirable products, the coffee is to die for.

sidd
Title: Re: Floods
Post by: Martin Gisser on August 18, 2018, 08:19:53 PM
https://www.independent.co.uk/news/world/asia/manila-rubbish-waves-monsoon-philippines-city-waste-rubbish-a8496401.html

Waves of rubbish crash into Manila after monsoon washes city garbage into sea
Footage shows tonnes of trash being swept back into coast-side streets
Title: Re: Floods
Post by: Sigmetnow on August 21, 2018, 02:33:34 AM
Similarly, from India:

“A friend from Kerala said, as the water recedes, this is how bridges look.. the river has thrown back at us what we have been putting into it for years”
https://twitter.com/tarunsingha/status/1030739617362796544
Photo below.
Title: Re: Floods
Post by: TerryM on August 21, 2018, 03:46:49 AM
Sadly I suspect that all of that will be unceremoniously tossed back into the river.


Humans aren't really trainable.
Terry
Title: Re: Floods
Post by: Avalonian on August 24, 2018, 06:58:58 AM
Just reporting in from visiting family in Saalbach, Austria. After a record hot, dry summer, the promised thunderstorms arrived last night, flooding the valley and destroying stretches of the road; some villages are cut off. Luckily looks like no-one has been injured, at this stage, but numerous hotels must have been inundated along the banks. There are some Youtube videos appearing, like this one:
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=PDswToY04Nc (https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=PDswToY04Nc)

The damage is largely due to the long hot, dry spell leading to extremely rapid runoff resulting from unusually intense thunderstorms (torrential rain for around 5 hours, lightning everywhere, hail...). Based on how much mud is being carried, there's been a lot of erosion, and probably landslips. More heavy rain is promised for  the next three days, which is going to make rebuilding the road difficult.
Title: Re: Floods
Post by: sidd on September 02, 2018, 10:33:03 PM
"Houston, too close to New Orleans ...."

" ... savoring his $30,000 floodproofing investment ..."

"But if the water that had once sat on the golf course went downstream, where would it end up? "

"He used to work as a seismic engineer in oil and gas ..."

" ... rainfall is up 26 percent over the past 40 years—but runoff is up 204 percent. From 1996 to 2011, impervious surface in Harris County increased by a quarter, and from 1992 to 2010, the area lost almost a third of its wetlands—nearly 16,000 acres."

"Engineers who sign off on developments, assuring the public they will not contribute to flooding, bid for work from developers, who hire engineers who can make things pencil out. "

"the county must find a way to end this cozy relationship between engineers and their dual masters, developers and (according to state licensing) the public."

"Houston’s long-term strategy must simply be to evacuate the 100-year flood plain. It’s the equivalent of demolishing a midsize American city. "

https://slate.com/business/2018/08/houston-one-year-after-hurricane-harvey-is-at-a-crossroads.html

sidd

Title: Re: Floods
Post by: Tor Bejnar on September 02, 2018, 11:30:04 PM
From Weather Underground's Cat 6 (https://www.wunderground.com/cat6/91L-Likely-Become-Gulf-Mexico-Tropical-Cyclone-Tuesday):
Quote
From the NWS in Houston: "Our local flash flood decision tree is indicating a high risk of flash flooding with maximum rainfall totals by Monday evening between 8-10 inches. What is worrisome is that the TT WRF is showing a boundary and training cells over Galveston/Brazoria and southern Harris counties Monday morning (09-18z). A Flash Flood Watch will be required tonight and Monday for a large part of SE TX."
NOAA's 7-day precipitation projection (https://www.wpc.ncep.noaa.gov/qpf/p168i.gif?1535923087) shows over 7" (18 cm) of rain near Houston.
Title: Re: Floods
Post by: Alexander555 on September 05, 2018, 10:12:26 PM
Looks like there are floods and droughts everywhere.

https://watchers.news/2018/09/05/151-dead-or-missing-tens-of-thousands-displaced-as-major-floods-hit-north-korea-after-unprecedented-drought/
Title: Re: Floods
Post by: Archimid on September 20, 2018, 03:34:49 AM
Millions More Americans Face Flood Risks Than Previously Thought

https://eos.org/opinions/millions-more-americans-face-flood-risks-than-previously-thought


Quote
A New Approach to Calculating the 100-Year Floodplain
Over the past 5 years, researchers across the globe have started to develop a set of these alternative top-down approaches to flood inundation modeling over vast areas, taking advantage of increasingly available large data sets and high-performance computing resources. These methods take available digital elevation models (DEMs), river hydrography, and gauging station data and use them to automatically create flood inundation models of whole regions, countries, or even the world.

Such approaches do not currently outperform local bespoke modeling, but many flood management questions can be answered only by consistent flood maps with the type of complete coverage that these top-down methods produce. For many flood management questions, it may also be acceptable to sacrifice a small amount of local accuracy to achieve a national-scale view.
Title: Re: Floods
Post by: sidd on September 20, 2018, 05:42:10 AM
I think i posted a reference to the Wing et. al paper ( doi:10.1088/1748-9326/aaac65 ) earlier. I attach fig 4. Insurance gonna go up ...

sidd
Title: Re: Floods
Post by: gerontocrat on September 21, 2018, 12:40:52 PM
The consequence of Florence was mainly FLOODS. The article shows how there was building development where one shouldn't including draining wetlands, the response to floods is to build higher & bigger & more levees and dams and drain the swamps, but the real solution is to move to higher ground and restore wetlands, i.e. retreat.

Perhaps one can call it an example of geoengineering syndrome? (see "geoengineering-another rush for money" and "what's new in Antarctica" for larger examples ?)

https://www.washingtonpost.com/national/we-need-help-nc-towns-plead-for-dam-levee-upgrades-after-second-major-flood-in-two-years/2018/09/18/1792b788-bb61-11e8-a8aa-860695e7f3fc_story.html?utm_term=.7143d120dbb4&wpisrc=nl_green&wpmm=1

‘We need help’: N.C. towns plead for dam, levee upgrades after second major flood in two years


Quote
When it inundated North Carolina in 2016, meteorologists called Hurricane Matthew a “500-year rain event,” the kind of downpour that was likely to occur once every half-millennium. But then, just two years later, here came Florence, a “1,000-year event” that hit all the same places in all the same ways, if not harder.......

.....The mayor wants to clear the area’s swamps and canals of fallen trees and debris from Matthew and past hurricanes, which he said would allow storm water to drain out of neighborhoods faster.......

.....Ryan Emanuel, an environmental scientist at North Carolina State University who studies the Lumber River, said that dredging and levee projects are not long-term fixes for the escalating problem. Canals and levees have allowed people to build homes on river margins and in swampy areas over the decades, yet research shows that wetlands can mitigate flooding by temporarily storing water after storms. Emanuel said that moving to higher ground and restoring swamps to their natural state are better ways to alleviate the problem.
Title: Re: Floods
Post by: Sigmetnow on September 23, 2018, 02:15:01 PM
Fittstown, Oklahoma!

Alex Spahn on Twitter: "Terrible! I just watched a herd of cattle get swept away under a bridge in floodwaters just SE of Fittsville, OK after 13+ inches of rain flooded their entire field. #okwx #rain #flood #flooding #StormHour @spann @ReedTimmerAccu @JimCantore https://t.co/k4RP6jZGS3"
https://mobile.twitter.com/spahn711/status/1043298533519097858
Title: Re: Floods
Post by: Tor Bejnar on September 23, 2018, 03:43:29 PM
Follow-up tweet (https://mobile.twitter.com/spahn711/status/1043375918755078144) to the Fittstown flood:
Quote
Some potentially good news: I have been hearing from the owners here and there and was told "Lots have been saved but no accountability yet."
Title: Re: Floods
Post by: Aluminium on September 28, 2018, 09:37:19 AM
Yesterday there was a small flood in Saint Petersburg, despite the dam.
Title: Re: Floods
Post by: sidd on September 29, 2018, 12:27:19 AM
I have posted here before on the floods in Kerala. Here is something on the aftermath and the remarkable resilience of women. It is not coincidental that Kerala has a strongly matriarchal society.

https://www.counterpunch.org/2018/09/28/keralas-women-farmers-rise-above-the-flood/

Those women's meetings can get quite ... rambunctious. Some of the more obscene jokes I have heard in Malayalam have been at predominantly women's gatherings in Kerala.

sidd
Title: Re: Floods
Post by: miki on September 29, 2018, 02:09:25 AM
I have posted here before on the floods in Kerala. Here is something on the aftermath and the remarkable resilience of women. It is not coincidental that Kerala has a strongly matriarchal society.

https://www.counterpunch.org/2018/09/28/keralas-women-farmers-rise-above-the-flood/

Those women's meetings can get quite ... rambunctious. Some of the more obscene jokes I have heard in Malayalam have been at predominantly women's gatherings in Kerala.

sidd

Ah, Women! <3
Title: Re: Floods
Post by: AbruptSLR on October 02, 2018, 06:36:34 PM
Welcome to the new normal:

Title: "Old age, neglect and a changing climate are rendering US dams dangerous"

https://www.dailyclimate.org/us-dams-are-in-disrepair-2609229574.html

Extract: ""If you have more intense storms, more frequent storms then those deficient dams can't handle that. And you're going to see more problems where dams are under stress due to the high waters levels or the overtopping," Ogden said.

There are more than 90,000 dams in the U.S., according to the National Inventory of Dams, which is kept by the Army Corps of Engineers. Approximately 15,500 of them are classified as high hazard, meaning in the case of failure, at least one life could be lost.

According to the Association of Dam Safety Officials, the average age of dams in the U.S. is 56 years old. By 2025, seven out of 10 dams will be 50 or older.

It would take approximately $22 billion to rehabilitate the most critical dams, according to the Association.

While the Army Corps keeps track of the amount of high, significant and low-hazard dams in the country, the individual hazard potential for each dam is not available for the public, Kathryn Van Marter, a spokeswoman with the Federal Emergency Management Agency, told EHN in an email."
Title: Re: Floods
Post by: Archimid on October 03, 2018, 04:51:32 AM
DAM FAILURE imminent! Evacuations for Ali Chuk, AZ downstream of Menegers Lake with damn failure likely. Lake levels are rising and about to flood out.

https://mobile.twitter.com/breakingweather/status/1047312412465139717
Title: Re: Floods
Post by: oren on October 03, 2018, 05:28:35 AM
Some more info:
https://tucson.com/news/local/dam-expected-to-overflow-on-tohono-o-odham-nation-evacuations/article_e278bf10-857d-5600-b571-e8449f3954bd.html (https://tucson.com/news/local/dam-expected-to-overflow-on-tohono-o-odham-nation-evacuations/article_e278bf10-857d-5600-b571-e8449f3954bd.html)

Quote
A dam on the Tohono O'odham Nation is expected to overflow and could fail due to heavy rain and flooding from remnants of tropical storm Rosa, authorities said Tuesday night.
...
Certain areas of the reservation have received up to 7 inches of rain in the last 72 hours, and rain levels of 3 to 5 inches are widespread on the reservation, said Glenn Lader, a meteorologist with the weather service in Tucson.

He said Menegers Dam is an old earthen dam that's 22 feet high.
Title: Re: Floods
Post by: kassy on October 10, 2018, 01:30:52 PM
Majorca flash flood kills at least six on Spanish island

At least six people have died and nine are feared missing in flash flooding on the Spanish island of Majorca.

A huge wave of muddy water engulfed the town of Sant Llorenç des Cardassar, in the east of the island, after a river burst its banks following heavy rain.
Vehicles were swept away, some with their headlights switched on, as water gushed through narrow streets.

...

The area was hit with more than eight inches of rainfall in just a few hours on Tuesday, according to Spanish meteorological agency Aemet.

...

https://www.bbc.com/news/world-europe-45807978
Title: Re: Floods
Post by: Sigmetnow on October 17, 2018, 07:10:56 PM
Up to 10 inches (254mm] of rain has fallen in areas of central Texas, leading to disastrous flooding.

LLANO COUNTY, Texas (KXAN) — Homes, businesses and resorts along the Llano River are expected to flood "disastrously," according to a National Weather Service update for the area Tuesday morning.

At least 1 dead in Texas flooding that caused bridge collapse, breached dam - ABC News
https://abcnews.go.com/US/dead-texas-flooding-caused-bridge-collapse-breached-dam/story?id=58532779

List of evacuations for 'disastrous' Llano, Colorado River flooding
https://www.kxan.com/news/local/hill-country/evacuations-along-llano-river-as-disastrous-flooding-expected/1527600330

Video: aerial view around Lake LBJ dam.
https://m.facebook.com/48009558692/posts/10156030132378693/
Title: Re: Floods
Post by: Sigmetnow on October 18, 2018, 01:54:26 PM
The Weather Channel (@weatherchannel)
10/18/18, 7:22 AM
Texas' Lake Travis expected to rise another 5 to 10 feet by Friday to its highest level in at least 21 years, per the @LCRA, potentially #flooding hundreds of homes.
https://twitter.com/weatherchannel/status/1052882508566679553

Quote
A northward buckle of the jet stream in the West has left behind an upper-level low-pressure system over the southwestern U.S.

In absence of a jet stream to kick the low out, it has stalled out over the region, pumping in moisture from Mexico and Central America.

This moisture will continue to wrap over the chillier air that has engulfed Texas, ensuring the rest of the week will be shrouded in clouds and rain.
https://weather.com/forecast/regional/news/2018-10-14-texas-southern-plains-wet-pattern
Title: Re: Floods
Post by: Gray-Wolf on October 19, 2018, 11:44:01 AM
Spain takes some nasty flooding with the threat looking to move south over the next few days?

Very sad for the region but I , in the UK , am counting my blessings that these highs are keeping the rain to our north/south!
Title: Re: Floods
Post by: magnamentis on October 19, 2018, 09:14:18 PM
Spain takes some nasty flooding with the threat looking to move south over the next few days?

Very sad for the region but I , in the UK , am counting my blessings that these highs are keeping the rain to our north/south!

sorry if i appear as a PIA but generally one should be more specific. there are so many statements and talks about americans, germans, spain as cold as norther europe while that's madrid and a few mountains only etc. etc. the flooding has been on the east coast between valencia and barcelona with a surge inland from the coast, all the large rest of spain was not prone to that flood.

further, floods and rainfalls being heavier in that region is at least a bi-annual event, hence some kind of normal with slight variations on scale and exact region. valencia however is almost always involved, has to do with topography as well as prevailing winds from the warm ocean air rising up the mountain slopes and cooling/discharging in the process.

so please forgive me, it's not personal and not post specific but a general observation that most such generalizations don't really draw an accurate picture of what happened and how people and things are. not even in small switzerland people in bern, zurich, mountainside or romandie are the same and by far not. ;)
Title: Re: Floods
Post by: be cause on October 19, 2018, 11:03:00 PM
Hey Magnamentis .. the detail was welcome .

if those like you with fine computer skills etc had filed the original rather than GW , then he would have not needed to do the obviously thankless task of providing the information that he did.

However bare the bones , they gave an opportunity for us all to inform ourselves further and/or as you did .. bring more to the table !
 
It is also interesting that this weather is a late display of the combined energies of the late Hurricanes Leslie and Michael .... b.c.
Title: Re: Floods
Post by: magnamentis on October 20, 2018, 01:16:09 AM
Hey Magnamentis .. the detail was welcome .

if those like you with fine computer skills etc had filed the original rather than GW , then he would have not needed to do the obviously thankless task of providing the information that he did.

However bare the bones , they gave an opportunity for us all to inform ourselves further and/or as you did .. bring more to the table !
 
It is also interesting that this weather is a late display of the combined energies of the late Hurricanes Leslie and Michael .... b.c.

hey, thanks for the feedback. even though i read every thread out of general interest i never posted in this thread except perhaps in respons. for me floods have happened and will happen most of the time so i have no special interest and to measure the scale is a bit futile without proper longterm stats in locations where there are quite frequent. this is why i did not post myself.

in case i was not clear a gladly say it again, it was an opportunity to point at something general and not specifically on topic and by no means personal. somehow i even felt uncomfy and was afraid it would come across wrong, which is why i relativated it, thought to take the sting out of the post that way.

basically i had the pic ready because i sent it to my friend near valencia to make him aware of his luck and how close it was (he's living at the very southern edge of the area with super heavy rains.

BTW, where i live at the "costa del sol" the color shown was yellow and it was horrible enough.

i had to clean the drainage of the terrace 3 times and listened very carefully at the wall whether the roof is indeed draining, 3 years ago i had 30cm of water on the roof due to blocked drainage and that was freightening considering the weight imposed on the roof above our heads.

again sorry for any inconvenience and hope i was able to still convey the part that i thought is worth to bring it up. ;)
Title: Re: Floods
Post by: vox_mundi on October 24, 2018, 07:01:51 PM
Austin Urged to Boil Water as Texas Flood Shuts Down Treatment Plants – Wettest Autumn on Record in Dallas (http://www.desdemonadespair.net/2018/10/austin-urged-to-boil-water-as-texas.html)

(https://s.hdnux.com/photos/76/25/60/16342023/3/480x480.jpg)

Silt and debris from floodwaters have overwhelmed Austin’s ability to produce clean water, prompting an unprecedented citywide alert Monday that urged residents to avoid drinking tap water without boiling it first.

By Monday evening, the situation led to a run on bottled water supplies at grocery stores throughout the region — and appeared to be worsening. City officials warned that water use was outpacing the amount of water being treated, and that residents needed to cut their personal water use by 15 to 20 percent to keep the city from running out of water altogether.

“Austin water treatment plants can currently produce 105 million gallons of water per day. Current customer use is about 120 million gallons per day,” officials said. “Water reservoir levels are reaching minimal levels.”

The current problem is twofold.

The water is so murky and full of silt, measured Tuesday at 250 NTU (normal is about four NTU), that city engineers worry they won’t be able to clean the water to meet federal standards.

Additionally, that dirty water is slowing down the cleaning process, putting the city’s ability to meet customer’s water demand in question. As a result, the city is asking people to continue conserving water.

"We've been providing water for 100 years, this has never happened to us," Meszaros said

Councilmember Troxclair questions why the city didn't see this coming

A flash flood watch remains in effect for Central Texas, including Travis County, through tonight. The area could see an additional 1 to 2 inches of rainfall.

https://www.cnn.com/videos/us/2018/10/23/austin-texas-water-quality-boil-notice-presser-bts-vpx.cnn

(https://www.readingeagle.com/storyimage/RE/20181022/AP/310229791/AR/0/AR-310229791.jpg&q=80&MaxW=1200&MaxH=630&RCRadius=5)

A weather pattern stalled over Texas has produced the worst flash flooding since 1935 in Llano County in the central part of the state. The area got as much as 13.24 inches of rain in just the past two days.

The Llano River rose from about 10 feet to nearly 40 feet in less than 24 hours.

Also, Dallas broke the record for the wettest autumn on record -- just halfway into the season. The city has received almost 2 feet of rain so far this fall.

More rain is on the way for Texas on Wednesday and Thursday as flood watches and warnings remain in place for a large part of Texas.
Title: Re: Floods
Post by: FrostKing70 on October 24, 2018, 09:45:36 PM
Follow up to earlier post on Lake Travis, here is the daily averages for the last few weeks.  More raining hitting the area today (Moisture from the remnants of Hurricane Willa):

Title: Re: Floods
Post by: vox_mundi on October 25, 2018, 08:43:16 PM
Then ...
Changes in the occurrence of extreme precipitation events at the Paleocene–Eocene thermal maximum
https://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0012821X18304643

Quote
- Modelling shows a shift in the frequency–intensity relationship of precipitation.
- Incidence of extreme events increases by 70% in some regions.
- Changes in extreme precipitation are often decoupled from mean annual changes.

While the most extreme precipitation rates tend to relate to increases in convective precipitation, in some regions dynamic changes in atmospheric circulation are also of importance.

Catastrophic soil erosion during the end-Permian biotic crisis (https://pubs.geoscienceworld.org/gsa/geology/article-abstract/33/12/941/129272)

https://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2012/10/121018141844.htm
_______________________________________

Now ...
In New California Disaster Era of ‘Fire-Floods,’ Where Will Deadly Debris Flows Strike Next?
https://www.sacbee.com/news/weather/article219881260.html
https://www.sacbee.com/news/state/california/big-valley/article220570100.html

California is entering what experts call the “fire-flood” era: a formidable one-two punch prompted by warmer temperatures, bigger wildland fires, and more intense winter rain dumps, even in drought years.

Fall fire season sets the table by denuding millions of acres of hillsides and baking the soil surface so that it becomes non-absorbent, or, in scientific terms, hydrophobic. When heavy winter rains hit, the water cannot penetrate the burned soil, and instead rolls downhill in the form of a mud and ash soup, similar to a flash flood, carrying boulders and trees with it.

We know where things are headed,” climate scientist Daniel Swain of UCLA said. “We are just entering this era, and it is only going to get more interesting from here.”

(https://media.sacbee.com/static/newsroom/graphicsembeds/2018/hazard-probability.png)
and other maps (https://www.sacbee.com/news/state/california/big-valley/article220570100.html)

--------------
Galveston County residents drying out after nearly 9 inches of rain floods homes and streets
https://abc13.com/weather/nearly-9-in-of-rain-sends-water-into-homes-in-galveston-co/4552912/

--------------
Severe Thunderstorm Covers Rome In Hail and Floods - video
https://www.theguardian.com/environment/video/2018/oct/22/severe-thunderstorm-covers-rome-in-hail-and-floods-video

A severe hailstorm hit Rome on Sunday evening, bringing a dramatic end to a long spell of hot weather and covering the streets of the Italian capital in hail and floodwaters.

Drivers found themselves stranded in high waters, while the runoff poured into underground stations. The temperature around the city dropped by 10C during the storm.

An area of low pressure moving south from northern Europe to Italy over the weekend brought disruption to most of the country, with other Italian cities – such as Milan and Palermo – experiencing floods as well.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=BBEhB_1fx4w

----------------------

Flash floods hit Russia's south, streets turn into raging rivers
http://www.pravdareport.com/news/hotspots/disasters/25-10-2018/141870-flash_floods-0/

Two people were killed, two were injured, another one went missing as a result of flash floods in the Tuapse district of the Krasnodar region in southern Russia. The region has seen 119 mm (4.7 in) of precipitation in six hours. Countless buildings have been flooded, railway and road communication have been interrupted. Many local residents were left without electricity and gas supplies. More than 350 people were evacuated.
Title: Re: Floods
Post by: Archimid on October 26, 2018, 03:00:50 AM
Everyone knows that this will pass and things will return to normal. It happened that way since the beginning of history. Bad times followed by good times. That’s the way it works and everyone knows it.

Except that the climate changed, and the changes are just beginning. I doubt we will have much recovery time from now on. I hope we get a few years to rebuild and regain strength, but I doubt it.

Humanity should be seriously preparing for climate change, but we are not.
Title: Re: Floods
Post by: vox_mundi on October 27, 2018, 07:07:23 PM
... Humanity should be seriously preparing for climate change, but we are not.
This is probably not the way ...

Largest Flood Barrier In World Proposed for Texas (https://www.wbtv.com/2018/10/27/largest-flood-barrier-world-proposed-texas/)
https://www.wbtv.com/2018/10/27/largest-flood-barrier-world-proposed-texas/

Quote
GALVESTON, TX – The U.S. Army Corps of Engineers have released their plan to build the largest flood barrier in the world along the Texas coastline.

The Corps of Engineers released their idea for a floodgate system Friday to protect the Galveston region, which could cost as much as $30 billion. (... probably 2-3x that)

The groundbreaking plan includes almost 30 floodgates, which will form a protective barrier to the oil refinery businesses, homes and business owners.

The proposed barrier system would cover 70 miles of coast, starting near High Island, down Bolivar Peninsula, across the entrance to Galveston Bay, and down the Island to San Luis Pass.

Once complete, the main gate across the ship channel would be the largest flood gate in the world at 2,800 feet wide, big enough for two tankers to pass through at once.

The study will be completed by 2021 and submitted to Congress for funding approval.

(https://grendelsmotherthenovel.files.wordpress.com/2017/02/donaeldunready_thumb.jpg?w=400&h=208)
Title: Re: Floods
Post by: Ktb on October 28, 2018, 01:42:41 PM
After briefly buffing up on my roman history, that is by far one of the funniest things I have ever seen on this forum.
Title: Re: Floods
Post by: magnamentis on October 28, 2018, 05:55:36 PM
This is probably not the way ...

GALVESTON, TX – The U.S. Army Corps of Engineers have released their plan to build the largest flood barrier in the world along the Texas coastline.

The Corps of Engineers released their idea for a floodgate system Friday to protect the Galveston region, which could cost as much as $30 billion. (... probably 2-3x that)

The groundbreaking plan includes almost 30 floodgates, which will form a protective barrier to the oil refinery businesses, homes and business owners.

The proposed barrier system would cover 70 miles of coast, starting near High Island, down Bolivar Peninsula, across the entrance to Galveston Bay, and down the Island to San Luis Pass.

Once complete, the main gate across the ship channel would be the largest flood gate in the world at 2,800 feet wide, big enough for two tankers to pass through at once.

The study will be completed by 2021 and submitted to Congress for funding approval.


almost  nauseating to see how those military heads and their fellows from the industry try to find ways to fight the effect by protecting the cause, if it were not sad it were funny.

i'm referring to protecting refineries and allowing two tankers to pass :-(

Title: Re: Floods
Post by: Shared Humanity on October 28, 2018, 06:29:03 PM
I hope we get a few years to rebuild and regain strength, but I doubt it.

It would be best if we don't. I hope we have a period of unrelenting damage from weather. One of these category 4 or 5 storms needs to be a direct hit on D.C., flooding and severely damaging our historic monuments and buildings.

Humanity should be seriously preparing for climate change, but we are not.

If we continue to have communities decimated by devastating storms caused by climate change, this will happen sooner.
Title: Re: Floods
Post by: magnamentis on October 28, 2018, 07:42:02 PM

If we continue to have communities decimated by devastating storms caused by climate change, this will happen sooner.

i've always been of the opinion that things are ultimately self-regulating, only that transitions are painful and destructive for some and that we should be smart enough not to boost but to reduce such effects.

ultimately population of planet earth will be decimated for recovery, the means of decimation there are plenty of them and most probably they will happen in succession. wars famines, floods, earth-quakes and epidemias etc.


Title: Re: Floods
Post by: vox_mundi on October 28, 2018, 09:42:22 PM
Thx Ktb; and magnamentis, I agree, there will be a reckoning.
-------------------------------------
Remnants of Hurricane Willa strike the East Coast.

For some, Saturday's flooding almost as bad as Hurricane Sandy (https://www.accuweather.com/en/weather-news/photos-noreaster-causes-destruction-and-leaves-thousands-without-power/70006472)

Quote
https://twitter.com/twitter/statuses/1056205668313690113

The coastline of the mid-Atlantic and New England endured the worst of the storm as strong winds led to tree damage in many communities. Wind gusts of up to 67 mph were recorded.

The strong winds blowing the ocean’s water onshore led to moderate to major coastal flooding at high tide from New Jersey to Long Island Sound on Saturday.

In terms of coastal flooding, this storm will rank up there as the one of the worst in recent memory. Tidal gauges at Cape May (https://tidesandcurrents.noaa.gov/waterlevels.html?id=8536110) reached major flood stage. Ocean City, Atlantic City and Barnegat Light were in moderate flood stage.

In my home town, high tides were running ~3.5 ft above normal - significant flooding along the shore (11.1 ft vs 7.8 ft)
Title: Re: Floods
Post by: Sigmetnow on October 29, 2018, 06:24:46 PM
NWS Eastern Region:  Updated 2018 Eastern US rainfall totals after this weekend's nor'easter. A number of locations have already cracked their top 10 wettest years on record.
https://twitter.com/NWSEastern/status/1056676199425019905
Image below.
Title: Re: Floods
Post by: Martin Gisser on October 29, 2018, 06:47:39 PM
almost  nauseating to see how those military heads and their fellows from the industry try to find ways to fight the effect by protecting the cause, if it were not sad it were funny.

i'm referring to protecting refineries and allowing two tankers to pass :-(
The U.S. Army Corps of Engineers is not the military. While they also work for the military (building bases, or support infractructure at war) the main job is large scale civil engineering like building dams and stuff.

If they build a 30+ billion $ thing, it must be worth it in an economic sense. Thus they protect refinieries who are strategically vital for the economy (plus, are a pollution hazard), and not (directly) the house of Joe Sixpack.
Title: Re: Floods
Post by: Martin Gisser on October 30, 2018, 02:28:13 PM
For a a little relief, here are some pretty images of flooding...

Three-quarters of Venice flooded by exceptional high tide
Strong winds push water into historic Italian lagoon city in worst flooding in a decade

https://www.theguardian.com/world/2018/oct/29/venice-experiences-worst-flooding-since-2008

(https://i.guim.co.uk/img/media/67057eea557bae7aa9b2d86b97988c3122f7c3f3/0_0_3000_2000/master/3000.jpg?width=700&quality=45&auto=format&fit=max&dpr=2&s=96095b43f10f171db69b0d34aabdef03)

Title: Re: Floods
Post by: Shared Humanity on October 30, 2018, 06:16:18 PM
Europe will eventually spring to build a sea wall across the Straits of Gibraltar to address flooding of coastal cities across the Mediterranean.
Title: Re: Floods
Post by: magnamentis on October 30, 2018, 08:07:59 PM
Europe will eventually spring to build a sea wall across the Straits of Gibraltar to address flooding of coastal cities across the Mediterranean.

while i generally think that humans should restrain from such things in general, in that case one can consider whether it makes sense because:

a) it's definitely feasible and affordable once needed and compared to flooding costs

b) whatever eventual downsides could be and considering that the dam would not be hermetic
...(not entirely closed but able to let water through into both directions) the benefits would be huge
...once we put the number of cities and infrastructure into account. after all the coastline that would
...be protected with kind of a relatively minor intervention, is several thousand kilometers long.

c) the number of countries to contribute in their own interest would be huge ( affordability)

of course some would argue that they won't follow up adolfs dreams of "atlantropae" ever ;) [JK]
Title: Re: Floods
Post by: oren on October 30, 2018, 11:03:02 PM
Terrible idea. Once the dam is in place you will have hundreds of millions of people at risk of death in case of a catastrophic failure, dependent on continued maintenance forever after, even in case of major war, civilizational collapse, need for expensive refurbishment and whatever not, not to mention vulnerable to major terrorism or bombing.
It will be the Mosul Dam a hundred times over.
The good news being that by the time humanity realizes the imminent total loss of all coastal cities and infrastructure, there will not be enough cooperation and resources left to attempt such a project. (The same applies to geoengineering).
Another point - damming Gibraltar will raise global sea level faster. Will America, China, India, Northern Europe sit idle? No way.
Title: Re: Floods
Post by: bbr2314 on October 30, 2018, 11:20:04 PM
Terrible idea. Once the dam is in place you will have hundreds of millions of people at risk of death in case of a catastrophic failure, dependent on continued maintenance forever after, even in case of major war, civilizational collapse, need for expensive refurbishment and whatever not, not to mention vulnerable to major terrorism or bombing.
It will be the Mosul Dam a hundred times over.
The good news being that by the time humanity realizes the imminent total loss of all coastal cities and infrastructure, there will not be enough cooperation and resources left to attempt such a project. (The same applies to geoengineering).
Another point - damming Gibraltar will raise global sea level faster. Will America, China, India, Northern Europe sit idle? No way.
Think of the cable news ratings from the dam collapse -- the ad dollars alone would pay for construction. Sounds like an argument to build, baby, build!
Title: Re: Floods
Post by: DrTskoul on October 31, 2018, 12:17:02 AM
you would have to dam the other entrance too... In any case..trade and shipping much more valuable... Most cities will have to deal with it... There are many ancient cities under the water already. Venice will just be another....
Title: Re: Floods
Post by: be cause on October 31, 2018, 12:40:57 AM
the pretty flood in Venice reached 5feet in St Marks square .. 4th worst flood the city has experienced . As the flood was caused by wind forcing water up the Adriatic , a dam at the mouth of the Med would not have stopped it ..
 Looks like rapid melting of recent snow in the Alps over the coming days will cause further flooding in Europe as warmth follows the weather moving North .. b.c.
Title: Re: Floods
Post by: oren on October 31, 2018, 01:33:44 AM
Quote
Another point - damming Gibraltar will raise global sea level faster.
Just fact-checking myself, Mediterranean surface area is less than 1% of the global ocean surface, so the effect on SLR elsewhere will be (almost) negligible.
Title: Re: Floods
Post by: RikW on October 31, 2018, 01:28:25 PM
you would have to dam the other entrance too... In any case..trade and shipping much more valuable... Most cities will have to deal with it... There are many ancient cities under the water already. Venice will just be another....

That's not that difficult, that's only a manmade channel. It would be an interesting project with huge  hydropower options. Although I don't know if the strait of gibraltar currently functions as a way to raise or to lower the mediterranean sea lvl.
Title: Re: Floods
Post by: magnamentis on October 31, 2018, 07:50:27 PM
Terrible idea. Once the dam is in place you will have hundreds of millions of people at risk of death in case of a catastrophic failure, dependent on continued maintenance forever after, even in case of major war, civilizational collapse, need for expensive refurbishment and whatever not, not to mention vulnerable to major terrorism or bombing.
It will be the Mosul Dam a hundred times over.
The good news being that by the time humanity realizes the imminent total loss of all coastal cities and infrastructure, there will not be enough cooperation and resources left to attempt such a project. (The same applies to geoengineering).
Another point - damming Gibraltar will raise global sea level faster. Will America, China, India, Northern Europe sit idle? No way.

while the risks you mention are true that would be the case for every dam, some more and some less depending what lays below them, hence that can't be an arguement, still millions or even billions of people live in places that would be erradicated in case of a dam failure. yangtse, river below the dam, cities below the hoover dam etc. etc. , probably thousands of such dams exist.

however, while opinions may differ and i'm not convinced that the idea is good, just considering, it's certainly not a "horrible idea" before all factors are weighed agains each other. the part about resources etc. is jumping to conclusions while it could be exactly the other way around. i say "could be" not "is" because under common threads history has also shown that even enemies can unite to first fight the common enemy and then fight each other again ;)

either way i don't conclude anything but the thought is certainly worth a proper and detailed analysis before being discarded in case of a sea-level rise of several meters.

last but not least in case of a 60+ meters rise the idea will become obsolete again, that and the time frame would also have to be part of a propers analysis.

the question will be what cost more, to rebuild all the cities far enough inland, how much time it takes to move population and cities compared to how much time a dam would win us to move slowly and organized etc. etc.

there are so many factors that one cannot just say "great" or "bullshit" to be honest i was surprised about the the "horrible" word while i respect a more negative approach to the idea. i tend to be open to ideas until they are proven to be no good and in this case we wouldn't do it for fun but for a an organized and much slower transition of the mediterranean population and infrastructure.
Title: Re: Floods
Post by: Sigmetnow on December 12, 2018, 04:13:59 PM
Flooding from Hurricane Harvey in Houston, Texas last year.

Houston_First won’t recover from the economic hit until well into the next decade.

Houston First Tightens Belt To Pay Off Harvey Damage
https://www.houstonpublicmedia.org/articles/news/2018/12/11/315061/houston-first-tightens-belt-to-pay-off-harvey-damage/

Cross-posted from Hurricane 2018 thread
Title: Re: Floods
Post by: kassy on December 12, 2018, 05:05:41 PM
Quote
Another point - damming Gibraltar will raise global sea level faster.
Just fact-checking myself, Mediterranean surface area is less than 1% of the global ocean surface, so the effect on SLR elsewhere will be (almost) negligible.

The Mediterranean Sea is quite salty because it has a lot of evaporation.

It would be a more advanced version of the Oosterscheldedam. Probably should have sluices for shipping and points to let in Atlantic water.

The big problem is when is it urgent enough to build and at that time which projected SLR do you use for planning? And if that is really bad we might need some money in the north for flood defence too...or relocating.



Title: Re: Floods
Post by: sidd on December 21, 2018, 07:47:58 PM
Amtrak treading water:

" Parts of Amtrak’s Northeast Corridor route, which carries 12 million people each year between Boston and Washington, face “continual inundation.”  "

"Amtrak has since de-emphasized the threat of climate change in its public documents, even scrubbing the phrase entirely from its most recent five-year strategic plan."

"One of the redacted portions of the report is an analysis of the full costs and benefits of protecting the corridor against climate change, making it impossible to know if the company has determined it would save more money by keeping the corridor open than it would have to spend to save it. The disclosure of that information “could possibly cause public confusion,” ... "

https://www.bloomberg.com/graphics/2018-amtrak-sea-level/

They be screwed.

sidd
Title: Re: Floods
Post by: Nemesis on December 21, 2018, 07:50:28 PM
What a pity  :) "Shrug", Karma rules  :)
Title: Re: Floods
Post by: Sigmetnow on December 23, 2018, 02:29:43 PM
So, tunnels, then?
Title: Re: Floods
Post by: Sigmetnow on February 19, 2019, 03:47:27 PM
U.S. Southeast:

One sign of the seriousness of this week's heavy-rain/flood-threat onslaught in the Tennessee Valley: Nashville is very likely to see its wettest February on record--and the old record was set in 1880.

Serious Flooding Threat Looms for Tennessee Valley This Week and Beyond by Bob Henson | Category 6 | Weather Underground
Quote
A fast, furious jet
The upper-level dynamics on tap to drench the Southeast are in some ways an eastward extension of the pattern that doused California last week. Both events are the result of shots of energy moving through a very persistent and slow-moving upper-level trough (an elongated zone of low pressure) that extended on Monday from central Canada into the southwest U.S. On the east side of this trough, the jet stream has been roaring at extreme speeds—sometimes topping 220 mph at heights of around 35,000 feet.
...
This intense jet streak will be pushing across the Ohio Valley and Northeast into the Atlantic over the next several days, but its tail end will remain close to Kentucky and Tennessee through the week, assisting at times with the rain-producing dynamics. Beneath the jet stream, a surface front will be sloshing back and forth across the mid-South. As each upper-level impulse approaches, a rich supply of low-level moisture will be pulled northward from the Gulf of Mexico, intercepting the front and stoking periods of heavy rain. ...
https://www.wunderground.com/cat6/Serious-Flooding-Threat-Looms-Tennessee-Valley-Week-and-Beyond
Title: Re: Floods
Post by: Sigmetnow on February 19, 2019, 04:08:37 PM
NASA: Relentless rainfall pounded Queensland for weeks, causing destructive flooding in the region. When the clouds dispersed, our @NASAEarth satellites got a clear look at the damage caused across the Australian state.
https://twitter.com/NASA/status/1097317279686107137
Image below.

See the full report: https://earthobservatory.nasa.gov/images/144545/summer-floods-in-australia
Title: Re: Floods
Post by: mitch on February 19, 2019, 05:01:21 PM
Look on the bright side--storing excess water on land leads to a temporary sea level fall.
https://www.sciencemag.org/news/2013/08/scienceshot-why-did-sea-level-drop-2010
Title: Re: Floods
Post by: vox_mundi on February 22, 2019, 01:13:50 PM
Plans Approved to Build Massive Seawall in NYC for "Once in 300 Year" Storm
https://www.inverse.com/article/53485-but-what-happens-when-every-300-years-becomes-every-ten

Despite Hurricane Sandy’s immense impact, the city has been slow to adopt protective measures that would safeguard residents from future storm-related disasters. A 2018 report that evaluated storm preparation ranked New York 12th out of 16 Eastern coastal states, behind both New Jersey and Connecticut. But on Tuesday, New York finally secured funding to begin addressing that though the Staten Island Levee Project, a $615 million seawall that will be built to withstand a “300 year storm.”

The new project is set to run 5.3 miles along Staten Island’s Eastern shore. It’s actually not technically a “wall,” and it will eventually be composed of a system of interconnected levees, berms, and seawalls, designed to combat both storm surges and rising sea levels.

But as climate change proceeds at an increasingly destructive pace, the more traditional ways of measuring storm severity — once every 100 years, every 300 years, every 500, etc. — and the ways in which those designations inform our seawall design could quickly become outdated. Hurricane Sandy, after all, was a once in a century storm. The Staten Island seawall is built for a once-in-300 year storm. But a report released last year by the Regional Plan Association (https://www.6sqft.com/study-new-york-city-could-get-hit-with-a-flood-every-five-years-instead-of-every-500/) found that those “every 500 years” floods New York has been slow to protect themselves against? They could start happening once every five.

https://www.6sqft.com/study-new-york-city-could-get-hit-with-a-flood-every-five-years-instead-of-every-500/
Title: Re: Floods
Post by: gerontocrat on February 22, 2019, 01:48:19 PM
Plans Approved to Build Massive Seawall in NYC for "Once in 300 Year" Storm
https://www.inverse.com/article/53485-but-what-happens-when-every-300-years-becomes-every-ten
I am unable to stop a wry smile. In some ways humans are so predictable.
I posted this last September elsewhere in this forum

The Kraken Wakes
Author: John Wyndham, published July 1953

The novel describes escalating phases of what appears to be an invasion of Earth by aliens.
The aliens are speculated to come from a gas giant, and thus can only survive under conditions of extreme pressures in which humans would be instantly crushed. The deepest parts of the oceans are the only parts of Earth in any way useful to them.  Humanity nevertheless feels threatened by this new phenomenon – particularly since the newcomers show signs of intensive work to adapt the ocean deeps to their needs.

In the final phase,the aliens begin melting the polar ice caps, causing sea levels to rise.

The book describes in some detail the ever greater efforts by society to prevent catastrophe rather than adapt to it. Higher and higher sea walls and other massive infrastructure - all doomed to fail.

To me it was a good illustration of the mind-set that says "we can fix it, no matter what it is". Man as the master of nature. I doubt if I will be around long enough to see sea walls across the Bering Strait and on the Antarctic sea-floor, though I am sure to see before I finally pop my clogs an awful lot of new sea walls, raised roads, vast pumps etc. built on land.
Title: Re: Floods
Post by: Sigmetnow on February 23, 2019, 03:04:58 PM
Quote
Tennessee Valley Authority (@TVAnews)
2/22/19, 12:21 PM
Heavy rainfall continues mainly across the lower Tennessee River Valley. Stretches of the river in North Ala. are above flood stage and areas below Pickwick Dam in West Tenn. are approaching and will exceed major flood stage. Tune to the @NWS and your local news. #TNWX #ALWX
https://twitter.com/tvanews/status/1098996222105399306
2-minute video at the link describing how TVA dams are handling up to ten inches of rain falling in its river basin in Tennessee and Alabama.
Title: Re: Floods
Post by: ritter on February 28, 2019, 01:14:39 AM
Local flooding for the North Bay Area in California. Sonoma County just finished up two days of an atmospheric river, resulting in major flooding on the Russian River. Recall, we've been scorched by wildfire the last two summers. From fires to floods, climate change in action.

https://www.sfgate.com/weather/article/forestville-russian-river-drone-flood-water-storm-13649847.php (https://www.sfgate.com/weather/article/forestville-russian-river-drone-flood-water-storm-13649847.php)

Title: Re: Floods
Post by: sidd on March 01, 2019, 01:03:09 AM
"These owners won't sell after the first flood; they think they have another 99 years to go," he said. "But they will sell after the second flood."

https://www.waxahachietx.com/zz/news/20190216/climate-change-means-more-floods-great-and-localized

sidd
Title: Re: Floods
Post by: wdmn on March 02, 2019, 03:51:03 PM
Local flooding for the North Bay Area in California. Sonoma County just finished up two days of an atmospheric river, resulting in major flooding on the Russian River. Recall, we've been scorched by wildfire the last two summers. From fires to floods, climate change in action.

https://www.sfgate.com/weather/article/forestville-russian-river-drone-flood-water-storm-13649847.php (https://www.sfgate.com/weather/article/forestville-russian-river-drone-flood-water-storm-13649847.php)

More on the flood:

"Sonoma County authorities, about 70 miles (110km) north of San Francisco, said about 3,600 people were evacuated after the Russian River flooded.

Torrential rain and snowfall has triggered the worst deluge in over 20 years, emergency officials say.

The towns of Monte Rio and Guerneville are currently only accessible by boat.

"You cannot get into or out of town," Sonoma County officials said on Wednesday night in a mandatory evacuation order. "Guerneville is officially an island."

Around 2,000 homes and businesses are currently underwater, Ms Khan said, adding that only around half of the town's 4,500 residents complied with the official warning to leave.
........

By Wednesday night the Russian River crested at 45ft - nearly 14ft above flood stage - before beginning to recede.

In nearby Sebastopol, the Laguna de Santa Rosa wetlands rose high enough to swamp the town's main shopping district.

The Russian River Valley is home to more than 300 wineries, according to the Mercury News, and tourists there spent around $2.1bn (£1.6bn) in 2017.

It's not yet clear to what extent the flooding has affected local vineyards, but photos clearly show fields that are underwater.

More rain is forecast in the coming days, weather officials warn, and an increased snowpack in several western states could continue to keep water levels higher than average."

https://www.bbc.com/news/world-us-canada-47406809

Title: Re: Floods
Post by: Sigmetnow on March 02, 2019, 06:20:45 PM
“Atmospheric Rivers”

Today’s floods in California may be a preview of a more extreme future
Quote
These floods show why atmospheric rivers are double-edged swords for California. They drop between 25 and 50 percent of the thirsty state’s precipitation over just a few days every year. But they’re also to blame for an estimated 81 percent of levee breaches in California’s Central Valley, according to a 2015 report. And in 2017, back-to-back atmospheric rivers accelerated damage to the crumbling Oroville dam spillway.

To capture that balance between benefit and hazard, Ralph proposed a new scale published earlier this month in the Bulletin of the American Meteorological Society. It ranks atmospheric rivers based on the amount of water they’re carrying, and how long they linger. The scale ranges from a “weak” category 1 that mostly brings helpful precipitation to an “exceptional” category 5 that’s far more hazardous than helpful. Based on early measurements, Ralph estimates that the one that just drenched California falls around a category 3 or 4 — somewhere between strong and extreme.

While Ralph can’t speak to the effects of climate change on this particular atmospheric river, he says we may be able to expect worse atmospheric rivers as climate change continues. Warmer air can hold more water vapor, which means more rainfall. But winds, which are also important for atmospheric river formation, are expected to slacken on average as temperatures at the poles climb. “These two trends compete with each other in terms of the long-term projections,” Ralph says. “One says weaker, one says stronger.”

That could mean somewhat fewer atmospheric rivers in general, but it could also mean that some of the ones we do see are likely to be bigger, and stronger, a recent study from Ralph’s lab predicts. “An average AR has about 25 Mississippi Rivers worth of water vapor transport going on,” Ralph says. “A stronger AR would be like adding additional Mississippis worth of water vapor flow.”
https://www.theverge.com/2019/2/27/18243658/california-floods-extreme-weather-future-atmospheric-river
Title: Re: Floods
Post by: Sigmetnow on March 03, 2019, 07:41:27 PM
Quote
Tennessee Valley Authority: "Management of the Tenn. River system using our integrated system of 49 dams across the region adverted $1.6 billion in flood damages. After the wettest February and fourth wettest month on record, we continue to manage high river and lake conditions to minimize flood impacts.”
https://twitter.com/TVAnews/status/1101528715173994497
Drone video of full-running dam at the link.
Title: Re: Floods
Post by: Sigmetnow on March 17, 2019, 03:22:58 PM
U.S.:  'Bomb Cyclone' Leaves Midwest Battling Floods
Quote
It's the worst flooding parts of the Midwest have seen in decades, where several states are battling the aftermath of a powerful "bomb cyclone" which swept through the region, bringing blizzard conditions, hurricane-like winds, snow and heavy rain.
...
The powerful storm pushed some waterways, including the Missouri River, to record levels in South Dakota, Iowa and Minnesota.

Marc Chenard, a meteorologist with the National Weather Service, told NPR many areas will remain water-logged for days.

"All the rivers respond differently, have different time scales that they flood and then recede. A lot of the rivers are going to remain in flood into the weekend, and some into next week," Chenard said. "Eventually as we head into next week, we should see more and more of the rivers start to recede below flood stage.” ...
https://www.npr.org/2019/03/16/704130300/the-midwest-battles-historic-floods-in-the-aftermath-of-bomb-cyclone

Much more on this storm in the “Weird Weather...” thread.
Title: Re: Floods
Post by: vox_mundi on March 17, 2019, 08:31:55 PM
Home Of Strategic Command And Some Of The USAF's Most Prized Aircraft Is Flooding   
http://www.thedrive.com/the-war-zone/26991/home-of-strategic-command-and-some-of-usafs-most-prized-aircraft-is-flooding

The home to America's prized RC-135 "Rivet Joint" strategic reconnaissance and E-4B "Nightwatch" Advanced Airborne Command Post aircraft, as well as others, and the headquarters of U.S. Strategic Command (STRATCOM), is flooding with water from a swollen Missouri River. 

Offutt Air Force Base sits near Omaha, Nebraska and is considered one of the most critical installations in the U.S. Air Force's portfolio. Not only does it house extremely high-value, but low density reconnaissance and command and control aircraft—massively expensive platforms that are essential to national security—but it is also the beating heart of STRATCOM that oversees America's strategic nuclear forces. In fact, a brand new command bunker, buried underground at the base, was just opened in January—which sounds far less than ideal considering water is now nearly covering the end of the base's runway..

A conga line of RC-135s were tracked escaping the impending deluge earlier today

(https://pbs.twimg.com/media/D10tMq3UcAEc4Ac?format=jpg&name=small)

The thing is that the fleet of aircraft housed at Offutt is among the oldest in the USAF's inventory and has received quite a reputation as of late for less than stellar readiness. In other words, some aircraft may not have been able to fly out. And even if most were good to go, there will almost always be a number left behind due to various circumstances—most commonly of which is being down for deep maintenance.

{Remember, over half the aircraft were left behind during Hurricane Michael - with base damage in excess of a $Billion dollars)

But still, considering the strategic operations centers that are the backbone of STRATCOM are located at the base, many of which are underground, this flood could prove to be way more harmful than the damage done to aircraft and basic infrastructure above ground.   

Quote
UPDATE: Offutt's commanding officer, Colonel Michael Manion, noted 15 hours ago that major damage is already being done to the base and that the rising river's edge isn't the only way water is flooding into critical areas:
Quote
"Team - 1600L/16 March update. Water is rising at a rapid rate on the SE side of the base. Water is entering from the river and through the storm drains. Several buildings including the Wing Building are inundated with water. We continue to work as rapidly as possible to improve water defenses around critical infrastructure. ...

Since then things have been getting worse, not better:

... "Team - 2100L/16 March update: Substantial flooding on the SE portion of Offutt AFB and we expect the water to continue to rise through the late afternoon of 17 March. Over 20 buildings have been evacuated due to flooding and we expect more flooding overnight. ...

(https://imagesvc.timeincapp.com/v3/foundry/image/?q=60&url=https%3A%2F%2Fs3-us-west-2.amazonaws.com%2Fthe-drive-cms-content-staging%2Fmessage-editor%252F1552821866909-adsasdcv.jpg)
Title: Re: Floods
Post by: oren on March 18, 2019, 01:37:24 AM
Oh dear. This looks severe indeed.
Title: Re: Floods
Post by: Archimid on March 18, 2019, 01:40:10 AM
Well, their boss said to ignore climate change and like good little soldiers that's what they are doing.
Title: Re: Floods
Post by: vox_mundi on March 18, 2019, 02:24:54 AM
UPDATE: 1,600 workers relocated, at least 30 buildings damaged by floodwaters at Offutt
https://www.omaha.com/news/military/air-force-gives-up-fight-to-stop-water-at-offutt/article_631f9b34-5271-50e8-b5eb-19f488daaf32.html

Even the U.S. Air Force couldn't stop the Mighty Missouri River from flooding Offutt Air Force Base.

Between Saturday night and early Sunday, the 55th Wing called off a 30-hour, round-the-clock sandbagging effort because the floodwaters were rising too fast.

Quote
"It was a lost cause. We gave up," said Tech. Sgt. Rachelle Blake, a 55th Wing spokeswoman.

By Sunday morning, one-third of the base was underwater, she said. Thirty buildings, including the 55th Wing headquarters and the two major aircraft maintenance facilities, had been flooded with up to 8 feet of water, and 30 more structures damaged. About 3,000 feet of the base's 11,700-foot runway was submerged   

(https://imagesvc.timeincapp.com/v3/foundry/image/?q=60&url=https%3A%2F%2Fs3-us-west-2.amazonaws.com%2Fthe-drive-cms-content-staging%2Fmessage-editor%252F1552857730446-54257775_2574050372609543_3309349095583252480_n.jpg)

At Offutt, the 55th Wing managed to fly out nine of the 33 reconnaissance jets based there Saturday evening, according to 55th Wing Commander Col. Michael Manion's official Facebook post. Some were flown to the Lincoln Airport, where the Nebraska Air National Guard has a base.
More photos: https://m.facebook.com/story.php?story_fbid=2574278785920035&id=1728411170506805&__tn__=%2As%2As-R
https://facebook.com/55.WG.Commander/

Five planes were still parked on the northwest taxiway and the apron Sunday morning. Blake said it's not clear yet when or whether they'll be moved. No planes have been damaged in the floods.

(https://imagesvc.timeincapp.com/v3/foundry/image/?q=60&url=https%3A%2F%2Fs3-us-west-2.amazonaws.com%2Fthe-drive-cms-content-staging%2Fmessage-editor%252F1552857723688-53777982_2574050389276208_3229748379332378624_n.jpg)

Army Corp. Of Engineers expects water will begin to recede beginning Thursday, Mar 21

------------------------'--

Offutt, $1.2 billion StratCom HQ   
https://www.omaha.com/news/military/at-worksite-at-offutt-billion-stratcom-hq-taking-shape/article_5687667c-2ee2-5492-87f1-0b466d262c03.html

Exclusive: Inside the Base That Would Oversee a US Nuclear Strike
https://amp.cnn.com/cnn/2018/03/23/politics/us-strategic-command-nuclear-hyten/index.html

Several Workers in StratCom's Basement Got Mysteriously Sick. The Likely Cause: Carbon Dioxide Buildup   
https://www.omaha.com/livewellnebraska/several-workers-in-stratcom-s-basement-got-mysteriously-sick-the/article_56ba026e-86c4-5505-8b6a-cedd36ad2fb3.html

Offutt's Aging Jets are Breaking Down at Sky-high Rates 
https://www.omaha.com/news/military/risking-disaster-offutt-s-aging-jets-are-breaking-down-at/article_dde63e61-06eb-517e-bd8f-b28269dd152b.html

Tornado Caused Almost $20 Million in Damage at Offutt Air Force Base 
https://www.omaha.com/news/military/tornado-caused-almost-million-in-damage-at-offutt-air-force/article_dc05a175-0658-5595-b585-9f09f878e4b6.html

Offutt Runway Project Could Hit $100 Million
https://www.omaha.com/news/military/offutt-runway-project-could-hit-million-will-likely-continue-into/article_f11cf924-f468-542e-bae9-2638f36ca5a6.html

------------------------

From 2 month's ago ...

Climate Change Threatens a Majority of Mission-Critical Military Bases, Pentagon Report Says 
https://www.militarytimes.com/news/your-military/2019/01/18/dod-majority-of-mission-critical-bases-face-climate-change-threats/

More than two-thirds of the military’s operationally critical installations are threatened by climate change, according to a new DoD report.

https://partner-mco-archive.s3.amazonaws.com/client_files/1547826612.pdf

The January 2019 report, “Report on Effects of a Changing Climate to the Department of Defense,” was submitted to Congress Thursday without an official announcement of the report or a public release. Several environmental organizations made the report publicly available early Friday.


In its assessment of those 79 installations, which included Army, Air Force and Navy installations — and notably no Marine Corps bases — the services reported that 53 of the 79 faced current threats from flooding; 43 of the 79 face current threats from drought and 36 of the 79 faced current threats from wildfires.

... Also, the report failed to mention last year’s massive storm damage to military installations. Tyndall Air Force Base sustained serious damage to almost all of its buildings by Hurricane Michael and the Marines' Camp Lejeune was badly damaged by Hurricane Florence.


See also: https://forum.arctic-sea-ice.net/index.php/topic,1858.msg188475.html#msg188475
Title: Re: Floods
Post by: Sigmetnow on March 18, 2019, 04:54:14 PM
Not as dramatic as the Air Force Base flooding, but impactful nonetheless:
Quote
NWS Omaha (@NWSOmaha)
3/17/19, 11:00 AM
You may encounter some broken links on our webpage, but our forecasters remain hard at work forecasting and issuing warnings and products. We've moved operations to Hastings, NE.

Thanks, @NWSHastings!
https://twitter.com/nwsomaha/status/1107295624586805248
Image below.
Title: Re: Floods
Post by: kassy on March 19, 2019, 08:53:14 PM
Cyclone Idai: 'Massive disaster' in Mozambique and Zimbabwe


Cyclone Idai has triggered a "massive disaster" in southern Africa affecting hundreds of thousands if not millions of people, the UN says.

The region has been hit by widespread flooding and devastation affecting Mozambique, Zimbabwe and Malawi.

Mozambique President Filipe Nyusi has called it "a humanitarian disaster of great proportion".

He said more than 1,000 people may have been killed after the cyclone hit the country last week.

Cyclone Idai made landfall near the port city of Beira in Sofala province on Thursday with winds of up to 177 km/h (106 mph).

...

Mozambique's government says 84 people have died and 100,000 need to be urgently rescued near Beira.

An aerial survey of the province shows that a 50km (30 mile) stretch of land is under water after the Buzi river burst its banks, charity Save The Children says.

...

In Zimbabwe, the government says 98 people have been killed and more than 200 are missing.

President Emmerson Mnangagwa said that the government was conducting rescue missions and delivering food aid.

In the south-eastern town of Chimanimani residents told harrowing stories of how they lost their relatives when the storm hit.

Some rescuers said homes and even bodies were washed away in the rivers to neighbouring Mozambique, the BBC's Shingai Nyoka reports.

Floods of up to six metres deep had caused "incredible devastation" over a huge area in Mozambique, World Food Programme regional chief Lola Castro said.

"This is shaping up to be one of the worst weather-related disasters ever to hit the southern hemisphere, if the report by [Mozambique's] president and other agencies are confirmed, in terms of the causality toll," Clare Nullis from the UN's weather agency told the BBC.

At least 1.7 million people were in the direct path of the cyclone in Mozambique and 920,000 have been affected in Malawi, the UN said.

In Zimbabwe, at least 20,000 houses have been partially damaged in the south-eastern town of Chipinge, 600 others were completely destroyed.

Local officials say they are distributing rice and maize from the national food reserve to those displaced.

and more on:
https://www.bbc.com/news/world-africa-47624156
Title: Re: Floods
Post by: vox_mundi on March 21, 2019, 11:22:34 PM
‘Unprecedented’ US Flood Season Will Imperil 200m People, Experts Warn 
https://www.theguardian.com/us-news/2019/mar/21/mississippi-river-flooding-missouri-nebraska-noaa

The severe flooding in the American midwest is set to only be a prelude to “unprecedented” levels of flooding across the US in the coming months that will imperil 200 million people, federal government scientists have warned.

(https://s.w-x.co/util/image/v/1553185777107_floodoutlook0320pm.1.jpg)

Nearly two-thirds of the lower 48 states will have a heightened risk of flooding until May, according to the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (Noaa) forecast.

Much of the nation is forecast to receive above-average precipitation April through June.

Communities living near the Mississippi river, which has received rain and snow levels up to 200% above normal, the lower Ohio river basin, the Tennessee river basin and the Great Lakes are at the greatest risk, Noaa said on Thursday. Vast swaths of the rest of the country may also get mild or moderate flooding, including most of eastern US and parts of California and Nevada.

-------------------------------------------------

U.S. Military Knew Flood Risks at Offutt Air Force Base, But Didn’t Act in Time
https://insideclimatenews.org/news/21032019/military-climate-change-flood-risk-offutt-air-force-base-army-corps-levee-failure

For several years, the U.S. military and federal and local officials knew that Offutt Air Force Base in Nebraska lay exposed to the threat of catastrophic flooding. But a key federal agency moved too slowly to approve plans to protect the base from last weekend's deluge, a top local official said.

The risks to Offutt, long known, were laid bare back in 2011 when floodwaters crept to within 50 feet of the runway.

... the risks exposed by the 2011 flood were formally recognized in 2015. A land use management plan (https://www.documentcloud.org/documents/5772214-Offutt-AFB-JLUS-Report-Final-August-2015.html)—carried out by officials representing the base, the city of Omaha, the natural resources district and various cities and counties protected by the levee—warned that the levee needed to be built up, and cautioned that climate change might make matters worse.

Under the heading "Climate Adaptation," the report cited the 147 acres of wetlands on the base and the Platte and Missouri rivers just outside the fence, and said:

"During heavy rainfall, this area is prone to flooding, and flooding onto Offutt AFB may cause delays to missions and operations."

It went on: "Due to changes in the base flood elevation of the Missouri River, Federal Emergency Management Agency (FEMA) has identified the need to raise the levee between two inches to several feet for it to be capable of protecting the installation." (... fortification cost of the levees: $22.7 million)

In particular, FEMA had ordered 19 miles of levees along the Missouri to be raised by 2 feet to protect Offutt and portions of Omaha, including one of the city's wastewater treatment facilities.

(https://insideclimatenews.org/sites/default/files/styles/icn_centered_medium/public/offutt-flooding-satellite_55th-wind-commander.jpg?itok=jE8f_jaY)

"For the Department of Defense, the takeaway from this event has to be what lessons have been learned," said retired Army Lt. Col. Frank Galgano, an associate professor in the Department of Geography and the Environment at Villanova University.

"You can't say it was an act of God and hope it doesn't happen again. You have to look at the frequency of these events and plan for the future."

"If this pattern persists, it may signal a larger problem," Galgano added.


(https://insideclimatenews.org/sites/default/files/styles/icn_centered_medium/public/offutt-tanks-900_55th-wing-commander.jpg?itok=Go4Vn8DY)
The flooding surrounded fuel tanks at Offutt Air Force Base and tipped over one, which military officials said was empty and had been decommissioned
Title: Re: Floods
Post by: sidd on March 22, 2019, 05:12:07 AM
"If this pattern persists, it may signal a larger problem,"

No shit. Guess what, Sherlock, it's gonna not only persist, but get worse.

Now as to :

"The flooding surrounded fuel tanks at Offutt Air Force Base and tipped over one, which military officials said was empty and had been decommissioned"

These people lie and lie and lie. I deal with those large oil tanks. Even when empty there is sludge in the bottom, toxic, the worst stuff settles out during operation. Thats why its impossible to sell a fuel oil tank until you clean out the sludge, and doing that is usually worth more than the tank at end of life. Now that tank in the picture on its side looks about 5-10Kgallon, i guarantee there was 500-1000 gallon of sludge in the bottom. When that thing floats up and tips over it ripped all the plumbing out, and probably popped a weld or two when it tipped. All that sludge is in the Missouri.

Now take a look at the walls around the tanks. Thats the spill containment. When you put a big tank in you got to build a retaining wall round it, enuf to retain spill of all tank contents. Now you can see that the two tanks  still standing also have spill containment full of water.

Now the inside of those spill containments at large facilities are pretty gross places. Place like Offut, been goin for decades, that floor of that spill containment had decades of contaminant from millions of little spills over the long years. All that is in the river.

My tax dollars at play.

sidd
Title: Re: Floods
Post by: vox_mundi on March 23, 2019, 01:00:48 AM
Flooding's National Security Risk 
https://www.axios.com/floodings-national-security-risk-06d03b4d-6e32-4b72-a644-d4562f193934.html

In just the past 12 months, Nebraska floods, Carolina and Florida hurricanes and California wildfires have put military installations in peril, ravaging buildings and doing billions in damage.   

This is not a far off threat for the Pentagon to consider, and it's certain to get more challenging as the climate continues to warm, seas rise, and stronger and wetter storms strike.

(https://images.axios.com/cLX3CljoHMY5pS9aDA6EkumccEE=/2019/03/22/1553287175206.gif)

... Retired Rear Adm. David W. Titley told the AP that Defense Department officials “by and large know what they need to do, but it’s very hard for them to do. White House dynamics are the White House does not want to hear about it."

“We probably do need some walls — but they’re probably levees," Titley said.

https://phys.org/news/2019-03-national-threat-posed-climate.html

-------------------------------

Flooding Impairs Drinking Water Treatment for Kansas City, Missouri   

KANSAS CITY, Mo. (Reuters) - Record flooding along the Missouri River has impaired treatment of drinking supplies in Kansas City, raising health risks for infants, the elderly and other people with compromised immune systems, the municipal water service warned on Saturday.

The public health advisory came as utility crews struggled to replace broken pumps at a wastewater treatment plant submerged by floodwaters about 30 miles upstream in Leavenworth, Kansas, a town of 35,000 on the river's west bank.

The KC Water utility, which serves 170,000 mostly residential customers in Kansas City, Missouri, with water drawn from the river, said it had failed to meet "enhanced treatment technique standards."

Testing showed excessive levels of turbidity, the presence of fine particles in the water that can carry bacteria, viruses and parasites including Cryptosporidium, which can cause diarrhea.

-------------------------------

Meanwhile, in Mozambique, they've had no clean water or food for five days and  they're drinking from puddles. Cholera has already been detected.
Title: Re: Floods
Post by: vox_mundi on March 25, 2019, 01:40:29 AM
"If this pattern persists, it may signal a larger problem,"

No shit. Guess what, Sherlock, it's gonna not only persist, but get worse.
....
My tax dollars at play.

sidd

(https://izquotes.com/quotes-pictures/quote-a-billion-here-a-billion-there-and-pretty-soon-you-re-talking-about-real-money-everett-dirksen-51364.jpg)

Marine Commandant Memo Adds Billions to DoD’s Growing Weather Cleanup 
https://breakingdefense.com/2019/03/marine-commandant-memo-adds-billions-to-dods-growing-weather-cleanup/

.... The Pentagon is looking at a growing list of bases that have been damaged or largely wiped out over the past six months due to extreme weather events. Joining the Marine Corps' Lejeune $3.6 billion price tag is the $5 billion the Air Force estimates it will take to repair Tyndall Air Base in Florida after it was walloped by Hurricane Michael’s 155-mile-per-hour winds last fall.

That $8.6 billion in repair work will likely push past the $10 billion mark once estimates come in from the historic flooding at Offutt Air Base in Nebraska, home of Strategic Command, which is currently 30 percent underwater and will need to repair or replace dozens of buildings, roads, and its main runway.

This unprecedented damage at three bases has raised alarm bells over how ready the Pentagon is to deal with climate change, and how it affects operations and readiness.

“DoD can’t count on 500-year storms coming every 500 years any more,” John Conger, director of Center for Climate and Security, and a former deputy comptroller at the Pentagon, told me.
Title: Re: Floods
Post by: vox_mundi on March 26, 2019, 04:40:40 PM
Death Toll in 'Unprecedented' Iran Floods Rises to 21
https://phys.org/news/2019-03-death-toll-unprecedented-iran.html

... The disaster, which the energy minister blamed on climate change, struck in the middle of Iranian New Year holidays, with many relief workers on vacation.

Nineteen people were killed and 98 injured in the southern city of Shiraz, while one person died in the western province of Kermanshah and another in Lorestan, also in the west, rescue services said. With 20 of Iran's 31 provinces experiencing floods or facing an imminent threat, the country's National Crisis Management Committee was activated at the cabinet level.

Iran's meteorological service has warned of more heavy showers until Wednesday, and flood warnings have gone out for central provinces such as Isfahan and the capital Tehran. The floods followed extreme rainfall which at times was equivalent to half of the average annual levels within 24 hours.

It follows major floods on March 19 in the northeastern provinces of Golestan and Mazandaran, for which no official casualty toll has been given. Such a widespread flood threat is unprecedented in arid Iran, which until 2018 was dealing with decades of drought.

"Climate change is forcing itself on our country," said Energy Minister Reza Ardekanian, who is in charge of dams and water supply. "These unprecedented floods in our country are because of climate change worldwide," he said on Monday, quoted by the Tasnim news agency.
Title: Re: Floods
Post by: Archimid on March 30, 2019, 03:37:38 PM
Midwest flooding threatens water safety in 1 million wells

https://us.cnn.com/videos/us/2019/03/29/nebraska-wells-flooding-health-concern-mclean-pkg-nr-vpx.cnn/video/playlists/top-news-videos/

Quote
Record flooding in the Midwest is now threatening the safety of more than a million private water wells. The National Ground Water Association estimates that people living in more than 300 counties across 10 states have their groundwater threatened from bacterial and industrial contamination carried by flood waters. CNN's Scott McLean takes a closer look.


Video in the link.
Title: Re: Floods
Post by: Tor Bejnar on March 30, 2019, 04:24:39 PM
I'm glad that the folks who located my cluster's well (5 or 6 families share each well in my community of 28 families) put it near the crest of a ridge here in north Florida.  While my house is down the slope on a locally flat-ish acre, a house-building carpenter got 'stuck' in my yard (didn't dare wade to the house) during an intense down burst and reported 'at least a foot' (300 mm) of water rushing under his truck.  My house has a ~1 meter crawl space and I've put berms in two places to prevent flood waters doing what they did that day - one almost over-topped during Tropical Storm Fay which dumped about 635 mm (25") in 7 days (mostly during 3 consecutive days), but we're planning on upgrading  the driveway berm to 'potentially cope' with 600 mm in two days.  (There are lots of woods, a neighbor's pond and a community 'dry' sinkhole that will absorb anything [water-wise] the gods might throw at us.  Water in different parts of my yard flow into two different local watersheds.  My driveway berm actually diverts water from one of these watersheds into the other!)
Title: Re: Floods
Post by: vox_mundi on March 30, 2019, 10:55:51 PM
Midwest Floods Have Reached Superfund Sites in Three States, EPA Says   
https://www.bloomberg.com/news/articles/2019-03-26/midwest-floods-reach-superfund-sites-in-three-states-epa-says

Major flooding across the U.S. Midwest has reached at least eight Superfund sites in three states, and kept EPA staff from determining whether any are leaking toxic chemicals as a result.

The Environmental Protection Agency said it is unable to access the sites containing arsenic, benzene, cyanide and other toxins, because of the floodwaters inundating the facilities.


(https://assets.bwbx.io/images/users/iqjWHBFdfxIU/iwjFzGnrnewA/v1/960x-1.png)

The affected sites include a defunct ordnance plant, a chemical disposal facility and a former manufactured-gas plant, and some contain radioactive waste in addition to dangerous chemicals. At least three of those sites already faced the risk of contaminated groundwater movement before the flooding started earlier this month, according to EPA data.

... At the Iowa-Nebraska Light & Power Co. site, in the small city of Norfolk, “fieldwork is delayed due to road closures,” Sauerhage said. Even before this month’s floods, the contaminated groundwater beneath the site was already moving toward Norfolk’s municipal well field half a mile away, according to information on the EPA’s website. 

... In Kansas City, the Conservation Chemical Co. site, which stored and disposed chemicals from the 1960s to the 1980s, “is partially flooded,” according to Sauerhage. The EPA’s website says groundwater on the site contains cyanide and other dangerous compounds.

... The risk of chemical exposure is likely to expand to other sites around the region. Federal weather officials warned this week of “record flooding from now through May.”

The EPA has long warned that more intense flooding caused by climate change threatened to dislodge chemicals around Superfund sites. In 2014, the agency released a so-called Climate Adaptation Plan, which said that “inundation and flooding may lead to transport of contaminants through surface soils, ground water, surface waters and/or coastal waters.”
Title: Re: Floods
Post by: Shared Humanity on March 31, 2019, 04:23:37 PM
Record number of Americans believe that human induced warming is real.

https://thehill.com/policy/energy-environment/396487-poll-record-number-of-americans-believe-in-man-made-climate-change

As horrific as these storms are, we need more frequent and more devastating climate disasters in order to finally galvanize the public to insist on dramatic change.
Title: Re: Floods
Post by: Archimid on April 01, 2019, 03:37:32 PM
‘Breaches Everywhere’: Flooding Bursts Midwest Levees, and Tough Questions Follow

https://www.nytimes.com/2019/03/31/us/midwest-floods-levees.html

Quote
The widespread, severe flooding in the Midwest over the last month has exposed the vulnerabilities in a levee system that is now so full of holes that many here ruefully describe it as “Swiss cheese.”

With dozens of costly breaks across Nebraska, Iowa, Missouri and nearby states, the surging waters have left large areas without even cursory flood protection.
Title: Re: Floods
Post by: Sigmetnow on April 02, 2019, 01:00:15 AM
‘Breaches Everywhere’: Flooding Bursts Midwest Levees, and Tough Questions Follow
...
Quote
The widespread, severe flooding in the Midwest over the last month has exposed the vulnerabilities in a levee system that is now so full of holes that many here ruefully describe it as “Swiss cheese.”

With dozens of costly breaks across Nebraska, Iowa, Missouri and nearby states, the surging waters have left large areas without even cursory flood protection.

Building levees in one location on a river makes flooding worse in other locations.  The solution is managed retreat and designated flood areas, not more levees.
Title: Re: Floods
Post by: sidd on April 02, 2019, 06:19:39 AM
Letter from a flooded out farmer: Look out below!

" the river is back—bigger and taller than ever."

"Gavins Point is the last line of defense against Missouri River flooding in four states. It’s designed to meter upstream water into the river, not contain it. So when big water hits Big Muddy at Gavins Point, about all the authorities at Gavins Point can do is say “look out below.” "

"The good news, if you can call it that, is that although the new crest beat the 2011 record, it never made it to the forecast high. That’s because levees above us collapsing under the weight of record water flows allowed flood plains above to absorb, if only temporarily, part of the excess. They flattened out the wave by a foot or two. "

"each inch of snow or drop of rain is just another nail in the coffin of flood control"

https://www.dailyyonder.com/letter-langdon-40-feet-high-rising/2019/03/27/31094/

sidd
Title: Re: Floods
Post by: sidd on April 02, 2019, 06:38:18 AM
My last link contained a Johnny Cash video. Here are the lyrics:

How high's the water, mama?
Two feet high and risin'
How high's the water, papa?
Two feet high and risin'

We can make it to the road in a homemade boat
That's the only thing we got left that'll float
It's already over all the wheat and the oats,
Two feet high and risin'

How high's the water, mama?
Three feet high and risin'
How high's the water, papa?
Three feet high and risin'

Well, the hives are gone,
I've lost my bees
The chickens are sleepin'
In the willow trees
Cow's in water up past her knees,
Three feet high and risin'

How high's the water, mama?
Four feet high and risin'
How high's the water, papa?
Four feet high and risin'

Hey, come look through the window pane,
The bus is comin', gonna take us to the train
Looks like we'll be blessed with a little more rain,
4 feet high and risin'

How high's the water, mama?
Five feet high and risin'
How high's the water, papa?
Five feet high and risin'

Well, the rails are washed out north of town
We gotta head for higher ground
We can't come back till the water comes down,
Five feet high and risin'

Well, it's five feet high and risin'

Title: Re: Floods
Post by: wdmn on April 02, 2019, 06:46:29 AM
Thanks for the Cash, man.
Title: Re: Floods
Post by: Sigmetnow on April 03, 2019, 02:19:44 AM
California:

Oroville Dam Spillway Reopens First Time Since 2017
Quote
Water is flowing down the rebuilt spillway of the nation's tallest dam for the first time since it crumbled two years ago and threatened to flood California communities.

Live video by the California Department of Parks and Recreation shows a light stream of water flowing down the main spillway Tuesday. It comes as spring storms are expected to swell the lake behind Oroville Dam this week.

Molly White with the state Department of Water Resources says crews may increase how much water is released if needed.

In early 2017, the dam's half-century-old spillway broke apart as it carried heavy flows from storms. That drove nearly 200,000 people from their homes over fears of catastrophic flooding. ...
http://www.ktvn.com/story/40230880/repaired-spillway-at-nations-tallest-dam-to-be-deployed

Article includes a video of the first water flowing down the new spillway.
Title: Re: Floods
Post by: Sigmetnow on April 09, 2019, 07:46:24 PM
Deadly flooding around the world is a warning of the cascading impacts of climate change
https://thinkprogress.org/deadly-flooding-climate-change-impacts/

Health effects; food supply; roads, schools and levees.

Image below:
Corn burst from a grain bin which was soaked with floodwater on March 23, 2019 near Union, Nebraska. Damage estimates from flooding in Nebraska top $1 billion. (Credit: Scott Olson/Getty Images)
Title: Re: Floods
Post by: Tom_Mazanec on April 10, 2019, 02:56:04 AM
Mike Snyder has some good articles on the current flooding, and what it will mean to all of America:
http://endoftheamericandream.com/archives/catastrophic-flooding-in-the-midwest-could-last-for-months-and-that-is-going-to-mean-a-dramatic-drop-in-u-s-food-production
http://endoftheamericandream.com/archives/200-million-people-at-risk-national-weather-service-warns-apocalyptic-midwest-floods-are-a-preview-of-what-we-expect-throughout-the-rest-of-the-spring
http://endoftheamericandream.com/archives/100s-of-millions-of-dollars-in-crops-destroyed-by-flooding-and-farmers-are-being-told-theres-nothing-the-u-s-government-can-do-to-help
Title: Re: Floods
Post by: Alexander555 on April 10, 2019, 01:24:00 PM
And a new bomb cyclone is on his way to the same area.   https://www.wowt.com/content/news/Storm-to-hit-Rockies-before-forming-new-bomb-cyclone-508294461.html
Title: Re: Floods
Post by: Klondike Kat on April 10, 2019, 02:08:40 PM
Michael Snyder has been writing about the collapse of the American society for years.  This is just his latest scare.  FYI, if our crops were indeed in such a dire situation, it would be reflected on their prices in the futures market.  Yet, their prices have barely budged.
Title: Re: Floods
Post by: vox_mundi on April 12, 2019, 03:18:39 AM
US Disaster Aid Won't Cover Lost Crops in Midwest Floods, Farmers Out Millions of Dollars
https://accuweather.com/en/weather-news/us-disaster-aid-wont-cover-lost-crops-in-midwest-floods-farmers-out-millions-of-dollars/70007922

Record flooding that has overwhelmed the midwestern United States this spring has taken a significant toll on farmers, and the U.S. disaster aid isn't covering crops lost by the floods.

The federal policy states that the grain damaged from flooded river water has to be destroyed, and according to Reuters there's nothing the U.S. government can do about the millions of damaged crops under current laws or disaster-aid programs.

Reuters reports this is a problem the USDA has never seen on this scale before because U.S. farmers have never stored so much of their harvests.

Midwestern farmers have been storing their corn and soybeans in unprecedented amounts due to the U.S. and China trade war, according to the BBC.

Last year, the USDA made $12 billion in aid available to farmers who suffered trade-war losses, but there is no program to cover the catastrophic and largely uninsured stored-crop losses from the widespread flooding.


Nebraska's Gov. Pete Ricketts has estimated the losses to the agricultural sector alone at $1 billion. However, the damage doesn't stop there. States such as Missouri, South Dakota, Wisconsin and Iowa were also greatly impacted.

AccuWeather estimated the total damage and economic loss caused by record-breaking flooding in the midwestern U.S. this spring will total $12.5 billion, based on an analysis of damages already inflicted and those expected by additional flooding 

...On top of losing millions in crops, farmers are facing pricey facility damage. According to ISU experts, grains swell when wet, so bin damage is likely. Wood structures will be hard hit and may retain mold and contaminants.

Not only does flooding impact their grain and facilities, but it also delays planting of this years crop, Mohler said.
Title: Re: Floods
Post by: wdmn on April 12, 2019, 04:03:29 AM
Hands a shovel to the alligators, and lets his base get washed away. Trump is like Caligula.

As a Canadian, I can't help but laugh hysterically at the trade war part. Trump must secretly be a democrat, because he truly is a jackass.
Title: Re: Floods
Post by: Shared Humanity on April 12, 2019, 10:45:46 PM
Trump must secretly be a democrat, because he truly is a jackass.

This had better be a joke because it is truly laughable. Trump is the logical end point of the Republican Party's 5 decade long courting of racist, misogynistic, xenophobic, Christian Dominionist homophobes. The Republican Party has finally become what it has courted. Trump is the very personification of the Republican Party base.

Title: Re: Floods
Post by: Shared Humanity on April 12, 2019, 10:47:50 PM
I wish people could look more clearly and see what's there. Trump is not a King Louis the XIV of France. He's just a front man who by himself makes next to no difference at all. aka Obama and all the rest. It's the people and powers behind the "throne" that really are the movers and shakers. And they are always in power no matter what.

So focusing on Trump, blathering on that he's an idiot, a jackass, or whatever is a waste of breath.

This is absolute bullshit. To suggest there is no difference between Obama and Trump is trolling at its worst.
Title: Re: Floods
Post by: interstitial on April 13, 2019, 12:53:27 AM
Trump must secretly be a democrat, because he truly is a jackass.

This had better be a joke because it is truly laughable. Trump is the logical end point of the Republican Party's 5 decade long courting of racist, misogynistic, xenophobic, Christian Dominionist homophobes. The Republican Party has finally become what it has courted. Trump is the very personification of the Republican Party base.

Christ didn't teach or demonstrate racist, misogynistic, xenophobic or homophobic values. I understand the confusion because unfortunately many claiming to be Christian have taught hate. To further confuse the issue much but not all of the old testiment is a history and includes the actions of some of Gods early followers. At times those followers did the right thing at others they did the wrong thing. Christ taught and demonstrated love for all and that is what I believe true Christians aspire to.
Title: Re: Floods
Post by: gerontocrat on April 13, 2019, 12:13:54 PM
Mid-west floods.... and one of the consequences is
High Gas Prices Made Worse By Midwest Floods
https://www.forbes.com/sites/ellenrwald/2019/04/11/high-gas-prices-made-worse-by-midwest-floods/#51d782c3700f

All about ethanol. The writer at th end questions the policy of using 40% of the US corn crop for ethanol "when the future supply of corn is always unknown".
Title: Re: Floods
Post by: Klondike Kat on April 13, 2019, 01:55:49 PM
Mid-west floods.... and one of the consequences is
High Gas Prices Made Worse By Midwest Floods
https://www.forbes.com/sites/ellenrwald/2019/04/11/high-gas-prices-made-worse-by-midwest-floods/#51d782c3700f

All about ethanol. The writer at th end questions the policy of using 40% of the US corn crop for ethanol "when the future supply of corn is always unknown".

Government subsidies and mandates have fueled the continued use of corn for biofuel.
Title: Re: Floods
Post by: Rodius on April 13, 2019, 02:40:41 PM
Mid-west floods.... and one of the consequences is
High Gas Prices Made Worse By Midwest Floods
https://www.forbes.com/sites/ellenrwald/2019/04/11/high-gas-prices-made-worse-by-midwest-floods/#51d782c3700f

All about ethanol. The writer at th end questions the policy of using 40% of the US corn crop for ethanol "when the future supply of corn is always unknown".

What a tragic waste of food.
Title: Re: Floods
Post by: Tom_Mazanec on April 15, 2019, 09:20:42 PM
Here is Paul Beckwith's take on the floods:
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=EDJUVc1-om8
Title: Re: Floods
Post by: Tom_Mazanec on April 15, 2019, 10:06:09 PM
Michael Snyder has been writing about the collapse of the American society for years.  This is just his latest scare.  FYI, if our crops were indeed in such a dire situation, it would be reflected on their prices in the futures market.  Yet, their prices have barely budged.

Where can I check these futures, as I suspect this will be the first place to indicate if/when AGW is reaching disaster level?
Title: Re: Floods
Post by: gerontocrat on April 15, 2019, 10:53:09 PM
Michael Snyder has been writing about the collapse of the American society for years.  This is just his latest scare.  FYI, if our crops were indeed in such a dire situation, it would be reflected on their prices in the futures market.  Yet, their prices have barely budged.

Where can I check these futures, as I suspect this will be the first place to indicate if/when AGW is reaching disaster level?
You can go to Bloomberg.com and click on commodities. Or you can go directly to the Chicago Stock market and get all sorts of data. Or just google "corn futures" and you will be awash with data.

Only one problem. Back in 2008 the stock markets were roaring up and then they fell apart. The Stock market is only a short-term indicator. The market will take account of seasonal climate outlooks as just one parameter when betting on prices for the current season's crop. It will ignore longer-term risks for future seasons as unknown knowns- e.g. over-use of the US Ogallala aquifer, collapse of the Murray-Darling Water Basin.

When the stock market through prices says there is a crisis it may be real or may be manufactured (e.g. suppliers hoarding supplies to manipulate prices). It may be permanent or it may be temporary. Klondike Kat's faith in the markets is not matched by mine.
Title: Re: Floods
Post by: Archimid on April 15, 2019, 10:59:31 PM
Where can I check these futures, as I suspect this will be the first place to indicate if/when AGW is reaching disaster level?

Futures are a good indicator of short term problems only. They will indeed show when disaster is reached but by then it will be too late to do anything about it.
Title: Re: Floods
Post by: vox_mundi on April 29, 2019, 04:03:27 AM
Future of New Orleans in Peril as $14B Flood Protection Starts Sinking
https://www.scientificamerican.com/article/after-a-14-billion-upgrade-new-orleans-levees-are-sinking/

NEW ORLEANS, La. -- The $14 billion upgrade to New Orleans’ system of levees to fortify the city is sinking, according to engineering experts. Sea-level rise and ground subsidence will render the flood barriers inadequate in just four years

After investing an amount of money that is five times greater than the gross domestic product of the island country of Aruba, the Army Corp of Engineers said levees may not be adequate enough to protect New Orleans and the surrounding region from major flooding associated with a 100-year storm.

According to the Corp, a combination of subsidence, sea level rise and weak soil is the cause behind the sinking levees. It’s now pursuing a $3 million-study with funds appropriated by Congress to figure out the severity of the problem and what it would take to lift the levees. It’s expected to be completed in 2021.
Title: Re: Floods
Post by: gerontocrat on April 30, 2019, 12:56:16 PM
Canada- it's your turn now.
Worth reading as it looks like at least some are thinking about long-term solutions - e.g. managed retreat from high-risk flood plains.

https://www.theguardian.com/world/2019/apr/30/canada-flooding-quebec-montreal-justin-trudeau-climate-change
Canada: extreme floods show climate threat as experts warn of further tumult
Thousands evacuated from eastern Canada as Justin Trudeau admits urgent action necessary to improve climate preparedness
Title: Re: Floods
Post by: vox_mundi on May 01, 2019, 08:29:22 AM
Indonesia Is Moving Its Capital City as the Current One Sinks Into the Sea 
https://earther.gizmodo.com/indonesia-is-moving-its-capital-city-as-the-current-one-1834420363

For as long as Indonesia has existed—even during colonial times—Jakarta has been its capital. But the 10 million-strong coastal city that sits on the northern coast of Java will soon lose that title, thanks to some serious infrastructural and environmental challenges.

Indonesian President Joko Widodo decided Monday after a cabinet meeting to push forward on this long-anticipated plan, reports the Jakarta Post
. The idea of moving the capital city stretches to the country’s first president, Sukarno, in 1945 after it gained independence from the Dutch. It’s finally becoming reality as the city’s reached a tipping point with congestion, air pollution, and, well, climate change.

The city, parts of which are already below sea level, has sunk 13 feet in the past 30 years, according to Reuters. The highly vulnerable city could be permanently flooded by 2050 as sea levels are expected to rise at least 20 inches and potentially even 5 feet by some estimates, according to the Ministry of Foreign Affairs of the Netherlands. Along with sea level rise, the pulling groundwater for human use has reduced the region’s elevation, as the ground can compacts or shrinks when there’s less water running through it, as the Asean Post has noted.

-----------------------

Rounds of Rain, SevereThunderstorms to Raise Flood Rsk in Central US this Week 
https://accuweather.com/en/weather-news/rounds-of-rain-severe-thunderstorms-to-raise-flood-risk-in-central-us-this-week/70008131

--------------------------

Downtown Davenport, Iowa Floods After Temporary Levees Fail
https://earther.gizmodo.com/downtown-davenport-iowa-floods-after-temporary-levees-1834434835

Downtown Davenport, Iowa flooded after HESCO barriers in the region failed sometime around 3:30 p.m. local time as the Mississippi River rose to nearly 22 feet.

... Scott County Emergency Management Director David Donovan told Weather.com that The temporary flood protection levee that they put in place failed this afternoon and it’s inundating a portion of downtown Davenport” spanning about four blocks. He added that water had reached six feet in some areas, with fire rescue crews going door to door and local businesses forced to shutter.

... As the Des Moines Register noted, Iowa has already been seriously affected by flooding this year (including the so-called “bomb cyclone” that swept across the central U.S. in March) and concerns about Mississippi River levels “driven by snowmelt and heavy rain, has been high for weeks, but the danger spiked again this week after easing somewhat earlier in April.” The river is expected to crest at 22.3 feet at the Rock Island, Illinois, Lock and Dam on Wednesday afternoon, just short of the 22.63 record in July 1993, the paper added.

“This is exactly what ’93 looked like,” WQAD-TV meteorologist Eric Sorensen said, according to the Register.


... “Wednesday marks the 39th day of continuous flooding here,” making this the longest flood on record.

“Because so much of the Midwest experienced heavy rain last fall, followed by the wettest winter on record, the soils remain saturated over a wide area,” Weather.com meteorologist Bob Henson wrote. “It won’t take a great deal of rain to trigger additional flooding as the spring unfolds.”
Title: Re: Floods
Post by: vox_mundi on May 03, 2019, 04:48:49 AM
Mississippi Sets All-Time Record, Worse Than “Great Flood of ’93”   
https://wqad.com/2019/05/02/mississippi-sets-all-time-record-worse-than-great-flood-of-93/amp/

This morning, close to an inch of rain fell on the river basin, officially pushing the level of the Mississippi River over the previous all-time high. That was set on July 9, 1993 during the "Great Flood of 1993" when much of the Mississippi River was flooded from Minnesota, all the way down to the Gulf of Mexico due to heavy rainfall. On that date, the official height of the flood gauge at Rock Island achieved 22.63 feet.

(https://localtvwqad.files.wordpress.com/2019/05/crestrankings2.png?w=560&h=316)
Title: Re: Floods
Post by: bbr2314 on May 08, 2019, 01:05:00 AM
The models are now unanimous in forecasting very heavy rains across the South-Central states. As-is, the Mississippi is already expected to approach record levels in Baton Rouge.

https://water.weather.gov/ahps2/hydrograph.php?wfo=lix&gage=btrl1

The recent record is 45' set in 2011.

(https://water.weather.gov/resources/hydrographs/btrl1_hg.png)
Title: Re: Floods
Post by: Sigmetnow on May 08, 2019, 01:26:20 PM
May 7. Storms in south-central U.S.

Flash Flooding Inundates Houston Area as Storms Spawn Heavy Rain, Tornadoes Across Plains
Quote
As much as 15 inches of rain fell in Humble, northeast of Houston, according to radar estimates. As much as 3.5 inches of rain an hour was estimated in some areas.

All major roads in the city of Sugar Land were impassable. Fort Bend County, where Sugar Land is located, declared a local state of disaster. City spokesman Doug Adolph told The Weather Channel that rainfall surpassed the city's storm drain capacity.

“We’re seeing conditions that are far worse than what we experienced during Hurricane Harvey,” Adolph said.
...
Tornadoes and baseball-size hail were reported in the Texas Panhandle. There were no immediate reports of damages or injury. A tornado was spotted in Tulia, Texas, just after 6 p.m. local time. ...
https://weather.com/news/news/2019-05-07-storms-flash-flooding-tornadoes-impacts
Title: Re: Floods
Post by: vox_mundi on May 10, 2019, 01:38:17 AM
Officials seek to open major spillway on Mississippi River 
https://phys.org/news/2019-05-major-spillway-mississippi-river.html

(https://watchers.news/data/thumbs/798_296/2011/05/morganza.jpg)

Army Corps of Engineers officials in Louisiana aim to open a historic flood control structure above New Orleans on Tuesday for an unprecedented second time in one year.

... Continued rains in the Midwest and Ohio Valley and floodwaters from the upper Mississippi River are heading down the Mississippi, National Weather Service hydrologist Jeffrey Graschel said. In addition, he noted, storms are expected to dump 5 to 10 inches (13 to 25 centimeters) of rain in parts of Louisiana and Arkansas.

The Bonnet Carré Spillway gets opened to relieve stress on New Orleans levees when the Mississippi flows at 1.25 million cubic feet (35,400 cubic meters) per second—fast enough to fill the Empire State Building in 30 seconds.

"The risks in not operating the spillway as it is designed ... would be potentially catastrophic," corps spokesman Ricky Boyett said.

... Moby Solangi, director of the Institute for Marine Mammal Studies in Gulfport, Mississippi, said he's concerned about the spillway opening, because it means that polluted fresh water will flow into Mississippi Sound, a nursery for dolphins and endangered Kemp's ridley sea turtles.

More of those animals died in April than in any April over the past five years, he said, with 28 dolphins and 57 sea turtles found dead. Solangi said many of the dolphins had lesions on their bodies from exposure to fresh water, which also damages oyster reefs and blue crabs, on which the turtles feed, and plants that are food for animals lower on the food chain.
Title: Re: Floods
Post by: Tom_Mazanec on May 10, 2019, 02:10:22 AM
The answer is probably no, but is it possible that the Atchafalaya could become the new Mississippi outlet with all this flooding?
Title: Re: Floods
Post by: vox_mundi on May 10, 2019, 03:02:24 AM
It appears that they're only diverting 15-20% of the main flow, which the diversion is able to handle; so probably no.
Title: Re: Floods
Post by: J Cartmill on May 10, 2019, 03:30:15 AM
There is also the Morganza spillway they can open.
There was a threat of of the Mississippi changing course in 1973, they had to shore up the Old River Control structure with a special concrete that could harden underwater.
Nice article here
https://www.wunderground.com/blog/JeffMasters/americas-achilles-heel-the-mississippi-rivers-old-river-control-st.html (https://www.wunderground.com/blog/JeffMasters/americas-achilles-heel-the-mississippi-rivers-old-river-control-st.html)
Title: Re: Floods
Post by: Sigmetnow on May 12, 2019, 04:58:41 PM
Bonnet Carré spillway opened.

Louisiana Declares Statewide Emergency as Mississippi River Rises; Train Derails in Mississippi
Quote
In an effort to relieve stress on New Orleans levees, the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers opened the Bonnet Carré spillway about 28 miles north of the city on Friday.

The opening marks the first time the spillway has been used twice in a single year and only the 14th time it has been opened since it was built in the aftermath of a historic flood that swamped New Orleans in 1927.

The Corps had decided on Thursday to open the spillway next week, but changed the timeline due to high amounts of rainfall.

“Regional rainfall caused the Mississippi River to rise 6 inches in the past 24 hours with more rain expected through the weekend,” Corps spokesman Matt Roe said in a press release. “These rains could elevate the Mississippi River above 17 feet with a peak as high as 17.5 feet at the Carrollton Gage. In an abundance of caution the operation date is being moved forward to ensure the safe passage of this high water by limiting the elevations downriver of the spillway.”
https://weather.com/news/news/2019-05-10-texas-louisiana-houston-flooding-storms-heavy-rain
Title: Re: Floods
Post by: vox_mundi on May 13, 2019, 05:28:01 PM
Researchers Find Patterns Associated with Extreme Floods
https://phys.org/news/2019-05-patterns-extreme.html

Extreme floods across the continental United States are associated with four broad atmospheric patterns, a machine-learning based analysis of extreme floods found.

Researchers analyzed relatively rare floods in the United States, using a machine-learning algorithm to place the floods into groups based on atmospheric patterns that happen at the same time. They found that tropical moisture exports, tropical cyclones, low-pressure systems and melting snow are the primary patterns associated with extreme floods.

"This is the first time that atmospheric patterns have been linked to extreme floods in an automated fashion at the continental scale," Moradkhani said.

... The researchers developed an interactive website with detailed information about extreme floods across the continental U.S.

"Knowing where extreme floods tend to occur at the same time over a large region highlights where it would be beneficial to design flood control structures that account for both the regular flood season and an extreme flood season that occurs at a different time of year," Moradkhani said.

"The website is open for anyone to access, and we hope it will be widely used by a variety of agencies and individuals," Moradkhani said.

https://kschlef.shinyapps.io/ExtremeFloods/

(https://media.springernature.com/m685/springer-static/image/art%3A10.1038%2Fs41598-019-43496-w/MediaObjects/41598_2019_43496_Fig4_HTML.png)

Open Access: Katherine E. Schlef et al. Atmospheric Circulation Patterns Associated with Extreme United States Floods Identified via Machine Learning (https://www.nature.com/articles/s41598-019-43496-w), Scientific Reports (2019)
Title: Re: Floods
Post by: gerontocrat on May 23, 2019, 11:16:49 AM
The floods in the Mississippi catchment area are very long-lasting and severe this year.
Trouble is we only see the headlines about an event or events, and tend to forget the long-term impacts. 
E.g
https://weather.com/safety/floods/news/2019-05-21-plains-flooding-increasing-river-gauges-in-flood
Quote
At a Glance
-Flooding rain in parts of the Plains is the latest round of a siege of heavy rain events this spring.
-Earlier this month, torrential rain triggered serious flooding in parts of Texas, Louisiana and Mississippi.
-Flooding in the Mississippi Valley and northern Plains also continues from heavy spring rain and earlier snowmelt.
-Taken together, almost 400 locations could be above flood stage by later this week
.

https://www.eenews.net/stories/1060362841
Floods prompt scrutiny of Missouri River dams and levees

Quote
The Army Corps of Engineers is looking into strengthening flood control along the Missouri River in response to the record deluge this spring and criticism that the agency is not doing enough to protect communities.

The Army Corps is considering realigning its levees along the Missouri and expanding or building new systems such as floodways, easements and retention basins to capture more floodwater, Maj. Gen. Scott Spellmon, the agency's deputy commanding general for civil and emergency operations, said in an email to E&E News.

"Levee realignment" involves moving and reshaping levees so they better control rising waters. Building or expanding other flood controls would involve working with communities to find and access land.

The Army Corps also is working with Congress and the administration to get money and the authority to study "how we can better improve flood control on the lower basin" of the Missouri, which has been heavily flooded since mid-March, Spellmon said.

"Our intent would be to outline the alternatives, seek public comment and take those recommendations to the administration and Congress for consideration," he said.

Republicans and Democrats in Congress have pressed the Army Corps in recent weeks to better protect communities along the Missouri — the nation's longest river — particularly in the heavily flooded states of Nebraska, Kansas, Iowa and Missouri.

Sen. Chuck Grassley (R-Iowa) criticized the agency for not prioritizing flood control over its other river-management goals such as protecting fish and wildlife, generating hydropower, and promoting commerce and recreation. Congress requires the Army Corps to consider eight factors, including flood control, without prioritizing any of them except during a major flood, when the Army Corps emphasizes protecting life and property.

"The No. 1 priority of the Corps should be flood control, period," Grassley said at a Senate hearing April 17 in Glenwood, Iowa, a city of 5,300 people that was nearly covered in floodwater in early April.
Title: Re: Floods
Post by: bligh8 on May 24, 2019, 03:32:34 PM
I read an article yesterday that said that 66 of the 70some counties in Oklahoma had been declared a disaster zone.  These rain fall patterns will never get better over any given period of time only worse.  The spring rains will come sooner, last longer and be more robust.  We seem to not have the ability or resources or will to deal with these events and our current infrastructure is woefully inadequate. Imagine if the home pictured in the above post was your home.  Real estate adds still read "River living...slow and easy"   
Title: Re: Floods
Post by: gerontocrat on May 27, 2019, 04:17:13 PM
USA floods - the story continues...

https://www.wunderground.com/news/storms/severe/news/2019-05-23-severe-thunderstorms-tornadoes-flash-flooding-plains-midwest
Severe Weather, Flash Flood Saga Continues Memorial Day From the Midwest into the Plains
Quote
Rainfall Forecast
At least three locations have set new river crest records from this siege of heavy rain:
-Avant, Oklahoma (Bird Creek), topped its previous record from March 11, 1974.
-Near Ponca City, Oklahoma (Arkansas River), topped its previous record from May 14, 1993.
-Van Buren, Arkansas (Arkansas River), topped its previous record from April 16, 1945.
This extended siege could eventually lead to more record-breaking river flooding lasting into early June in some places, particularly along the Arkansas River in northwestern Arkansas, where levels are expected to top records standing from 1927 or the 1940s upstream from Little Rock.
NWS-Little Rock tweeted Sunday night this historic flooding could lead to levee overtopping with significant impacts that could last well into the summer.
Title: Re: Floods
Post by: Juan C. García on May 27, 2019, 06:43:29 PM
We seem to not have the ability or and resources or and specially will to deal with these events and our current infrastructure is woefully inadequate.
:-\
Title: Re: Floods
Post by: Tom_Mazanec on May 30, 2019, 01:04:39 AM
Midwest flooding and AGW - Wired's take:
https://www.wired.com/story/for-the-midwest-epic-flooding-is-the-face-of-climate-change/

EDIT: Arkansas river flooding:
https://amp.usatoday.com/amp/1268616001
Title: Re: Floods
Post by: Alexander555 on May 31, 2019, 07:33:57 PM
Some more about the US floodings, and still more rain to come. https://watchers.news/2019/05/31/levees-breaching-along-the-mississippi-and-arkansas-rivers-us/
Title: Re: Floods
Post by: b_lumenkraft on May 31, 2019, 07:57:53 PM
Today i learned about the Old River Control Structure

Quote
Could Mississippi River change course? New research raises question, but Corps says plan working
https://www.theadvocate.com/baton_rouge/news/environment/article_d5a29f26-06a9-11e8-abde-8b9660c81021.html

Anyone having insight here in the context of all this rain?
Title: Re: Floods
Post by: Tor Bejnar on May 31, 2019, 08:26:08 PM
There was a three-part post on this in Dr. Master's Category 6 (https://www.wunderground.com/cat6) Weather Underground weather blog.
Any insight I might have is a poor substitute to that of 'the experts'!
Title: Re: Floods
Post by: b_lumenkraft on May 31, 2019, 08:31:44 PM
Thanks, Tor. Is pocketed. :)
Title: Re: Floods
Post by: gerontocrat on May 31, 2019, 10:02:38 PM
Today i learned about the Old River Control Structure

Quote
Could Mississippi River change course? New research raises question, but Corps says plan working

Anyone having insight here in the context of all this rain?
The only insight I can give is Murphy's law... "Whatever can go wrong, will go wrong"

and its corollary... "Everything can go wrong".

and from http://bluebox.ippt.pan.pl/~vkoval/vk_files/funny/Murphy.pdf
O'Toole's Commentary - "Murphy was an optimist".
____________________________________________________________
I claim this was nicked - from me. Many, many years ago I was in in a bar somewhere (might have been the British Club in Port Moresby) while working on a totally crap project. After a few beers a story just arrived in my head - complete and ready to tell. It was all about O'Toole's  trials and tribulations over many years while studying Murphy's Law for his Ph. D. thesis. And he finally submitted it - just 4 words, but the appendices were enormous.

Title: Re: Floods
Post by: be cause on June 01, 2019, 12:21:36 AM
 I live in what was once the small kingdom of the northern Murphys from @ 750 - 1350 AD. Then they were chased by the O'Neill for being too disruptive .. :) b.c.
Title: Re: Floods
Post by: b_lumenkraft on June 01, 2019, 07:34:40 AM
Thank you Gerontocrat, i always appreciate a good use of Murphy's law. Pretty scary stuff.
Title: Re: Floods
Post by: Sigmetnow on June 01, 2019, 02:05:41 PM
Arkansas

Quote
Brian Emfinger (@brianemfinger) 5/31/19, 2:57 PM
A little more video this morning showing the Dardanelle Levee Breach and active enlargement of the breach as pieces of levee fall away into the river! #arwx #flooding
https://twitter.com/brianemfinger/status/1134534393740107776
Image below. 1-Minute video at the link
Title: Re: Floods
Post by: Tom_Mazanec on June 01, 2019, 03:19:10 PM
First week of June to be heavy rain southern plain:
https://twitter.com/NWSWPC/status/1134518586330849280

Midwest farmers suffering:
https://qz.com/1631469/midwest-floods-linked-to-climate-change-are-devastating-us-farms/
Title: Re: Floods
Post by: Shared Humanity on June 01, 2019, 03:27:15 PM
First week of June to be heavy rain southern plain:
https://twitter.com/NWSWPC/status/1134518586330849280

Can everyone say "stuck weather patterns"?
Title: Re: Floods
Post by: Tom_Mazanec on June 04, 2019, 05:36:46 PM
Still more on Midwest flooding:
https://www.theguardian.com/us-news/2019/jun/03/so-much-land-under-so-much-water-extreme-flooding-is-drowning-parts-of-the-midwest

EDIT: Precipitation projections Jun 5-12:
https://www.wpc.ncep.noaa.gov/qpf/p168i.gif?1559745598

AND: Will floods tip America over the edge?
https://blog.usejournal.com/the-possible-end-of-the-united-states-f174b72015b0

Farmers suffering:
https://www.ecowatch.com/climate-crisis-farmers-planting-season-2638398287.html

MORE: This is farmers last chance:
https://beta.washingtonpost.com/local/2019/06/04/after-biblical-spring-this-is-week-that-could-break-corn-belt/?outputType=amp&utm_source=reddit.com

Still more on farmers, flooding:
https://www.accuweather.com/en/weather-news/more-weather-woes-for-farmers-there-will-be-a-lot-of-acres-not-planted/70008442

YET MORE: 2nd wettest American May:
https://www.axios.com/may-2nd-wettest-month-us-since-1895-27b98a94-9613-491d-a377-f3d979b9edd5.html

EVEN MORE: More floods, less flood insurance:
https://www.nytimes.com/2019/06/08/climate/climate-flood-insurance.html
Title: Re: Floods
Post by: vox_mundi on June 09, 2019, 03:35:32 AM
Mississippi Seeks Seafood Disaster Declaration Amid Spillway Complaints 
https://phys.org/news/2019-06-mississippi-seafood-disaster-spillway-complaints.html

Mississippi's governor wants the federal government to declare a fisheries disaster as freshwater from a Mississippi River spillway gushes into what's normally a partly salty estuary, killing countless oysters and crabs.   

...  Gov. Phil Bryant announced Friday that he had made the request, releasing a May 31 letter to U.S Commerce Secretary Wilbur Ross.

Bryant says 70% of the Mississippi Sound's already imperiled oyster population is estimated to be dead, with the crab catch down by 35%. He also noted that shrimp season would normally be getting underway in June.


"The large releases of freshwater from the actions of the spillway inundate the saltwater of the Mississippi Sound and greatly disrupts the unique ecosystem, and subsequently, all sea life of this region," the Republican Bryant wrote to Ross

... This year's months-long flood along the Mississippi led the Corps to open the spillway for an unprecedented second time, after already opening and closing it once before. Salinity levels in the sound are normally about 18-22 parts per thousand, about half the saltiness in deeper parts of the Gulf of Mexico. But Friday, the highest salinity level of any reporting station in the sound was 7.6 parts per thousand.

That's especially bad for oysters and other plants and animals anchored to a particular spot. Mississippi's oyster industry has been in steep decline because of repeated freshwater inundations and other problems. ... a heavy dose of freshwater in late spring and early summer could be especially bad. That's when plants and animals in the shallows atop the continental shelf are normally bulking up at the beginning of a new growing season. Graham said that with normal summer winds from the south, the giant shield of freshwater could linger all summer in the Mississippi Sound. The only thing likely to break it up would be a tropical storm.

"You're really talking about a prolonged event that's happening at the wrong time for productivity on the shelf," Graham said. "There likely will be a cascading ecological effect that will continue through next spring or longer."
Title: Re: Floods
Post by: Tom_Mazanec on June 11, 2019, 01:52:07 AM
The Midwest flooding is going to mess up the Gulf of Mexico:
https://www.washingtonpost.com/science/a-major-punch-in-the-gut-midwest-rains-projected-to-create-gulf-dead-zone/2019/06/10/7ddb8648-8b93-11e9-8f69-a2795fca3343_story.html?noredirect=on&utm_term=.37e45f02b9d9

EDIT: Flooding helps catfish:
https://www.bayjournal.com/article/biologists_fear_catfish_spread_after_last_years_record_deluge
and paralyzes river shipping:
https://www.nytimes.com/2019/06/10/us/flooding-river-shipping.html?action=click&module=Top%20Stories&pgtype=Homepage
and hurts marine life:
https://www.wbur.org/hereandnow/2019/06/10/mississippi-river-flooding-marine-life
Title: Re: Floods
Post by: Alexander555 on June 13, 2019, 12:17:21 PM
Heavy flooding in China. https://www.accuweather.com/en/weather-news/two-dozen-dead-as-downpours-strike-southern-china-little-relief-expected-for-rest-of-june/70008529?utm_source=twitter&utm_medium=social&utm_term=&utm_content=&utm_campaign=breakingweather
Title: Re: Floods
Post by: Alexander555 on June 14, 2019, 08:43:13 PM
More than 60 people died in the floods so far, and 3,7 million hectares of farmland damaged. https://www.nytimes.com/reuters/2019/06/13/world/asia/13reuters-china-weather.html
Title: Re: Floods
Post by: Carex on June 15, 2019, 03:45:10 AM
Flood? Maybe not, but the Great Lakes are rather high too.

https://www.glerl.noaa.gov/data/wlevels/data/superiorLevelsFeet.png (https://www.glerl.noaa.gov/data/wlevels/data/superiorLevelsFeet.png)

(https://www.glerl.noaa.gov/data/wlevels/data/superiorLevelsFeet.png)
Title: Re: Floods
Post by: bbr2314 on June 15, 2019, 03:51:47 AM
Flood? Maybe not, but the Great Lakes are rather high too.

https://www.glerl.noaa.gov/data/wlevels/data/superiorLevelsFeet.png (https://www.glerl.noaa.gov/data/wlevels/data/superiorLevelsFeet.png)

(https://www.glerl.noaa.gov/data/wlevels/data/superiorLevelsFeet.png)
I wonder what happens if we see the same year over year increase into 2020. I would imagine the impacts would be fairly catastrophic in many locations.
Title: Re: Floods
Post by: Carex on June 15, 2019, 03:59:13 AM
This is an all time high for Lake Erie.
(https://www.glerl.noaa.gov/data/wlevels/data/erieLevelsFeet.png)

And Lake Ontario
(https://www.glerl.noaa.gov/data/wlevels/data/ontarioLevelsFeet.png)

The big lakes upsteam usually don't reach full pool until later in the year.
Title: Re: Floods
Post by: Carex on June 15, 2019, 04:13:36 AM
RE#342:   

The Lakes are quite dynamic. L. Superior was within 0.1 foot of record low in 2004 and L. Michigan was low enough to restrict shipping as recent as 2006.  Still people build as close as they can and light to moderate damage is happening during storms now.
Title: Re: Floods
Post by: bligh8 on June 15, 2019, 02:15:55 PM
 Still people build as close as they can and light to moderate damage is happening during storms now.

It use to be the ice that scared folks.....60yrs ago I recall watching as folks set-off charges in the ice before the ice destroyed the lake side portion of their homes. 
Title: Re: Floods
Post by: Tom_Mazanec on June 15, 2019, 08:50:29 PM
Flood caused landslide strands hundreds (England):
https://weather.com/news/news/2019-06-14-england-flooding-strands-train-passengers-eight-hours

EDIT: Midwest floods hurt Louisiana fisheries:
https://www.apnews.com/e9eac7f1faf847118dad2e996c66ed6c
Title: Re: Floods
Post by: Alexander555 on June 21, 2019, 07:24:23 PM
And plenty more rain to come. https://watchers.news/2019/06/21/floods-claimed-88-lives-destroyed-17-000-homes-and-damaged-82-000-china/
Title: Re: Floods
Post by: Alexander555 on June 21, 2019, 07:25:41 PM
The same for the US i think, plenty more rain on his way. https://watchers.news/2019/06/21/over-200-000-without-power-evacuations-and-high-water-rescues-as-severe-thunderstorms-hit-u-s/
Title: Re: Floods
Post by: bbr2314 on June 21, 2019, 09:25:47 PM
It is hard to express how irredeemably stupid these people are. Like potatoes with mouths. And this isn't just the case in Michigan, it is how people are everywhere.

http://www.fox2detroit.com/news/local-news/high-water-levels-plaguing-metro-detroit-harrison-township-roads-underwater